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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, August 10, 1910, Image 1

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TRIBUNE
WANT ADS
1 ^T BRING RESULTS
THIRTIETH YEAR
STATED AT EARLY HOUR THIS ORNING THERE WAS NO DANGER
OF DEATH ENSUING—MAYOR TAKEN FROM BOAT AND RUSHED
GAYNOR'8 CONDITION.
The following bulletin on
Mayor Gaynor's condition, prob
ably tbe last which will, be
Issued tonight, was given out
by surgeons, timed at 9
o'clock: "The Radiographic
examination of Mayor Gaynor's
wound indicates that the bullet
is divided into two fragments,
occupyiug positions that do not
demand operative interference
at present. The condition of
the mayor is satisfactory. He
is resting quietly."
By Associated kress.
New York, Aug. 9.—William J. Gay
nor, mayor of New York city, was
shot 8n the head and seriously wound
ed today. As he stood on the prome
nade deck of the steamship Kaiser
Wilhelm der Grosse, by James J. Gal
lagher, a discharged employee.
Gallagher was almost instantly ov
erpowered and arrested.
The shot was fired at 9:45 o'clock
this morning, fifteen minutes bdfum
the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse was
due to leave her pier at Hoboken, N
J., and the mayor was receiving 'God
speed from a group of friends pre
paratory to a vacation trip to Europe.
The bullet struck him behind the
right ear and ranged downward, in
flicting a dangerous though not ne
cessarily fatal wound, and unless blood
poison develops surgeons are oopeful
of the mayor's recovery, although at
his age, 59 years, such a wound 1B
essentially grave.
Tonight the mayor is at St. Mary's
hospital, Hoboken, surrounded by
specialists, with members of his fa-
ii
TO HOSPITAL—BULLET DISCOVERED TO HAVE SPLIT AFTER
ENTERING THE BODY—ASSASSIN PROTECTED FROM VIOLENCE
OF MOB BY LARGE SQUAD OF POLICEMEN—BULLETIN ISSUED
LAST NIGHT SAID OPERATION WAS NOT IMMEDIATELY IMPERA
TIVE—GALLAGHER, THE A88ASSIN, MADE DESPERATE RESIS
TANCE WHEN ATTEMPT TO ARREST WAS MAOE, AND MADE
REPEATED EFFORT8 TO FIRE ANOTHER SHOT.
EXPENSE"
NUMBER OF AUTOMOBILES CUT
FROM THIRTY-TWO TO SEVEN
'TEEN—NUMBER OF DRIVER8 RE-
DUCED—KEPT IMMENSE 8TRING
OF AUTOS.
New York, Aug. 9.—G. K. G. Bill
ings, gas man of Chicago, Wall street
capitalist, horseman, automobilist and
yachtsman, appears be cutting down
expenses. According to the police reg
ister, published today, he has reduced
his "string" of Imported automobiles
from thirty-two to seventeen and his
army of chauffeurs from twenty to
six. How Mr. Hillings will get along
with only seventeen automobiles Wall
street is unable to guess.
CANAL WORK FELL
OFF DURING JULY
By Associated Press.
Washington, Aug. 9.—Excavation
work on the Isthmian canal fell off
in the month-of July as compared
with that in 'the previous months, ac
cording to a cable report received at
Isthmian canal commission here to
day from the chief engineer on the
isthmus. For the month of July
2,406,288 cubic yards, place measure
ment, were excavated, as against 2,
616,609 cubic yards for the preceding
month. There were laid, however, in
the month of July 131,653 cubic yards
Of concrete, as against 124,214 cubic
yards in June.
NOTORIOUS BURGLAR E8CAPE8.
Hartford, Conn.. Aug. ».—Timothy
A. Sheedy, said by the police to be
one of 'the most notorious burglars
in the country, escaped late last'night
from the county jsiil where be waa
helft
I Itenwrdi
Assassin Makes Attempt on Life of Reform Mayor
as He is About to Leave for Europe on Vacation
mily gathered near, awaiting the out
come with anxiety. All early reports
from the hospital were hopeful and
this evening six X-ray negatives of the
wound were taken to facilitate an op
eration for the removal of the bullet.
Assassin Locked Up.
Gallagher, the would-be assassin, is
locked in a cell at Jersey City with
out bail. He expresses no remorse.
The big liner was gay with flags and
ringing with shouted good-byes when
the tragedy occurred.
Most of those who had been aboard
the ship to say farewell to friends or
relatives had gone ashore, but a little
group remained to talk with the
mayor. They were standing on the
vessel near the forward promenade
deck and were in the act of posing for
a group photograph when Gallagher,
unnoticed, pushed his way almost to
the mayor's side and fired point-blank
at his head.
