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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, March 23, 1912, Image 1

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THE WfA'/TfEJ*
NOT MUCH JGMAHQHt&Mfi1'--'
Thirty-second Year, No. 72
FO R. KNOX
:refary of State Witnesses
Reverence Paid to
HfisUogton
.wspapersare
Over the Visit of the
Secretary
CARACAS, March 23*.—Secretary
Ends, accompanied by President Go
nex, todav paid a visit to the mlH
iry academy. The party then pro
eeded to Washington square, where
Dlaced on the statue of George Wash,
igton, whose memory is held as
pear as that of Simon Boliver, the
'great liberator, upon whose statue
a national panthon wreath was
placed today by Secretary Knox.
Other visits were paid to the nation*
,al museum and to Bolivar square,
where there is another statue of
F'olivar, and to many of the public
buildings. A lunch in honor of Knox
given today at the American lega
tlon, and a reception is scheduled for
this afternoon at the ministry of for
eign affairs. The visit to Venezula
promises to be a strenuous one. Thereservations,
reception accorded the secretary of
"+*te is remarkable for the spontan
ity of hospital welcome, and the pro
gram for Vr. Knox is a most elabo
rate one. The papers appear en
thusiastic over the secretary's visit
and most of them publish pictures of
Washington, Lincoln, Knox, Gomes
and Bolivar.
By Associated Press.
PHILADELPHIA, March 23.—Gen
eral Henry H. Bingham, member of
congress from the First Pensylvania
district, and "father of the house"
died at his home here today. He has
been a member of the house continu
ously since March 4, 1879, and wasthe
71 years old. General Bingham had
been in 411 health for a long time.
GOVERNOR BURKE NAY
BE SUED FOR DAMAGES
SUPREME COURT SETTLESONCE
FOR ALL "POOLE CASE."
Contention of Former Adjutant Gen
oral is Upheld, and Suit Against
Executive may Now Materialize.
The supreme court of North Dako
ta his handed down a decision deny
ing the request by the defendant for
a rehearing in the case of Poole ver
sus Peace. Thus endeth tne last
chapter and the book. The court
martial which ousted former Adju
tant General Poole from the argon
ised mHma of the state was declared
illegal, and General Poole is relnstat
er as a member of the guard.
"The Poole case" has occupied the
center of the stage for over throe
years—part of the time at least
More momentous questions have rel
egated It into the wings on occasions,
but it has always bobbed forth se
renely. The opponents of General
Poole continued to wage their con
flict, but have finally met their Watr
erloo. The mantle of obscurity is
drawn'over, the case, and it now is
ancient history.
General Poole was discovered at
the Hotel McKensie by a represent
stive of the Tribune, and when asked
for an interflow apropos the supreme
court's Anal decision, he said:
"L am very much -pleased with the
•ami outcome of the ft vlndi
cetes .nty contention that Governor
Barke was exceeding authority,
japd was in the wrong In attempting
to" organise a court martial for thehas
.' tmrpss* wttch he did.
"This procedure has cost the state
of North Dakota between $1500 and
$2,000 to prosecute. The expense was
not borne by the governor personally,
hot by the state itself. The expenses
of say 4oXense have been borne by me
1. individually. It has been quite ex
"pensive, and I have investigated the
proposition of brfaging an action for
damages against Governor Burke
personally—both exemplary and acta
i&' al' damages.. This wouk* include all
*K tab expanse I have been through to
defend myself before an authorised
$»'. and fBesjal court martial.
y'*^-vW ass convinced beyond a. doubt
O at th*re is absofate precedent tor
(Gusjtiiiucd oa &)
remainder of the reservation.
"*$:".:'. •••'-.:' h?': ''v 4'-:^"W'::-:':"::-S:rK" ^':&
e. 0
FOR DBS MOINES DIOCESE
D(BS MKMN1ES, la., March 23.—
April 26 is the date set for the
consecration of Rev. Austin
Bowling as the first bishop of the
Roman Catholic diocese of Des
Moines, according to word re
ceived from P-ovidence, R. I.,toy*
IBishop James Davis of Daven
port today.
