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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, August 18, 1911, Image 1

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TRIBUNE
**n
WANT ADS
BRING RESULTS
THIBTY-FIRST YEAR
STRIKE III
Striken Fear Plae is Mads
to Delay a Settlemeat
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Aug. 18.—The fight be
tween the railroad companies and
striking union employes Is on in dead1
earnest today. Thousands have obeyed
the strike order other thousands have
continued to work. The companies
are operating their principal trains
under modified schedules. The gov
ernment and the board of trade are
continuing their eforts toward peace,
but the old deadlock between the
managers and the unions appears to
have reasserted Itself today. The
managers had. a prolonged meeting
with the members of the board of
trade, but as far as could be learned
the railroad .companies declined to
budge from their stand of making no
further concessions beyond submitting
dispute to royal commission suggested
by the government. The chief cities
of England are armed camps. The
stations, workshops, signal posts, tun
nels and bridges are guarded by sol
diers. Clerks fiave been pressed into
service to aid non-strikers in moving
trains. Despite the efforts of the com
panies, freight is demoralized and a
shortage of food supplies threatens
famine at some points. The govern
ment views the industrial war as so
grave that parliament did not adjourn
as had been expected today, but will
continue, prepared to adopt any
emergency legislation the moment it
is necessary.
Thousands of people living outside
were unable to ?et home. A large
number of bluejackets from the war
ships at Portsmouth were ordered to
stand by with a view to the possibil
ity of having to replace garrison
troops which have been ordered into
the strike area.
LONDON, Aug. 18—Officials of the
union and railroad managers were in
session at Unity hall considering the
government's suggestion for the ap
pointment of a royal commission
which should investigate and report
what amendments, if any, should be
made to the conciliation agreement
now existing between owners and em
ployers.
When the suggestion of a royal
commission was made by Premier As
quith yesterday it was accepted by
the managers but rejected by the men
who seemed to feel that such arrange
ments would mean a long delay in
the adjustment of their grievances.
The chancellor explained that the
men had misunderstood the premier's
proposal. It was he said to give them
fair play and "not to lure out of their
hands the great weapon of striking.
The plan was to appoint a committee
of three, one from the strikers, and
one from the railroads and a third
man well known for his impartiality.
PRESIDENT TAFT TO
VETO FREE LIST
WASHINGTON, Aug. 18—President
Taft's third important veto message
of the special session disapproving
the fanners free list bill will bejsent
to the house this afternoon. The bill
reached the White House shortly after
ten o'clock today and the president
immediately set to work on a mes
sage, material for which he has been
collecting for weeks. The message,
it is said, will be short.
WEALTHY FARMER
CAN'T BE FOUND
NECHE, N. D., Aug| 17.—William
Marshall, a wealthy farmer who lived
east of Neche, is missing from home.
Marshall has been suffering from can
cer and last week made his will and
is said to have remarked': I do not
see what they want to keep an old
man like me alive for."
When he did not return home Mon
day evening the neighbors were noti
fied and Tuesday searching parties
scoured the woods, but no trace of
him was found. Marshall was very
weak and it is feared he laid down
in some secluded spot and died.
EFFORT TO CALL GENERAL"
I WAYS A PARTIAL SUCCESS
Meiud Managers hive
Heetiig at Holly Ball
Today
Appointment of loyal
mfcsioi Not Liked by
CANAD
A CROP
S
O HAI
Storm Rages ThroughSooth
era Alberta Cwotry
(By Associated Press)
LETHBRIDGE, Alberta, Aug. --—A
Hail storm that traveled through
southern Alberta late yesterday des
troyed probably a million bushels of
grain. The worst was found at Wil
son and Sterling southeast of Letih
bridge where several farms were com
pletely threshed out.
NEWSPAPER
IS
EDITORIAL "WE" DIVIDED BY DI-
VORCE PROCEEDINGS
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Young Now Pre
side over their Individual Newspa
pers—Divorced by Judge Fisk.
,• WILLISTON, N. EL Aug. 18—The
combination of two editors as man
and wife didn't work out in the case
of Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Young, to
whom a degree of divorce has been
granted by Judge Fisk. Mrs. Nella
Young, the complaining witness, is
at present engaged in the publication
of a weekly newspaper at Berg, this
state, while Mr. Young is engaged in
the same capacity at Gharlson,
Kenzie county.
