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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, October 21, 1911, Image 1

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I THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER.
THIRTY-FIRST YEAR
PROGRAM TODAY
POINTOFSEASON
DEFEATED FOOTBALL TEAMS
TODAY WILL LOSE HOPES
FOR TITLE.
MINNESOTA PLAYS NEBRASKA
GREAT INTEREST CENTERS IN
GAMES THROUGHOUT THE
MIDDLE WEST.
Chicago Meet* Illinois, and North-
western Is Scheduled to Meet the
Hoosiers—Many Hard Fought Con
tests Expected—Hard Games for
Eastern Teams Also.
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO Oct. 21.—The gridiron
program today in the "Big Eight" con
ference may be tae turning point of
the season and teams which meet
defeat will have to wait another year
before making claims to the confer
en title. ...
The principal games in the middle
west today are:
Chicago vs. Illinois at Marshall
Field.
Minnesota vs. Nebraska at Min
neapolis.
Wisconsin vs. Colorado at Madison.
Michigan vs. Ohio State at Ann
Arbor.
Northwestern vs. Indiana at Evans
ton. $
Marquette vs. Wabash at Milwau
kee
Iowa vs. Cornell college at Iowa
City. 1*
Case vs. Kenyon at Cleveland.
Middies Play Princeton.
ANNAPOLIS, Md., Oct. 21.—Rain
which fell all night and continued
this afternoon has put the new ath
letic field at the naval academy into
a soft and muddy condition for to
day's football game between the mid
shipment and Princeton Sevens.
WEST POINT, Oct. II.—A. north
east rain storm this morning turned
the football field into a quagmire. The
storm had no terrors fo'r the follow
er* of the game w»»« came from all di
rections to see the cadets meet Yale
in what was generally regarded as the
first big pigskin struggle of thj sea
son.
NO SESSIONS OF
COURT TO-DAY IN
hlAMARA CASE
LOS ANGELS, Oct. 21—An agree
ment of the opposing counsel to pro
need in examining telesmen without
a full jury box enabled Judge Wal
ter Bordwell, in the McNamara mud
tier case, to excuse all the veniremen
not already in the box until the open
ing of the court Monday morning,
and only six talesmen, left at the con
clusion of court yesterday, were un
der restraint today.
There was no session of the court
today.
WILL MARK THE
BOUNDARY LINE
PEMBINA, Oct. 21.—A party of gov
ernment surveyors with three car
loads of equipments unloaded from
the Northern Pacific Tuesday morn
ing and hauled their outfits to the
'Sheep Ranch" farm, up the Tongue
river, where Mr. Newton has con
tracted to take charge of them for
the winter.
^The outfit unloaded consisted of 32
norse3, wagons, saddles and complete
camping outfit to accommodate a
corps of 30 men. They started at Pop
lar Mont., in April, and quit work at
Portal, where they shipped from. At
Portal' a party of Canadian surveyor^
have been running the line east and
will go into winter quarters at Emer
son after completing the survey to
here, which will be in the next ten
days.
A Pioneer Express representative
was told that it is the intention of the
two governments to erect iron posts
and earthen mounds marking the
boundary from Lake of the Woods to
the Pacific ocean, and to make topo
graphical survey of the land a mile on
each side of the line. The iron posts
which are familiar to people here,
were erected in 1874-75 and extended
west to the vicinity of the Turtle
mountain.
Mr. Jesse Hill is in charge of this
outfit which winters here, and the
men are all young fellows, principal
ly from Washington D. C, who are
returning home for the winter. In the
spring they will start in where the
boundary line intersects with the Red
river and run east to the Lake of the
»Woods.
HUNDREDS ARE KILLED
1 A
A
A PALERMO, Sicily, Oct. 21—
An explosion has occurred in a
mine at Trabonella. It is report
ed that one hundred persons
were killed or injured.
LIBRARYBOARD
SUCCESSFUL GATHERING HELD
AT JAMESTOWN FRIDAY
AND SATURDAY.
Program for the Two Days Meeting
Was Interchanged—Delegates Are
Banqueted at Hotel Gladstone This
Noon—Address by Bessie Baldwin
of Williston This Afternoon.
(Special to the Tribune)
JAMESTOWN, N. D., Oct. 21.—The
annual meeting of the North Dakota
library board convened in this city
yesterday, the president's address by
Librarian Batt of the tSate Agricul
tural college being the leading fea
ture of the opening session. The two
days* program as originally announced
was interchanged, today's program
being given yesterday and the pro
gram of yesterday being carried out
today. There are a number of dele
gates present from all parts of the
state. A series of round table discus
sions wa3 the feature of this morn
ing's meeting. At noon the delegates
were banqueted at the Gladstone ho
tel by the Jamestown Library asso
ciation, and this afternoon the dele
gates listened to an address bty Miss
Bessie Baldwin of the library at Wil
liston on the topic, "Creating a Li
brary Atmosphere." Th meeting this
year haa proven to be a very success
ful one.
