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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, November 23, 1911, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1911-11-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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Stitite LimitationsHi fpili
ciUeti
Goapers, HllcbeU art Mar
risoi Most Before
(By Associated PrsttJ
WASHINGTON, Not. 23.-^Samuei
4Gompers, John Mitchell and Frank
Morrison, labor leaders, again must
stand trial in the supreme court of
the District of Columbia, on charges
of contempt erising out of the Buck's
stove and range case. Justice Wright
today handed down a decision over
ruling the motion of the labor lead
ers for a dismissal of the proceedings
under statute limitations. The court
held contempt of court is not classed
as criminal and consequently is not
subject to the bar of the statute of
limitations.
The supreme court of the United
States recently dismissed the original
oases against Gompera, Mitchell and
Morrison, but gave the lower ccurt
the right to renew proceedings. At
this time the controversy between he
stove company and the America* Fed
.eration uf Labor had been settled
Notwithstanding this, Justice
Wright took the ground that the dig
nty of the district supreme court's or
ders had been .viol
cited the labor lead*
defend themselves.
id. again
ipear and
ir» Bbeat*,fright
far as the people of tM organisation
are concerned, Justice Wright is men
tally incompetent to*givea.fain-and
impartial trial to the contempt pro
ceedings •«w-?^-iiifcssss
Gompors of W?}MMmi&*
convention here, when the annou-oee
ment was made that Wright today
handed down a decision overruling
the motion of the labor leaders for a
dismissal of 'the contempt proceed
ings.
CLOAK MAKERS IN
BERUN ON STRIKE
(By Associated Press.)
BERLIN, Nov. 23—* general strike
of Berlin cloak and suit makers, and
workers in the children's clothing
trade occurred today, the strikers de
manding from ten to fifteen per cent
increase of wages. The strike effect*
50,000 female home workers and 3,000
tailor Intermediaries.
BALLOO PRAISES
P0ETRY_0F FOLEY
TELLS WHY IT APPEALS TO THE
GENERAL READING PEOPLE.
N». Other Post Has 8hown Skill
*Hs}ndle Everyday Occurrences
tJfe In so Trite a Manner.
To
of
"The saying that in St Paul's Lon
don, all yon need to do to find Sir
Christopher Wren's monument is to
look about you, has a plain parallel
in the ubiquity of the verses of our
chief verse maker," said William Bal
dou, of Fargo. 'If you want the words
of James W. Foley, any day, use your
eyes!
"Poetry is present. That is to say,
and with remarkable unanimity peo
ple are reading, printing, quoting each
fresh poem, Foley writes. His vogue
1s not alone a mark of personal emi
nence among the members of the
poet's guild, it marks as well a new
enlargement and popularisation of his
craft. The goodly fellowship of bards
should vote him to be their chief, for
he has enlarged appreciably their
market.
'His literary secret looks easy to
unwind. The joys of retrospect, 'the
days that were fairer than ever
again,' the intense and blissful pleas
ures of childhood, sun-filled days
passed in, the open, juvenile hero
worship, the safe folding of motherly
care, paths of truant romance, gro
cery store forums of village solons.
Earner Dow and Abner Sykes andI Hi
Griggs—it looks remarkably familiar.
"The fact remains, however, that
no other poet has shown the skill
to handle these trite matters so deftly
as to give them the semblance of pul
sing life that Foley does. ^Whitcomb
Riley came the nearest to him in this
kind of creation, but Foley's hand is
surer with him romance does not
lapse through the stage of fantasy
to the merely fantastic
"Whatever fate befalls the cause or
pure literature in North
D**t»one
thing the state cannot be robbed or,
vi- that in the year of grace,
i, still held within Rs borders, the
AmerfceK poet of the common life.
fZSZvcto^VKT tWa condition stUl
continue tree ttaough «a»y ye*" of
grmcw*
vtf
BIG POTATO CROP.
MADISON, Wis., Nov. 28.—The
value of the potato crop in Wia
cousin was approximately $10,.
000,000, according to James O.
•.Milward of the horticultural de
partment of the University of
Wisconsin.
Snare Aed Falser
IcftttiftoConfess
19 Crime
iy
lehtifB Fear Benton Bin
ford Hsf Create Scene
at
(By Associated Press.)
RICHMOND. Va., Nov. 23—The re
port that Beulah Blnford, the girl for
the love of whom Henry Clay Beattie,
Jr., is alleged to have killed his wife,
arrived here today, caused a sensa
tion. The police denied the story but
searched for the girl until word came
from New York that she was still
there and would not come to Rich
mond.
