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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, June 06, 1912, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1912-06-06/ed-1/seq-6/

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SIX
New Scientific
Corn RemOTer
Surest, Saimi, Safast, CtuiskestS
Say good-bye to every toucliy, torturing,
crippling corn and bunion—every distressing,
dirt-accumulating, foot-enlarging callous!
There's a new and quick way—a sure and
safe way—to completely rid yourself of all
such pesky, troublesome things.
"BINGO"—that's the new marvel! "Bingo
(he fruit of master scientific minds, tireless
laboratory research and experience. Put
"Bingo" on't and—say!—pain's gone just like
that! Corn dies, dries up—and you pick otl
the whole blamed thing—body, seed, root
shouting "Glory to Bingo!" No cutting—
and all—so easily, painlessly, you can't help
no bleeding—no blood poisoning! No injurj
to healthy flesh. No sticky stockings. No
bothersome straps—no lumpy cotton balls!
None ot tnc usual annoyances.
Buy "Bingo" at your druggist's—25c—or
if he hasn't it, send price to Dennison Phar
macal Co., Ill No. Dearborn St., Chicago,
111. Sold in this city by Adams Drug Store,
First National Bank building.
ADAMS DRUG STORE
First National Bank Building
BOY IMITATES AUTO BANDITS.
Barricades Himself in House and
Takes Shots at Party of Be
siegers.
PARIS, June 6.—Any amount of
mischief has been created by a lad
of thirteen dwelling in a village near
Aurillac, whom a perusal of the ac
count of the exploits of the motor
brigands had fired with the ambition
to emulate the performance of Bon
not. After some reflection he decid
ed on reproducing the scene at Du
bois' garage of Choisy-le-Roi, and ac
cordingly, arming himself with an ax,
fell upon and severely wounded hifl
brother, afterward putting their fath
er, who had come to the child's res
cue, to flig'Jt.
The young bandit then proceeded
to a neighboring house, from which
he took a gun, some ready-made cart
ridges and a collection of bullets and
powder for the manufacture of more,
and, barricading himself in the
place, awaited developments. These
warlike preparations having attract
ed notice, siege was laid to the house,
but the bolder assailants were soon
warned by a series of shots to retreat,
the boy shouting in great glee, "You
vill have to blow me up."
Drops From Window.
Oendarmes now appeared on the
spot, only to be treated in their turn
to some of his target practice, and,
as a council of war was being held,
the la1 ran up to a loft, slipped out
of a window after the manner of Bon
not, ?.id, dropping en th? ground, ran
off as fast as he could. From time to
time, however, he halted to take a
shot at bis nearest pursuers, and' he
succeeded in reaching a wood.
As his cartridges were now exhaust
ed, he hid himself in a thicket, and
was engaged! in making more when
he was discovered. He offered stout
resistance, and when finally led1 off to
prison walked along with evident
pride at his performance.
COMPANY "A" DRILL.
There will be a regular drill of
Company "A" at the armory this eve
ning at 8 o'clock. All members must
be in attendance at this time as bus
iness of utmost importance regard
ing the annual encampment is to be
brought up for consideration.
Recent accurate experiments at the
University of Wisconsin have shown
the melting point of tungsten to be
3000 degrees Centigrade.
Atlantic
One a half Blocks from Depot
116 Fifth Street
Best of Good
Things to Eat
Chinese Dishes of all Kinds
Special Dishes to Order
C. S. TUCK, Proprietor
EXTRA SESSION
ANGERSJSENATE
Out of 63 Members 55 Sign
Agreement to Consider
but Two Measures
Reaportionment To Be Ig
nored and Some Would
Adjourn Now
ST. PAUL, Minn., June 6.—Mem
bers of the Senate were not backward
in expressing their displeasure at be
ing called into extraordinary session.
A general grumble and protest was
beard in all corners of the Senate
chamber. Before Lieutenant Gover
nor Gordon boat the table with his
mahogany gavel, calling the body to
order, the attitude of the upper
House was almost that of an indigna
tion meeting. Scores of times was
the- suggestion made that the Senate
meet and immediately adjournn. The
protestors were in the minority, how
ever, when any action along that line
was proposed.
