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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, March 14, 1912, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1912-03-14/ed-1/seq-8/

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fcS^s'Sfe
Workers WiU Not Agree to
Aiy Compromise
Strike Will Be on If Opera
ore Do Not Concede
By Associated Press.
4
NEW YORK March 14.—"The
United Mine Workers of America
will not compromise a single de
mand they have made of the an
tbracite coal operators." declared
John P. White, president of the
mine workers, this afternoon. "I
look for a general suspension of
work in the anthracite field by
April 1."
"Operators have notified us,"
he continued, "that there reply
was final. When we meet' them
tomorrow we will file merely a
formal reply, reiterating our de
mands. lit will then be up to the
operators. If they make no con
cession every union hard coal
miner in Pennsylvania will lay
down their tools the night 6f
March 31."
.*«
BATH TUiTGASE
GONE TO JURY
By Associated Press.
DETROIT, Mich., March 14.—The
ease of the government against the so
called bath tub trust, charged with
conspiracy in restraint of trade, wasi
placed in the hands of the jury in the
federal court at 10:30 this looming.
FARMHOUSEHSECADSES
W N is rs DEATH
TBNNG TO SATE HOT
WINNIPEG, Man., March 14.—
Word was- received here today of
the burning to death of the Rev.
'David Cattanach, superannuated
.Methodist minister, and Walter
4 Blackburn, four years old, when
afire yesterday destroyed their
farm house near Dauphin, Man.
Both todies were found near a
window where the clergyman had
sought in vain to rescue the boy.
The window sill stuck and the
family was away from home at
the time.
PACKERS CASE
TO JURY SOON
By Associated Press.
CHICAGO, March 14.—The ten Chi
cago packers charged with criminal
violation of the Sherman law, will
subimt their case to the jury without
presenting any testimony. This an
nouncement was made today toesting
United tSates District Judge Carpen
ter by counsel for defendants. Pack
ers trial court then took adjournment
until Monday, when arguments to jury
begins.
HAY RATES
By Assodatea Press.
WASHINGTON March 14.—Pro
posed advances in transportation rates
on hay. varying from 12 to $7 per car,
by northwestern railroads, was sus
pended today by the interstate com
merce commission from March 15 to
July 31. The rates were intended to
apply to shipments to Chicago, Bast
8 Louis,„ St. Paul, Dulut'n. Omaha
and other receiving points in South
Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota.
Wisconsin and Iowa.
The present rates range from 10
cents to $71-2 cents per hundred:
pounds and the proposed advances
range from cent to a 14 cents per
hundred, which.is an average of ap
spos&nateljr IS per cent.
SjIMTsjImMiilta
WILL TALK ON BIRD
LIFE IN THE STATE
AL FEASTGATE WILL DELIVER IL
LUSTRATED LECTURE MON
DAY EVENING.
Address to Be Given In the Commer
cial Club and Is Said to Be Unusual
ly Interesting.
Mr. Alf Eastgat., the bird man of
Stump lake, will deliver an illustrated
lecture in Commercial club hall on
Monday evening, March 18. at 8
o'clock.
Mr. Eastgate has been delivering
these lectures all over the state dur
ing the past few months, and judging
by press reports he has a very inter
talk. He has abotu 140 pic
tures of our native game birds and de.
scribes their habits and many other
interesting things abotu them.
WELL KNOWN RESIDENT OF THE CAPITAL CITY STRICKEN
SHORTLY AFTER BREAKFAST HOUR THUR8DAY MORNING AND
DEATH RESULTED IN VERY FEW MOMENT8. FUNERAL WILL
ra and Eliza were at his bedside when
the end came. Lieut. William F.
Cochrane, Jr., U. S. N., the elder son,
is at present at the Norfolk navy
yard, on sea going duty. He was not
ified immediately of his., father's
death, and is expected to arrive in
the city Sunday or Monday.
