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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, April 12, 1912, Image 4

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FOUR
•I8MARCK TRIBUNE COMPANY
ETCTT Evening, Except Sunday, and Weekly.
Publication Office: .„.„,..
IH FOURTH STREET. COK. BROADVVAV
Daily established 1681 Weekly, 1873.
BY MARSHALL H. JEWELL
Oldest in SUtc.
Subscription Sates:
L»i!j by carrier "0 cents montli
fitW by mail P«
Weekly by mail :.$1.£0 per vear
AU papers are continued :'ntil an explicit
•rder to discontinue Is received, and until all
^rearages are paH.
Correspondents wanted in every city, town
tnd precinct in the western part of the state.
"No attention paid to anonymous contribu
tions Writer's name must be known to the
alitor, but not necessarily for publication.
Manuscripts offered tor publication will be
returned if not available. Communications
tor the Weekly Tribune should reach this
office not later than Tuesday of each week
to insure publication in the current issue.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF BURLEIGH
COUNTY.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF CITY OF
BISMARCK.
bntercd at the post office at Bismarck, N.
as second-class matter under Act of Con
cress of March 3. 1878.
Member of Associated Press.
FRIDAY APRIL 12, 1912.
..
SECOND ANNUAL NORTH DA
KOTA INDUSTRIAL EXPOSI
TION, BISMARCK. OCTOBER 1
TO 13, 1912.
fy .j.
CONDITIONS ENCOURAGING
The rainfall of Thursday and today
has aroused a greater feeling of opti
mism in the breasts of North Dako.
tans. The soil was already in excel
lent shape as a result of the snows
going off gradually, the moisture sink
ing deep into the ground. This added
rain will work wonders. Spring work
is being rushed along in every sec
tion of the state, with the soil in
fine condition, nothing more is needed
save two or three weeks of good
weather that will enable the farmers
to pursue their spring work and do
their seeding without interruption.
Proper farming methods with an even
break on weather conditions and mois
ture during the summer will assure
the state a bountiful harvest in the
"fall. Of greater interest to North
Dakota is the transformation to a
dairying state. More and more farm,
ers are devoting themselves to dairy
ing, which necessitates corn and al
falfa raising and the building of silos
to secure the greatest productiveness
from their cows. Pigs and clover are
also making their appearance. That
the day will soon come when the
state's prosperity will not depend up
on weather conditions, nor upon the
yield of wheat and flax and other
cereals is the cause of the greater re.
joicing among North Dakota's citi
zens.
FIRE PREVENTION
The need of work such as is car
ried on in North Dakota by the Fire
prevention Association is no better
manifested than in New York City,
where the annual fire loss increased
four millions of dollars in 1911 over
1910. There is something pathetic
in the editorial of one of Gotham's
newspapers, which says:
When its figures are analyzed, the
report of the Fire Department for
1911 is not so encouraging as at first
appears from the reported reduction
in the number of fires. Although
there were but 13,868 fires in 1911, as
against 14,405 in 1910, the fire loss
showed an increase of nearly four
million dollars, jumping from $8,591,.
831 in 1910 to $12,470,806 last year.
Moreover, the actual reduction in fires
during 1911 is a mere scratch on the
surface of the need when we compare
the total with metropolitan London's
worst offenders. That this exception
is doubtless correct in attributing the
gain to thorough inspection and the
placing of some 5,000 violations on
buildings which were found to be the
wrst offeneders. That this exception
al drop in the fire rate was due at
least in part to good fortune is, how
ever, clear from the renewed outbreak
Per
Dozen
Carnation Special
of fires during the first few months
of 1912.
Every intelligent citizen will stop
for a moment to reflect what this
means, this enormous waste of pro
perty, with its toll of human life.
Each citizen should do all in his pow.
er to take such precautionary meas
ures as possible to prevent fires in
their own homes and home communi
ties.
OLD MAN TROUBLE
Old Man Trouble come a-knockin* at
de door.
Says, "You's had some bother an' you
g'ineter hab some more.
See dat sun a-shinin' bright an' warm
up in de sky?
He g'ineter git so hot he'll nearly
melt you by an' by.
See dem little flowers a-bloomin' mod
est and so fair?
Dey'II soon be hidden by de weeds
a-growin' everywhere.
De bird that keeps a-singin', though
it helps to cheer you some—
You'll never hear 'im warble when de
skeeter starts to hum.
Old Man Trouble, he siddown an* rest
his hat.