RICHMOND, Va., Nov. 23.—Henry
Clay Beattie, Jr., awoke at the usual
time thig morning, on what, by law,
was the last day of his life. Shortly
after daybreak tomorrow he will go
to the electric chair for the murder of
his wife There were no signs of a
breakdown today, the young man
dressing with the same fastidious care
he hag taken -since he entered the
prison, and the death cell
Neither Seattle's attorneys nor
relatives believe.He Will confess Rev.
John A. F^
viser, m^-W*-M&K&m&
,_ 4ay Fi* said: "If*&WtiW,TVg
that Wrigh today reasonably Certain he wttt aeknow*:
edge "all. To go to kds death with a
lie upon his lips would he a sacrilege,
and Beattie is at peace with his
maker." Beattie from the first, how
ever, has sought 'to spare his aged
father, and it is a question whether
the condemned man does not consider
that he owes it to his father, to whom
he has brought pain and disgrace, to
die with sealed lips
FOOTBALL. STAR
IS NEAR DEATH
(By Associated Press.)
KANSAS CITY, Nov. 23.—Thomas
Warwick Johnson, the famous quar
terbac of the Kansas university foot
ball team of 1908-10, is dying of tu
berculosis at the Kansas university
hospital at Rosedale suburb. He was
unconscious today.
SHOW GIRLS BEING
TRIED MURDER
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.—Lillian Gra
ham aid Ethel Conrad, the show
girls, who shot W. E. D. Stokes, a
millionaire sportsman, last June, were
brought to trial today on indictments
charging them with having attempt
ed to take.his life. Indications are
that considerable time will be spent
in selecting a jury.
NEW ENTERPRISE
FOR CAPITAL CITY
F. EDMUND YOUNG SHIPS TWO
TONS OF FLAX STRAW TO
CALIFORNIA.
If Linen Mills Find It Satisfactory a
Branch Linen Mill May Be Estab
lished in Bismarck.
F. E Young, always a promoter for
Bismarck and Burleigh county, and
an enterprising reaf estate agent,
shipped two tons of unthreshed flax
straw Wednesday to a large linen
manufacturing concern at Stockton,
Cal.
This concern has been experiment
ing with North Dakota flax straw for
some time and has.'been in corre
spondence with Mr. Younsyover- two
years with the view of being able to
secure North Dakota flax straw for
manufacturing purposes. Mr. Young
thinks the straw which he has just
shipped them will be just what they
want, and if the firm finds they can
use the product raised in this vi
cinity they later estab"sh a large
plant here. _,„
Should that be decided upon it will
_ean another big industry for this
locality and will furnish another good
market point for farmers here, as the
straw la worth 15 per ton and a ton
can be secured from each acre.
BIG RECEPTION
I he Given led Caps by
Pepe itPibllc Con
sistory Next Week
(By Associated Press.)
ROME, Nov. 23.—Cardinals-Desig
nate John M. Farley and Diomede Pal
conio arrived here this morning, both
in good health though fatigued by
their long journey. Each one of a
large crowd of ecclesiastics, assem
bled to greet them, knelt and kissed
the rings of the new cardihals-desiK
nate. Many travelers and other
joined In emphasising the reception
Cardinal Merry del Va) communicated
to the pope the arrival of the two
cardlnals-designater "A secret consis
tory will be held Monday next. A
public consistory, when the new car
dinals will receive red hats from the
pope, following on Thursday.'
TAR A SE
(By Associated
LINCOLN
Press.)
Kan., Nov. 13.
—After two hours aaM a half of argu
msmU by the attorneys at the morn
ing sussioq of ooort, the "tar party"
%t verdict5lathe case of the first
three men tried on charges of complic
ity in the "tar party" is expected to
hinge the fate of all the defendants
in the case. The victim was Miss
Mary Chamberlain of Beverly, Kan.,
a school teacher, aged 26, who worked
in a Shady Bend, Kaa., general store
during the summer months. She was
attacked on the night of August 7.
r:
GOES TO VALLEY CITY.
Col. Ben G. Whitehead, who had
been spending a week here, left this
afternoon for Valley City,
WITNESSES ABSENT.
^DENVER,€61$,
Refers
JNOV.
23.—A
reversal of attitude! on the part
of one witness andithe absence
of two otherf, .seriously hamp
ered the prosecujtion|today in rhe
Patterson murder else. Special
Prosecutor Benson asked for a
recess when the witnesses failed
to respond to their ijsmes, short
ly before t|tne for %e noon in
terval.,, */,
«^.£ *e.jj(
to! Entire
nch
Packers Wy
lo tore
(By Aseofitetet Press.)