A leader of the North Dakota bar
and surrounded by those evidences
of social and professional success pos.
sible only in a modern and progres
sive community, William Florence
Cochrane, of Bismarck, embraces In
his own experience those remarkable
antitheses which occur only in a rap
Idly changing country. Less than
twenty years ago Mr. Cochrane look
ed on at the ghost dancing which
I was the last protest of th edying in-
\^J??t&£fil
BE HELD UNDER AU8PICES OF MASONIC ORDER OF THE CITY.
William F. Cochrane is dead. The
capital city mourns the loss of one of
its roost prominent citizens, one whotinguished
has ever been actively identified with
its best interests, and its progress.
Death laid its icy hand upon his brow
with DO warning note, and its sudden*
ness has shocked every resident of
Bismarck, and plunged them into
grief and sorrow.
Mr. Cochrane has been in ill health
for several weeks past, but no grave
fears were entertained by the mem
bers of his family, nor by his immed
iate friends. Death resulted from
uraemia.
Mr. Cochrane arose Thursday morn
ing about 7:30 o'clock, apparently in
the best of health. He drank a
cupall
of tea, but as he had been suffering
from biliousness, was unable to
par-Ohio,
taKe of any more breakfast and
re-William
turned upstairs, when a nauseous at
tack seized ihim. His son, Edwin,
heard his father and induced him
tohave
go to bed again. He took him a glass
of water, and Mr. Cochrane said he
felt much better. A few moments
later, however, he was seized
withsas
uraemic convulsions. A physician
was summoned immediately, and
didSchool.
all in /his power to relieve Mr. Coch
rane's sufferings, which were intense.
The end came quickly, and he passed
away a few minutes before nine
o'clock. Mrs. Cochrane, Edwin,
He is out in the interests of theerecting.and
State Audubon society, which has the
care of our wild birds and animals
and which is doing so much good in
their preservation. There WiU be a
small admittance fee to the lecture,
the proceeds to be devoted to the work
of the society. Every lover of birds
an interesting one and the proceeds
will be devotd to a good cause.
FARM HOUSE BURNED.
ALLEY CITY, March 14.—The
farm dwelling house, occupied by Irv
ing Dunn, on the Blank and Grady
farm, nine miles southeast of thefarms
city, and formerly owned by Albert
Renner, was totally destroyed by
fire. Mr Dunn got up and started
the kitchen fire and went to the barn
to do the chores. When he started to
return he saw the building in a blase
and Mrs. Dunn in the yard in herand
night dress—having barely escaped
from the burning building. Nothing
was saved from the flames. i':,
VISITED CAPITAL.
Clarence T. Peterson, traveling
passenger agent of She Northwestern
line with headquarters at S Paul,
was a caller at the state capital
Thursday, looking after the interests
of the great railway system which he
represents..
PENNY POST CARDS
at the
BISMARCK STATIONERY CO.**
li Fourth St.
«.*«,
many another North Dakotan, while
the last hope of the Indian was ex
down on the Standing
Rock reservation. Now, while. Just
in the prime of life, be has seen the
development, in the country which
Sitting Bull and his fellows held for
their hunting ground, and flowering
of a .civilization which is as ample
and enlightened as there is on earth.