BIG FLAX YIELD
PROMINENT A6RlCUi.TUR«T8
REAP 30,000 BUSHEL8 OF
FLAX.
Haul Grain Overland Forty Miles to
Market It—Brqke Up 2,500 Acres of
Land North of Taylor Last Spring.
Threshing Operations Not Yet Com
pleted.
DICKKINSON, N. D., Oct. 21—The
growing of 30.000 bushels of grain on
2,500 acres of land which has here
tofore been productive of nothing bet
ter than prairie grass is the achieve
ment of/ C. W. Colgrove of Minneap
olis and J. B. Dickson of Mt. Vernon,
S. D., and the land on which this has
been accomplished is located in Dunn
county, 40 -miles from the nearest
railroad.
The problem which now confronts
them is that of marketing the big
crop, and it being solved through the
use of tractor engines, hauling seven
big grain tanks each trip, with a to
tal capacity of 700 bushels. It will re
quire over 40 different trips with the
same sized loads to market the entire
product of this big new farm, wi:»
Taylor, this county, as the point of
ma'Keting. The value of the crop ai.
tl.e prevailing price is over $60,000.
Threshing operations on the big
farms—there are two of them—are not
yei completed. About 800 bushels of
flax is being threshed out each day
and with the operations in progress
for a period of about two weeks al
ready, there remains over three weeks
more work to be done.
It was on April 17 of this year that
the two men commenced breaking up
the big tracts of land. Mr. Colgrove
had 1,065 acres and Mr. Dickson had
1,400 a?res. They are working to
gether in the threshing of the crop
and in the marketing of the same.
C. W. Colgrove is a son of A. L.
Colgrove of Minneapolis, and is a
sraduae of he University of Minne
sota. He will plant 3,000 acres of
flax next year.
CITY MUST PAY
S5.3I9JAMA0ES
DICKEY, N. D., Oct. 21—The $5,000
damage suit of' Mrs. Charlotte Carpen
ter against the village of Dick-ey for
alleged injuries sustained by getting
a leg tangled up in a defective side
walk in this village over a year ago,
was tried in the district court at La
Moure the first of the week. M. C.
Lasell and John Knauf appeared for
the plaintiff, and Jones and Hutchin
son for the village. After a great legal
battle in which every inch of the
ground was fought over, the case
went to the jury Tuesday evening.
Wednesday they brought in a verdict
for $5,319 for Mrs. Carpenter, tie
sides the $5,000 asked in the suit she
was allowed the $319 for doctor's
bills and other expenses. A motion
for a new trial will be made at once
and if this is denied the case will no
doubt be carried to the supreme court.
MOUSE RIVER
LOOP RESIDENTS
FORM A HAGUE
MEETING AT MINOT HELD SATUR
DAY TO PERFECT THE
ORGANIZATION
ARRANGE FOR BIG EXHIBIT
DEVINE HEADS MOUSE RIVER
LOOP DEVELOPMENT
ASSOCIATION
Counties of Ward, Burke, Renville,
tineau, and McHenry, Send Repre
senatives to Attend Gathering—As
sociation Wants Prosperous Farmer
on Every Quarter Section.
(Special to the Tribune)
MINOT, N. D., Oct. 21—The Organi
zation of the Mouse River Loop De
velopment Association comprising
Ward, Burke, Renville, Bottineau and
McHenry counties, wer perfected to
day.
Former governor J. M. Devine, of
Minot, is president, and F. R. Bickell,
of Towner is secretary. An executive
committee of three from each of the
counties will be named later and each
county will contribuate $500 to ar
range a display for the land show to
be held in Chicago in November. The
purpose of the association is to place
a prosperous farmer on every quar
ter section in northwestern North Da
kota.
PIONEER SLOPE
fOMANIS DEAP
DICKINSON, N. D., Oct. 21—Mrs.
Don Stephenson, Sr., one of the pio
neers of the slope country, is dead.
Mrs. Stephenson had been ill at the
home of her daughter, Mrs. Townsend
of this city for some time.
Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson came to,
this part of the country in the vary
early seventies, among the earliest!
settlors in this region. For many
years Mr. Stephenson was a freighter,
scout and Indian fighter. Later -he
became a rancher on the Cannonball,
where they lived until Mr. St-aphen
son's death, about three years ago.