Mc
"S00NERS" WERE,
CAUGHT IN ACT
DEVILS LAKE, Aug. 17.—Several
"sooners" who will be forced to pay
a fine and incidentally do other things
in cotnplance with the game laws were
captured yesterday afternoon doing
the regular before season hunting
stunt. District Game Warden Duis
was on the job in a minute in carry
ing out his duties and promises to con
tinue the work of having the law
obeyed without fear or favor.
CONSTRUCTION WORK
DEGINS AT EDGELY
EDGELY, Aug. 18.—H. H. Herning,
construction engineer in charge of the
ironing of the Midland Continental
railroad grades has established his
headquarters at^Edgetey. Steel and
ties are on the ground and a large
gang of men are work laying con
struction tracks from the Milwaukee
and Northern Pacific lines where ma
terial cars may be sided. There is
every promise that trains will be run
ning between Edgeley and Jamestown
before snow flies and that a direct
route will be opened to Winnipeg
within a year. The general opinion
is that the new line is to form a part
of the Milwaukee system.
A year ago a grade was built from
Edgeley to Jamestown and extended
northeast through Courtenay and
Cooperstown, along a survey through
Aneta, Park River and Pembina to
Winnipeg.
After grading, no further moves to
ward finishing the line were made
until a few days ago when construc
tion crews came to Edgeley and com
menced work upon switches from the
Milwaukee and Northern Pacific lines
which are to be used for the purpose
of side tracking can of materials.
From Jamestown reports come that
the same things have been done at
that place and that work has been
reopened upon the unfinished grade
to the northeast of that town.
BREAKS ARM IN FALL
Driscoll News: Emmett Carroll
son of P. H. Carroll, while playing
with his little wagon had the mis
fortune to fall on a stone near the
doorstep of his father's home east
of town, and breaking his left arm
above the elbow. Dr. Baer was at
once called and the broken member
set. and at this writing fthe little
fellow is getting along as well as can
be expected, but still has to carry his
arm in a sling.
STRIKEONLY A
PARTIAL SUCCESS
SOME OF THE RAILWAY LINES
OPERATING ON A NORMAL
BASIS.
MILITARY PARTIES HOLD STA
TIONS ALONG THE LINES TO
PROTECT PROPERTY—NO
INTERFERENCE WITH
STRIKERS.
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Aug. 18.—At noon the
strike ordered last night by the Amal
gamated Society of Railway Servants
and allied organizations of employes
have been only a partial success.
Some of the railway lines were oper
ating very few trains, while on- other
roads the service continued practical
ly normal. Military parties 'hold pos
session of stations along the lines
but not for purposes of at present in
terfering with the strike except to
protect men desiring to work and
guard the. property of the companies.
FIRST TRAINS
ARRIVE AT VASHTi
VASHTI, N. D., Aug. 18—The rail
road has been finished as far as Vash
ti, and the crew is working six or
seven miles west of this place. The
community is much gratified with the
passing trains even if they are work
trains. The supply train is running
from Pingree and carrying the neces
sary supplies here, so the new road
is much in use and it is a welcome
sight to the local residents. The ma-,
terial yards have been moved here for
the present Two side tracks are
laid and they are full of cans most
of the time.
The census of Vashti is now about
300. The only regret felt here is that
it is a floating population and does
not- represent a variety of business.
THE WEATHER
North Dakota—Generally fair to
night and Saturday warmer tonight.
(By Associated Prase)
OOATESVILLE, Pa., Aug. 18.—The
burning to death of Zacharia Walker,
a negro, by a band of lynchers here
has caused Governor Tener to order
the state constabulary to guard the
town, and eforts are being made to
/+.
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, AUGUST 18, 1911.

CONGRESSMAN WHO WILL
HEAD INDUSTRIAL PROBE
(By Associated frets)
WASHINGTON, Aug. J8.—It has be
come known here that Martin W. Lit
tleton, congressman1 from Nassau
county, N. Y., will be chairman of the
proposed congressional committee
which will be authorized to investigate
the industrial conditions of the
United States. "Jfhis committee will,
it is reported here, be the most im
portant one appointed' by congress in
recent years. "I am advised/' statea
Mr. Littleton, "that there is to be a
thorough inquiry into all the commer
cial ills of the nation- and that a con
ference will be called to determine
the problem of how to deal with the
industrial situation in America. It is
a project that will Involve a most
drastic investigation and bring to
gether capital and labor in an effort
without bias to find out just what
should be done." "That is the best
news I have heard," say* George W.