In the breadth of these experiences,
as well as through a natural adapta
bility to the conditions of life in the
new state, Mr. Cochrane has found
the means tofithimself for the place
he occupies in his city and state as
a type of the spirit which dominated
in the making of North Dakota. He
had the advantage—not possessed by
of his contempararies—of a thor
ough schooling. Bom in Circleville,
Cla-place
The funeral will be a Masonic func
tion. Thefinalarrangements cannot
be announced until word is received
from- the out of town relatives. The
North Dakota history -contains the
following story of his life:
tht ov«rwh«lmlnf
'power ofothetwhite man. Hea
wag of
those wih fel the menace of out
break of racial hatred which might
have made the horrors of an Indian
war, possible he looked on, as didporia,
December 29, 1859, the son ofknights
Henry and Fannie (Flor
ence) Cochrane, he has in his veins
that sturdy Scotch-Irish blood which
given to this country so many
of her leading citizens. He was edu
cated in the public schools of his na
tive state, took a course at the Kan-
State Normal School and earned
his law degree in the Cincinnati Law
He came to North Dakota,
after having had an experience of
teaching school in Kansas and Ohio,
and settled at Steele. He was ad
mitted to the bar in 1885 and won a
in bis profession that entitled
him to the nomination of state's at
torney at the hands of the Republi
can party with which he has always
affiliated. He was elected and served
for two terms as attorney for Kidder
county and was sent to the legisla
ture in 1892. He liked the environ
ment and promise of Bismarck so
well that he became a resident of the
Capital City sixteen years ago
andDuluth
during that time has maintained a
dignified position in the community of
which be is one of the most progres
sive and liberal citizens. For nine
years he has been a member of the
Board of Education, bringing to the
office the invaluable experience gain
ed during his own service in theSt.
sphere of pedagogy.
Mr. Cochrane was married June 26,
1885, to Miss P. A. Fridley, at Ash
ville, Ohio, and is the father of four
children who ornament a home that
is one of the most popular at tine
capital. William F. Cochrane Jr. the
eldest son is a lieutenant in (he Unit
ed States Navy. The other children
are Edwin F., Clara F. and Eliza F.
Cochrane. A brother, J. F. Cochrane
of Bismarck, a sister in California
and his stepmother, residing at Em-Friday
Kansas, also survive him.
ANOTHER CREAMERY
FOR SLOPE CODNTRf
ADAM8 COUNTY 8EAT ANTICI
PATES CONSTRUCTION OP
PLANT SOON.
Progressive Commercial Club and En.
terprlsing Business Men Assure
Success of Enterprise.
Adams county was represented in
the capital city the early part of the
week by G. N. Keniston of Hettinger.
Mr. Keniston is very optimistic oves
the outlook in the slope country for
the coming season, and expects to
see a large crop harvested.
There was an enthusiastic meet
ing at Hettinger recently, according
to Mr. Keniston, at which time a
stock company was organised with
|5,000 capital for the purpose of
maintaining a creamery,
i-resident John G. Johns of the Com
mercial club, and Secretary W. L.
Lanxon, manager of the Hettinger
experiment station, were -active in
promoting the venture, which has the
a
and animals should make it a point i?' &
to be present, as tbe lecture will be
endorsement of! every member
to or
and,*the
1
Si
^^J**!** S
«ream«ry
w*»
to
Hettinger to a syndicate composed of
bankg and individuals.
The syndicate that is interested in
this establishment is planning to
purchase one thousand milk cows, of
good grade, and place them on the2.03.
surrounding Hettinger. It is
expected that work on the building
will be commenced as soon as tbe
plans in mind have been completed,
and' the necessary, preliminary de
tails are attended to. Adams county
Is continuing to forge ahead rapidly,
will be one of the most, if not
the most prosperous sections of the
great slope country If the creamery
project is successfully carried out
^raWftyja^
(Continued from page l.
scope of the measure as it would af
fect individuals.
Tiie report asserts that the burden
of "our present indirect taxation'' telle
upon the people having incomes of
leas than ROM. while the
Mil would impose a tax of oao
cent on all Incomes over tigtSt. att
exempting those receiving less,
Guard are Also
LINCOLN, March 14.—War-•
den DeEeQianty was killed and 6
three deputy,wardens and other
employes at the state peniten
tiary were fatally wounded in a
mutiny of convicts at the insti,
tutJpn this afternoon.
»^'ffl».«»:»» •»»,•
COMMANDERY INSPECTION.
Knights Templar Were Banqueted at
the Grand racifie Hotel.
The annual inspection of Tancredt
commandery. No. 1, Knights Templar,
was held at the Masonic temple on
Wednesday afternoon and evening.
