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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, May 03, 1912, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1912-05-03/ed-1/seq-3/

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COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT VIC
NE88 RETURNS FROM NORTH
ERN PART OF BURLEIGH COUNw
TY WHERE HE WAS VISITING
RURAL SCHOOLS. ALL SPRINQ
WORK IS PROQRE88INQ NICELY
CROP8 ARE LOOKING FINE
County Superintendent or «chools
C. L. Vignest returned late Wednes
day evening from a motor trip thru
the northern part of Burleigh county,
where he visited the schools of that
section.
Mr. Ylgness reports that the farm
ers are progressing nicely with their
aprlhg work and seeding. A large
amount of grain Is already sown. The
soil conditions were never betterand
a feeling of optimism is manifest ev
erywhere. In some localities grain
that was sown early is already sprout
W
The Byrne Abstract
Office
The
Pioneer Abstracters of
Burleigh County.
WE OWN OUR OWN REC
ORDS AND INDEXES.
Our Equipment is Modern and
up to the Minute.
'"Do you really own the land you.
think you own?"
a
UNDERTAKING
LICENSED
EM BALMIER
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
Phone 100 Day or Night
E. G. FIELD
Mala sad 3d St. Bismarck
F. H. HURLEY
SIGN PAINTER
AMD
DECORATOR
6ILDIN6 AND GRAINING
PAINTING, PAPER HANG
ING AND KALS0IIININ0
West End ef aveaae Fheae 414J
THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE
kMNTINa
'HOMNLV
ROOilCKO
BtMAIKK. m. O.
Henry Burman
Practical Shoemiker
Is bnUdiag ap excellent
business shoe repair
ing. Plenty of coeape*
teat help and era do
your work too
Henry Burman
Bnarfir,Htiiii4tll5tkSts.
a 1 a W a a
CEMENT and
STONEWORK
General Contracting
Cement Walks, Foundations
Either stone or concrete
M. P. MOOR
E
614 6th S Phone 460J
0
DRESSMAKER
Formerly Located
622 Third St.
Roo 12 LucasBlk
O PBIHTBI
In All Its Branches
I BISMARCK TRIBUNE CO.
pear to be in? sptendia eondltlon.
Manyjiowert :bsfe sJde4-y4|i^
of the early grains and allirj»feMii
IiBAiD, S D., May 3—Jack Sheridan
a boss was killed and A. L. Ryan, a
miner waB seriously injured by a cave
in at the Homestakemine'last night
iNEW YORK, N. Y.. May S.—koco
motive firemen and hostlers employed
on railroads east of Chicago, and
north of the-Ohio and! Potomac rivers,
have submitted to a conference com
mittee of railroad' managers a sched
ule of rates for pay which caJls tor
a general increase in all classes of
the service.
WHEN YOU BUY
Basement Bargains here you
real Bargains. Come and see,
Store.:.^Vv.^ •:. „.
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
THE AB
BURLEIGH COUNTY
8TRACT CO.
Legal Abstractors for Burleigh
County. Under Bond of $10,000.
CITY NATIONAL BANK BLK.
FRANK FEENEY,
General, Insurance.
CITY NATIONAL BANK BLK.
i*****^** ^f*g»f- srer^rgfiaTifTjisjijg
Hairdressing
Go to the Florentine
Hair Dressing
Parlors
Rooms 1& 2, Tribune Bldf.
Telephone No. 234
W W
Undertaking
AND
Embalming
UcenaedEmbaJmer InCtanrfe
OayPfeMMlO
Night Phono 43R or Ml
WEBB BROS.
Geo. LaLone,
SIGNS
Paper Hanging, Painting
Phone 541
Five JMooks From High
Prices
Slattery, Qunn & Co.
Wholesale and Retail
GROCERIES
Dealers tn
Coal, Wood, Ice
and Grain
Corner rural and Broadway
BISMARCK, N. D.