ASK
O OPEN I E
Resolutions Sent to Washing
too Asking Openiog of
Indian Lands
ABERDEEN, March 23—Over a
hundred representatives of the towns
west of the Missouri river at points
adjacent to the Cheyenne and Stand
ing Rock Indian reservations have been
in the city during the past two days dis
cussing plans for the opening of the.
•balance of the two reservations.
A set of resolutions will be sent to
the legislative representatives at Wash
ington, as follows:
"We, the undersigned, residents of
points within and adjacent to the
Standing Rock and Cheyenne Indian
realizing that the socedy
opening of the remainder of those res
ervations is of highest importance, to
the indians themselves, as to the gen
eral uplift and development of the
states and people of South and North
Dakota.
"Hereby respectfully represent to
and urge the honorable senators and
representatives in congress, from the
states of South and North Dakota, to
exert every energy within theit gift
and power, jointly or separately, to
secure the prompt passage of the
measures now before congress, and
providing' for the opening of tne re
mainder of the Standing Rock and
Cheyenne Indian reservations, passed
as .senate bills Nos 108 and 109,. and
now before the house of representa
tives. ,-- .'..'•/"•' •r-'-'-r
And, whereas, there is manifest -dis
satisfaction existing among the'Indians,
caused by the failure of tneSdepart
ment of the interior to promptly give
them the benefit of the partial open
ing, secured in recent years and
whereas, the. Indians, on account of re
cent failures of crops, and the extreme
ly hard winter just closing, are now infinal
a position which demands that they
have speedily that reasonable relief
which they now seek at the hands of
government and whereas, this dis
satisfaction of the government's dila
toriness and failure to bring them
prompt relief and to live up to the
terms of agreements as to the distribu
tion of the proceeds of the partial open
ing, has caused the Indians to oppose
any further opening of the reservation.
'The honorable senators and rep
resentatives of the states of South and
North Dakota are hereby respectfully
urged to assist the Indian delegates
now at Washington, D. C, from the
Standing Rock and Cheyenne reserva
tions, with a view of presenting their
grievances before the Indian office and
department of the interior, in every
manner possible, so as to aid them in
ootaining a hearinsr of their just de
mands, and compliance therewith in
order that then the Indians may be
come favorable to the opening of
theDIFFICULT
REBELS PUT TO
ROUTE BY FEDERALS
IfBXKX) CITY, March 23.—Re
ports were received today of the
rout of the force of the rebels
near Escalon, 45 miles southeast
of Jiminex, state of Chihuahua, 4
yesterday.
(Eighteen dead rebels are said
to have been found on the field.
The federal troops lost only three
wounded.
RECEIVED APPOINTMENT
J. M. Tapley Has Been Appointed
Wagon Master.
J. M. Tapley has received notice
from the United States civil service
commission that he has passed an
examination for wagon master and be
received his appointment at Fort
Lincoln. Mr. Tapley formerly was in
the government employ at Fort Yates,
and came to Fort Lincoln when Yates
was abandoned. He returned to civil
life for a while, but decided the gov
ernment service was better, and re
turned to Fort Lincoln, where he is
now acting in his new capacity as
wagon master.
1
RETURNED FROM FAR«0
Burt Finney returned Saturday on
No. 3 from Fargo where he has been
attending a meeting of the state
pharmaceutical board. The board
examined' a class of 87 applicants
for admission to the practice of
pharmacy in North Dakota. It- was
one of the largest classes on record.
i:W'^T^^^Wr':^^f^M^^W:
"HELL AND
ANTI HELL"
Students
Taken Sides Over Unique
Class Yell
By Associated Press.
MADISON, March 23.—A purity
wave has struck the University of
Wisconsin senior members, who are
just now diverted into the "hell" and
"anti-hell" factions.
One group is led by the president,
Harold G. Eckert and joined by most
of the girls are for eliminating "hell"
from the class yell. Stuart O. Blythe,
son of Samuel 6 Bltyhe, journalist,
thinks the tendency at Wisconsin is
too much in the direction of change,
and that this is one example.
The yell is not ephonistic. It goes
this way: "We are hell, we are hell:
'Varsity, Varsity, nineteen twelve."
Class officers are empowered to de
cide what it shall be. but a large por
tion of the class favors referendum.
