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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, August 11, 1910, Image 1

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TRIBUNE
Ttlssfieat
13 or 32
WANTADS
BRING RESULTS
THIRTIETH YEAR
It is difficult to say whether he will
recover, for not even.. the most re
nowned specialists may say whether
blood poisoning will be the aftermath,
but as yet the mayor's temperature
has given no cause for alarm. Every
indication is that the wound is heal
ing.
Bulletins issued today and tonight
did not vary in their tone of optimism
and so cheerful was the patient that
Mrs. Gaynor, after an almost sleep-
less vigil at the bedside, left the
mayor's side late this afternoon for
a forty-minute outing by auto.
Quartered in a larger and better
lighted room at the hospital the mayor
chats pleasantly with those who are
allowed to see him and confidently
predicts that he will be out in a few
days. As yet he has not discussed
the tragedy, or is he even aware of
the identity of the assassin. It was
reported that he had inquired the
man's name soon after the shooting,
hut this seems to have been an error.
And although familiar with Gallagher's
annoying letters and his persistent at
tempts to obtain reinstatement as a
night watchman in the dock depart
ment, the mayor does not know that
it was he who fired the shot.
Aside from deploring that he should
have been fired upon for doing his
duty, he has in no way criticised his
assailant and maintains a marked av
ersion to discussing the incident.
One of the most extended confer
ences on the mayor's condition was
held tonight, but at its conclusion
there was issued merely a brief bul
letin and no announcement was made
as to when, if at all, an operation
would be performed.
New York, Aug. 10.—Interest cen
ters on the mayor's condition, hut
Gallagher^ professing a trace of peni
tence, commanded no further notoriety
from his cell in Jersey City this even
ing.
An anonyfous letter threatening the
life of Commissioner William H. Ed
wards, whose blows felled Gallagner
yesterday, started a perfunctory po
lice investigation. The communica
tion is attributed to a crank, and al
though it predicted for "Blf BUT a
Gallagher Being Held Awaiting Outcome of Injuries
to Determine Charge to be Lodged Against Him
WOULD-BE ASSASSIN DI8PLAY8 BUT LITTLE PENITENCE FOR CRIME.
RUMORED POLICEMAN KNEW OF INTENDED ASSAULT—PHYSIC
IANS ISSUE LATE BULLETIN ROFESSING HOPES OF MAYOR'S
New York, Aug. 10— The fol
lowing bulletin on Mayor Gay
nor's condition was issued at
9:30 o'clock tonight:
"The mayor's progress today
has been satisfactory. He has
good strength, has rested well,
has taken considerable nourish
ment and is in good condition
this evening. Signed, William
J. Arlitz, George D. Stewart
and George E. Brewer."
»j $» •$•
By Associated Pres/.
New York, Aug. 10—William J. Gay
nor, mayor of New York, lies in St.
Mary's hospital tonight with two seg
ments of a split bullet fired yesterday
by James J. Gallagher, who attempted
to assassinate him, still buried in his
neck and mouth, but he has shown not
one alarming symptom.
ULTIMATE RECOVERY—GAYN OR NOT YET INFORMED WHO THE
MAN WHO SHOT HIM IS—NOT KNOWN WHETHER OPERATION
IS PLANNED—BULLET SPLIT INTO TWO PARTS.
fate similar to the mayor's, he did
not regard the matter seriously
Two young girls who declared they
I overheard an intoxicated) policeman
remark Monday night that the mayor
would be shot either on his departure
for or on his return from Europe, iur
nished the foundation for another po
lice investigation, but nothing tangible
had developed. The policeman's
number is in the possession of In
spector Russell, and while there is
little, if anything, to indicate the ex
istence of an organized plot to take
the mayor's life, the policeman will
be tried for intoxication while on duty
and with making indecent and incen
diary remarks.
Gallagher's statement this evening
was his first talk concerning the
crime.
"While I will not say that I am
sorry," he said, "I now hope the mayor
gets well. But I wanted to teach high
officials to regard the rights of subor
dinates. I consider I had to shoot
the mayor as a lesson to the country.
I did what I did for personal prin
ciples, and was not prompted by any
anarchistic belief.
I am sorry that Comissioner Ed
There is a determination to make
Gallagher an example of "quick Jersey
justice." But it was decided not to
law his case before the grand jury
pending the outcome of the mayor's
injuries. If the mayor recovers Gal
lagher will be tried, charged with as
sault with intent to kill, and may re
ceive a maximum sentence of twenty
years. If his victim should die the
charge will be murder in the first de
gree, the penalty for which is death.
CONSULTABQITT
P0STAL_BANKS
REPRESENTATIVES OF GOVERN-
MENT AND BANKING
INSTITUTIONS.
