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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, April 12, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1912-04-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED.
Thirty-second Year N 8 9
NO INCREASE OF WAGES
HEAVY VOTE
AGAINST THEM
INJECTION
Meeting of Managers Will Be
Held Soon to Consider Re
sult of Vote
Original DemandforIncrease
of Wages Aggregated
Fifteen Per Gent
General Strike lay Yet Be
Favored by Firemen as
Well as Engineers
By Associated
NEW YORK CITY, April 12—By
a majority of more than 23,000 out
of 25,000 votes cast, the locomotive
engineers on fifty railroads east of
Chicago, and north of Norfolk, and
western, negotiations with the rail
roads for increased pay fail. The
count of the vote was completed at
noon today, and the result was made
known immediately by Warren S.
Stone, grand chief of the Brotherhood
of Locomotive Engineers, to J. C.
Stuart chairman of general managers
association of railroads.
The general managers have called
a meeting to be held here April 15,
to consider the result of the vote. The
engineers' officers have notified Stu
art that they would remain here for
a "reasonable time" to await a coun
ter proposition of the railroads. The
original demands of the engineers for
increases in pay aggregating fifteen
per cent was recently rejected by the
railroads. In addition to 25,000 mem.
bers of the brotherhood, Stone said
approximately 15,000 members of the
brotherhood of locomotive firemen
and enginemen had also voted on the
proposition. They are, he said, also
overwhelmingly in favor of authoriz
ing a strike, should further negotia
tions with the railroads fail. While
no formal vote was taken on the mat
ter engineers probably will remain
here until April 16th, awaiting fur.
ther word from the railroads.
BOYS DROWN IN
CAPSIZING BOAT
Were Mtnitieg to Cross
aUo River Fr«n Virginia
When loatllpset
By Associated
EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio, April 12
—Four boys were drowned today
when the boat in which tbey were
crossing the Ohio river from the Vir
ginia side, capsized twelve miles
south of here. The fifth boy was
saved. Those drowned were:
Henry Brandt, 20 Earl Brandt, 18
and Hugh Sproul, 18, all of Port Hom
er, Ohio, and Clifford Howard, 17, of
Fairview, W. Va.
4 4 A
FOUNDER DIE
WASHINGTON, April 1 2
Miss Clara Barton, founder of
the American Red Cross Society
died at her home in Glen Echo,
Md., this morning. The cause of
Ideath was chronic pneumonia,
with which she was stricken
about a year ago. Miss Barton
was born at Oxford, Mass., in
1821.
GENERAL MENOCAL
AGAIN CANDIDATE FOR
PRESIDENCY OF CUBA
ARE TWO PARTIES
Result of State CooventloD
Creates Two Republican
Courts May Be Required to
Settle Which is the Legal
Committee
By Associated Press.
DETROIT, April 12.—JAs a result of
the special interest in the state repub
lican convention at Bay City yester
day, there are in one sense, practical
ly two republican parties in Michigan
today, although neither side will rec
ognize the other ay representative of
the party.
There are two republican state
central committees, each claiming the
other illegal, and also two state chair
men. If Alex J. Groesbeck, whom the
Taft wing of the convention yesterday
elected as state chairman, tries to
serve as such, Frank Knox, tbe Roose
velt leader, elected chairman in the
fall of 1910 for a term of two years,
promises to carry the matter to the
courts. The same is true with re
spect to several committeemen who
were replaced at the convention yes
terday. Each faction is equally posi
tive that its contents are correct.
WHOLE FAMILY WAS
BRUTALLYJURDERED
lead ef Eack VictinCresked
and Ditcher Kotos Stick
ii Their todies
By Associated Press.
SAN ANTONIO, Texas, April 12—
Wiliam Burton, his wife and two chil
dren, and Leaon Evers, his brother
in-law, were murdered while asleep
in their home here early today. The
head of each victim appears to have
been crushed with an ax, and butcher
knives were found sticking in all tke
bodies, except those of the children.
All the victims were negroes. There
are apparently no clews to the the
perpetrators of the crime, but the pol.
ice believe a negro fanatic is respon
sible.
THE SPIRIT OF PROGRESS.
Over half a million dollars to be expended
for new buildings in the Capital City during
the summer of 1912 regardless of crop condi
tions, and with two unfavorable years imme
diately preceding! The figures in the above
table are conservative, being the architects'
own estimates. In most of the cases the struc
tures will cost even more before they are com
pleted. If the season's developments assure a
splendid crop still greater construction work
will commence. These figures portray, far
more forcibly than any words that might be
spoken, or any editorials that might be writ
ten, the steady, substantial, certain growth of
Bismarck, the metropolis destined to become
within the two ensuing decades, the largest
city in the state, and one of the best of the en
tire Northwest.