N
O REASON
FO
Chinese Will Negotiate Big
Loan in Domestic
Quarters
By Associated Press.
SHANGHAI, March 23.—An increas
ing number of miner disturbances is
reported from various districts in the
southern provinces, but officials of the
republican government continue to as
sert there is Absolutely no reason tor
tutetslness.
i|*rea^er§Tsarflliao Ti has conferred
wtttr a numtbor of leading Chinese
merchants and omdals, and it Is be
lieved In well informed quarters that
he is endeavoring to arrange a pure
ly domestic Jpitt of a hundred million
ta«l8 (approximately $70,000,000). Th
premier says the delay in making the
arrangements for the loan from
foreign ftnanlcal syndicates was fatal
to the success of the foreign loan.
BATTLE CAUSES DEATH
OF SIX HUNDRED
BUENOS AYRBS, March 23.
4* The victory of the revolutionary 4
0» forces over the Paraguayan gov
eminent troops at Asuncion is
4 complete. More than $00 men
reported killed during the battle.
President Pedro Pena a
taken refuge at the Uruguayan 4
legation at Asuncion.
BLAZE FOR
FIREMEN TO FIGHT
BASEMENT OF COONEN'S CAFE
18 8CENE OF SMALL CON
FLAGRATION.
Flames Were Hard to Reach. Good
Work Done by Fire Department in
Checking Spread.
.-£
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA. SATURDAY MABCH 23,1018.
Shortly before 2 o'clock Saturday heard the solemn tolling of the "Paul
morning the fire department was Revere" bell of All Soul's Unitarian
called to the building occupied by church, which tolled at the funerals
Coonen's cafe, where a blase had of presidents, admirals, generals and
broken out in the basement. Difflcul- other prominent men
ty of access to the scene of the fire In the procession to the Arlington
made the work of fighting the blase, cemetery President Taft accupied a
unusually trying. The location of
the blase, in the heart of one of the
most substantial business blocks of
the city, caused considerable alarm,
and the firemen were commended for
their ability to hold it within bounds.
Several hours wOrk was required be.
fore it was finally quenched. The
loss on the building, which is owned
by Paul C. Remington, will approx
imate $1,000, fully covered by insuis
ance. Mr. Coonen's loss will ap
proximate $300, in addition to the
business he will lose while obliged to
remain closed. The origin of the fire
is not known.
BACK TO BUTTE
Abraham Huslofen of Butte, N. D..of
has departed for bis home after hav
ing received medical treatment in one
of the local hospitals.
LEFT FOR STANTON
Edward Heinemeyer departed for
his home at Stanton after spending
the past two months In a local hos
pital. Mr. Heinemeyer ut one of the
oldest residents of Mercer county and
his numerous friends will rejoice to
hear of his recovery.
FE SLAYER TO THE PEN
CHICAGO, Maro 23.—Frank
4 R. Backer was found guilty to
day of murdering -his wife, and
.punishment was fixed at fif
teen years in the penitentiary.
During the trial it was suggest
ed dhat the unwritten Jvr
might be taken advantage of. 9
ARE BURIED
Ceremonies Occurred at
and Solemnity
Bodies Were Laid Beside
After the War
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, March 23.—With
all the pomp and solemnity that the
mighty nation can pay its heroes of
war, the last of the drad of the
Maine, were laid away today in tie
Arlington cemetery.
Side by side with the bodies of
those brought iback from the Havana
harbor after the war with Spain, they
were consigned to the earth of the
old dominion, while the nation paid
its last measure of honor to the "un
identified" of the catastrophe timt
brought the war, changed the map of
the world and extended the empire
of the United States iito all corners
of the earth.
Seldom In the Mstory of this coun
try has there been any higher tribute
to the memory of man or men than
than for the sixty-four dead of the
Maine.
Government business in Washing
ton was practically suspended by
anA
executive order. President Taft, and
most of the members of the cabinet,
the highest officers of the army, navy
and marine corps-,.officials of the de-neer
partments and representatives of
many /foreign, powers Jfertlcipeted in
the exercises. ,'•
Beginning with the removal of the
dead from the United States Steam
ship Birmingham, which 'brought
them up from Havana, and ending
with the firing of three volleys of
musketry over the new made graves,
the exercises designed to show all
the honor and respect to the martyrs.