Organization is Rapid.
Organization was quickly accom
plished. After the prayer by Chap
lain Stowe, John Moonan was named
as temporary secretary, the Govern
or's proclamation was read, the offi
cers of the body chosen, a resolution
introduced by Senator Pugh provid
ing for a committee to wait on the
Governor and announcement was
mad* that the committee appoint
ments made at the last session would
stand for the extra session without
change. A little later on. however,
on motion of Senator G. H. Sullivan
of Stillwater, the Senate voted to in
crease the number of members of the
erection committee from eleven to
nineteen.
"That committee will have the
greatest amount of work to do," Sen
ator Sullivan said. "The most import
ant measure to be considered by this
body will come before it."
Quibble Over Supplies.
The Senate spent a half hour quib
bling over the question of the pur
chase of supplies, and finally passed
a resolution directing the secretary
of the state to purchase those neces
sary for stenographers, but limited
his authority to buying paper and
renting typewriters, Julius A. Sch
mahl, secretary of state, had already
Vought about all the necessary things
for the Senate's use.
Temporary Employes Ousted.
The temporary employes in the
Senate chosen by Custodian Corliss
at the direction of the governor, last
ed about an hour, before being dis
carded. The statutes give the cus
todian authority to employ two door
keepers, one cloak-room man and two
pages. These were on the job when
the Senate convened. Before recess
was taken, however. Senator Clague
offered a resolution dispensing with
their services forthwith, and it car
ried unanimously.
Agreement Signed by 65.
While routine matters were being
disposed) of, Senator Wallace of Hen
nepin county was going about among
members with a long sheet of paper
liberally signed by Senators, agreeing
to take up only two pieces of legisla
tion—state-wide primary and a cor
rupt practices act. This agreement
at 12 o'clock was signed by fifty-five
of the sixty-three members. The cap
tion of the agreement specified that it
was not to be binding on members
unless signed by at least thirty-two.
Those who had not signed it at noon
were Senators Boyle. Cheadle, Dunn,
Elwell, Glotzbach, Peterson, Sageng
and G. H. Sullivan.
It was Intended to introduce a res
olution limiting the legislation to the
primary act and the corrupt practices
act, before recess was taken at noon,
but if was withheld. The agreement
is "ironclpd," however, and apparent
ly there is no disposition on the part
of any one who signed it to accede to
the program mapped out by the
House.
MAY GIVE UP LIQUOR PERMITS.
Grand Forks Druggists Resent Activ
ities of State Enforcement
League.
GRAND FORKS, N. D., June 6.—
Grand Forks druggists may surrender
their permits under which they are
authorized to make sales of liquor on
prescriptions, as a result of the ac
tivities of the State Enforcement
league. Superintendent Watkins
made an inspection of the records on
file, an* it is said in one or two in
stances found the sales have been too
heavy.
NOTICE OF BIDS.
Notice is hereby given that on the
8th day of July. 1912, at the County
Auditor's office in the office building
at Washburn, N. Dak., the County
Commissioners will open sealed bids
for the furnishing and installing! of
tanks and Drainage system for the
Office and Jail Buildings.
Plans and specifications are on file
in the County Auditor's Office.
The successful bidder must file a
bond for twice the amount of bid for
the faithful .performance of work ac
cording to contract. The Board re
serves the right to reject any and all
bids.
D. C. WRIGHT, Chairman.
T. E. THOMPSON.
County Auditor
Dated the 5th day of June, 1912.
Bellows worked by the feet to blow
air into the mouth to help a musician
play a wind instrument have been in
invented by a German.
OLD SOLDIERS
WANT PENSION
Robert M. McWads.
Bismarck Tribune Washington Bureau.
WASHINGTON, June 6—Although
over 200,00 veterans of the Civil war
have already turned in their appli
cations for increased pensions un
der the new law, Commissioner Dav
enport expects that considerably
more than 500,000 will file their pap
ers before the rush is over. It is
safe to say that rarely Have congress
men or their secretaries been so busy
as they have been since the dollar-a
day law went into effect. Some of
the latter are at thein desks until
after midnight, and the following
morning sees them up and at it again
long before seven o'clock, rather long
hours for clerical workers at the
capitol. One thing that these work
ers note is that most of the appli
cants for pensions are now over 65
years of age, so that the "old sol
dires" are old in fact as well as in
name.