17ut we had to move Mm 'roun' to
brush de ashes off de mate.
De way he kep' a-talkin' it would pes
terate a saint.
De things he says will happen is
enough to make you faint.
But we rapped 'im wif a broomstick
an' we splashed 'im wif a mop,
We spread de paint an' whitewash
everywhere he tried to stop,
Till Old Man Trouble says, "I'll bid
goodday to you.
It ain't no chance to visit when dar's
so much work to do."
—Philander Johnson, in Washington
Star.
THE TYPICAL BISMARCK SPIRIT
A great deal has been said, and
much has been written concerning
Bismarck's future. The building op
erations that will be under way with,
in thirty days, especially in the down
town district, will demonstrate to the
outside world, to the thousands of
travellers who pass our way, and to
our residents themselves, that Bis
marck citizens are men who do things
not dream them all day long.
Industry and enterprise are the bul
warks of any city's prosperity and
success. The Bismarck spirit.. That
is the spirit of victory. Energy, pluck,
perseverance and progess march hand
in hand. Just so long as Bismarck
exemplifies these charaicterisVtycs ftt
will forge persistently to the vanguard
of the wide awake cities of the na
tion. Nothing typifies the true Bis
marck spirit better than the vast
amount of building which will actually
be done at the state capital this year.
whether or not a bountiful harvest
is reaped in the fall.
The expert views about the pro
tection of the Panama canal are a
great disappointment to the thrifty
Americans who entertained hopes of
creating splendid perspectives of mar.
ket gardens along the banks of the
big waterway. However, there is still
an abundance of soil in the United
States awaiting any agricultural en
erprise not yet intelligently occupied.
In its plans for overseeing the wat
er ways as well as the railways, the
interstate commerce commission is
liable to encounter obstinacy worthy
of the traditional canal boat mule.
Some prominent democrats discuss
Woodrow Wilson with a freedom that
suggests a satisfaction in discover*
ing an opportunity to lecture a school,
master.
Col. Goethal's suggestion that the
Panama Canal Zone be turned into a
jungle makes the ordinary conserva
tion program look like retail business.
Mexico regarded the banishment of
Diaz as a great success. Now the
country is beginning to suspect that
it was a collossal failure.
The bright sun is bringing on an immense
crop that will be prime, fresh stock. We
guarantee every flower will be cut the day sold
Saturday, April 13th Only
50c
Tw
ncc
Dozen uK,
Mail orders for shipment Saturday will be
accepted any time
HOSKINS' FLORAL CO.
Bismarck, North Dakota
m-++++++++m*0++++++*+++0t++i+++++++++t
Capitol Run
GONE TO MAYVILLE
Deputy Suiperin'lende.it of Public
Instruction W. E. Parsons has gone
to Mayville to look after some educa
tional matters.
VISITED REFORM SCHOOL
Judge Carmody, Dr. Robertson and
Henry Tatley of the board of control
inspected the reform school at Man
dan today.
GO TO ST. PAUL
Govanor and Mrs Joh.i Burke will
leave for St. Paul, Sunday. The gov
ernor will be one of ine most promi
nent speakers at the big democrat
banquet held in St. Paul, Monday.
CAPITOL BI-ITORS
Lewis O. Magnus of Flasher, C. T.
Butts of Minneapolis, J. B. Gornichall
of Evans and Harry E. Wells of St.
Paul called at the capital and visited
the different departments Wednesday.
LIEUTENANT APPOINTED
The adjutant general's depart
ment today issued an order ap
pointing Second Lieutenant F. A.
Moore recruiting officer for Company
"C" at Grafton, and an order granting
a leave of absence for six months to
First Lieutenant J. L. Lewis of the
First infantry.
MORE STOCK
The First State bank of Abercrom
bie was yesterday authorized by the
secretary of state and the state bank
examiner to increase its capital_stock
from $10,000.00 to $15,000.0^.
VISITED CAPITOL
A H. Nieter of the New Leipzig
State bank was doing business with
the bank examiners this morning. A
change has been ordered in the name
of Mr. Nieter's town and it will here
after be known as Lawther.
WAS AT CAPITOL
Dr. Wallace N. Stearns, assistant
professor of history at the University
of iNorth Dakota, was among the
prominent visitors at the capitol yes
terday afternoon.
NEW CASHIER
W. J. Glass is the new cashier of
the Farmers and1 Merchants State
bank if Inkister, having this week
succeeded R. J. Loubek. And F. O.
