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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, September 29, 1911, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1911-09-29/ed-1/seq-5/

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1911.
Henry Burman
Practical Shoemaker
Is now located in {Stewart's
old stand, just back of
Kupitz's Store on Broadway,
and has the latest improved
shoe machinery that can be
obtained for the business.
Your Repair Work
Solicited
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Cam* Out Strong at tha End.
Chippj—I wan not at all up to the
mark last night tried to say some
thing agreeable, bat couldn't do it
somehow, so at last I bade them
goodby. Jones—Ah, then you did man
age to say something agreeable after
all!—London Stray Stories.
Bering Walls.
The art of boring wells was practiced
in the east more than 4.000 years ago
Abraham's servant encountered Re
bekah at a well in 1850 B. C.
The wise prove, the foolish confess
br their conduct that a Jtoef employ
ment j» the only life worth leading.--'
talay.
JiVOUT 75 U. S.
FLAG
S
5x8 and 50 4x6. Never
used. Rather than car
ry these as surplus
stock will sell in lots of
half a dozen at actual
cost. Single pieces very
cheap.
LT.F.ARNALL
Palace Hotel
Washington Lands
Fruit Lan
Garden Tracts
Tacoma, Wash.
Now being offered for the
first time by them in five acre
tracts, suitable for Fruits,
Gardens, Small farms,Chick
ens, etc. Does not require
irrigation. Deep fertile soil
—very productive. You can
easily own your own home
& be independent, The price
is $400 for each five acres,
easy terms on monthly or
annual payments.
You are in 5 miles of Ta
coma, the greatest market in
the northwest. Climate mild
and pleasant—no cold win
ters—no crop failures. It
will pay you to investigate.
See G. W. HOFFMAN,
RaprMeatisc E. P. Oratfry Ca.. N«
ttoaalRaaltjrCa. RafWMCMt Aajr
Bfttk In TatceMM
SOO HOTEL, CITY
Short Orders]
A E
Atlantic
Served at any time
Blue Points on the Half Shell
Sun Fish
Red Snappers
Cod Fish
Lobsters
Smelt
Halibut
Salmon
Exposition visitors and every
body are invited tocome here
for the best meals or short
orders in town.
Atlantic Cafe
116 Fifth St
TURKISH ANSWER TO ITALIAN
ULTIMATUM DECLARED
UNSATISFACTORY
ITALIANS BLOCKADE COAST
BATTLESHIPS HASTEN TO PRE
VENT TURKS LANDING
REINFORCEMENTS
Diplomatic Circles of Europe Are
Agog With Excltemeit -Italy 13
Tired of Promises and Demands
Quick Action on Part of Turkish
..Government,
ROME, Italy, Sept. 29—-Italy has de.
clared war on Turkey. The official
announcement was made late this af
ternoon. It declared that the two
countries were in a state of war be-
Sev
ailing at half past two o'clock on
afternoon of Friday. September
29. This is the hour at which the
Italian ultimatum to Turkey expired
and followed a session of the cabinet
at which the Turkish reply was con
sidered and found unsatisfactory.
Though every indication points to
this action by the royal government,
there was always a possibility that
the good offices of other governments
would be successful in avoiding hos
tilities and when the final decision of
tue cabinet was announced, the ex.
citement throughout the city was in
tense. Throughout the earliest hours
of the day the papers have issued
special additions anouncing that the
Italian fleet was moving in plain sight
off the Coast of Tripoli and intimating
that war might be declared at any mo
ment. Minister of Foreign Affairs
Signor Di Sangiuliano, received the
turkish reply from the Turkish am
bassador this morning and immedi
tely went into conference with his
associates in the ministry.