Since that time Mrs. Stephenson has
been residing with her children.
(By Associated Press.)
P«ilt
BISMARCK. NORTH DAKOTA, SATURDAY OCTOBER 21, 1911.
A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A
A A
"HOME RUN" BAKER IS
CHAMPIONSHIP HERO
...,-...
A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A
"HOME «tHT 6*KER
(By Associated Press.)
NEW YORK, Oct. 81—Frank Baker,'
who will be known for some time as
•'Home Run" Baker, is easily the hero
of the world's championsnip series
to date. He won the second game in
Philadelphia. He knocked the ball
over the fence when a man was on
s-acond and thus won the game. In
the third contest the score was one
to nothing in favor ot the Giants at
the beginning of .the ninth inning.
One man was out when Baker went
to bat and sent the ball into the cen
ter field grandstand. He trotted
around the bases with the run that
tied the score while the crowd went
wild. The game went into axtra in
nings and the Athletics finally won.
GROSSCUP RESIGNS
CHICAGO, Oct. 21—Judge Pet
er S. Grosscup, of the United
States supreme court today for
warded his resignation to Presi
dent Taft. He askorl that it be
come effective next month.
Refugees from Tripoli Met Privations After Ibey Had Fled to Other
Cities and Were Cared for at Public Expense
SYRACUSE, Sicily. Oct. 21.—When
Italy prepared to bombard Tripoli
the residents of that city hurried away}
in every possible direction. Hundreds,
went to Malta, while other hundreds
came to this city. There were so
many of them that it was impossible
to provide shelter for them. Thiey
were allowed 2 francs (40 cents) daily
to buy food until they could be sent
back to Tripoli. These payments
were made at the police station. The
picture shows a group of refugees just
after they had received their allow
ances. These refugees were of all
nationalities—German, Italian, Turk
ih, etc. No distinction was made and
all received the same amount. An
other picture shows the Italian de-|
stroyer Corasziere, which took part {many Italian soldiers were sent here data them, and many slept in churches
in the operations at /Prevesa. So that the barracks could not accommo-jand doorways.
JTURKISrt Rf FUOCCS PROM TR1POU !«_ SYR*
MWitAH »»g»c »»T'»*
ODENSE, N. D., Oct. 21—One of
the saddest and most horrible acci
dents which has ever occurred in this
country resulted in the death of Jac
ob Renner on his farm six Imiles
southwest of Odense Tuesday after
noon.
Imeediately after dinner Mr. Ren
ner drove to the field for a load of
flax which he was just harvesting.
After loading the hayrack to capacity
he started to drive to the place, near
the house, where he was stacking
the grain, a plowed field intervened,
over which it was necessary to drive.
When within 200 feet of the house,
at aboutl:30, the reach broke under
the stra'in of the load, and the jarring
caused by the roughness of the road.
Not daring to attempt to proceed with
the load the driver stopped and crawl
ed beneath the wagon to chain up the
reach for temporary use.
Mr. Renner found it necessary for
reaching over the circle or hound, and
evidently to see better, put his head
over the circle, between it and the
wagon box, while in this position the
reach gave v\y entirely %nd allowed
the whole weight of the front of the
load to come down upon the impris
oned man. Having his arm over the
circle near his head, left a part of the
weight resting upon it, so that the
full force was not upon the head, he
realized his peril and called to his
son, who was in the yard not many
feet away, saying that if his wife did
not come immediately he would die
right there. The boy summoned his
mother who says she reached the
scene in less than two minutes. But
the man had moved ab6ut and freed
his arm, withdrawing it from beneath
the circle and the wagon box, so that
the entire weight came upon the top
of his head, pressing it against the
circle and strangling him.
CHINESE EMPIRE FACES CRISIS IN
SPREADING OVER ENTIRE COUNTRY
FOURTH GAME il
FOURTH TIME
(By Associated Press.)
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., Oct. 21
—The fourth game between the
Philadelphia Athletics and New
York Giants for the baseball
championship of the world, which
was scheduled to be played here
last Wednesday, was postponed
today for the fourth time, and
under the rules will be played on
Monday, or the first clear day.
Rain fell heavier today than at
any time since the present weath-*
er last Tuesday night.
Monday Game Doubtful.
Connie Mack was not at the ball
grounds when the umpires made their
decision, but when he arrived and
took a look at the wretched condition
of the field he said it appeared to
him that it was doubtful if a game
would be played Monday unless the
rain soon ceased.
STREET CARS
(By Associated Press.)