There are quite a number of mat
ters that veterans ought to know
about this law, and of which, judging
from their letters, they are largely
ignorant. A soldier may have served
for a couple of years and been shot
to pieces, and yet he won't receive
a penny more than the comrade who
served the same length of time and
escaped scott free of wounds and ill
ness. The age of the comrade and
the length of his service are the
prim* factors. The date of his en
listment and the date of his muster
ing out are noted at the pension of
fice on a card index then the length
I of service is computed, and all fur
lough, sick leaves, and absence by
desertion or otherwise are marked
off, and the number of days thus
away from his actual service are
taken from his time. Then, after all
that has been done, his age is noted.
Afterwards, by reading the table pro
vided for by the act, the pension of
fice folks know just what he should
get every month.
Chafjting about the amount paid
out by the government in pensions,
including the Civil war, the Indian,
Mexican and Spanish Wars, which
foots up the comfortable sum of $4,
380.381,730, Commissoiner Davenport
says, "there is no telling how much
the increased pension law will cost
the nation. More than 50,000 veter
ans die each year, and the rate of
mortality will increase. Hlowever,
about half of those who die leave wid
ows who are entitled to a pension,
provided that they had been married
to the pensioner prior to June 27.
1890."
There's one section of the new law
that's a bit misleading, and may have
the effect of building up hopes among
some of the old comrades that they
are to get the maximum, rate of $30
per month, regardless of age or
length of service. This particular
section provides that in the event of
a soldier being "disabled by reason
of his wounds, so that he is unfit
for manual labor," he will receive the
$30. The word "unfit" has been in
terpreted by the Attorney General as
meaning "totally disabled." It should
be remembered that the old and the
new laws read about the same in
this Tegard.
Simple apparatus for the manufac
true of gas from 98 per cent air two
per cent gasoline vapor has been in
vented by an Australian.
NOTICE AMD CITATION, HEARING
OF FINAL ACCOUNT AND
DISTRIBUTION OF
ESTATE
STATE OP NORTH DAKOTA,
Couaty of Burleigh
In 'County Court, Before Honorable
M. J. McKenzie, Judge.
In the (Matter of the Estate of William
H. Oockerell, Deceased:
T. R. Mockler, petitioner, vs. Charles
Cockerell, Walter Cockerell, Wini
fred Cockerell, Fred Cockerell and
Fern Cockerell, respondents,
The State of North Dakota to the
Above Named Respondents:
You the said Charles Cockerell,
Walter Cockerell, Winifred Cockerell,
Fred Cockerell and Fern Cockerell are
hereby notified that the final account
of T. R. Mockler, a'ministrator of
William Cockerell, late of the City
of Harlan, County of Shelby and State
of Iowa, deceased, has been rendered
to this court, therein showing that
the estate of said deceased is ready
for final settlement and distribution
and petitioning that his account be
allowed, the residue of said estate be
distributed to the persons thereunto
entitled, his administration closed and
he be discharged that Thursday the
13th day of June A. D. 1912, at ten
o'clock in the forenoon of that day at
the court rooms of this court in the
court house, in the city of Bismarck,
County of Burleigh and State of North
Dakota, has been duly appointed by
this court for the settlement thereof.
At which time and place any person
interested in said estate may appear
and file his exceptions, in writing, to
said account and petition and contest
the same.
And you, the above named respon
dents and eachof you, are hereby cited
and required then and there to be and
appear before this court and show
cause, if any you have, why aid ac
count shall not be allowed the residue
of said estate distributed and the ad
ministration -if said estate closed and
6aid T. R. ckler be discharged.
Dated this 13th day of May, A. D.
1912.
By the Court
M. J. MoKENZIE,
Judge of the County Court
(Seal)
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE.