It is understood that the Ottoman
government completely conceded Ita
ly's economic claims in Tripoli, but
evaded the direct answer demanded
by this government, which had set
forth in its ultimatum that Turkey
must say that.she would not resist
the proposed occupation of Tripou
and Cyrene. Instead the porte sent
a conciliatory note suggesting furth
er delay. It was known that the
same time Turkey transmitted the
note to the powers, in which it is
assumed that she represented herself
as the injured party, by the confer
ence at least sought their interven
tion. The Royal government decided
to stand absolutely by their ultima
tum of yesterday and in the absence
of the reply called for to declare Italy
and Turkey in a state of war from
the hour that the ultimatum of 24
hours expired.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Sept. 29—The
Trukish reply to the Italian ultimatum
demanding assurances that there will
be no resistance to the Italian military
occupation of Tripoli and Cyrene was
communicated to the Italian charge
d'affaires, Signor Di Martin, at 6:30
o'clock this morning.
The message was couched in friend
ly terms and expressed surprise at the
action of Italy in view of the cordial
relations existing between the two coun
tries. It pointed out that the Italian
interests in Tripoli had not been threat
ened and expressed the hope that Italy
would desist from her contemplated
measures. Assurance was given of Tur
key's desire for a settlement of the
matters pending between the two gov
ernments. The reply also stated that
the Italian subjects in Ottoman terri
tory were^ exposed to no danger as the
authorities afforded them protection,
and added that Turkish military meas
ures had been suspended during the
period of negotiations for a settlement
of the differences. The reply was de
termined upon at a cabinet council
which continued at the palace from late
yesterday until early today.
Upon receiving the communication
the Italian charge d'affaires immediate
ly telegraphed it to Rome. The im
pression in diplomatic circles is that
the note will not be satisfactory to
Italv. A Turkish squadron has left
Beirut, and is returning to Constan
tinople. Every precaution has been
taken to preserve order in the capital
$nd. throughput the provinces.
Italians Have Landed.
MALTA, Sept. 29.—It is believed
here that Italians have landed at Trip
oli.
Close Blockade is Ordered.
CHIASSE, Switzerland, on Italian
frontier, Sept. 29—The Italian fleet has
been ordered to maintain a close block
ade of the Tripolitan coast and pre
vent the landing of further reinforce
ments. Secret instructions have been
given for the strategic distribution of
ships also along the Albanian, Mace
donian and Syrian coasts the moment
action is begun, to prevent any attempt
by Turkey to attack the Italian coast
through privateers, which would be
easy from the Albanian *coast, which
on the opposite side of the Adriatic
Sea, is but a few hours sail from the
Italian coast, which is quite undefend
ed. The ships have been instructed al
so to defend not only Italians but all
foreigners on Ottoman territory.
Turks Won't Resist Landing
PARIS, Sept 29—A dispatch to the
Havas agency (from Conqfcantfnop^
says that the Turkish government has
decided not to resist the Italian land
ing at Tripoli.
Turkey Seeks Conciliation.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Sept. 29—The
Turkish government today aent a con
cilatory reply to the Italian ultimatum
demanding that no resistance be
UPON OHOMANEMPIRE
made to Italy's proposed occupation
of Tripoli and Cyrene.
The diplomats residing here believe
that the reply will be unavailing.
915,000 ROBBERY.
Hamilton, Ot„ Sept. 29—The
•, local offices of the Canadian ex- «f
«8» press company were robbed of
$15,000 in cash during last night.
SHOPME
N VOT
E
FO STRIK
E
THIRTY-FIVE THOUSAND EM
PLOYES WILL WALK OUT
FRIDAY MORNING.
Conference Between Presidents of
Five Unions Belonging to Federa
tion Was Held This Morning and
Final Action Wat Decided Upon.
Railway Officials Skeptical.
CHICAGO, Sept. 29.—Shopmen on
the Harriman lines and the Illinois
Central will, go- on a strike at 10
o'clock tomorrow morning, according
to the final statement by J. W. Kline,
president of the blacksmiths.
The strike order was issued and
the time set this morning after a
conference with five union presidents.
Two More Union Strikes.