He used a 38-calibre revolver and
an examination later disclosed that
the first cartridge had missed fire.
This probably saved the mayor's life,
for Gallagher, when he first pulled the
trigger, was less than two feet away.
Backing away slightly in his excite
ment, he pulled the trigger a second
time and sent a bullet crashing into
the mayor's neck below the oar.
William H. Edwards, commissioner
of street cleaning, and former Prince
ton football star, lunged forward with
his 300 pounds Just as Robert Adam
son, the mayor's secretary, struck Gal
lagher's arm. As he did so a second
shotpierced Edwards' sleeve, inflict
ing a Blight flesh wound on the com
missioner's right leg, which remained
undiscovered for hours because of the
excitement.
Unmindful of his wound, Edwards
hit. the man a crashing blow in the
(Continued on page 8)
SAWYER SUSPECT
CLEM JONES WAIVES EXAMINA-
TION AND IS BOUND OVER
TO FALL TERM. S
Had Watched Opening of Safe and
Secured all of Combination Cor-'
rectly with Exception of One Figure
Had Pair of Opera Glasses to Bet
ter Observe Operations.
Special to The Tribune.
Minot, N. D., Aug. 9.—At the pre*
limlnary bearing of Clem Jones,
charged with/the attempted robbery
of the Sawyer bank, the state intro
duced itsytestimony and the defen
dant waived further examination and
was bound over.
The state Bhowed that not only was
the hole bored in the floor, but that
a pair of opera glasses were found
by its side with a piece of paper upon
which the combination of the safe
had been set down correctly, with the
exception of one number.
FEMALE ATTORNEYS
MUST TAKE OFF HAT
New York, Aug. 9*—When man or
woman lawyer, it's hats off in Su
preme Court Justice Goff's presence.
"Why do you wear your hat in the
court room? Are you different from
any other attorney?" asked the jus
tice in court yesterday of Mrs. Sarah
M. Meyer, a woman lawyer who ap
peared before him.
Mrs. Meyer was not prepared to ar
gue the point, and she hastily re
moved a large black picture hat. The
case then proceeded.
SEIDEL-LA FOLLETTE DEBATE.
Milwaukee, A4g. 1—Mayor Seidel
has accepted an invitation to a po
litical debate with Senator La Fol
'lette and Levi H. Bancroft at De
lavan Aug. 1*?"'" '',-«:•.--v^-v-"
W
SHORT SKETCH OF MAYOR
GAYNOR'S LIFE.
Mayor William Gaynor, who is 59
years old, began life as a Brooklyn
newspaper reporter, studying law at
night while working days. He enter
ed politics as a democrat and was
first appointed assistant and then
elected district attorney of Kinds
county. One of his first acts in this
latter capacity was to attack the rule
of John Y. McKane, who was the po
litical "boss" of tbe town of Graves
end, of which Coney Island was a
part. McKane, who was accused of
corrupting the ballot and profiting fi
nancially by hia acts, was overthrown
and sent to Sing Sing, where he sub
sequently died. Soon after this Gay
nor was elected to the supreme court
bench, and there he served unu. his
appointment to the appellate division
of the supreme court, second district,
which place he resigned after his
nomination for mayor last year. On
the bench he was a strong advocate
of the enforcement of the strict letter
of the law.
WOULD TRY TO
F0EEJ1PPEN
QUEBEC NEWSPAPER ATTEMPTS
a
TO RAI8E QUESTION OF
ILLEGAL ARREST.
Authorities Refues to Become Ex
cited Over Proposition—Say Arrest
by Provincial Police on Federal
Territory not Legal—Attorney Gen
eral Laughs at Idea.
By Associated Press.
a
Quebec, Que., Aug. &.—A novel
point in favor of Dr. H. H. Crippen
and Ethel Leneve, now under arrest
here awaiting return to England to
answer for the murder of Belle El
more, Crippen's actress wife, was
raised here today by a local news
paper. On the authority of a Mon
treal criminal lawyer it is contended
that their arrest was illegal because
made by Quebec provincial police in
federal territory, as they were seized
on an ocean liner while on a navig
able river.
The Quebec authorities, however,
refused to become excited over this
argument, and it was denied by
Deputy Attorney General Lanctot,
who is in charge of the case, that
Crippen's attorney has raised such a
point.
Judge Langelier of the court of
special sessions declared that to do
so would avail Crippen nothing, and
said there was no loophole by which
he might take advantage of the meth
od of his arrest.