Beach has been elected cashier of the
Citizen State Bank of Tagus to suc
ceed G. O. Haugen.
LIBRARY TRAINING
The University of North Dakota
this sunvmer will offer a six weeks'
course in library training under the
direction of Clarence W. Sumner, the
university librarian. During the week
beginning with July 22, Mrs. M. C.
Budlong, secretary of the public li
brary commission, will lecture on
"Children's Work." "Book Selection,"
Work of Library Commission," and
"Personal Relation of Librarian With
Library Boards, Schools, Etc." This
is the first time in the history cf the
state that library instruction has been
attempted at a summer school. The
rapid increase of libraries in almost
every town and city in the state has
made such a course necessary and
the university summer school man
agers are looking for a large enroll
ment in that depuartment.
IN SUPREME CO.URT
The following cases have been set
for argument .before the supreme
court on the 18th of this month.
O. K. McKone. et al., appellants, vs.
City of Fargo, resopndent. Attorneys
Robinson & Lemke will argue for the
appellants, and Attorney W. H. Shure
for the respondent.
Mary L. Mann, respondent, vs. W.
F. Redmon, as administrator, appel
lant. This case which is a motion to
dismiss appeal, comes from Cass coun
ty, and the respondent's case will be
argued by Attorney Taylor Crum of
Fargo, while Attorneys Augustus Rob
erts and G. S. Roberts will argue for
tlie appellant
jBurleigh county, respondent, vs. H.
C. Rhud. appellant. State's Attorney
W. L. Smiith will argue for this county
and Attorneys Newton & Dullam for
Mr. Rhud.
Bismarck Water Supply company,
respondent, vs. City of Bismarck, ap
pellant. Attorneys Newton & Dullam
will appear for the respondent, and
Attorney F. H. Register for the ap
pellant.
NEW CORPORATIONS
Charters of incorporation were to
day issued by the department of
state to:
Fessenden Free Press, formed for
the purpose of conducting a general
printing and .publishing business at
Fessenden. The capital stock is $10,
000 and tfe directors are C. M. Brin
ton, E. R. Brinton and iH. M. Brinton,
all of Fessenden.
The Abstract & Title company of
Medora. Formed for the purpose of
carrying on a general abstract busi
ness. The capital stock is $10,000 and
the directors are George E. Burgess
and J. G. Bryant of Medora, and John
Keobane of Beach.
Hartland Farmers' Elevator com
pany of Hartland, Ward county.
Formed for the purpose of buying
and building grain elevators and
warehouses the 'buying, seeling. stor„
ing, shipping and handling of grain,
and the buying and selling of feed and
fuel. The capital stock is $7,000, an
the directors are Nels P. Larsen of
Berthold, Martin D. Johnson of Hart
land, Lewis Iveraon of Donnybrook,
W. W. Wice* of Berthold, R. L. John
son of Donnybrook, Gilbert (Sklnnings
rud of Canpio, and James Johnson of
Dbnnybrook.
FREIGHT RATE ANALYSIS
An analysis of Western Classifica
tion NOB. 50 and 51 has been com
piled under the supervision of the
classtficsitkm committee of railroad
commissions, shippers organisations
and shippers in western classification
territory, consisting of Rate Expert
J. A. Little of the North Dakota rall-
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE.
road commission, C. B. Bee of Oklaho
ma, A. D. Beals of Iowa, T. N. Bfrad
bury of Missouri, A. L. Flynn of Min
nesota, J. H. Hogan of Wisconsin, O.
D. Hudnall of Texas, V. G. Powell of
Nebraska, C. H. Rhodehaven of St.
Louis. E. E. Smythe cf Kansas, E. F.
Swartz of South Dakota, H. G. Wilson
.of Kansas City, and T. F. Wolfe of
Illinois. Thds analyses has been sent
to the shippers of the states affected
by the change in rates, for examina
tion. They will the.i report to the
railroad commissioners the affect
upon their shipments. In this way
the railroad commissioners will be
enabled to go before the interstate
commerce commission at the hearing
at Washington, D. C, April 15, pre
pared for business. The case of the
state of North Dakota, ex rel. North
Dakota Trust company, respondent,
vs. W. H. Stutsman, et al., appellant,
set for hearing before the supreme
court on April 17, has been postponed
so as to allow President Stutsman of
the North .Dakota railroad commission
to go to Washingtn fr the interstate
commerce hearing on classification
No. 51.