Of the doomed battleship were com.
menced.
An escort for a slow march thru the
streets of the capital from the Birm
ingham to the state, war and navy
buildings was picked from the Birm
ingham, and other vessels, now in4»
Washington. The speakers who faced
th great crowd in the plaza behind
the navy building were only three,
Taft, Father Chidwick, Chaplain Of
the Maine when the explosion of
February 15, 1808, sent to the
bottom, and Chaplain Bayard of the•
U. S. Marine band, the 6how band of
Washington, was chosen to give sol
emn music for the dead, and an army
battery stationed near the Washing
ton monument wag selected to fire 21
salute guns as the ceremonies at the
navy building ended and the quiet
march to Arlington began.
Conspicuous among those who paid
tribute to the sailor aead today were
Rear Admiral Charles D. Sigsoee,
who commanded the Maine at the
time of the explosion Rear Admiral
Richard Weinwright Lieutenant
Boyd and Medical Director L. G.
Heneberger, officers under him at
the time.
Occupying special reservations,
with these just mentioned, on theleft
steps of the big granite building
where were Admiral Dewey and Lieu
tenant General Nelson A. Miles.
During the memorial evercises was
place at the head of the. mourners.
The naval escort'was comprised of a
batalion of marines, two battalions
of seamen, the naval band and theand
District of Columbia naval militia,
and Just ahead of thirty-four army
caissons hearing the leaden caskets
were Chaplain Bayard and Father
Chidwick, and just behind the flag
draped coffins were the pall bearers
from the navy, honorary pall bearers
from United Spanish war veterans,
and forty-eight body bearers. Many
distinguished persons were in thelife
line of march. Over the graves in the
Arlington cemetery simple exercises
included the burial services by Bay
ard and Chidwick and with the firing
three volleys of musketry, tibe na
tional salute of 21 guns, and sound
ing of plaintive sound of "taps" the
dead were given to earth.
BANNER MONTH
The exact amount of collections
made by County Treasurer. Kositsky
during the month of February, 1912,
was. 198,751.64, which sets anew
record for the office. Tibe colleo-
ffitffi»ffiji^ift^^
WILL
FAMILIES
SiIvatfoD Army of Mionesoto
Will Start Faros Like
Other States
By Associated Press.
ST. PAUL, March 23.-^0 colonise
fifty poor families at St. Paul and
Minneapolis on 40-acre farms in north
em Minnesota, provide homes for
them and "start" them at farming,
is a move started here by the Salva
tion Army.
Business men interested in the
project will meet in the office of H. J.
Maxfield. state immigration commis
sioner, at the capitol next Friday, and
will endeavor to outline definite plans
for the start. The Salvation Army
started such a colony in Ohio several
years ago and later another in Cali
fornia, and men sent to both "made
good." Aitkin county, Minnesota, has
been selected as the most feasible
point at which to start the colony be
cause of the potato crop there.
AER0PL4NE
jATAirry
two Aviators are Hurled to
the Ground and Insianlly
Killed
By Associated Press.
SEVASTOPOL. Russia, March 23
double aeroplane fatality occurred
here today, when iSuithiLleutenant Al
bokrlonoff and his assistant, an engi
making a flight in a Farnam 'bi
plane. The aeroplane was seized by
a fust of wind which overturned it
and whirled it to* the'ttfwrad*-*I%*--twe
aviators were killed instantly and the
air craft was wrecked.
CHILORFN LEFT ALONE
DIE IN BURNING HOUSE
SHAWLO, Wis.. March 2 3
Three little children of Fred
4* Ziemer at Richmond were burned
to death in a fire which swept
through th dry timber and wiped 0
•J* out the Ziemer farm house at
Steveniag, according to word re
ceived here today. The children
were left alone while the mother
went for mail a mile away. 4»
SERGEANT MAJORHAYES
KINDLYJENENBEIED
MANY FRIENDS AT FORT LINCOLN
PRESENT HIM WITH TWO
HANDSOME GIFTS.
