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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, November 10, 1911, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1911-11-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE WEATHER
FAIR CONTINUED COLD.
GERMAN PAPERS
CONDEMN ACT OF
Open Demonstration of Ap
proval of Chancellor's
Policy Unpopular
Leading Papers of German
Empire Unite in Deplor
ing Incident
(By Associated Press.)
BERLIN, Nov. 10.—The attitude
of Crown Prince Frederick William
during the debate yesterday in the
reichstag, when he openly demon
strated his pleasure over and approved
of the criticisms of Chancellor Von
Bethemann-Hollweg's policy in the
Moroccan affair with Prance, is sharp
ly condemned today, not only by
friends, but by opponents of the chan
cellor.
The Berliner Tageblatt, the Voasis
chee Zeitung, the Vorwaerts, the Co
logn Gazette, and the Frankfurter See
Zeitung* join in the describing the in
cident as a frivolous and dangerous
•exhibition.
M'VEY TELISOF
diversity President Ad
dresses inference
at Mirth
Some Day North Dokota will
Become a Ureat Manu
facturing State
(By Associated Press.)
DULUTH, Minn., Nov. 10.—"The
possibilities of North Dakota, and the
extent of her coal fields are not ap
preciated," said F. L. McVey, presi
dent of the Uni ersity of North Da
kota, attending the Charities and Cor
rection conference here
"We have more than 35,000 acres of
lignite coal iu our state, with approx
imately 500,000.000,000 tons, or enough
to keep manufactories of the world
going for another hundred years.
"At present there are two state ex
periment stations, and the United
States has a station, all dealing with,
lignite question This means that
some day North Dakota is going to be
a manufacturing state. We have al
ready $20,000,000 invested in manu
factories. And while the wheat crop
was below normal this year, the out
put of flax more than made up for it."
I A O ol IS
COVEREDJYLAKE
SPOKANE, Wash., Nov. 10—Roose
velt, the principal town in the Thun
der Mountain district in central Idaho
in 1902, today is covered by a lake
600 yards in length and 200 yards in
width, and of an average depth of
25 feet. It was the scene of a gold
strike nine years ago and thousands
braved the hardships and hazards of
the trail. It proved a disappointment,
though much pay ore was developed
near by.
The circumstance which wiped the
town of Roosevelt from the map was
peculiar It resulted from a landslide
two years ago, starting near tine source
of Mule creek, a mile and a half from
the settlement. The great avalanche
of earth and stone plowed its way
through a virgin forest with a roar
that was heard for miles. Twenty-six
hours after the break occurred the
mass stopped abruptly across the low
er part of the town, forming a dam
for Monument creek, which has now
formed a lake where the townsite
stood.
There were few residents in the
town at the time of the slide and all
escaped with their possessions, owing
to the slowness of the avalanche.
OFNORTH DAKOTA E ABANDONS
JUDGE W. H. LANNING, ONE
OF THE THREE JUDQE8
WHO WILL HEAR 8TEEL
CA«E.,.A
TRENTON. N. J., Nov. 10—Judge
Wm. Lanning, who, with Judges Gray
and Buffington, will hear the govern
ment's suit to dissolve the United
States steel corporation, is a resident
of this city. He was born in Mercer
county, January 1, 1849. He has been
judge of the United States third' cir
cuit court since May 21, 1909. He Is
a republican and has long been prom
inent in New Jersey affairs.
ERNEST STEWART
(Special to the Tribune)
PEMBINA, N. D., Nov. 10—Ernest
A. Stewart, former United States im
migration officer at Neche, charged
with murdering Phillip Worrell, was
dismissed from custody this morning
on a statement filed by the prosecut
ing officials, in which they admit that
the evidence against the defendant is
entirely circumstantial, and so far
from positive that they could not hope
for conviction. Stewart was jailed
last July and has been in the Pembina
jail ever since. His trial had com
menced yesterday afternoon and only
the second witness was on the stand
when the prosecution decided to
abandon the case.
TURKSANDARABS
ATTACK ITALIANS
(By Associated Press.)