OUR GROWING INDUSTRY
Dairy Commissioner R. F. Flint
says: "There is an industry that is
not subject to failures that brings
returns not once a year but 365 days
each year enriches the soil, cleans
the land, plants groves, builds houses
and barns, pays taxes, interest and
mortgages accumulated during years
of crop failures, promotes thrift,
economy and prosperity by paying as
we go and still leaves some cash in
the pockets and that is the dairy
industry.
Dairying promotes thrift by enabl.
ing the farmer to use his time, which
is to a greater or less extent capital,
during all seasons of the year.
It promotes economy because dairy
stock is able to convert much of th.e
coarser feeds that are produced on
a farm that might otherwise go to
waste, into valuable milk and cream.
The dairyman is able to buy for
cash and thereby reduce his expense
of living. Investigation has shown
that a person buying for cash will
live two days on what he would con
sume in one and one-thalf days if
bought on time. If buying on time,
you also pay interest on the purchase
price.
Dairying Increases the value of
farm lands more rapidly than exclus
ive grain farmin, because it increases
the earnings of the land.
Successful dairying necessitates di
versified farming and lessens the dan.
ger of crop failure, which sometimes
comes when one kind of crop is de
pended on.
Dairying anchors the man to the
farm, causes him to feel at home,
which encourages him to put hs best
efforts nto his labor and by that token
secures for himself and his family the
best in return.
Seems reasonable, doesn't it?
t******^*******^****************^*
0
City News
HAVE GONE EAST.
Mrs. Roy Hitchcock and young son,
of Helena, Mont., who have been vis
iting at the home of Mrs. P. E. Byrne
resumed their Journey on No. 2 last
evening.
Mrs. Hitchcock is the daughter of
E. A. Goodkind, formerly a well
known resident of Bismarck, who sub.
sequently located in Helena, Mont.
FEWER DEATriJ) IN MARCH ..
During the month of March there
were five deaths in the city as com
pared with 14 in the same month in
1911. For the quarter ending March
31st the total number of deaths was
13 during the same period last year
the total number was 31.
GOES TO CANADA
Rev. Nelson E. Ellsworth, who has
been rector of St. George's Episcopal
church during the winter, departed
Friday morning for points in the nor
thern part of the state, from whence
he will go into Canada for the sum
mer. There will be no services in
St. George's church until Rev. Lewis
Wilford assumes charge, which will
be some time in May.
LEFT FOR EAST
Mrs. Scott W. Derrick has departed
for a visit to her old home at Wheel,
ing, W. Va., she will also visit for
some time in New York City and oth
er eastern points before returning
to her home.
MUST SECURE LICENSES
All dogs found on the streets after
May 1, that have not the 1912 dog
tag will be killed by the police. Own
ers may secure licenses at the police
station in the basement of the Are
hall.
SON IS PARTNER
Austin Logan has announced that
he has taken his son, Roy, into part
nership with him, both in the cattle
business, and in the store. Roy has
made good with his father, and will
have full charge of the business.
BOX OF CANDY FREE
To each child, with a carnation to
every lady patron at our Saturday
Matinee at 3: SO. Admission 5 and 10
cents. At the BISMARCK THEATRE
BABY BOY.
A baby boy was born Easter morn,
ing to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Burtts.
All concerned are doing well. Mrs.
Scott arrived in the city from Livona
to visit with her daughter.
MANY ARE GOING
There will be a big attendance of
local Knights of Pythias at the dis
trict convention to he held at Mandan
Monday evening. A special train has
been secured which will depart from
the capital city at 8. o'clock Bis
marck time, and w« return' immedi
ately after the lodge work is ended.
MAENftERCHOR DANCE
The members of the Bismarck
Maennerchor enjoyed another of tbeir
dancing parties at the Maennerchor
hall last evening. There was a large
crowo in attendance and good music
had been secured. All had a pleas
ant time.
HERE FROM DICKINSON
W. J. Elliott of Dickinson was1 num
bered among the prominent slope
country visitors in the Exposition
City Friday.
REMOVING DIRT
Laborers with teams are engaged
in removing the nsightly pile of dirt
and sand at the corner cf Seventh
and Main streets, soth of the Soo de
pot. This immense sand pile has long
been an eye sore all residents of
the city, and great satisfaction is
being expressed over its removal. The
dirt is being sued in filling up depres
sions in the streets.
FILM MAN HERE.
L. V. Calvert, manager of the Gen
eral Film comipany of 'Minneapolis,
was calling upon the management of
the Orpheum theater this week, ar
ranging for new films whiich will give
Bismarck the most up-to-date motion
pictures to be secured.