H. Oatman & Joe Hasseo
POO HAL
AND SOFT DRINKS
Ashley, N D.
•The host of everythsst always
Perfection
fa printing comes with long
experience, complete modem
equipment, and highly skilled
workmen. Ton get this in
Business
X^M{
Stationery
at our big print shop and
we do the work in a jiffy—al
ways deliver when promised.
Osll onr man—phone 32.
Tribune Printing Co.
I 4th and Broadway
§£k:
Mi&^:
Indica-
tions are that BurWlgh county wlU
be able to make some notable exhib
its at the serond annual Industrial
Exposition to be held In Bismarck
October 1 to 18. as well as share In
the general wave of prosperity .that
seems certain to roll over the state
when the harvest is garnered.
&<£• CAVE-IN WAS FATALitm^
get
Lucas'
0
HomeCourse
Road Making
XL—The Relation of Au
tomobiles to Modem
llff '"'•. Hfcliwaya.
By LOGAN WALLER PAGE,
DkectorOfficeof Public Rowk,
Unpted States Department
of Agriculture.
Copyrisbt by American Press Asao*
elation. 1912.
HE most complex problem now
engaging the attention of
highway engineers all over the
world is the preservation of
the crashed stone road under the de
structive action of motor vehicles and
the devising of new methods of con
struction adapted to the requirements
of this twentieth century traffic. That
the automobile has come to stay no
one will dispute. It is estimated that
there are already about 450,000 ma-
iat'OOMD MACADAM BOAD WITH XAOHTOB
TBAVKIiDIO BUtt XtUtS PKB HOUB—HO
DUST.
chines owned in the United States, and
the number Is Increasing at a marvel
ous rate.
The fact that must give us concern
Is that the old methods of construction
which have stood every test for more
than 100 years are Inadequate to meet
the conditions of this new form of traf
fic and that we are In the midst of a
transition period which must eventual
ly revolutionise the science and art of
the road builder. The highway en
gineer of today Is called upon to ascer
tain in what way the automobile in
jures the road, what is the exact cause
of the injury, andfinallyto devise an
adequate remedy.
When Tresagnet the great French
engineer, made his report to the coun
cil of bridges and roads In 1775 he set
forth the principles of construction
which, as modified and added to by
John L. Macadam in the early part of
the nineteenth century, have proved
adequate until the twentieth century.
These great road builders and their
successors sought to secure a road ca
pable of withstanding the wear of iron
tired, horse drawn vehicles, for the mo
tor driven vehicles had no place in
their philosophy. They worked upon
the theory that the dust abraded from
the crushed stone would, fill the voids
between the angular fragments.and
when wet serve as a cement, thereby
making the road surface practically a
monolith. The iron shod horses and
the iron tired wheels passing over
the1
road from time to time were depended
upon to wear off a sufficient amount of
rock dust to replace that carried away
by wind and water, and this under the
action of moisture recemented, thereby
automatically renewing the bond of the
road surface.'
The rubber tired wheels, moving at
Highway and mechanical engineers
have given much study to the action of
the automobile on the road surface.
and many Ingenious theories have been
advanced. While It is true that the
Slipping of the tire, skidding, shape of
the ear body, suction of the pneumatic
tires, ail contribute to produce the ef
fect, the most conclusive experiments
seem to warrant the assertion that the
great tractive force or shear exerted
by the driving wheels of motorcars Is
the main factor of injury.