Kansas City, Mo. Sept. 29—Follow
ing a conference here today between
Presidents J. A. Franklin and M. P.
Ryan of the boiler makers and car.
men's unions, respectively, the two
men sent out strike orders to the
members of their union this after
noon.
About fifteen thousand carmen and
five thousand boilermakers are effect
ed by this order.
Freight Handlers Walk Out.
NEW ORLEANS, La., Sept. 29.—
The strike of the Illinois Central
railway employes today spread to the
river front, where 100 members of
the New Orleans Freight Handlers
union went out. This organization
is local and has no connection with
the Brotherhood of Railway Freight
Handlers, whose members struck
here yesterday.
Railway Officials Skeptical.
CHICAGO, Sept. 29.—Although or
ders instructing 34,000 employes of
the mechanical departments of the
Harriman railroads, including the Il
linois Central, to strike at 10 o'clock
tomorrow morning, are ready for
transmission today to the various
division points, there will be no strike
according to officials of the railroads
concerned.
The belief of the railroad managers
that the men would not strike is
based oa the fact that thousands of
railway men are already idle as a re
sult of the retrenchment by the Har
riman railroads, and that the de
mands of the men do not call for in
crease3 of wages. The strike is
threatened because the railroads yes
terday for a third time flatly refused
to recognize the federation of shop
employes in the manner that they
now deal with the individual unions
comprised in the federation.
I RE
VISITS CHICAG
O
'By Associate* Praaa}
CHICAGO, Sept. 29—Five firemen
were injured and the lives of ten
guests of a hotel were imperiled by
a spectacular blaze which destroyed
the building occupied by an oil man
ufacturer in North Canal street to
day.
A spark from a passing locomotive
is believed to have caused the fire,
which resulted in a property damage
of $150,000.
WOMEN'S CLUBS TO MEET
CANTON, S. D., Sept. 29—The
State Federation of Women's Clubs
will hold its annual' meeting in Can
ton, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs.
day of next week, and club women
generally are displaying much inter
est* in the approaching gathering.
A Strict Grammarian.
"Ton think a great deal of your bus
band, don't you?" said the visiting
relative.
"Ton have the wrong preposition.'*
answered Mr. Meekton's wife, with the
cold tones of the superior woman. "I
think for him."—Washington Star.
The Spirit That Wins
Griggs—I admire Parker Immensely.
Ha has a hard time making both ends
meet, but he's game from the word go.
Brlggs—Game! Why, Parker looks
upon the struggle with the wolf as a
mere sporting event.—Boston Tran
script
Something Like It.
"What was the matter with the old
gentleman who was so fond of argu
ing about everything?"
"I don't know, but I believe the doc
tors said It was something like discus
sion on the brain."—Baltimore Amerl
BISBUJtCK DAILY TRIBU^?
TAF SPENDS
DA VISITIN
IOW
A CAPITAL
RECEPTION TO EXECUTIVE OF
NATION 13 NONPARTISAN IN
CHARACTER.
SPEAKS AT THE COLISEUM
ALL STATE OFFICIALS JOIN COM
MITTEE IN EXTENDING
WELCOME.
President Breakfasts at Grant Club,
Following Which He Is Taken on
Auto Trip and Visit to Iowa State
Capitol—All Space in Coliseum Is
Filled Early.
(By Associated Prats.)
DES MOINES. Iowa, Sept. 29—
President Taft received a welcome
from many thousands of citizens of
Des Moines this morning when he
began the second day of his tour
through Iowa.
Senator Cummins, the progressive
leader who waB conspicuously absent
from the. state reception committee,
was on hand bright and early and
greeted Taft at his train. During the
automobile parade,' Senator Cummins
rode in the same car with former
Senator LaFayette Young, from the
"stand pat" wing of the party. Des.