BOX OF CANDY FREE
To each child, with a carnation to
every lady patron at our Saturday
Matinee at 3: SO. Admission 5 and 10
cents. At the BISMARCK THEATRE
HAVE THE BUTCHER
Martin Krohn of Watertown, Minn.,
has been employed by the Gussner
meat market to care for their large
trade, additional help having become
necessary in getting out orders.
RETURNED FROM CHICAGO
'Frank Crowl, who has been spend
ing the winter in Chicago, arrived in
the city on No. 3 Friday morning,
and will spend the summer in Bis
marck, being employed1 by the Lewis
Vidger company.
MEET TOMORROW NIGHT
There will be a meeting of the Au
tomobile club at the Comercial club
rooms tomorrow (Saturday) night.
ELKS TO DANCE
Final Party of Season at the Elks
Hall This Evening.
The mem'bers of Bismarck lodge
No. 1189, B. P. O. E., will wind up
their season's series of dancing par
ties with a dance to be given at the
Elks hall this evening. There will be
a large attendance and' a cordial in.
vitation ha.tf been extended to alliginal
visiting Elks who m#y be in the city
to attend and enjoy the good time.
CONTEST CASE
A contesit case occupied the atten
tion of the officials of the United
States land office, being ended Thurs*
day evening. It was the case of Nel
son versus Winkler. The interested
parties reside near Aplin. F. L. Conk,
lin represented Nelson, and H. R.
Berndt defended Winkler.
TO ST. PAUL
Attorney H. R. Berndit departed
-Thursday evening on No. 2 for St.
Paul, where he was called to attend
to some legal matters.
GOING TO M'KENZIE
IMiss Anna Maloney will go to Mc
Kenzle, Saturday, to take testimony
in some cases that are to be called
there on that day.
BOX OF CANDY FREE
To each child, with a carnation to
every lady patron at our Saturday
Matinee at 3: SO. Admission 5 and 10
cents. At the BISMARCK THEATRE
JURY DISAGREED
©T. LOUIS, April 12.—The
jury in the case of Mrs. Annie
Himnlng on trial at Hillsboro,
Mo., on the charge of complicity
in the murder of her husband,
Martin Hunniag. failed to agree
today and was discharged after
being out 21 hours.
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY.
(,»
FOR RENT—Furnished room in mod
ern house. 117 1st St., phone 332R.
SEED GRAIN—'Wheat, oats, barley,
flax. Holland Nursery. Jos. Hol
land.
IISEDSKETI
To Darken the 'Hair and Rej3
store Gray and Faded HaiB
to Its Natural Color.
It is easier to preserve the color oil
the hair than to restore it, although it
possible to do both. Our grand
mothers understood the secret They
made a "sage tea," and their dark,
flossy hair long after middle life was
lue tothis fact Our mothers have gray
lairs before they are fifty, but they are
beginning to appreciate the wisdom of
our grandmothers in using "sage tea" I
for their hairandare fast following suit
The present generation has the advan
tage of the past in that it can get a
ready-to-use preparation called Wyeth's
Sage and Sulphur Hair Remedy. As a
scalp tonic and color restorer this prep
aration is vastly superior to the ordinary
"sage tea" made by our grandmothers.
The growth and beauty of the hair
depends on a healthy condition of the
scalp. Wyeth's Sago and Sulphur Hair
Remedy quicklykills the dandruff germs
which rob the hair of its life, color and
lustre, makes the scalp clean and
healthy, gives the hair strength, color
and beauty, and makes it grow.
Geta60centbottlefrom yourdruggist
today. wHe will give your money back
if you are notsatisfied after a fair triaL
itowan's Drag 8tore. Bismarck. N. D.
I
Amusements
BISMARCK THEATER.
«:•.• &
Introducing for tonight and Satur
day, the noted animated illustrations
of worlds events, showing the great
occasions of state, international hap.
penings, and world famous people.
Detailed information is given in adis
played news article elsewhere in to
day's Tribune—read it.
ORPHLwM THEATER.
«8*
2—Acts Tonight—2
The new program at the Orpheum
tonight wit the exception of one act
that appeared last evening, is sure
to mcie than please all that attend.
With two vaudeville acts, four reels
of real pictures and a classy illust
rated song, the Orphetum is sure to
be packed tonight and tomorrow.