A series of tests conducted by the
United.1 States office of public roads in
1806 produced some interesting results
•Jong this line. Cars of various weights
and types were run over a measured
conrse at different'rates of speed and
right angle photographs taken of each
inn. A sixty horsepower car stripped
tor racing, weighing with its driver
and mechanician about 2300 pounds,
was driven over this stretch of road at
rates of speed varying from live to six
ty miles per hour, the speed being In
creased five miles per hour for each
trip over the road. Up tofifteenmiles
an hour little or no effect was produced
on the road, but from twenty miles an
hour the effect was striking with each
Increase in speed. These demonstra
tions proved that little or no effect Is
produced by the front wheels and that
practically the entire disturbance of
1 the road Is produced by the rear or
[driving wheels. If the effect were pro
duced by suction or vacuum the action
of both front and rear wheels should
be somewhat similar at least It seems
apparent to the writer, therefore, that
the road best adapted to motor traffic
Is the ioad which will best resist this
powerful tractive sheer. It has already
been demonstrated that no p)aln mac
adam road Is capable of resisting this
force. '"•','''-.
The efforts of progressive highway
engineers are thus directed primari
ly toward the preservation of our stone
surfaced roads and the construction of
dustless roads by the use of a binder
more powerful than stone dust and.
secondly, to minimising or mitigating
the dust nuisance.
For the purpose of discussing Intelli
gently the experiments thus far con
ducted with special binders the term
"Must preventives" has been applied
to all of the various binders having for
their main object either suppression or
the prevention of dust These may be
divided into two classes, temporary
and permanent The temporary binders
serve merely as palliatives and require
frequent renewal. The permanent bind
ers, so called, enter into the structure
of the road as a constituted element
and are either incorporated with the
other materials at the time of the con
struction or applied later by a surface
treatment
In the class of temporary binders
may be included water, salt solutions,
light oils and tars and oil and tar
emulsions, waste sulphite liquors, etc..
while the permanent binders include
the heavy petroleums and tars, pitches
and numerous oil, tar and asphalt prep
arations. The value of salt solutions,
which have been used to some extent,
lies in the hygroscopic character of the
dissolved salt, which, having consider
able affinity for water, keeps the road
surface in a moist condition long after
a surface treated with water alone
would have become dry through evapo
ration.
The light oils and tars as well as the
Oil and tar emulsions depend for their
effect upon a comparatively small
amount of true binding base left upon
the road surface after the volatile
products have evaporated. These ma
terials prove effective only so long as
they retain their binding power. When
the binding power is destroyed it Is
necessary to apply more material.
The heavy oils and tars differ from
the lighter products in that they con
tain a much greater amount of true
binding base. The results are, there
fore, of a more lasting character and
hence the name "permanent binders."
The semisolid and solid preparations
usually contain a still greater amount
of binder. With some few exceptions
all of the true binders are bitumens.
The usual method of applying these
materials to the road surface Is by
sprinkling. The temporary binders can
usually be applied cold, but the perma
nent binders because of their much
greater viscosity must be heated until
sufficiently fluid. In England and
France the use of coal tar is practiced,
to a large extent, and their methods of
application have been highly developed.
Machines are in general use which are
self propelling and In which the tar is
heated and applied to the road surface
as a spray under high pressure. These
j-so called "tar sprayers" are not only
very economical In the use of tar, but
insure a more even distribution and
better penetration of the road surface
than It is possible to obtain in almost
any other way.
In the construction of dustless roads
the crucial question is that of cost The
[effort must be to develop a form of
construction which will withstand fast
automobile traffic and at the same time
be within thefinancialresources of the
community. This is largely being done
excessive speed, fall to produce any at present by the use of a bituminous
new dost from the rock, but the tre
mendous shearing effect of the driving
wheels "loosens this dust, and as the
body of the machine displaces a large
volume of air the deflected currents
carry the rock dust off the road, there
by effecting a permanent loss of the all
essential binder. It follows that the
road is soon stripped of its fine bind
ing material, exposing the upper or
wearing course of the stone. These
stones robbed of the binding material
are soon loosened by the shear of the
driving wheels, leaving the road badly
raveled or disintegrated. It is, of
course, apparent that the effects de
scribed are greatly intensified on
curves, where skidding Is most fre
quent
binder instead of rock dust The two
methods generally employed are known
as the penetration and the mixing
methods. In the former the hot liquid
binder is sprinkled or sprayed over the
stone and allowed to penertate through
TBAvnnntosgTT mus
AH HOOB—FUH-
IT 0» DOIT.
the voids and coat the stones usually
to a depth of two or three inches. In
the mixing method the stones and
binder are thoroughly mixed either by
hand or machine, so that each stone is
covered with a thin film of the binder.