TRIPOLI. Nov. 10—Turkish artil
lery and Arab horsem-en made several
attacks upon the tlalian lines yester
day. The Italians fought their way to
the treaches of the enemy, who tem
porarily retired, but again attacked as
the Italians were returning to their
base. At night the Turks withdrew.
The Italians sustained some casual
ties and the Arabs and Turks many.
TWO PRISONERS HELD
TO DISTRICT COURT
SID HARRIS OF WING BOUND OV
ER ON CHARGE OF ASSAULT
AND BATTERY
Lester Varnum of Menoken to be Sent
to Reform School for Criminally
Assaulting Little Girls.
Two (prisoners held to District Court
was the record in Judge Casselman's
court today, Sideny Harris of Wing,
who is charged with striking Frank
Knowles with an iron bolt. The pre
liminary hearing was concluded at
3 o'clock this afternoon and the pris
oner was bound over in $1,000 bail,
which he gave. Harris and Knwles
had a difficulty over 30me cattle and
came to blows.
The other case was that of Lester
Varnun, a youth of fourteen years,
residing with his parents at Menoken,
He is charged with a criminal assault
on two little girls and did not deny
his guilt Judge Casselman sent him
to district court and he will most
likely be sent to the reform school.
THIRTY-REST YEAR BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY NOVEMBER 10, 1911.
ATTEMPTS MADE
THE NATIVE CtTY
Night is 9oe of Terror and
Anxiety and Inhabitants
are Fearful
Shipping is at Mercy of the
Pirates who Act in High
Handed Manner
(By Associated Press.)
(By Associated Press.)
NANKING, China, Nov. 10—Historic
Nanking this evening is the shambles
of Manehu butchers. The sun set up
on a scene of fire, rapine, devolution
and butchery ^unrecorded in modern
history. Tonight 12,000 Manchus and
imperial old style soldiers hold Purple
Hill, where they are entrenched, while
from behind their stronghold they are
driving out of the city hordes of
Chinese with shrapnel and solid shot.
AMOY, China, Nov. 10.—This city
is without a ruler today. Taotai
Chang has laid down the reins of gov
ernment and non-3 of his subordinates
appear willing to take them up.
Chang today refused to receive of
ficial dispatches, declaring that he
was no longer in charge. Tun Gan,
the chief magistrate of the district,
haB abandoned his court and fled
from the city. The night was one of
anxiety. All street gates were closed
and the citizens remained within
doors.. There were repeat-ad attempts
to fire the city but all were frustrated.
Shipping is at the mercy of pirates,
who are carrying affairs with a high
hand. Junks are afraid to v-enture far
from their anchorages. The American
cruiser Albany returned to Shanghai
last night. The British submarine
supply ship. Rossario, anchored in
the harbor this morning. At Foo
Chow, which yesterday was occupied
by the revolutionists, the fighting
continued with heavy losses on both
sides. Last night a number of Man
chus, fleeing from Foo Chow, tried
to burn one of the suburbs. They
were caught by a detachment of reb
els and summarily executed. Be
tween last night and an early hour to
day a few Foo Chow revolutionists
captured and put to death 40 incendi
arie...
Canton
Proclaims*r~.,
«r*™?cIndependence.
xrssx
(Continued on page 8.)
Only five men are in the group who
were here at the beginning of the con
ference 25 years ago. They are Mr.
CITY WITHOUT
Q-
+*&'#
FIRM HAS,FAILED.
NEW YORK, Mov. 10—An
nouncement was made on the
stock exchange thfe morning of
the failure of theytlrm of A. L.
Stevens and compStty. The pres
ent firm was founded April, 1910.
NeitherMinnesotaorWiscon
sin Have fiate Scheduled
that jay
Greatest Interest is Shown
with Northwestern
(By Associated Press.)
CHICAGO, Nov. 1C—Minnesota and
Wisconsin universitlw' football teams,
the only conference/teams that have
not met defeat this season, ar-e not
scheduled to play tomorrow, and the
few contests that will be held in the
west are chiefly of local importance.