Regulations for Operation of New Sys
tem is Under Consideration—Con
ference Held in New York and Many
Matters Discussed—Postmaster Gen
eral was Present.
By Associated Press.
New York, Aug. 10.—The new postal
savings bank system soon to be estab
lished by the government was dis
cussed at conferences here today be
tween officials of the postoffice depart
ment of several New York savings
banks and the accountants of large
commercial and transportation com
panies. Postmaster General Hitch
cock, Theo. L. Weed, secretary of the
board of trustees of the postal bank
system Harry H. Thompson, superin
tendent of the financial division, and
B. Niles, superintendent of foreign
mails, represented the government.
The tentative plans drawn up for
the regulation of the postal savings
bank were submitted to the New
Yorkers and suggestions invited as to
how they could he improved.
$
I 1
I TEXAS DEMOCRATS IN QUEER
TANGLE.
Austin, Tex., Aug. 10—Special.—The
most remarkable political situation in
the history of the democratic party in
Texas exists since the result of the
recent primaries was made known.
O. B. Colquitt, the victor in the pri
mary battle, was named through the
activity of the anti-prohibitionists,
wards was wounded, for I was aiming while a majority of the delegates
only at the mayor. But even theychosen
thought of killing him had not been
long in my mind. I reached no de
cision until I got up yesterday morn
ing. The paper said that Gaynor was
going to sail for a vacation. That
made me angry—to think that he
should have a vacation in Europe
while I did not even have a chance
to work, much less get a vacation. So
I hurried over the Twenty-third street
ferry and made my way to the
steamer.
"My wrongs had proved more that
I thought I could bear. Over and
over I sized up my hard station in
life and contrasted it with that of
some other man—of Mayor Gaynor,
who had wronged me, in particular.
"No, I was not drunk yesterday
morning, as has been Intimated. On
the contrary, I had not taken a drop
of liquor since last Saturday."
to 8 a
convention are in
favor of state-wide proohibition.
ALDRICH WILL
DEFENOTARRIFF
SENATOR WILL BREAK LONG PRE-
CEDENT AND ANSWER
HIS ENEMIES.
Preparing Speech to Be Delivered on
Rubber Schedule—Will Take Stump
in Western Part of United States in
Fall Campaign—Will Positively Not
Seek Office Again.
By Associated Press.
Boston, Mass., Aug. 10.—Details of
the conference at Warwick, R. I., on
Sunday last, attended by Senator Nel
son W. Aldrich, Senator W. Murray
Crane of Massachusetts, and Secretary
to the President Norton, became
known in political circles today. It is
said that Senator Aldrich definitely
told his callers that stories that he
had reconsidered his determination
not to again run for the senate was
without foundation. The senator said
he had made all his plans to retire
that he felt he had given a good part
of his life to the government, and he
had no desire to "grow old" in the
senate. Mr. Aldrich went so far as
to discuss his probable successor. It
was learned that he, Aldrich, break
ing a lifelong precedent of never issu
ing a statement "under fire," has de
cided to make a reply to the charges
of Senator Bristow of Kansas regard
ing the rubber schedule of the Payne
Aldrich tariff bill. He has told his
friends, who have urged him to reply,
that in his political life he has never
felt called upon to make statements in
response to "malicious or unjust at
tacks."
With regard to the charges as to
the cotton schedule, Senaor Aldrich
will make a speech in the coming
campaign in the "enemy's country"
out west, in which he will defend the
tariff law as a whole and will make a
full statement regarding the cotton
schedule.
Senator Aldrich has been at work
on bis reply to the rubber charges for
several days. He has told some of his
friends that he is proud of the part
he played in framing this schedule and
that he will make his course absolute
ly plain.
WILL EXTEND ROAD.
Portland, Ore., Aug. 10.—President
John F. Stevens of the Oregon Trunk
railway, the Hill system, announces
that the road will be extended across
the Cascade mountains to Medford,
connecting with the partly built Pa
cific Eastern to reach that city.
ptenwrck P«ili) ®ribmte.
r+.*+*+++++++++++++++r»++*r++r-r+++++-
BADLY HURT
AVIATOR LOST CONTROL OF MA
CHINE AND IT LANDED IN THE
CROWD OF PEOPLE, SEVEN OF
WHOM WERE BADLY HURT—
BROOKINS HA8 BROKEN NOSE
AND MINOR HURTS.
By Associated Press.