This method in general insures the bet
ter and more even distribution of the
binder throughout the road surface
but the cost is greater than that of the
penetration method.
One of the chief causes of tbe great
•tfrnber of failures which have been
recorded In tbe use of bituminous road
smterlais is tbe failure of the user as
well ns manufacturer to understand
certain fundamental principles. To
many a tar Is simply a tar and an oil
an oil. while in reality there is a vast
difference sometimes even hi the tars
produced at tbe same works. The oils
range from those of a paraffin
to those almost wholly asphaldc
Specifications forthe bitumens should
be prepared by an expert and materials
should be tested in the laboratory.
,'#'S&!iMu£ti1-:
t$W0M$W$$%
SOIL CONDITION!!
JWE EXCELLENT
PLENTY OF MOISTURE IN THE
SOIL AND GROUND FROZEN TO
GOOD DEPTH. WM. H. BROWN
RETURNS FROM TRIP ON THE
SLOPE. EXPECT3 TO LOCATE
MANY FAMILIE8 THERE THI3
YEAR.
Wm. H. Brown, who was down in
the Mott country looking over and
showing some homeseekers over the
fine farming district located all round
'1Mott the Spot," states that he has
been riding for over a week through
Morton and Hettinger counties and
that in his opinion the soil was never
in a better condition at this time of
the year that last fall there was
sufficient moisture so that this win
ter theg round was frozen down from
four to seven feet, and then with
the snows and big rains they had
this spring, the Mott, Flasher, Man
dan and Bismarck district are in ex
cellent condition for seed, and they
have the promise of a big yield of No.
1 hard wheat, flax, barley, oats millet,
spelts, fodder corn, potatoes and veg
etables and also a big hay crop.
Mr. Brown is president of the Wm.
H, Brown' Company, extensive real
estate dealers and business promot
ers in the towns of Mandan, Flasher
Odessa, faaynes and Mott.
Mr. Brown states that practically!
all of the old fields in Morton and
Hettinger counties will be put Into!
crop and that many of the new farm-1
ers are breaking new ground for
crop.
Mr. Brown's company expects to
locate a large number of families In
the vicinity of Mandan, Flasher and
Mott this year, and they will bring
quite a consilerable capital into the
district.
TICKETS ON 8ALE
Tickets will be on sale for the can
tata by the public schools at the Bijo"
theatre Friday evening, May 3, Thurs
day (tomorrow) morning at Knowles
& Haney's.
PRETTY SUIT8
For
Pretty Girls, at magnificent
Read our ad. A. W. Lucas Co.
prices.
HE SOAKED HIS
MOTHER INLAW
Last evening Peter Johnson was ar
rested and this morning was ar
raigned before, a justice of the peace
on the charge of striking his mother
in-law, Mrs. Ella Hanson. Mrs. Han
eon told the Judge that Pete came
home last night smoking a stinking
cigar. As she was troubled with
asthma it started her coughing, she
objected and so the trouble ensued
until he struck her a severe blow. The
old lady said she was sorry the trou
ble occurred as she had always liked
Pete and did not object to his smok
ing, on the contray she enjoyed the
smell of a good cigar, but could not
stand the smell of the vile cigar he
was smoking last night. The judge
was a good judge and a judge of a
good cigar, and discharged the pris
oner. He told him if he smoked in
the future to try the "All Stock and
No Style" cigar as they only cost a
nickel and are worth ten cents that
they are made by theltuhles & Stock
Co. of 81 Paul, and are retailed in
(Bismarck by
6. A. Solvig at the Candy
Shop. Mrs. Hanson stopped at his
store and bought a box of "All Stock
and No Style" cigars to surprise her
son-dn-rlaw on his return home. After
Pete had smoked one, the old lady
declared It was the most fragrant ci
gar he had ever smoked. They kissed
and made up and declared they would
cot to quarrel in the future.