Chtef among the games is the one at
Evanston between Northwestern and
Chicago. Chicago is the favorite.
MAKE HEADWAY IN
SELECTING JDRY
(By Associated Press.)
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 10.—Ten ven
iremen, with three others temporarily
excused, remain-ad from the forty men
summoned in the fifth venire in the
McNamara murder trial today, when
Judge Bordwell finished his prelimin
ary examination.
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 10.—Erstwhile
redictions that the jury to try James
B. McNamara would not be selected
for at leost six weeks or more seemed
extravagant today. The surprising
progress during the last two days in
examining talesmen has given rise to
a belief that the panel might be ob-
urwsn v-sYNrn IA r»K„_„ tained in quicker time. Three jurors
been swornv
passed for cause, and a new venire of
40 was on hand today.
Jf THE NORTH DAKOTA METHODIST CONfERNCE
RECENTLY IN SESSION INGRAND FORKS IN THEIR TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY.
Wm. H. White of Fargo, the pioneer
Methodist of the state and the chair
man of the conference board of trus
tees Dr. H. P. Cooper, Dr. S. A. Dan-
NEW YORK, Nov. 10—Miss Edith
Pulitzer, the only daughter of Joseph
Pulitzer, who was in Europe when her
father died, has sailed for New York.
She is a tall, slender girl, about 21
NEBRASKA GOES
(By Associated Press.)
OMAHA. Neb., Nov. 10.—Practical
ly complete returns from last Tues
day's election in Nebraska confirm
the first estimate sent that the entire
Republican state ticket was elected. For
supreme court justice. Hamer, Repub
lican, who ran behind his ticket, leads
Dean, the high man on the Democrats
ticket, by about 2,500 votes.
Miss Edith Pulitzer, Daughter of Dead Editor
Returning to America
IS
AT STANDSTILL
(Special to the Tribune)
MINOT. N. D., Nov. 10.—Threshing
in northwestern North Dakota, where
thousands of acres of flax and wheat
lie in the field unthreshed, is at a
standstill as a result of a h-aavy fall
of snow and zero weather. The gov
ernment thermometer this morning
registered 9 below zero, the coldest
for this time of the year in the his
tory of the state. It is estimated
that two-thirds of the flax is still un
threshed.
ford, Rev. Wm. R. Morrison and Rev.
C. A. Macnamara. The conference
now is one of the strongest in the
northwest.
years old and resembles her father
in" many ways. The inheritance she
will get from her father's estate will
probably make her one of the richest
young heiresses in America.
CLEAN STABLES
ARE NECESSARY
WASHINGTON, Nov. 10.—Farm
ers' bulletin 473, goon to be issued by
Secretary Wilson, contains an impor
tant and most comprehensive state
mant of facts on bovine tuberculosis.
The bulletin deals with the history,
nature, symptoms of the disease how
it spreads, how a herd is infected, the
tuberculin test, and its prevention and
suppression.
"Tuberculosis," the bulletin states,
"is a widespread disease affecting an
imals and also man. Human beings
and cattl-e are its chief victims, but
there is no kind of animal that will
not take it. Hogs and chickens are
quite often affected horses, sheep
and goats being affected but seldom,
however.
The disease is contagious. It spreads
from cow to cow in a herd until most
of them are affected. It is slow in
developing and may not become'no
ticeable for months or even years.
The tuberculin test, which can not do
harm to the healthy cow, reveals the
germ in a few hours, and always
proves successful when in the hands
of an experienced veterinarian."
"The disease is common among
hogs," the bulletin goes on. "The pub
lic abattoirs report that a serious per
centage of hogs inspected is found to
be tuberculous. The losses among
cattle and hogs are enormous, amount
ing to millions of dollars annually."
Turning to the infection of human
beings with the tuberculosis germ
through cattle, th? bulletin says:
"Milk is the staple food of infants and
young children and is usually taken
in the raw state. If this 'milk is taken
from a tuberculous cow it may contain
millions of living tubercle germs.
Young children fed on such milk often
cont'ract the dis-ease. and it is a fre
quent cause of death among* them.