WASHINGTON, Nov*.—Chief Jus
tice White today refusfcd to grant a
stay in the trial of the! Chicago beef
packers,, hut referred the attorneys
making the application to the entire
bench with the -staten ent that the
matter was of too muih importance
for him to pass-en Individually.
Attorney Miller• am lounced that
such application would \»made at the
first sitting December I. Attorneys
for the packers indicated that efforts
will be made to have Julge Carpenter
of the United States circuit court at
Chicago, before ifhomrthe indicted
packers have been jsummoned for trial.
Monday, to grant a farther postpone
ment until the supreme court passes
on the application for a stay.
Attocneys Miller and Mayor for the
packer* returned.•$&WKBA thi* aft
ernoon.
WALTERS APPOINTED,
FARGO, N D, Nov. 23.—State
President J. H. Worst of the country
life movement has appointed Dr. J.
M. Walters, pastor of the First Meth
odist church of Fargo, as state dele
gate to the next session of the Com
munity Farm congress to be held in
Spokane, Wash.
The country Jitys movement was
started by Theodore Roosevelt when
president of the United States and
has rapidly spread until now it em
bodies a vast assemblage.
Henry Clay Beattie, Jr., and Prison Where He Will be Executed Nov. 24
Scene Enacted
In Nlnnt Police Court
Today
Not Tali
English and Insulted
Judge
(special to the Tribune)
MINOT, N O NOV. 23.—At first
grabbing the defendant by the necK,
and starting to choke him, finally dis
charging him on the ground that he
was innocent of the offense charged,
Judge William Murray enacted a spec
tacular scene in the police magis
trate's court this morning. Tom Mor
ris, charged with stealing a rig frm
his landlady, is a Greek and cannot
talk English plainly. He was profuse
in profanity and made some insulting
remarks about Judge Murray, who
leaped from his seat and grabbed Mor
ris by the neck. State's Attorney
Nash urged the judge to discontinue
his attacks. Judge Murray finally dis
charged Morris on the ground that
he was innocent.
je ,jhf' Tribune)
HAZEI^pp|j D., Nov. 23—Fire
destroyed the Haselton creamery last
night, entglling.a loss oM5,0000. There
was insvanceyon the property of
$3,500. T** loss falls heavily upon
th^ farmers, who found this a profit
able market for their cream. Reports
as to the origin of the blase are con
flicting, but lhoJjpj|Bi|st^rtiilon seems
to be that the fire was caused by a
defective flue. No plans have yet
been formed for rebuilding.
VISITING CIVIC LEAGUERS.
I Jacob Riis is spending a few days
with the civic leaguers in the Twin
Cities and leaves tonight on No. 3 for
Bismarck, so he'll be here tomorrow
morning and will look over our city
during the afternoon.
CHOsEN VICE PRE8IDENT.
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 23.—Jose
Pino Suares today was invested
with the office of vice president
of the republic by the chamber
of deputies. Later he was 're
ceived by President Madero, te
cabinet and other officials.
OF
PRINZ JOACHIM
SAFELYRESCUED
Ward Line Steamship, Seg
nraDca,TakesPeoplefrom
Wreck was Impossible
This Honing
(By Associated Press)
STEAMER 8IGHTED.
NASSAU, Nov. 23.—The Ward
line steamer Seguranca, bringing 4
•0* 87 passengers and mail of the 4
stranded Prinz Joachim, has been
sighted.
NASSAU, New Providence Island,
Bahamas, Nov. 23.—A wireless mes
sage from the Ward line steamer Se
guranca says she will bring in here
today 87 passengers and the mail from
the standanded Prinz Joachim.
NEW YORK, Nov. *3.—All passen
gers of the steamship Prinz Joachim,
ashore on Atwood Key, a remote is
land of the Bahmas, have been taken
aboard the Ward steamer Seguranca,
and are now on their way to Nassau.
The news reached the Ward line of
fice here today In a wireless message
from'^Up Seguranca. The Ward, line
officials*saidVtte aeguraaaca was ex
pected to reach Nassau between.2 and
3 o'clock: this afternoon.
NEW YORK, N. Y., Nov. 23.—News
from the* stranded steamship Prinz
Joachim, which ran on the rocks on
Atwood Key, a remote island of Ba
hamas Ya, was lacking this morning,
the wireless operators here being un
able to get in communication with the
boat because of the interference of
other serial messages.
The officials of the Hamburg-Ar.er
icafr line say the 87 passengers,
among them William J. Bryan, his
wife and grandchild, are in no dan
ger.
ABERDEEN HAS NEW
CHIEF OF POLICE
ABERDEEN, S. D., Nov. 23.—Cal
lers at the city police station found
Fred M. Jump at the desk and wear
ing the star of the head of the force.