Moines wanted to make the presi
dent's reception non-partisan. Sena
tor Cummins automobile shared gen
erously in applause from the street
Chrongs as the presidential parade
moved by. Taft's principal address
was devoted to peace treaties. The
crowd broke into applause when he
announced his subject and he was
frequently interrupted. The audienc*
had first shown its friendliness by
vigorous aplause for Governor Carroll
when he introduced Taft as "the
president whose adminjstraiton we
appreciate, whose comprehension of
public questions is as broad as the
needs of the land, and whose courage
to do right is measured only by the
limit of human ability." Senator
Cummins frequently joined in the ap.
plause which marked the president's
apeal for support of arbitration treat
ies.
Taft thanked Governor Caroll and
the people of Iowa, for their cordial
reception to him. On the way out of
the «ol|sfium whtere the president
spoke Taft and Senator Cummins had
a sort of informal joint rebate on the
subject of pending treaties. Senator
Cummins pointed out a number of
provisions which he thought should
be altered. 0|e of these was to
make more definite provisions as to
the personel of the proposed high
joint commission and to provide for
the confirmation of the American re
presentative by the senate.
DES MOINES, la., Sept. 29—Des
Moines' reception to President Taft
today was nonpartisan in character.
The Greater Des Moines committee,
which was the host of the chief ex
ecutive and his party at the Grant
club breakfast, also had charge of
the arrangements at the Coliseum,
where the public meeting was held
Senator Albert B. Cummins, who did
not put in an appearance yesterday,
was on hand at the station here to
meat Taft today, as was former
United States Senator Young, Gov
ernor Carroll, his staff, who had es
corted the presidential party from
Council Bluffs. Immediately upon
the arrival of the train here they
joined the committee In according the
distinguished visitor a cordial wel
come.
Following breakfast at the Grant
club, the entertainment provided for*
the visitors consisted of an automo
bile ride and a visit to the Iowa state
capitol building. The doors of the
Coliseum, where the president was
scheduled to deliver the most impor
tant speech of the day, were opened
early, and long before the executive
arrived all available space bad been
filled.
THE BRITISH CABINET.
Hew Its Secret Documents Are Pre*
tected and Printed.
Each member of the cabinet is sup
plied with a key which fits the lock of
a certain dispatch box retained by the
prime minister. At any particular
crisis, when important papers reach
Downing street, the premier, after
perusing them, places them in the dis
patch box and bands the box to a spe
cial messenger, who takes it round to
each member of the cabinet in succes
sion. Each member opens, it with his
key and" relocks It after he has read
the documents it contains. In this
way the papers are prevented from
falling Into the hands of strangers or
members of parliament who are not in
the cabinet.
Now and again it is found necessary
to print copies of a "secret" which
comes up for discussion at a meeting
of the cabinet The document is cut
up into many small pieces and dis
tributed among a goodly number of
compositors in the government print
ing works, each of whom sets up bis
little piece, and the little piece may
represent only a dozen lines of type.
When all the fragments are In type a
highly trusted official collects both the
copy and the type and puts the latter
together. The printing of the docu
ment is then done in secret under the
eyes of this official, and the men who
work the printing machine are for
bidden to handle ady of the paper after
It is printed upon.—National Magazine
Itwill a
NAMES AND FACES.
Douglas Marked the Man He Wanted
to Knew Again.
"Stephen A. Douglas had the most
remarkable memory for faces of any
man in public life," declares a corre
spondent. "Upon the occasion of a I
visit to Washington on election day in
1880 the late Colonel John W. Forney
was discussing the election of Garfield
over Hancock with Colonel Harmon of
Detroit. Colonel Harmon had been
mayor of Detroit and prominent in na
tional politics. Harmon and Forney
got to talking about earlier politics,
and Harmon related the story of a
meeting with Douglas in New York.