Solid Silver Loving Cup and Exquisite
ly Engraved (.old Watch Presented
to eVteran Soldi*-.
Seregant Major Dennis Hayes, who
Fort Lincoln, Thursday, to take
up his new duties as regimental ser
geant major of the Fourteenth United
States infantry near Helena, Mont.,
was the recipient of two handsome
presents from his many friends at the
post as souvenirs of his long and
faithful service.
Company "C," Fourteenth United
States infantry, presented him with
a huge solid silver loving cup on
which was engraved -an appropriate
inscrlpion, while a group of close per
sonal friends in Company "D" gave
him a gold watch of exquisite design
workmanship. The donors ex
pressed to the sergeant their appre
ciation of his service and extended
their best wishes for his happy future.
LIFE SAVERS ON DUTY.
Begin Year's Work in Chicago Earlier
Than Usual.
CHICAGO, March 23.—Government
savers, in command of Capt.
Charles Carland, took up their duties
for the season of 1912 last night at
the mouth of the Chicago river.
Capt. Carland called his aids to
gether on instructions from Washing
ton, which came almost two weeks
earlier than during the ten years
Capt. Carland has been in command
has been April 1. This is one ofpleasantly
eleven great lake stations ordered to
begin duty at this time.
IN CAPITAL OITY
Martin L. Kepplin of Elgin was an
arrival in the city hospitals and will
ttons for the same month a- year agoi spend a few days In one of the hos
tetaled $1«4,«86.7». 'pitals.
INMATES SUFFOCATED.
4 NORWALK, Conn., March 23.
4 —Six inmates of the Huron
4 county infirmary are dead' as a
result of asphyxiation last night.
Several others were overcome,
but are recovering.
It is supposed fires in the gas
4 stoves went out as a result of 8
4 the gas failure and that later
fr the gas supply came on again.
«.«« «.«««««.* «, «.«.«.
CROWDS GREET
ROOSEVELT ON
SPEAKING TOUR
Tells the People He Believes
They C»n Uovern Them
Well
PORTLAND, Me., March 23
Rooseveltd was welcomed by mem
bers of the Roosevelt club, and many
people, when he arrived here at noon
today to address the public meeting
of tonight.
A receptions from 2 to 4 this after
noon was arranged by the dub. Mr.
Roosevelt, in a brief speech at Dover,
N. H., asserted his confidence In the
people to govern themselves well,
and said in order to rule themselves,
must exercise self control.
On the trip from Boston, Mr. Roose
velt was greeted at most every sta
tion by crowds varying in sites.
MAKE NOISE
LIKE A QUAKE
NE
W a S
men set off so much dynamite under
a safe in the office of the Staten Is-,
land manufacturing company early
today that the explosion was heard
for miles, and many persons thought
there was an earthquake.
Five safe blowers fled after an ex
change of shots. The safe was blown
to pieces, and some of its1 contents'
were destroyed. There Is no clew to
the cracksmen.
SEEK FEED IN MONTANA
Wyoming Cattle Are Shipped to Yel
lowstone for Temporary Relief.
•MILES CITY, Mont., March 23^-As
a result of the long continued ex
tremely cold weather, accompanied
by a heavily crusted Bnow, the cattle
men of northern Wyoming have found
it necessary to ship their stock to the
country along the Yellowstone river
in Montana.
It is estimaed that at least 8,000
head have 'been shipped in within the
last two weeks, and every pound of
available hay that wag expected to be
left over the winter has been bought
up at greatly advanced prices.
Dozens of crews of hay-balers are
at work along the river bottoms, bal
ing the hay, which is being hauled
and shipped to the haifstarved herds
distributed in the different fields.
The cost of all this will be enor
mous, because as soon as "grass"
comes the stock will have to be
shipped back again to their ranges,
there 'being no remaining open ranges
along the Yellowstone.
SPLENDID TIME.
Dime Social Thursday Afternoon Was
Great Success.
Thursday afternoon over seventy
five ladies attended a dime social
given by the ladies of the Methodist
church at the home of Mrs. T. J.