At the meeting of the city commis
sioners yesterday forenoon it was
voted to appoint Mr. Jump chief of
the city police, and immediately af
terward the new o/Rcial came over
from the federal ctfurt, vhere he has
been an officer, and took the oath of
office.
DEER MORE NUMEROUS
THAN TENJEARS PAST
OLD TIME HUNTERS REPORT AT
LEAST THIRTY FLEET
FOOTS KILLED.
Railroad on Opposite Side of River
Thought to Have Driven Denizens of
Forest to Bismarck Side.
Old time hunters of the city, and
who have taken advantage of the deer
hunting season this year, say that at
least thirty deer have been killed this
year within six miles of Bismarck be
tween here and in the vicinity of Sib
lay island.
It is also stated that more deer
A
I is also stated that more deer
have been found in those woods than Mandan.
in the past ten years and the increase
in numbers is thought to be caused by
the railroad on the west side of the
river which is thought to have driven
the deer to the woods on this side of
the riv-ar.
There are still a number of deer
left in the woods and though the law
permits the season to remain open
but another w-sek, local nimrods are
of the opinion that at least ten more
will be killed by local hunters.
NOTHING LEARNED YET
As yet nothing has been learned re
garding the demented man held in
-jail here. The wound on his head
Is serious and may result in tne per
manent loss of his mind. MSndan of
ficers say be fell through a window
while others say he was struck on
the head: by a club. If his place of
Yesidence can be learned he will be
taken home.
TO DEATH
DEATH IN FRANCE
TrainCrashes Tbrougb Bridge
lute toe 8i?er Timet
To-day
Powerless to len-
der JIM Because of Lack
of Bonis
(By Associated Press.)
SAUMUR, France, Nov. 23.—Sixty
passengers, i* is estimated, lost their
lives through the plunging of a train
into th River Thouet early today,
owing to the breakdown of a bridge
on the state railway at Montreuil Bel
lay, a department of Maine Et Loire.
All boats in the locality had been
carried off by inundations, so was im
possible for the people of the n*eigh
borhood to assist much in the work of
rescue.
Ten corpaes have been recovered at
various points of the river. Eleven
persons, including some children, are
clinging to the roof of a car still vis
ible above the surface of the water.
Three cars were submerged.
UGN1TE
(Special to the Tribune)
MINOT, N. D., Nov. 23,—Minot is
threatened with a coal famine. Prac
tically all of the lignite coal oper
ators are behind from 30 to 75 cars
on the orders. The coal men state
that there would be great suffering.
The city is getting coal on the hand
to mouth bast Many of the 'big coal
users at the city are able to get just
enough coal ahead for a twelve hours'
run.
NEW CITY
^DEDICATED
FIR8T ARREST MADE AND TRAN
8IENT LODGED IN NEW
BA8TILE.
'One Good Drink
Proves Undoing
In Capital City.
&
Deserves Another"
of Farmer Visiting
Bismarck's new Jail was dedicat
ed last night. A farmer came to
town' and claims the chill of the
weather caused him to resort to a
warming potion commonly called
whiskey. He took one drink and it"
seemed to warm him up. Another
drink increased the .comfortable feel
ing and then he bethought him that if
two drinks were so good, three might
be better. After that he lost count
and when Chief McDonald met him
at the cell door this morning he
seemed balky and penitant. "I do
not crave the distinction," he declared
when informed that he was the pio
neer prisoner of the new Jail. "What
I now want is to go home with as
little ceremony as possible. You do
not want to start the list with a far
mer, do you?" A*d the pleading had
its effect
"Come to think of it," said Chief
Sandy. "I don't believe I do. There
is meat in your argument. I am go
ing to turn you loose just because
this is a farmer's country," and the
farmer beat it out of town.
BLAKE IN CITY.
Humane Officer Blake is in the city
with Amy Campbell, the Bismarck in
corrigible, who has been in James-
town for some time. Young Campbell
a in
reform school at
Mandan
AFTER REQUISITION PAPERS.
Sheriff H. T. Boyle was at the gov
ernor's office this morning to secure
requisition papers for a man he
wanted on the Pacific coast. He left
for the west on No. 3
BOUNTIFUL CROPS.
Baldwin Farmers Finished Threshing
Before Snow Came.
H. W. Little and Henry Rupp. two
prominent farmers near Baldwin,
were amon« the notable visitors in
Bismarck Wednesday, both of whom
were favored with bountiful cropsthis
year and were congratulating them
selves upon the fact that they suc
ceeded in getting everything threshed
before the snow storm. Mrs. Little
who has been confined with illness in
a local hospital the past two weeks,
accompanied her husband borne.
•^m
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