LILLIS DENIES
MARRIAGE STORY
New York, Aug. 9.—Following the
receipt of a dispatch from Kansas City
to the effect that Jacke Cudeahy, son
of the millionaire packer, and who
last March attackeed and slashed
Jere S. Lillis, a Kansas City banker, is
planning a suit for divorce. Mr. Lillis
was discovered by a reporter in a
hotel in this city yesterday.
Mr. Lillis declared his acquaintance
with the Cudahys "had been severed,"
and denied the report that'he was to
marry Mrs. Cudahy if either she or
her husband obtained a divorce.
BOSTON IS FACITG
$1,000,000 LOSS
Boston, Mass., Aug. 9.—A general
alarm has been sounded for a fire
in the lumber yard district. The lum
ber yard of Blecker and Shepard Is
burning and the flames have spread
along both sides of Albany street, be
tween Dover and Thayer streets. The
loss will be upwards of a million dol
lars probably. There seems to be
little possibility of saving any of the
structures within the lire tone.
BANKER MOR8E
REPORTED ILL
IN PENITENTIARY
Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 9.—Charles W.
Morse, the New York banker, serving
a term of fifteen years for misappro
priation of funda In the federal peni
tentiary here, has been removed to the
hospital, where be is reported quite ill.
Mrs. Morse, after her bi-weekly visit,
said that she fears he will not survive
the year and will redouble her efforts
to secure a pardon for her husband
from President *%tt.
BETTER DESTROY
REVENUESTAMPS
Newark, N, J., Au&. ft.—Following
I an investigation by -secret service
'men, E. Allen Smith, deputy revenue
collector here, has started a crusade
'against traffic in barrels bearing in
ternal revenue stamps and brands
which have not been destroyed. The
collector's reports show that one firm
has 15,000 such barrels in its posses
sion. If it is found guilty, a fine of
$3,000,000 may be Imposed.
DR. ROLLER WAS
BADLY INJURED
New York, Aug. 9.—News reached
heretoday of the serious injury in
London last night of Dr. B. F. Roller,
the American wrestler. He broke two
ribs in a contest with Gama, an East
Indian wrestler, whom he had chal
lenged for a stake of $1,000 a side.
Gama, although at a distadvantage
in weight and height, defeated the
American easily, gaining the first fall
in one minute and forty seconds, and
the second in nine minutes.
IS BROKEN UP
New York, Aug. 9.—Irvin Hough
teling, the first husband of Mrs. Mary
three months sojourn on Blackwell's
island today, owing to his having cast
a sugar bowl at Joseph Batterman, the
second husband, while they were dis
cussing domestic affairs in the cosy
little flat where all have been living
for six years.
SALVATION ARMY GIRLS
BARED FROM SALOONS
Denver, Col., Aug. 9.—An order was
issued yesterday by the local fire
and police board prohibiting Salvation
Army lassies entering saloons to so
licit aid and sell their literature. The
order is based on the theory that the
practice is demoralising, as the girls
are thrown into temptation.
©tribune.
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 10, 1910. PRICE FIVE CEMTb
WORKERS IN OKLAHOMA BUSY
SENDING TELEGRAMS TO
WASHINGTON.
SOME STARTLING EVIDENCE
INDIANS URGED TO RECOMMEND
SALE BE PUT THROUGH
IS CLAIMED.
Gore Introduces Letter Showing Ref
erences Made to Sherman and Cur
tis—Taft Wrote Letter and Gave
Permission for Wide Publicity—Ap
proved of Settling Indian Affairs.
By Associated Press.
McAleiter, Okla., Aug. 9 —While J.
P. McMurray was in Washington last
May urging the approval of his con-j
tracts, by which he and his associates
would be able to secure 10 per cent,
attorney's fees on the sale of $50,000,
000 worth of land owned by tne In
dians, the Indians themselves werei
being urged to send telegrams to!
Washington recommending tse la.e A!
few days before May 6. on which date,
induce congress to approve the con-|
Senator T. P. Gore charged he wasi
offered a $25,000 or $50,100 bribo to!
tracts, McMurray telegraphed to Okla-j
noma:
"Send not. less than fifty letters
and telegrams and keep up the
work for a week at different
towns. Looks better here. We
will win, I know."
This evidence was brought out In
the investigation of the land deal be
fore the congressional committee to
day. Senator Gore said he introduced
it to show the activity at Washington
at the time the bribe is alleged to
have been made.