CLEVELAND, O., Oct. 21.—Two
Cleveland, Southwestern and Colum
bus interurban cars came together in
a headon collision at Kamm's Corner,
just outside the city, at 8 o'clock to
day. Ten people are reported in
jured, several of them fatally.
STATE TREASURY IS
SOMEWHAT OEPLETEO|of
AUDITOR INSTRUCTED NOT TO
DRAW ANY MORE DRAFTS
AT PRESENT
October Salaries of State Employes
Will Be Met, However—Apportion
ment of School Funds Will Be Made
Soon.
The state treasurer has notified
the auditor to draw no more warrants
against the general fund as it has
been exhausted. It is not known just
what will be done to meet the October
salary list but some provision will
probably be made for it. About sixty
thousand d/bllaiv •vent out of the
state treasury yesterday and today.
The apportionment of school funds
will be made to the counties about
November 1, the total amount is
$108,000.
PONS WANTS MATCH
WITH ROY GRATIAS
THE LOCAL HEAVYWEIGHT HAS
THROWN A NUMBER OF
GOOD MEN
Arrangements for Matches May Be
Made by Addressing Him in Care
of the Tribune Sporting Editor.
Carl Pons, the Wilton wrestler who
has been stopping in the capital city
for the past few days is anxious to
secure a match with wrae of the best
wrestlers in the state. He has been
in this country for some time and has
achieved an enviable reputation as a
mat artist. He is particularly desir
ous of securing a bout with Roy Grat
ias of Fargo. He is willing also to
arrange for handicap matches. He
recently threw Martin, the well
known wrestler in two successive
falls, the first in seven minutes and
the second in one minute and two
seconds. Arrangements for a match
may be secured by communicating!
with him. addressing the letters in
care of the sporting editor of the
Tribune.
English King Alfred in the ninth
century measured the day by candles
—three inches burning each hour and
six candles being consumed in 24
hours.
Last Edition
FIVE CENTS
LEARN OF ATTACK
CLOSETO PEKIN
SIMILAR NOTIFICATION WAS RE
CEIVED PRIOR TO OUTBREAK
AT WU CHANG.
WARNING ARE BELIEVED
GENERAL FEELNG OF UNEASI-
NESS PERVADES ENTIRE
COUNTRYSIDE.
Imperialist Forces Suffered More Se
rious Reverses Than Was at First
Expected—Yemen of Viceroy at
Tsinan Reported to Have Been
Burned.
(By Associated Press.)
PEKIN, China, Oct. 21.—There was
little in the news of the revolution
ary movement received today to reas
sure the government or relieve the
general feling of uneasiness. Mis
sionaries in this province have been
warned by students that there will be
revolutionary outbreak near Pekin
tomorrow.
Considerable creduience is attached
to the warning, as similar advance in
formation reached the missionaries at
Wu Chang prior to the rising there.
Evidently trouble is brewing in Tien
Tsin and a telegram /rom there con
tains the ominous statement that the
yemen of the viceroy at Tsinan, the
capital- of Shan Tung province, has
been burned.
PEKIN, Oct. 21.—There is no doubt
that more serious news than that of
the defeat of the government troop*
by the revolutionists at Hankow.
Wednesday, has been received at
Pekin but not published. There ara
rumors that Admiral Sah Chin Ping's
flagship was sunk or captured. It is
reported that the rebels are now
holding Hwang Chow at the narrow
est point of Yang Tse Kiang river,
and that they are al30 in possession
Ichang and the railway near
Kwangshui. The result of Wednes
day's fighting has caused a general
feeling at foreign legations that the
situation is now critical.
MILLERS FIGHT
FOR REDUCTION
IN FLOUR RATES
(By Associated Press.)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 21—An altern
ative writ of mandamus was issued
today by the commerce court against
the Lehigh Valley, to show cause by
October 25, why the rate of 9.2 cents
should not be exacted on Hour and
grain products from Buffalo to New
York.
Minneapolis' mill(l's are fighting for
a reduction of the present "23 cents
rate from Minneapolis to New York.
LEG IS BROKEN
ELLENDALE, N. D., Oct. 21.—Aaron
Edgely \vas the victim of a very seri
ous accident. As a result of a run
away he sustained a compound frac
ture of the right leg and ankle which
will probably cripple him for life.
MINNEWAUKAN OFFICE
OENTEREDjraGMEN
MINNEWAUKAN, Oct. 21.—The
postoffice here was entered and the
safe blown open, the yegg men se
curing som thing like $85 in cash and
a lot of five and ten-cent stamps. A
suspected person had been observed
on the streets, and his description
has been phoned to all nearby sta
tions. Several parties at this place
claim they saw the person answering
the description given, banging about
on our streets the latter part of laat
week.

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