Asbury Park, N. J., Aug. 10.—A
serious mishap to Walter Brookins, in
which the aviator was painfully, but
not dangerously, hurt, marred the first
day of the aviation meet here. Brook
ins was dashed, stunned to the earth,
when the machine suddenly turned
turtle. Seven other people among
whom the machine tumbled, were
more or less seriously injured. Brook
ins was pinned under the wreckage
and only half conscious when friends
reached him. This started a report
that he had been fatally injured. An
examination showed that his nose was
broken and that he had been badly
bruised and shaken up, but not seri
ously hurt.
REPORTS UNFOUNDED.
New York, Aug. 10.—The recent re
ports that the Italian royal family
have withdrawn all objections to the
marriage of the Duke of the Abruzzi
to Miss Katherine Elkins is without
foundation, according to Miss Elkins'
father.
San Sebastian, Spain, Aug. 10.—De
spite the threats of the Carlists the
troops have been able to maintain or
der here, and, while many arrests have
been made, the worst of the trouble
is believed to be over. Catholics are
extremely indignant at the govern
ment's repressive measures, as they
claim that the demonstrations planned
were not Carlist uprisings, but were
arranged to show the disapproval of
the people to the orders of Premier
Canalejas, who so far has had the
earnest support of King Alfonso. Gen
eral Weyler's assignment to command
of the troops in this district is taken
to mean that the government does not
intend to allow the uprising to suc
ceed. The Catholics here believe that
the efforts of the pope to settle the
entire mattr will prove successful and
that the end of the controversy is in
sight.
TRI-STATE WEATHER.
North Dakota: Showers and cooler
Thursday or Thursday night Friday
cooler.
South Dakota: Partly cloudy Thurs
day showers and cooler at night or
Friday.
Minnesota: Partly cloudy Thurs
day showers and slightly cooler at
night or Friday light to moderate
winds, becoming south and shifting to
northwest Friday.
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY MORNING, AUGUST 11, W10. PRICE FIVE CENTb
COUNTERFEITM0RE
CLEVER PLAN WORKED OUT BY
LONG TERMERS IN MASSACHU-
SETTS STATE PRISON.
MANUFACTURED HALF DOLLAR
MAN SERVING 25-YEAR TERM WAS
HEAD OF GANG OF
THREE MEN.
Planned Electrical Device for Melting
Metal—Coins Were Circulated With
in Prison Walls—Secret Service
Officials Get at Bottom of Daring
icheme.
By Associated Press.
Boston, Mass., Aug. 10.—How three
inmates of the state prison at Charles
town were able to construct a coun
terfeiting outfit and manufacture
spurious half collars has been discov
ered by the sevret service officials.
Since July 21, when the officials dis
covered counterfeit halt' dollars in cir
culation in the prison and that some
'had gotten outside, an investigation
has been in progress. At that time it
was known that Patrick Hanley of
Lynn, serving a twenty-five-year sen
tence, was involved. Tonight it was
announced that two other prisoners,
whose names were withheld, had been
fo'.md to be accomplices of Hanley,
and that the cases of all three would
be presented to the federal grand jury
today. They secured from some source
scraps of tin and lead, a jeweler's
crucible and plaster of paris. One of
the trio has a knowledge of electricity
and devised the means of melting the
metol. He cut in on the electric light
wire in Hanley's cell, attached two
pieces of carbon and placed them on
a small sheet of iron covered with
fireproof cement. On the white hot
carbo nthe crucible was placed and
the coins manufactured in a plaster
of paris mould.
Pope's Efforts Staj Han of Catholics
and Threatened "Uprising" is Averted
By Associated Press.
Congressman C. I) Parier The
Fourth Oklihona distiict. testiled
at an interne*' at llie hr n«* f:f l!i
ard C. Adv-is, at attorney a W.is.
ington. Adanib n-i'l said he had
arangement oy ui:.h he was se
cure five o'.'r cent of ih. "profit*' *'.
be derived f. 'rn I he MeMurray con
tracts.
"He also toli mo.' testified Mr. »r
ter, "that Con.?•es.*r.un B. S. Mtu"'ie
and Dr. Wright, *s.tc fr.r ue
|Choctaw Indi.'.is at Washington nth
a salary of $C "1, wer« ii' on uic
Ideal."
"Did Adams say he wa3 goins (o
I five per cent of iUr money .1. V. Me
Murray was t: realize':" asked Chair
man Chas. H. Durke
"Yes, he fia'd he was going to wake
sure of it, as MHIurr iy h:id doi.»"e
crossed him a', other times. But 'it's
time he was go:i to fix it so he w-.mld
not lose out, and when McrMuviay fim
his ten per rent, or i'H •luuOitf. oi
whatever it amoi-i: til he 'Adan.sj
was going to e« five per ceii* of it-.v
proceeds."