MAY FINISH NEW
CAPIM IN 1916
Beilding at Madisan WiU Cost
More Than Six Million
When finished
Under Coostnltlion Seven
Years and Two (Kings are
Yet To lie Unlit
MADISON, Wis., June 6.—The new
$6,000,000 capitol building of Wiscon
sin wall be one of handsomest struc
tures of its kind in tihe United States,
according to Lew iF. Porter, secretary
of bae capitc commission and super
vising architect. With the exception
of the Wisconsin capitol, the most pre
tentious structures are those of New
York, which will cost about $20,000,
000, and Pennsylvania, which cost $8,
000,000. Neither dn size, design nor
architectural beauty will either of the
two eastern buildings excel that of
Wisconsin. The cubic capacity of the
the capitol will be equal to that of
the iNew York building, and will ex
ceed that of the (Pennsylvania struc
ture.
Under Construction 7 Years
The great dome of the new building
rises 300 ifeet, and four great wings,
five stories high, extend at the points
of the compass. The extreme length
of the building from east to west and
from north to south, will be 426 ifeet.
The ground area covered is about 120,
000 square feet. The capacity of the
entire building, exclusive of approach
es, terraces and ereas, will be 6,000,000
cubic ifeet.
The building has been under con
struction seven years and it is rea
sonably certain that it will be finished
by July 1, 1©16. Two wings.'the east
and west, have been completed. The
south wing probably will be finished
this year. The steel frame of the
dome is erected and will be enclosed
before 1513. The north wing of the
old capitol, the only part of the build
ing still standing, will be torn down
next year and the foundation for the
new wing laid. The new wing will be
built in 1914 and 1915.
Spend $1,000,000 a Year on Building
Contracts for all of the work except
tihe interior finishing of the north
wing have been let, carrying more
than $5,000,000. The actua'l amount
so far spent on the building and heat
ing plant, the latter a separate struc
ture half a mile from the capitol, is
$3,673,431.15. The commission is au
thorized to spend $1,000,000 a year,
and the legislature has made provi
sion by taxation and direct appropria
tion for $6,100,000 .for the entire com
sltruction. The iheating plant, equip
ment and tunnel work entailed a cost
of $500,000. A large warehouse i« yet
to be built in connection with the
plant, costing $100,000.
Using gold wires in his operations,
a 'Budapest physician has succeeded in
planting living haid on the scalps of
bald persons so that is will grow.
A holder to clip on the bowl of any
pipe to support it on a table without
spilling the tobacco .has been patented
by a man in the District of Columbia.
With a view to economizing fuel
the Japanese government has adopted
for its railroads a German type of
locomotive with cylinders but 15 in
ches in diameter.
NOTICE AND CITATION, HEARING
OF FINAL ACCOUNT AND
DISTRIBUTION OF
E8TATE
STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA,
County of Burleigh
In County Court, Before Honorable
M. J. McKenzie, Judge,
In the Matter of the estate of Eleanor
I. Cockerell, Deceased:
T. R. Mockler, petitioner, vs. Charles
Cockerell, Walter Cockerell, Wini
fred Cockerell, Fred Cockerejl and
iFem Cockerell, respondents,
The State of North Dakota to the
Above Named Respondents:
You the said Charles Cockerell,
Walter Cockerell, Winifred Cockerell,
Fred Cockerell and Fern Cockerell are
hereby notified that the final account
of T. R. Mockler, administrator of
William H. Cockerell, .ate of the City
of Harlan, county of Shelby and State
of Iowa, deceased, has been rendered
to this court, therein showing that
the estate or said deceased is. ready
for final settlement and distribution
and petitioning that his account be
allowed, the residue of said estate be
distributed to the persons thereunto
entitled, his dminlstration closed and
he be discharged that Thursday the
13th day of June, A. D. 1912, at ten
o'clock in the forenoon of that day at
the court rooms of this court in the
court house, in the city of Bismarck,
County of Burleigh and State of North
Dakota, has been duly appointed by
this court for the settlement thereof.
At which time and place any person
interested in said estate may appear
and file his exceptions, in writing, to
said account and petition and contest
the same.
And you, the above named respond'
ents and each of you, are hereby cited
and required then and there to be and
appear before this court and show
cause, if any you have, why gaid ac
count shall not be allowed the residue
of said estate distributed and the ad
ministration of said estate closed and
said T. R. Mockler be discharged.