Perkins, former partnef $f John^Pier
pent Morgan, who recently testified
at length before the Stanley commit
tee, which is probing the methods and
operations of the United States Steel
company.
First Photo of Hurtling of Negro Zacharia
Walker by a Mob in Coatesville, Pa.,
Near Philadelphia
ascertain who were the perpetrators
of the deed. Walker shot and killed
Edgar Rice, a special policeman em
ployed by the Worth Brothers' Steel
company, when caught in the act of
holding up and robbing a foreigner
near the work's of the company. He
was dragged from his cot in the
im£®mffl&ffl&?
®rihmte-
NEW RECORD
FOR CROSS
COUNTRY FLIGHT
HARRY N. AT WOOD'S SCHEDULE
FOR TODAY IS NINETY-FIVE
MILES IN THE AIR.
HAS NOW COVERED MORE THAN
ONE-HALF THE DISTANCE IN
HIS FLIGHT FROM NEW
YORK TO ST. LOUIS.
(By Associated Press?
CLEVELAND, O., Aug. 18.—Ninety
five miles 'n air trip to Erie, Pa., was
Harry N. Atwood's schedule for his
aeroplane flight today.
Atwood, who already has covered
more than one-half of the 1,265 miles
of his proposed flight from St. Louis
to New York to establish a new
world's cross-country aeroplane rec
ord, said he did not expect to leave
Cleveland until some time after 12
o'clock.
If he lands at Erie for the night it
will be the shortest one day run he
has made since he left St. Louis last
Monday. However, he said if he finds
the weather favorable he might re
ascend at Erie and continue on to
Buffalo.
TAKE A WILD RIDE
BEFORE GLODD BURST
DEVILS LAKE, Aug. 18—With the
wind at its height and the waves
4 to 5 feet high tearing their way
across Devils Lake, but before the
near cloudburst occurred the report
spread like wild fire at Chautauqua
that some little children were out in
the "tub." The greatest apprehension
was felt, for with every moment the
waves were becoming higher.
WJatching from the station windows
the course of the craft was followed
until it was lost in the rain. Time
and again it would come into view
and then be lost. As the craft drew
near the shore it was seen that those
Handling it were not novices.
Coatesville hospital, where he had
been lodged under police guard, and
burned by a mob a half mile from
town. Coatesville is 38 miles west
of Philadelphia. The lynching, which
is the first to happen in this state, has
roused the town to a high pitch of ex
citement
One woman was killed and her son
injured.by falling timbers. The dead
body of a Mexican child was found
in a wrecked house at Wfinkelman.
Nearly two hundred buildings were
blown down. The Mexican quarter
at Hayden was destroyed and many
are reported injured there.
WARD COUNTY
TEACHERS WIN
AWARDED N. W. S. 8. PENNANT IN
FIELD MEET AT VELV.
Good Showing is Made by the Teach
ers at the Northwestern Summer
School.
VELVA, N. D., Aug. 18—In an ath
letic contest in which the teachers in
eight counties in Northwestern North
Dakota took part, Ward county won
first place and Bottineau second at
the Velva summer school which just
closed.
Ward county was awarded a pen
nant with the letters "N. W. S. S."
meaning the Northwestern Summer
School which pennant is on exhibition
at the office of Supt. E. G. Warren,
and will be held by Ward county un
til some other school wins first place
in an annual contest.
The contest consisted of foot, relay,
three-legged and sack races and stand
ing, running broad and high jumps
and nail driving.
OATS YIELD HEAVY
AT LA MOURE
LoMoure, Aug. 18—Fred Long will
be able to boast'of having the banner
oat crop this season. He has fifty
acres that will yield eighty bushels
to the acre. He has only threshed
a part but enough to assure him that
the yield will be as stated. Besides
threshing a few oats the longs put
thirty acres of wheat through the ma
chine, and it turned out eight bushels
to the acre. They threshed one acre
of oats for John Lau which gave him
71 bushels. Both the oat yields men
tioned were from new ground.