"I also met Jak-j L. Hamon it Wash
ington. He told no *O :.D 'lore find
get him to wUvi v.v that fool bill .f
his against the McMii-rav contracts."
Adams was described as a l'ela-
KILLED IN AN AUTO.
Springfield,,111., Aug. 10.—Miss Irene
Dodge of Normal, 111., was killed, and
Harman Scantlin of Athens, 111., se
verely injured last night, when an
automobile, driven by Rev. Father T.
M. Moore of Athens, was struck by a
street car.
TRIBUNE
TclcpboM
or 32
E ll
Suggestive Name for One Headquarters of Gang
Alleged to have Endeavored to Swindle Indians
CHARGES AND COUNTER CHARG ES MADE IN PLENTY BEFORE
CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE—SOME INDIAN WITNESSES CALL-
McAllester, Okla., Aim'. 10.—"Lo. tin
poor Indian," learned :i low more
things about tho oropiv-je 1 sale of $ '0.
000.000 worth of als lM)d ill .lie hir
ing before ih? congressional iiiV'_li
gation coniin..'.,e d:iy.
ED TO STAND—LATHAM CLAIMS HE WAS OFFERED TEN THOU
SAND DOLLARS FOR HIS ASSISTANCE IN GAME!
WANT ADS
BRING RESULTS
INDIAN LAND SCANDALS ARE
UNBARED AT INVESTIGATION
ware Indian, wno had been mentioned
as having ca'lod on President Taft in
matters pertai". 13 to Indian aO.'ilis.
It was Adams to whom the Indians in
this state were asued to address icle
grams urging President Taft to aj
prove the m'e of the lands.
Before Car*r left the siand M?Mur
ray's attonun-5 obi.lined from him tes
timony tending to show that Adams
in previous Ind.'in imirera had tup
ported mea^uios in congress opposed
to the inter^s'-j of McMurray.
K. B. Latnui., an attorney of Mc
Allester, re'uted a meeting with Mc
Murray twj «eam ago. whon McMur
ray, he said. "fared Mm a pif.sr-nt of
$10,000 if th? old tribal contract vouid
"go through.' 1 h'.-se contracts were
afterwards disi,vi ovrd by President
Roosevelt.
What the "present' was for Latham
declared he never could make out, for
be was not asked to support the con
tracts at another time. Latham testi
fied he was offered a share of the
$750,000 "'attorney's fee," which Mc
Murray subsequently obtained in an
Indian land deal, after the amount of
the fee had caused much discussion in
congress.
Incidentally, the Indians, many of
whom were present in the committee
room, heard of "Robbers Roost," a
town in the southern part of the state.
From Robbers Roost there emerged
one day an emissary representing Mc
Murray, who went to a "war council"
of Indians to get them to sign con
tracts.
SURVIVORS OF
MINNEAPOLIS MAN RELATES EX-
PERIENCES GETTING OFF
STRANDED BOAT.
No Panic and Everyone Was Rescued
Without Trouble—Landed on Senti
nel Island and Waded Through
Shoulder High Grass to Final Place
of Refuge.
By Associated Press.
Seattle, Wash.. Aug. 10.—The steam
ship Jefferson arrived from Juneau to
day with some of the survivors of the
wrecked Canadian Pacific liner Prin
cess May, which went on the rocks
north of Sentinel Island early last
Friday morning. L. R. Leyrer, who
was on his way from Alaska to his
home in Minneapolis, said that al
though there was great excitement
among the passengers, none seemed
to think there was much danger, as
the shore was near.
"I hastened to the deck where the
boats were located and found two
members of the crew preparing to
launch a boat," said Mr. Leyrer.
"There were six boats altogether. The
first three left with all the women
and children. Two others weer used
for the men and the other carried a
miner who was suffering with a brok
en leg. We landed on the north end
of Sentinel Island. When we reached
the top of the clirf our troubles did
not end. We found ourselves in grass
almost shoulder high. C. E. Peterson,
the lighthouse keeper, had just gone
to bed when the vessel ran on the
reef, but he headd our distress whis
tles and was hastening from the build
ing when we broke through the grass
and met him."
WYOMING FORESTS ARE
OPEN FOR SETTLEMENT
By Associated Press.
Washington, Aug.^ 10.—The presi
dent has signed a proclamation elim
inating 6,075 acres of land from, the
Hayden national forest in Wyoming,
in pursuance of the administration's
general plan for restoring to the pub
lic domain all areas not valuable for
forest purposes. The eliminated tracts
are situated mainly along the north
eastern boundary of the forests. The
largest and most important part of
the elimination, more than 4,000 acres,
is said to offer opportunity only for
dry fanning, no water being available
for irrigation. The unappropriated
eliminated land will be opened to set
tlement later.

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