•Dated this 13th day of May, A. D.
1912.
By the Court
(Seal)
M. J. McKENZIE,
Judge of the County Court
NOTICE OF PRIMARY ELECTION
Notice is hereby given that on Wed
nesday, the twenty-sixth (26) day of
June next, at the several voting pl'aces
in the precincts hereinafter mentioned,
in the County of BurJelgh, a
Primary Election will be held for the
purpose of nominating- Congressional,
State, District and County officers, which
election will be opened at eight o'clock
in the morning and continue open until
Ave o'clock in the afternoon of that day.
The officers to be nominated are as
follows:
Congressional Officer*
Representative in Congress, Second
Congressional District.
State Officials
Judge of the Supreme Court—Two
candidates to be nominated on non-parti
san Judiciary ballot.
Governor.
Lieutenant Governor.
Secretary of State.
State Auditor.
"State Treasurer.
Attorney General.
Superintendent of Public Instruction.
Commissioner of Insurance.
Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor
Three Commissioners of Railroads.
Member of Senate—Twenty-seventh
Legislative District.
Three members of the House of Repre
sentatives—Twenty-seventh Legislative
District.
Judge of the Sixth Judicial District
Two candidates to be nominated on non
partisan Judiciary ballot.
County Officers—Burllegh County
County Auditor.
Treasurer.
Sheriff.
Clerk of the District Court.
State's Attorney.
Register of Deeds.
County Judge.
County Surveyor.
Coroner.
Superintendent of Schools.
Public Administrator.
County Commissioners—Second Dis
trict.
County Commissioner Fourth Dis
trict.
County Commissioner—Fifth District.
Assessors—
First District.
Third District.
Fourth District.
Fifth District
Four Justices of the Peace.
Four Constables.
Precinct Committee-men.
For the purpose of Primary Election to
be held on Wednesday, June 26th, 1912,
the following precincts and polling placeB
were established according to the law
and the following inspectors appointed:
Precinct No. 1, Wild Rose—Township
137-75, except Lots 3 and 4 in Section 4,
air of Section 5, all of Section 6, and all
of Section 7, Lot 4 in Section 8 and all
of Section 18, 137-75, vote at school
house No. 1. Inspector, Chairman of
Township Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 2, Long Lake—To%nship
137-76, and Lots 3 and 4 in Section 4
all of Sections 5, 6, and 7, and Lot 4
in Section 8, and all of Section 18 in
Township 137-75. Vote at school house
in Moffit. Inspector, Chairman of the
Township Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 3, Morton—Township
137-77 vote at school house. Inspector,
Chairman of Township Board of Super
visors.
Precinct No. 4, Telfer—Township 137,
Range 78 vote atschool house on Sec
tion 27. Inspector, Chairman of Town
ship Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 5, Missouri Township
137, Range 79 vote at Eldrlge school
house. Inspector, Chairman of the Town
ship Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 6, Fort Rice—Township
137-80 vote at school house. Inspector,
Thomas Asbrldge.
Precinct No. 7, Lincoln—Township 138
80 vote at school house. Inspector, Jas.
Falconer.
Precinct No. 8. Apple Creek—Town
ship 138, Range 79 vote at school liouse.
Inspector, Chairman of the Township
Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 9, Boyd—Township 138
78 vote at school' house. Inspector,
Chairman of Township Board of Super
visors.
Precinct No. 10, Logan—Township 138
77 vote at school house No. 1. Inspect
or, Chairman of Township Board of Sup
ervisors.
Precinct No. 11, Taft—Township 138-76
vote at school house No. 2. Inspector,
Chairman of Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 12, Thelma—Township
138-75 vote at school house. Inspector,
Chairman of the Township Board of
supervisors.
Precinct No. 13, Driscoll—Township
139-75 vote at school house in Driscoll.
Inspector, Chairman of the Township
Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 14, Sterling—Township
139-76 vote at school house in Sterling.
Inspector, Chairman of the Township
Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 15, McKenzie—Township
139-77 vote at school house in McKen
zie. Inspector, Chairman of Board of
Supervisors.
Precinct No. 16, Menoken—Township
139-78 vote at school house in Menoken.