Col, J. W. Carroll of Lisbon officiated
as inspecting officer. At 6 clock t|ie
repaired to he Grand Pacific
hotel, where they enjoyed a. banquet,
following which they returned to the
temple and completed their work.
r**t'+*o++*&0>0*r*+*+**w*r+*^++*r+*+*
The Weather
fititf irfif gf.mf rr~
PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OP
THE SECRETARY OF
^\S AGRICULTURE.
Willis L. Moore, Chief of United
'"",: States Weather Bureau.
Bismarck, JJorth Dakota,
March 14. 1912.
Bismarck ..
Devils Lake
...
Helena ..... 0
Miles City ..—1*6
Moorhead ..,. 2
Pierre 2
Qu' Appelle —12
Rapid City... 2
Thursday,
All observations taken at 8 a. m.
(76th meridian time).
A
Clear
.—14
.—8
4
6
Clear
Clear
Clear
Clear
Clear
Clear
Clear
14
4
4
8
4
8
sw
NW
NW
NW
SW
S
4
4
Paul ...... 10
Wllllston ....—14
Winnipeg ....—6
»'i'.
.04 Clear
0 Cldy
0 Clear
0 Clear
N
SW
N
10
A—Btatlons.
B—Lowest temperature last night.
G-TJireetion of wind.
D—Veipcftf iftwind.
E—PreciplUtlon in last 24 hews,
F—State of weather.
^Weather Forecast:
Till 7 p. m. Friday.
For North Dakota: Fair tonight and
rising temperature Friday and
north and west'portions tonight.
For Bismarck and Vicinity: Fair to
night and Friday rising temperature.
Weather Conditions.
High pressure and unseasonably
low temperature overlies the entire
Missouri valfey and the Canadian
northwest. This condition, however,
is followed by lower pressure and
higher temperature and will result in
fair weather tonight and 'Friday, with
higher temperature Friday and in the
west portions of the state tonight.
ORRIS W. ROBERTS.
Official In Charge.
0 W
The Markets
#»—^•^^^ti^affieiy.***1——«—*»»««'
MINNEAPOLIS.
Wheat—1 Hard 1.07 34. 1 Nor
1.071*4. Arr 1.08 S-4 to 1.071-4. 2
Nor 1.051-4. Arr 1.043-4 to l.OS 3
1.0314. I l.OS. 1.03.
Cora—3 86 to 07. Arr 68. 4
oOra 6063.
Oats—3 W 0 511* to &?. 3 Oats
49 to 50.
Barley—TO-lMt^-M^''
Rye—89.
Flax—2.04. Arr 2.04. May 1.061-4.
Jul 1.076-8 3-4.
'bULUTRK.\
May 1.061-4 B4 July 1.07 B. 1 Hard
O & 1 Nor 6 «V Arr 1.0* 34. In
Store same, a NorA Arr O 1.03 34.
in store same. Sot Durum No. 1,
1.071-2. No 2, LOS 14. Regular May
1.071-2. May No. 1.1.10.
Oats—To Arr 61.
Rye—O 87 to 89.
Barley—O 704
iFUx—O 1.04, Arr 2.04, March
May 2.04. July, 2.04.
4
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY.
4
FOR RENT«—Modern furnished room.
400 Fourth street.
FOR *LE—Household furniture, 1
6 hole steel range, hot. water at
tachment 1 large hart coal parlor
heater, 1 laundry stove, 1 gasoline
stove, 1 family refrigerator, beds,
dressers and other household uten
sils at bargain prices. SIS 3rd St,
Telephone -BSW & ,*..-.•*.r^srs.
WANTEI
rectory of
Jewell
ef the Srst city dl
•.^Mrs. M. H.so
'iff"
WANTED—Position
housework sma
Percy. Phone 1914.
WANTE
prsitical
general
family.
Mrs..•
by da| or hour, or
iuritsg.
Mrs. Percy.
ltW.