BUILDING OPERATIONS ALREADY
COMMENCING.
Excavating has already commenced for a
large number of the structures to be erected.
Those that are not being started today will
be well under way before May 15. The four
coming weeks will see the inauguration of the
greatest building activity ever before mani
fested in this section of the commonwealth.
THE FEDERAL BUILDING.
The most important of the new edifices is
the United States post office and court house
that will be erected on the corner of Third
and Broadway. It will be three stories and
a full basement, 64 by 100 feet. It will cost
$150,000. Excavation work is now being done.
It will be completed before September 1, 1913.
MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM.
The municipal auditorium will grace the
corner of Sixth and Broadway. It will cost
about $45,000. It will measure 80 by 128 feet,
with a rear wall 72 feet in height. Prelimin
ary excavations have been made, and the con
tract work will begin within thirty days. The
building will be completed by October 1.
THREE HUGHES BUILDINGS.
E. A. Hughes will erect three buildings this
summer. The largest will be on Third street
opposite the Masonic Temple. It will be a
three story apartment house, costing $25,000.
Work will be started at once. The Hughes
building on Fourth street is already under
way, the foundation being in place. The
brick are hauled, and construction work will
begin immediately. This structure will be
two stories and basement, 25 by 140 feet, and
will cost $15,000. The third block to be erect
ed by Mr. Hughes is to be on Main street,
east of the Dakota block, and will replace the
wooden building destroyed by fire two weeks
ago, formerly occupied by the Kundert hard
ware company. It will be 25 by 80 feet, one
story and basement, costing $5,000. The work
of clearing away the fire debris and excavat
ing is to be started at once, the contract hav
ing been let to John L. Larson Thursday ev
ening.
STANDARD OIL COMPANY.
The Standard Oil company will erect a
$35,000 distributing warehouse on Front
street. Work is being delayed while the title
to three of their lots is quieted. This will be
ptemnrck Pflili) ®rilmiu\
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA. FRIDAY A I 12, 1912
BU DURING 1 2 REGARDLESS
Buildings Actually to Be Constructed in
Bismarck During: 1912
Federal Building, Cor. Third and Broadway $150,000
Sixty Private Dwellings, Aver, cost, $3,000 180,000
Auditorium, Corner Sixth and Broadway ..
Standard Oil Company, Front Street
Hughes Building, Third Street
Grand Pacific.Annex, Fourth Street
Hughes Building, Fourth Street
Webb Block, Fifth Street
Bismarck Tribune, Broadway
Treacy Apartment House, 2d & Broadway
Bismarck High School, Add. Improvements
Hughes Building, Main Street
Total $520,000
45,000
35,000
25,000
25,000
15,000
15,000
10,000
10,000
5,000
5,000
accomplished shortly, and building operations
will be under way very soon. In addition to
the warehouse, the company purposes to con
struct a large eight room house north of their
wholesale building to be used by their em
"'ploves.
GRAND PACIFIC ANNEX.
Henry Tatley will build his northwest annex
to the Grand Pacific hotel. Work is already
progressing. The annex will be four stories
and a basement, 60 by 80 feet, and will cost
not less than $25,000, probably running a lit
tle higher. It will be ready for occupancy be
fore October 1.
WEBB BLOCK.
W. II. Webb will build a handsome and mod
ern 'office building on Fifth street on the sec
ond lot north of the Atlantic Cafe. It will
be two stories and a full basement, 25 by 130
feet in dimensions, and will cost $15,000. Work
will commence thereon before May 15.
TRIBUNE BUILDING.
The building occupied by the Bismarck Trib
une will be remodelled. The southwest cor
ner will be constructed back to the alley. The
Avail on the Broadway side will be taken out
and replaced with handsome Hebron brick to
match the rest of the building. The book bind
ery -will be removed to the basement, and the
entire second floor will be fitted into modern
office suites. The improvement work and ad
dition will cost $10,000.
TREACY APARTMENT HOUSE.
Dr. R. H. 1 reacy will build a modern apart
ment house on the corner of Second and
Broadway. It will cost $10,000 and will be
one of the largest in the city.
HIGH SCHOOL IMPROVEMENTS.
Additional improvements will be made in
the new high school building, probably in
cluding the finishing of the gymnasium, man
ual training and domestic science departments.
The improvements will cost $5,000.
SIXTY PRIVATE DWELLINGS.
Plans are already on foot for the construc
tion of sixty new houses in the residence por
tion of the city. In case a favorable crop
condition prevails, this number will increase
to over one hundred. Some of the houses will
cost $2,000 and $2,500, and others will cost
$4,000 and $5,000, with two or three $10,000
residences contemplated. The Tribune places
a conservative estimate of $3,000 as the aver
age cost of each dwelling, making the total
amount to be actually done in this line at
the present time, $180,000.