AMUSEMENT FEATURES
NOT TO BE OVERLOOKED
Big pumpkins and fine grains will
not be the only attractions at the big
Industrial Exposition which opens in
Bismarck September 26 and continues
for twenty days. Commissioner Gil
breath who is general manager of the
show has arranged for one of the best
vaudeville shows that ever trouped
the United States and there will be
two performances given daily in the
big theatre that will be made in the
exposition building. This show will
be free to all who enter the building
and will last for two hours each after
noon and evening. The program will
be so varied that it will appeal to all
classes.
The Bismarck Commercial Club is
now arranging to present as a free
out door attraction one of the most
sensational feature acts that has ever
been originated. We are not at liber
ty as yet to give details of the act
but will in a few days have cuts and
a complete description of the most
thrilling and death defying stunt that
has ever been staged in the state.
I NE
Telephone
WILEY CASE TO INVOLVE
COSTS LIFEPresennCongress
One Woman Killed and Many
Injured in Storm
(By Associated Press)
PhOENIX, Ariz. Aug. 18—Damage
estimated at two hundred thousand
dollars was caused' by cloudburst that
swept over Winkelmen and Hayden
Wednesday night according to report
received here.
WANT ADS
BRING RESULTS
FIVE CENTS
nim RI1DQTNew Developmeats Eipected
0 1 Daily ID WHey Case
President Will Study Case
During Vacation lime
Will Ad
jOBr Before Reaching
The Case
(By Associated Prsss)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 18.—Presi
dent Taft does not expect to settle
the Wiley case before adjournment of
the present session of congress. The
closing days of the session have
pointed out to him so many important
matters that the president has been
unable to take up the case in detail.
If adjournment comes within a few
days, papers in the Wiley case will be
taken to Beverly by the president. He
intends to read all the testimony of
fered by the house committee which
is investigating the department of ag
riculture and any other information
bearing on the case which is avail
able. That there may be some crit
icism of officials of the department
other than Dr. Wiley is the belief here
today, although the president has
spent but little time in discussion of
the whole affair.
UNOLOTTERY
SAVE
S MAN'
S LIFE
GEORGE BERTRAM OF NOONAN,
REGISTERED AT MINOT AND^
ESCAPED FROM STORM
Buildings on Farm where he was Em
ployed Demolished by Wind Storm
One Man Killed.
MINOT, Aug. 18—George Bertram
of Noonan, who registered for land
in the Perthold Indian Reservation
believes that he owes his life to the
fact that he came to Minot to regis
ter.
Bertram had been working for Tru
ax Bros, of Noonan, whose farm build
ings were blown down and at whose
place a man was killed.
Bertram says that the name of the
man who was killed is Bill Pequin, a
Frenchman. Bertram used to work
side by side with Pequin and yester
day morning he decided to leave his
job for a few days and go to iviinot
to register.
He no more than got on the train
than the cyclone came. Pequin. Ber
tram's companion, was killed and sev
eral were injured.
MRS. COLT IS HAPPY
DENIES DIVORCE STORY
ACTRESS AND HUSBAND DE
CLARE THERE HAS BEEN NO
TROUBLE BETWEEN THEM
NEW YORK, Aug. 14—Ethel Barry
more and Russell Griswold Colt, her
her husband, are reunited, or. to em
ploy the expression hey Used in
talking with a reporter in their coun
try home at Mamaroneck, N. Y., "We
have never been parted never have
quarreled and never have contemplat
ed any sort of legal proceedings."
Whether or not "all other stories
pointing la different /Conclusion to
our happy marriage" are lies, as the
actress and broker declared them to
be last night, the dove of peace is
assuredly fluttering around their
house, and Samuel P. Colt, their baby,
will be taken to Mamaroneck to add
his peace song to theirs.
The old Taylor homestead was
bright with lights last night. Mr.
Colt, Miss Barrymore and the latter's
young woman companion were seated
around a table in the large drawing
room. Mr. Colt came to the door.
APPROVE SANITORIUM PLANS
Contract for State Institution of North
Dakota to be Let
Dunseith, N. D., Aug. 17—At a meet
ing today of the board of trustees of
the North Dakota Tuberculosis Sani
torium, to be erected in this city, the
plans for the building were approved.
Bids for the construction of the sani
torium also will be called for immed
iately and the contract let at an early
date with a view to getting^ the ex
terior work completed this fall, finish
ing the building for occupancy in the
winter months.

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