Inspector, Chairman of the Township
Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 17, Gibbs—Township 139
79 vote at school house No. 1. Inspec
tor, Chairman of Board of Supervisors.
139-80 and 81 vote at school house.
Inspector, Chairman of Township Board
of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 19, River View—Township
140-81 vote at school house No. 2 on
Section 26. Inspector Wm. Welton.
Precinct No. 20, Burnt Creek—Town
ship 140, Range 80 vote at east school
house. Inspector, Frank Kocker, Jr.
Precinct No. 21, Naughton—Township
140-79 vote at school house No. 1. In
spector, Mike Wolf.
Precinct No. 22, Frances—Township
140-78 vote at West school house. In
spector, Chas. Kroll.
Precinct No. 23, Sibley Butte—Town
ship 140-77 vote at school house No.
1. Inspector, Chairman of the Township
Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 24, Christiana—Township
140-76 vote at school house No. 1. In
spector, Chairman of Township Board of
Supervisors.
Precinct No. 25, Clear Lake—Township
140-75 vote at school houses No. 1. In
spector, Chairman of Township Board
of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 26, Leln—Township 141
75 vote at school house No. 1. Inspec
tor, Chairman of Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 27, Lyman—Township
141-76 vote at school house. Inspector,
Chairman of Township Board of Super
visors.
Precinct No. 28, Trygg—Township
141-77 vote at school houses No. 1. In
spector, L. E. Laken.
Precinct No. 29. Cromwell—Township
141-78 vote at school house. Inspector,
Chairman of Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 30 Crofte—Township 141
79 vote at school house No. 1. Inspec
tor, Chairman of the Board of Super
visors.
Precinct No. 31, Glenview—Township
141-80 and 141-81 vote at school house
in Glenview. Inspector, Chairman of
Board of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 32, Painted Woods—Town
ship 142-80 vote at school house No. 1.
Inspector, Chairman of Board of Super
visors.
Precinct No. 33, Ecklund—Township
142-79, and east one-half of Township
142-80 vote at school house No. 1. In
spector, Chairman of the Board of Sup
ervisors.
Precinct No. 34, Ghylin—Township
142-78 vote at school house No. 1. In
spector, Chairman of the Board of Sup
ervisors.
Precinct No. 35, Rockhill—Township
142-77 vote at school house Nor 1. In
spector, Chairman of the board ot Sup
ervisors.
iPrecinct No. 37, Harriett—Township
142-75: vote at Arena. Inspector, Wal
ter Scott
Precinct No. 38, Phoenix—Township
143-75 vote at school house on Section
9. Inspector, Grant Palms.
Precinct No. 39, Richmond—Township
143-76: vote at school house. Inspector,
Axel Soder.
Precinct No. 40, Andrews Township
143-77 vote at school houses No. 1. In
spector, 8. Jordan!.
Precinct No. 41, Estherville—Township
143-78 vote at school house No. 1. In
spector, Chairman of the Board of Sup
ervisors.
Precinct No. 42, Grass Lake—Township
143-79 vote at school house No. 1. In-
spector, Chairman of the Board of Sup
ervisiors.
Precinct No, 43, Hawkeye—Township
144-79 vote at southeast school' house.
Inspector, Chairman of the Board of Sup
ervisors.
Precinct No. 44, Pleasant View—
Township 144-78 vote at school house.
Inspector, Henry Anderson.
Precinct No. 45, Summit Township
144-78 vote at school house No. 1. In
spector, Chairman of the Board of Sup
ervisors.
Precinct No. 46, Florence Lake—Town
ship 144-76 vote at school house No. 1.
Inspector, D. Z. Keeler.
Precinct No. 47, Hazelgrove—Township
144-75 vote at the southwest school
house. Inspector, Chairman of the Board
of Supervisors.
Precinct No. 48, 1st Ward, City of
Bismarck—All that part of the city north
of the township line, west of the center
ofFifth Street to the river. Polling place,
school house. Inspector, Wm. Moore.
Precinct No. 49, 2nd Ward, City of
Bismarck—All that part of the city west
of the center line of Fifth street and
south of the township line, and north
of the center line of Broadway. Vote at
Hinckley's licery barn. Inspector, A. C.
Hinckley.