A E S
V~J-
+*++»*+*+*+++—+o»+*i •+++0+++w++++*++++++++*++*++w++**++++*++
Rooms, hot and Cold water, $1.00 per day,
with toilet $1.25, with private bath $1.50,
$2.0u, $2.50 and $4.00, two persons in a room
one and half rate.
Club Breakfast 25c and up
Noonday Lunch..1 35c
Evening Regular Dinner 50c
Services from a la carte bill at all hours.
E. 0. PATTERSON. Owner and Prop.
«»»»»»##*»*»**»»#a#aT#*^a»»a»»»»»a^»'»»a^«***»#*iaa'«*a*«»*«aa*
The Easy Way on lroningJ)0^S
The Iron Is Hot But You Aire Not
"American"
Electric Ironing
Turns out better work
more quickly. You feel
better because you keep Attach to Any Lamp Socket
cool, clean and comfortable. One iron does all the
work. Heats while it works—works while it heats.
Electic Supplies of all kinds, also
wiring and general electric
work
WALPER & WOODRUFF
110 Third St. Phone 64
rJ7Buy Shirts That Are Roomy
With Plenty of Arm-Swing
rHEN you buy a PatricUHifath
negligee shirt you buy absolute
shirt comfort. There is no bind-
ing under the arms, no tightmng at the
neck, nothing but the highest and best/
in comfort and worth.
They have won the enthusiastic ap
proval of the men of the Northwest
real men who want good values
Negligee or Dress
Shirts
•These are the stylish shirts. Fabrics 1
made for men's shirts—rich coloring
(not eaudyl-materials soft and beautiful,
but hard as iron in wearing quality.
Ask your dealer for Tatrick-Duhitli
Shirts, men's and women's hosiery,I
skirts, corsets, everything: for the ward
robe. Be sure they bear the Patrick trade
mark. It's your protection for quality. There
Is sure to be a Patrick dealer in your town. Send us
a postal today for our Quality Book. Address
F. A. Patrick & Co. Duluth
Dry GoodtOiMrlbMonitWbolcnle and Manufacturer* of Ganncnta for Man.
Woman and Childran. Makers of All Wool Cloths and Blanketa.
The Remington
Creates or Acquires Everything
Worth While in
Typewriters
The No. 10 and No. 1 Visible Remington
Models represent the sum total of all type
writer achievement—past and present.
They not only supply*but they anticipate
every need of every user of the writing
machine.
They supply Visible Writing under new
conditions—without sacrifice of strength,
durability or efficiency. These Visible
Remingtons have the drop-forged
type bars, the wide pivot bearings,
and every other distinctive feature
on which Remington supremacy
is based.
They have other features, new to the
Remington and new to the writing
machine. The Column Selector,
the Built-in Tabulator, the Tabulator Set Key and the Adding and Sub
trading Typewriter are the very latest contributions tq typewriter progress.
Remington Typewriter Company
(Incorporatad)
406 2nd Ave. So. Minneapolis, Minn.
&m
HOTEL
The Pride of Bismarck
Absolutely Fire Proof
EUROPEAN
Good enough for anybody,
not too good for anybody.
The very best of every
thing at sensible prices.
Dairy Lunch Room in connection open
day and night
At the following prices you can stop at the
McEenzie:
Rooms with hot and cold water including
three meals $2.10 per day hotand cold water
and toilet $2.35, with bath $2.60.
Electric Passenger and Preight Eleva
torservioe. Sample Rooms on 7th floor
Opposite Depot Park—Bismirck, N. D.
•mm
•:mm
f.f&*5!
JfcfttiftNat*"

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