References to Vice President Sher
man and Charles Curtis of Kansas
weer made in a letter introduced by
Senator Gore. It had been explained
by Congressman C. E. Creager that
he and Richard Adams had called on
(Continued on page 8)
Juneau Alaska, Aug. 9—Special.—
Great interest attaches to the elec
tions that are to be held here soon
for several local offices and the seat
of delegate to congress. Secretary
of Commerce and Labor Charles Na
ge3 .and Attorney General Wickerahani
By Associated I'rcss.
Except for a slight thunderstorm
lasting but a short time, the weather
during the long march was perfect,
Prom nine o'clock, when the signal to
start waa given, until after twelve}
o'clock, when the last Knight had,
paused before the reviewing stand,
the thermometer registered from 71
to 79 degrees while a cool breeze
prevented any discomfort from heat
among the assembled thousands.
There were over 40,000 Knights in
line, while over a half million specta
tors sat in the iiuge reviewing stand
occupying the east side of Michigan
boulevard as far south as Twelfth
street, or stood along the line of
march.
The first note of tragedy in the
day came when Herman Gro3sman of
Chicago, on his way to join his com
mandery, was caught in the "death
strip" between two cars on "Templar
Way" and received injuries from
which he died. In the grandstand two
blocks away sat Mrs. Grossman un
identified for three hours, while she
scanned the marchers for her hus
band, not learning of his death until
I son of J. A. Juen of Calmar, and the ™m*
Two Cabinet Officers Watch Alaska
Elections and Probe Federal Offices
are both in Alaska and will remain
until after the ballots are counted.
At the famous Treadwell mines, where
thousands of miners are employed,
charges of fraud were made and sev
eral scores of special deputy United
States marshals sworn in to prevent
TRIBUNE
FIVE HUNDRED THOUSAND SPECTATORS FOR GRAND PARADE
ONE MAN THROWN FROM HORSE AND MAY DIE AS RESULT OF
INJURIES—DOZENS OF WOMEN FAINT IN CRUSH ATTENDANT
Chicago, 111., Aug. 9.—One tragic
death, one accident which physicians
say will prove fatal, and a dozen
minor mishaps,, due to the crowds,'
cast a shadow toduy over the parade
of what Masons say was the greatest
number of Knights Templar everj
formed in line in any city.
UPON EFFORT TO GET SEATS TO VIEW PARADE—KNIGHTS TO
HAVE BUSY TIME.
ANT ADS
W
JSBT BRING RESULTS
THREE SERIOUS ACCIDENTS
MARRED FIRST DAY OF THE
KNIGHT TEMPLARS MEETING
Ohio Knight Caught Between Two Cars And Crushed
to Death at Start of Parade
the parade had passed and she reach
ed home.
A short time after, William Hack
ett, a Knight from Fosteria, Ohio,
was thrown from his horse in the
parade and dragged by bis neck in
the stirrup for a block before the
animal could be stopped. At a hospi
tal here tonight it was stated Mr.
Hackett's injuries may prove fatal.
W. B. Biddle of Laporte, Ind„ was
struck by a cab and received Berious
injuries. Scores of women who faint
ed in the crush received attention in
the hospital booths which bad been
erected at intervals along the line
of march.
Behind a platoon of mounted police
the procession was lead by California
mounted commandery of San Fran
cisco. Immediately following came
100 open carriages, each containing
four members of the Grand Conclave,
the highest body in Knight Templar
dom of this country. Acting Grand
Master William B. Melish occupied
the first carriage. Accompanying the
Grand Conclave were the noted
guests from England, the Earl of Eus
ton, and representatives from the
Great Priory of Canada.
Immediately after the parade the
first formal session of the conclave
was held. The sessions will be held
daily until the final conclave of the
gathering, and members of the Grand
I Conclave have but little time for en
tertainment, which will occupy the
'time of thousands of other visiting
Knights.
0+0++++++++++++++0+++++++++++++++*+**+++++++*+++++6++*+++01*+0++*++l+++f+*
WATER WAS FATAL. FASTING IS FATAL.
Mason City, la., Aug. 9.—Children in Elgin, 111., Aug. 9.—After fasting
play yesterday poured a lot or water
an effort 0
down the throat of Ralph, 4-year-old
wl
raInor
I little fellow only lived an hour. The Ruby Dale, a music teacher, lies at
I water went into his lungs and he was, the point of death. She is unable to
drowned. take any nourishment.
+0+ +o+m
„,
digestive troubles. Miss
illegal voting. Besides watching the
election, the two cabinet officers are
visiting various government stations
and inspecting affairs of the federal
offices. This is the first time in years
that two cabinet officers have visited
Alaska at the same time.
V.
&«*

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