Woodmansee, 4M Fifth street. The
afternoon was spent in a very delight
ful manner. A pleasing musical pro
gram was rendered, solos by Mes
dames Arnot and Larson being espec
ially pleasing. Dainty refreshments
were served 'uring the course of the
afternoon and a most enjoyable time
was reported by all.
FAREWELL RECEPTION.
Valley City Times-Record: Yester
day evening Mr. and Mrs. Frank E.
Packard were guests of honor at an in
formal reception at the home of Prof.
and Mrs. Morris Johnson. The func
tion was given by the ladies of the
bheyenne club of which Mrs. Packard
is a charter member, and in addition to
the club members and their husbands, it
was attended by a large number of in
vited guests. The evening was most
passed with music, games
and a general good time. An elaborate
luncheon was served. Mr. and Mrswork..
Packard, who leave for Bismarck the
latter part of next week where they
will make their future. home, will be
the guests of honor at a number of
social functions within the next few
days.
aiiiimMpi .11,»
Black Hand Fiends Operate
HAVE THROWN BRICKS THROUGH
WINDOWS OF'BANKER FUNK'S
RESIDENCE AND OFFICE—RE-
WARD HAS BEEN OFFERED FOR
APPREHENSION OF GUILTY
PARTIES AND NO MERCY WILL.
WE SHOWN OFFENDER.
Special to The Tribune.
WASHBURN, N. D., March 23.—
This village is in a state of profound
excitement as a result of alleged black
hand operations ./hich have been di
rected toward one of the prominent
bankers of the McLean county capital.
There was a faint suspicion that per
haps the outrages might have been
committed by some inane practical
Joker, but recent occurrences lead to
the belief that there is an ulterior mo
tive behind the mischief.
Cashier F. E. Funk of the First Na
tional bank of Washburn is the in
dividual toward whom the attacks are
directed. Recentlr a brick was thrown
through one of th windows of the
bank building. A short time later a
.brick was thrown through a window
of Mr. Funk's residence. A day or
so ago Mr. Funk, on his way to his
office, found apiece of paper with the
inscription, "Funk, we'll get you yet."
No reason can be ascribed for the ap
parent malicious intent of the culprit.
It is understood that the city au
thorities may offer a reward for the
apprehension of the guilty parties. Mr.
Funk offered a reward recently of $100
and has now Increased It to $200. The
offender will be shown no mercy if
he falls into the clutches of the offi
cers of the law.
MASSACRE
CAUSES FLIGHT
8y Associated Press. ....
SWATOW, China, March 23.—Busi
ness of all kinds has been suspended
in this city, and people are fleeing in
thousands owinf to fears of a massa
cre.
Severe fighting has occurred be
tween a body of Cantonese troops
and a force of local soldiery at'Chao
Chow Fu, 25 miles north of this city.
The local soldiers were defeated with
a heavy loss. Further troops are be
ing sent here from Canton.
SPRING OPENING FOR
SELZ SHOE COMPANY
SPLENDID LINE OF NFW STOCK
HAS RECENTLY BEEN
RECEIVED.
Popular Shoe H?use Will be Open
This Evening to Accommodate Pat
rons Desiring to Attend.
The spring opening of the local es
tablishment of the Selz shoe com
thy is being held today, ana a large
number of customers have been
flocking to the store throughout the
morning and afternoon.
The company has just received its
new spring stock and no more fas
tidious line is on the market. Mana
ger Ryan is gradually building up an
established trade which will assure
Ms firm a prosperous business here.
The spring oDentns sale will continue
this evening in order that all of the
store patrons may have an oppor
ity to attend.
BURNED HIS FINGERS
Linotype Operator Sorenson of the
Tribune force, while setting some
of the sizzling newspaper dope for
Saturday's Tribune, sustained a pain
ful injury to his right hand wjbich
necessitated a hurry trip to a sur
geon's office where the injured mem
ber was dressed.
PROMINENT VISITOR.
John Christiansen of New Salem,
was among the distinguished visitors
at the state capital Friday evening.
Mr. Christiansen is probably one of
the best informed men in the. state
on dairying and allied topics, and is
very prominent in farmers' institute
PURCHASED HOUSE.
I. A. Leonard has purchased the
Buckley property in this City. The
deal was consummated by. Attorney
Register.
'1
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