The Real Estate Fraud
A strong western dramaillus
trating how the unwary:
are caught ^i
••-\j-?*•..-
II "four:Yale-'lien |g
Beautiful in its simplicity
2
&
A
»««###»#^##^x»xsx^»r#«*»»»*»*^»/
City Hews
FROM DEVILS LAKE,
E. F. Reese of Devils Lake arrived
at the state capital Thursday morn
ing to look after business interests
UP FROM DAWSON.
A. B. Thompson of Dawson
numbered among the "guests in
city Thursday morning.
was
the
HERE PROM MOPFIT.
Fred W. Hinsey of Mofflt came up
to the capital Thursday to look after
some business matters.
PROMINENT ASHLEY GUEST.
Hon. J. H. Wisbek of Ashley was
among the distinguished guests of
the state capital this morning.
SLOPE COUNTRY VISITOR.
E. B. Serud of New England ar
rived in the city Wednesday evening
and is spending a short time looking
after business affairs.
PROM ST. PAUL.
H. B. Noltlmier, representing the
Hagstrum Brothers, merchant tailors
of St. Paul, wag a guest of one ofhest
the local hotels Wednesday and
Thursday.
HERE PROM SANGER.
Walter Hall, brother of Hon. Thom
as Hall, secretary of the board of
railway commissioners, arrived from
Sanger Wednesday evening for a
short visit in the capital city.
O. E. S. MEETING.
There wi.l be a regular meeting of
the ladles of the Order of the East
ern Star in the Masonic temple Fri
day evening. A large attendance is
desired.
HEBRON BOOSTER.
Charles Weigel of Hebron,. one of
the prominent boosters for the west
ern part of the state, was looking af
ter business affairs in the city
Thursday.
ON BUSINESS MISSION.
George M. Robinson, one of the
prominent residents of.Coal Harbor,
was In the city Thursday on a brief
business mission:
OVER FROM MANDAN.
Captain J. M. Hanley of Mandan,
came over to Bismarck Thursday
morning for a short visit with local
military officials. He also devoted
considerable time to legal affairs.
HERE FROM DICKINSON.
H. W. Elden of Dickinson was
among,the arrivals from the west
Thursday morning, coming to Bis
marck to transact some business mat
ters, :,.^ .. B^.:ft.&
TO MANAGE EXCHANGE.
Miss Ida Ringham, who hae been
employed at Garrison, arrived in the
city Wednesday evening and depart'
ed for New Salem, where-she will as
sume the management of the tele
phone exchange. Vv
VISITORS FROM WHO.
Mrs. G. H. Korupp and Miss Josie
Rolf of Wing, are guests at one ct
the local hotels, having come to Bis
marck to attend to some matters of a
business nature.
EMMONS COUNTY VISITOR.
George W. Lynn of Linton, who 1«
actively Identified witto all move
ments which boost for the slope
country, is spending the day attend
ing to legal matters in the city.
CI OF CARS CAUSES
IINOT COAL SIOITAGE
MINOT, March 14^-Wlthtlf aero
weatier staring it in the face, Mfnot
is having a touch of lignite coal short
age. Nearly all of the coal compa
nies or the city were out of coal this
morning, and the few fortunate
enough to have some on hand stated
that their bins were very tow:
Some of the coal companies chum
the trouble shortage of cars.
The situation with one concern was
serious that the manager took the
Srst train to the mints to ascertain
the trouble sad remedy it if posslble.l
F1MNY POST CARDS
S at the
BISMARCK STATIONERY CO/S
4 IfSFeHrthSt
4 4 4 4
miFOIME
S
jy:oa
ftilitlt
.-%"
I0c&l5c
1llll«trtfori Sfinn 9 "I will love you when the silver threads are shining among the gold"
IHUSinilCU OUIiy "There's nothing else in life like'love, love,'love''^ £^S5^
Ci\rnlntrl
special feature for Mon. and Toes, only-—M Through the Flame*
I :-.^: One of the most"sensationalfilmsever produced*MilftPf
BROKEN RAIL
'Continued from pane 1.)'
was among the injured. Among those
most seriously hurt are: James Lar
son, St. Joseph, Mo. Timothy Foley,
Dee Moines, la. George Hall, Nevada,
la, Mrs. Edward Mclntlre. St: Paul
E. L. Jones, Minneapolis, Minn. J. E.
Landholt, iNew York, N. Y. John
Youngblood. Amsrillo, Tex. H. E.