Marion and1 Deane have a p.easing
comedy act enit/tled "Getting Mar
ried." which surely pleased all. Frank
Neville is a singing and dancing co
median that comes with the best of
reports of having a good act. (Never
has a picture program been shown in
Bismarck that could equal the one
that is to be shown tcnight. "Pathe's
Weekly" No. 9 will be the regular fea
ture. A great Bunnygraph comedy
will be seen in "Chumps," in which
John Bunny and Marshall P. Wilder
are the "chumps," and the features.
"The Ghost's Warning" is a powerful
Edison production. 'His Sister's Chil
dren" is. a lively comedy with 'Maurice
Costello in the leading role. Miss
Myrtle Degnan will have a new song
and all new music will be furnished
by the Orpheum orchestra. Go early
tonight if you wish a seat at the first
performance.
BIJOU THEATRE
CASEY JONES WITH OLLlE MACK
The success oif Oliver LaBadie's
comedy, "Casey Jones," was of such
a cyclonic nature that the manage
ment was induced to launch several
new ^or\ it.kjf 'Iiere l.'^Nir, foui se
^rate productions now touring the dif
ferent sections of the country the or.
"umber one" organization
headed by Ollie Mack will appear at
the Bijou Monday April 15.
Ollie Mack is well remembered here
as the co-star in the famous Murray
& Mack productions of "Shooting the
Chutes," "Finnegan's Fall" etc., and
as public preference this season seems
JOHN BUNNY.
The Feature in 'Chumps" at the Or
pheum Tonight.
MARCIA HARRIS
In "Casey Jones" at the Bijou
Monday
FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 1912.
KJ1PIT7
The Leading Grocer
Nothing but first-class Goods.
Everything the Market Affords.
Fresh
Dressed Chickens.
Spring Lamb
Head Lettuce
Hothouse Tomatoes
Asparagus
Cucumbers
Radishes Rhubarb
Waukesha Cheese
Sweet Cream Puffs
Almond Macarooms
to favor comedy and established com
edians, an enthusiastic reception will,
no doubt, be accorded this old favorite
in anew play.
THE TRUTH ABOUT BLUING.
Talk No, 2.
Avoid liquid bluing. Don't buy water
for bluing. All the water contained Is
so much adulteration. Glass bottles
make an expensive package add
nothing to value to consumer.
Always ask for RED CROSS BALL
BLUE, the blue that's all blue. Makes
the laundress smile out loud. Large
package, 5 cents. ALL GROCERS.
BOX OF CANDY FREE
To each child, with a carnation to
every lady patron at our Saturday
Matinee at 3:30. Admission 5 and 10
cents. At the BISMARCK THEATRE
Cravenettes for rainy weather, a
$10 coat for $5.75 at A. W. Lucas Co.
HE SOAKED HIS
MOTHER-IN-LAW
Last evening Peter Johnson was ar
rested and this morning was ar
raigned before a justice of the peace
on the charge of striking his mot'aer
in-law, Mrs. Ella Hanson. Mrs. Han
son told the judge that Pete came
home last night smoking a stinking
cigar. As she was trouibled with
asthma it started her coughing, she
objected and so the trouble ensued*
until he struck her a severe blow. The
old lady said she was sorry the trou
ble occurred as she had always liked
Pete and did not object to his smok
ing, on the contray she enjoyed tie
smell of a good cigar, but could not
stand the smell of the vile cigar he
was smoking last night. The judge
was a good judge and a judge of a
good cigar, and discharged the pris
oner. He told him if he smoked in
the future to try the "All Stock and
No Style" cigar as they only cost a
nickel and are worth ten cents that
they are made by the'Ruhles & Stock
Co. of St. Paul, and are retai'.ed in
Bismarck by
6. A. Selvlg at the Candy
S
re
Hanson stopped at his
store and bought a box of "All Stock
and No Style" cigars to surprise her
son-in-law on his return home. After
Pete had smoked one, the old lady
declared it was the most fragrant ci
gar he had ever smoked. They kissed
and made up and declared they would
not to quarrel in the future.
The Square Deal
Grocery
Our New Fresh Stock is
open for business, where
courteous service, prompt
attention, and
methods will be our feature.
As business will be cash, our
motto is quick sales and
small profits. We cordially
invite a share of your trade.
Is the Boy's Worth Determined by the
John Dawson & Son
205 Fifth St. Phone 196
Freckles on His Face?
We look back of the freckles and help the
boy build up good healthy brain cells
BOYS ARE OUR JOY
Have you given us a chance at you boy?
BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOL
From 12 to1 Ave. B. and 4th St.
1
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