"Meat from tuberculous cattle is not
so likely to convey the infection for
several reasons. It does not so fre
quently contain the germs, cooking de
stroys those that may be present, and,
lastly, meat is not consumed by very
young children.
As to th-e spread of the disease, the
bulletin says: "Sooner or later the tu
berculous cow begins to give off the
germs of the disease. The germs es
cape by th-a mouth and nose, the bow
els, in the milk, and in discharges
from the gentail orgains. When the
germ3 are being given of in any of
these ways the disease is known as
open tuberculosis.
The bulletin concludes with: "Dark,
dirty, crowded stables are favorable
to tuberculosis. Under these condi
tions the disease spreads rapidly and
is only kept out with difficulty.
"Clean, airy, veil lighted stables, on
the other hand, are unfavorable to
th-e development of the disease. If
brought into such a stable it does not
spread so rapidly and is not s» diffi
cult to get rid of as in the first case.
A well built, sanitary stable need
not be made of expensive material or
of elaborate design, but should have
plenty of light, air and drainage.
"Light is very important. Direct
sunlight i3 a great destroyer of germ
life. Tubercle bacilli soon die if ex
posed to sunlight. It is a disinfectant,
always ready to work without cost."
LAST EDITION
FIVE GENTS
PRESIDENTIAL
IN EACH STATE
Circular Letters Being Sent
Out by Chairman of
Progressives
Leading Officials of Each
State are Also Sent
(By Associated Press.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 10.—Walter
L. Houser, chairman of the progres
sive Republican campaign committee,
has appealed through a circular letter
to the chairman of every Republican
state committee in thp United States,
urging that steps be taken to insure a
Republican presidential primary in
each by law in the five states where
it is provided for by statute, and in
the other states by direction of the
campaign committees.
Mr. Houser calls attention to the in
dorsement of the presidential primary
plan given at the progressive Repub
lican conference recently held in Chi
cago and says: "It is obvious that no
nominee selected despite th-e wishes
of the rank and file of the Republican
party can inspire confidence or com
mand the united and -enthusiastic sup
port which will be necessary to Repub
licans in 1912."
Mr. Houser also says the friends of
Senator LaFollette are ready to sub
mit his name for nomination to the di
rect vote of the rank and file of the
party.
Besides mailing the letter to cam
paign committees, Mr. Houser sent to
it to the governor, lieutenant govern
or and speaker of th-e lower house In
each state.
WOULD SUPPRESS
NEWS OF FAMOUS
CASEIN KANSAS
(By Associated Press.)
LINCOLN CENTER, Kan.. Nov. 10.
—Petitions were circulated here today
asking that the sending out of reports
of the "tar and feather" cage which
goes to trial here next Wednesday be
prohibited for the sake of the honor
of the community. The trial of 14
men charged with tarring Miss Mary
Chamberlain, a school teener at
Shady Bend, Kan., last summer, will
be held in the district court before
Judge Dallas Grover. The petitions
ar-e addressed to Judge Grover.
KVERMfAIN
CRITICAL SHAPE
(By Associated Press.)
CHICAGO, 111., Nov. lO.—Mrs. Louise
Vermilya, suspected of having poi
Isoned Arthur Bissonette and others
who lived at her home, is suffering
with valvular heart trouble whicn
may prove fatal befor-a she can be
brought to trial on the niurder charge,
according to Dr. B. J. Montgomery, the
physician at the county jail. Her con
dition is particularly dangerous, owing
to a quantity of arsenic she swllowed
Saturday, and the weakness which fol
lowed the efforts to remove the poi
son.
BROWN FOUND
NOT GUILTY
'Special to the Tribune)
MINOT, X. D., Nov. 10.—Charles
Brown, former chief of police of Stan
ley, X. D., charged with selling intox
icating liquors without a government
license, was found not guilty by the
United States district court this morn
ing, Judge Amidon presiding.
HILL TO FIX DATE
SIOUX FALLS, S. D., Nov. 10
—The exact date of the annual
meeting of the South Dakota con
servation congress to be held
4» here in January, has been left to
James J. Hill.

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