Singerhottse, Kansas City.
roosEvarwiLi
IELP
(Continued from page 1.)
ardise the. chance for the success of
the cause. I wire this as a devoted
friend and admirer of Senator La Fol
lette as well as *f Colonel Roosevelt
but first as being more anxious for
the success of the cause than that of
any man. The progressives owe it to
the Access of teh cause in the nation
give Roosevelt a sweeping vote in
North Dakota, mean* not only the
victory for progressives policies
but for those who have championed
them, which includes, of course, Sen
ator La Follette as well as Roosevelt.
Such a result will clinch the victory
in other states where Roosevelt is
now almost sure to win and where
Senator La Fofyette could possibly
win. Senator Lafollette could not get
the nomination If he got every vote
in North Dakota.
If the progressives divide the vote
there, North Dakota will do worse
than to throw away its opportunity,
and it will simply give the best pos
sible comfort support and astisfaction
to tbe Taft mangers, and am report
ing situation to'you exactly as it is.
(Signed) "BEN B. LINDSAY."
OREGON FOR ROOSEVELT.
WASHINGTON, March 14.—The
following dispatch was received to
day by the Roosevelt headquarters,
1 The Deserted Shaft
A thrilling and spectacular
1
ROBTMLaFOLLEHE
9is$*-'':*~
drama^oP'themines^tiSii
igx Too Much In]
We' guarantee this to'cure
the blues-- your baok money
if it does not
from Portland, Oregon, in reference
to the situation in that state:
"Tlhe overwhelming sentiment'
among progressive republicans in
Oregon that the placing of LaFol
lette's name on the Oregon ballot to
be voted for in the primaries will on
ly result in dividing th* progressive
vote, thus making possible the elec
tion of Taft delegates, has made it
difficult to secure sufficient signa
tures to the LaFollette petition.
In order to do so, the Taft manag
ers are assisting tlhe LaFollette man
agers in securing enough signatures.
The purpose of this action of course,
is to divide the progressive strength
in spite of this procedure there is
not the slightest doubt that Boose
yelt will carry Oregon hands down.
KINfi ESCAPES
(Continued from
where they found the king and queen
sitting unmoved.
Meanwhile the crowd seised file
man who fired tbe shots. All the cir
cumstances led to the belief uhat the
assailant of his majesty was not con
cerned In any plot of any organisa
tion, but that tbe deed was the out
come of his own individual aberra
tion:
In all quarters of Rome demonstra
tions have been prepared to protest
against the outrage, the effect of
which has been to increase tine pop
ularity of the king.
When the king and queen left Pan
theon in t/»eir closed carriage, news
of the attack had spread, and im
mense crowds had gathered in the
great open space in front. The king's
appearance was the signal foran over
whelming outburst of cheering front
the crowd, which almost reached a
frensy by the time their majesties
had reached the spot where the at
tempt occurred but a short time be
fore.
Throughout the Journey the people
along 'the streets and standing at
windows and on balconies waved
their hanukerchiefs, and cried en
thusiastically, "Long live the king."
U. S. Senator Fro Wisconsin
Friday Eve.,
Hea "Fighting Bob Discuss the
||ttreai National Political Iff.
mm0:msm Issues m^mg-iSP
EVERYBODY WELCOME
I BRING THE LADIES I
*e*:: :-^~,*r-
sr#i-
Tell yctur neighbors. You cannot af
ford to miss this great
educational opportunity
-Mi *%fe5§#»
m-L
m\
Wfi
Mfe&i
#:!H*:
I S

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