PROJECTS FOR THE FUTURE.
In addition to the half million dollars worth
of construction work that will be done re
gardless of conditions, there is almost a similar
amount in view in case crops appear favorable.
The Sisters of St. Benedict will erect a $150,000
hospital on the block north of St. Mary's con
vent. It is possible that excavating for this
edifice will commence late in the summer. The
Sisters are building an addition to their acad
emy at St. Joseph, Minn., as well as a church,
and do not feel like commencing the Bismarck
undertaking until their Minnesota structures
are well under way. There are also many
business blocks to be erected if conditions
warrant, and Bismarck stands on the verge
of an era of expansion and development far
greater than it ever dreamed of in years gone
by.
FRANK AuVAHOCfty
CRISIS ENDS FOR
FLOOD FIGHTERS
While Breaks Hay Occur
Along River Water Is Now|(
Rapidly Receding
Still Serious at Some Towns
Where Telephone Service
Has Been Broken
8y Associated Press.
MEMPHIS, Tenn., April 12.--Little
armies of 'flood fighters are holding
their own today all along the. upper
stretches of the Mississippi river to
day.
At Luxora and Osceola. Ark., the
situation is still critical and breaks
may occur, but the flood is rapidly
receding and the end of the crisis is
in sight.
Telephone Service Broken.
MEMPHIS, Tenn., April 12.—'Tele
phone communication was lost dur
ing the forenoon with Luxora and
Osceola, Ark., and Marked Tree, Ark.,
and the last news heard from the
first two named towns are that the
levee situation is very grave. This an
nouncement was made by tbe St.
Francis, levee board. Last reports
from Marked Tree said water was ris
ing rapidly there at albout an inch
per hour.
Women and children have been tak
en to the highest points in Luxora.
which for the most part lies below
the levee.
EXPLODING SHELL
RUPTURED TJUICAB
Striking ii Paris
BavedBmeoced Hewing
By Associated Press.
PARIS. April 12—A bomb exploded
inside the taxi auto in Rue de Lyon
this morning. The blast shook the
neighborhood and wrecked the motor
car. The chauffeur and several pe
destrians were injured.
The outrage is believed to have
been committed by chauffeurs, many
of whome have been on a strike for
two months. Many windows were
smashed by the force of the explo.
sion.
LAST EDITION
EIGHT PAGES
GRANT DIED SUDDENLY
IN NEW YORK HOTEL
«j» «j» «j» «j» •$• «j» j» »j» «j» $
FRANK A. VANDERLIP
TO B£ A W I N E S S A
MONEY TRUST INQUIRY
FIVE CENTS
HIS DEATH WAS
TO MPUOLIC
Only His Wife and Nurse
Were Present When Beath
Overcame Him
Attempts Had Been Hade To
Keep His Whereabouts
Hidden of Late
in Apparently Good
Health When He Went to
Hotel Wednesday
NEW YORK, April 12.—Gen.
'Frederick D. Grant, commander
of the department of the east,
and a son ojf the famous Oivil
war general, died suddenly at
midnight at the Hotel Bucking
iam, where he had been secret
ly taken Wednesday evening by
his physician.
K? *$* *5* *5* ty
Death Caused a Shock.
His presence in this city was not
known until the news that he had
been suddenly stricken was flashed
to the newspaper offices. A police
man stationed near the hotel called
an ambulance at the request of an
employe, who told him General Grant
was choking to death. Although there
had been rumors of Grant's illness,
and reports that he never again
would take up aative duties of Gov
ernors island, news of his death
came as a distinct shock to the pub
lic. According to Dr. Robert Abbe
and Dr. Edward Dench, his physicians,
death was caused by heart failure.
Cancer Not the Cause.
General Grant had been suffering
for some time, they asserted, in an
official statement from "diabetes and
attendant digestive disturbances." Ac
cording to recent reports Grant had
been in a private pavilion in St.
Luke's hospital in this city, suffering
from a cancerous growth under his
tongue, the same affection which
caused the death of his distinguished
(Continued on page 8.)
PRESIDENT RETURNS
TO WHITE HOUSE
AddressedChsanalesofYale,
'78 Ii New York Last
Night
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, April 12.—Presi
dent Taft returned to the capital from
New York this morning. He was ac
companied by his brother, Charles P.
Taft, Senator Root and E. C. Duncan,
republican national committeeman
from North Carolina. The president
went to New York yesterday and ad
dressed class mates of Yale, '78, and
Union League there last night.
4,4.
FOUND ON BOULEVARD
LYNN, Mass., April 12—The
body of George E. Marsh, presi
«j» dent of the soap manufacturing
«0 company of this city, was found
today on the boulevard. There
were five bullet wounds in bis
body. The police belive Mann
was murdered.
4 4

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