Douglas had been nominated in Balti
more by one faction of the Democratic
party. Breckinridge was chosen by
the other faction In Charleston. When
he heard of his nomination Douglas
was in New York. He entered the
Astor ITouse, then the headquarters
for all politicians and the principal
hotel in New York, and Immediately
was surrounded by his political admir
ers. Among them was Colonel Har
mon. The latter, according to the
story he told me, put forth his hand
and congratulated Douglas on his nom
ination.
'Thank you, Colonel Harmon,' re
plied Douglas.
"Harmon was amazed that Douglas
should have remembered his name, for
he had met the 'little giant' but once,
fifteen years before, and then for bus
a brief period. After a time he return
ed and asked Douglas how he was
able to call him by name.
'My dear colonel,' said Douglas,
'whenever I meet a man I want to
know again I put a mark on him and
I never forget.' "—Washington Post.
Respected His Wishes.
Friend—Why do you get married so
soon after the death of your husband?
Widow—My dear, if there was any one
thing that my poor dead and gone bus
band Insisted upon, in season and out.
it was that I should never pat off till
tomorrow what I could do today.
Cordova's S»on« Pavements.
The oldesi pnv**nent of which there
is any record in modern cities Is that
of Cordova, in Spain, which was paved
with stones by the Moors in the middle
of the ninth century. The Moors also
caused water to be conveyed to the
city in leaden pipes.
A Sticking Business.
"Well, Mrs. Smith, and bow's your
husband?"
"Oh. he's doing well, thank you.
mum. He's got a job nt the glue fac
tory now."
"Ah. well. I hope he'll stick there!"
—London Mail.
THE NEW GROCER
Is winning: new customers right
along. Why?
Prices are right
Everything new and fresh
Quick delivery Prompt service
And you save money
Read on
Cranberries, 2 qt. for 25c
Elberta Peaches the best
on the market, ripe and
fine, per crate...... .$1.05
Supreme Pears a 20c sel
ler, in No. 3 can, here 17c
Compass Apples, 2, No/3
can for only .25c
Red Raspberries, Satur
day, a 20c can, only 17c
Van Camp's Pork and
Beans— everybody knows
and likes them, can. 14c
OTHER BARGAINS
All thru the store. Come
and see.
Bismarck Dept. Store
210 Main St. Phone 64
AM $25,000
Worth of Merchandise
OF ALL KINDS IN MY STORE. THIS STOCK
IS TO BE CLOSED OUT AT ONCE
BARGAINS GALORE
Go
See
Don't
Forget
We Sell
Shoes
mm
*s.-™-jaii=
Both Ladies' Men's and Children's. Lat=
est 1911 styles, all sizes—-the kind that
satisfies.
Better Shoes at Less Prices
I Then don't pay more and have poorer
quality possibly.
W Expert Shoe Repairing
CARL JUHNKE'S SHOE STORE
Fifth Street
mm&zmmmm
PROBABLY THE LAST GOOD PRICE ON
CONCOR GRAPES
This Season
We have one hundred baskets of finest Michi
gan Concords left. We got them on a con
tract at the bottom price for grapes this sea
son. And tomorrow we will sell out at
Per basket LD*'
SweetPotatoes
per pound 6c
Cranberries
2 quts. for 25c
Bananas
per dozen I5c
Apples
per box $1.90
per pound 5c
Opaa Evanlitf» Until 8:30 Last Dallvary at S P. M.
McCONKEY & SON
"Where Your Dollar Goes the Farthest"
PHONE 209 120 6th Street
LOGAN'S GROCERIES
For Saturday's Sales
Mrs. Stewart's Bluing, per bottle,
Soapade, 4 packages for
Pyles Pearline, 4 packages for
Amonia, per bottle,
Cow Brand Soda
Four packages, Saturday, for
Minneopa Cleaned Currants, lb
Minneopa Seeded Raisins, lb
And Store Filled with other Attractive Bargains
LOGAN & SON,
120 Third St. Phone 211
Y^ft'r'^V'-
Tiv«
10c
15c
15c
08c
25c
lie
lie

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