Precinct No. 50, 3rd Ward, City of
Bismarck—All that part of the the city
east of the center line of Fifth street
and north of township line. Polling
place, M. A. Edberg's residence. Inspec
tor, C. A. Burton.
Precinct No. 51, Fourth "Ward, City of
Bismarck—All that part of the city east
of the center line of Fifth street and
south of the center line of Broadway
polling place, Robidou shop, Sixth street.
Inspector. Charles Griffee.
Precinct No. 62, Fifth Ward. City of
Bismarck—All that part of ilie city west
of the center line of Fifh fcireet and
south of the center line of Broadway
polling place at the McKenzie Hotel.
Inspector, A. B. Welch.
Precinct No. 53. Sixth Ward City of
Bismarck—All that part of the city east
of the center line of Fifth street, south
of the township line and north of the
center line of Broadway polling place,
Jone's paint shop, 7th street. Inspector,
A. Van Horn.
Dated at Bismarck this 28th day of
May, 1912.
T. E. FLAHERTY,
(Seal) County Auditor
SOLDIERS GOING INTO CAMP
Men From Fort Sheridan Will Start
for Wisconsin Tomorrow
OHICAiGO, June 6.—Soldiers (from
Port (Sheridan, who will make up three
battalions of a provisional regiment,
wall depart from Fort Sfaerdian tomor
row morning for 'Dubuque, Iowa, ar
riving there late in the afternoon.
At Dubuque 'they will go into camp
for a week, to allow the other two bat
talions from other western posts to
Join, and as soon as_all .have gathered
the march to 'Camp Emory Upton, in
Wisconsin, wall be begun.
This 'provisional regiment, made up
of selected soldiers, to test the new
army equipment and to work out new
fining lines and marching orders.
Colonel R. S. Getfty, commandant at
Fort Sherdian, will command the regi
ment.
The camp, which has 'the largest
government range in the country, will
be the scene otf mock war operation
during the summer months. The pro
visional regiment will disband early
in September, when the soldiers will
return to their various posts.
Three new officers reported for duty
at IFort Sheridan yesterday. They
are Second Lieutenant George P. Mur
phy, from Fort, Sill Ofcla. Second
Lieutenant Lester iMurphey, from Port
Benjamin Harrison, and Lieutenant
LeDoran Crawford, from J*ort Apache.
This is their first assignment.
THURSDAY, JUNE 6, 1912
U. S. DEPOSITORY
Also Depository for Gov. Postal Savings Bank Funds
First National Bank
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA
Established in 1879
Capital and Surplus $150,000
SAFETY DEPOSIT
BOXES FOR BENT
EZRA CORNELL
,, nim
and although he chopped wood to
put himself through grammer
school, and was successful as fore
man in a lumber yard for years, it
was not until the age of thirty
five that success came to him
through co-operation with Samuet
B. Morse in the development of the
telegraph. Then, after many weary
failures, wealth came abundantly.
As a wealthy man, one of the first
things done was the founding of
Cornell University, and almost his
last address was a sermon on
thrift for those who look to their
future development. Thrift, today.
la still the important asset of a
young man's success. The timely
saving of a few dollars you will
never miss are the factors that will
help you to win out, and our sav
ings department reaches out to aid
you,.
Succ*. |S
Born of pio
neer parents in
the sterile hills
of DeRuyter,
New York, the
eldest of eleven
children, Ezra
Cornell at six
teen was sud
denly fired with
an ambition to
be something
more than a
potter. Invin
cible determi
nation carried
That envelope contain
ing your valuable pa
pers? Don't stick it
away in some drawer or
pigeon hole, where its
liable to disappear any
time. Put it where you
know its safe, where you
can get it any time—in
our
SAFETY DEPOSIT
VAULT
And have done with all
possibility of fire loss,
burglars, misplacement
orforgetfulness. Don't
take chances when the
cost is so slight.
Come and see.
NIXON NEAR DEATH
Senator From Nevada is Critically III
Suffering From Spinal Meningitis
WASHINGTON, June 4.-^United
States Senator George S. Nixon of Ne
va'da lis dangerously ill in a hospital
here with an attack of spinal menin
gitis.
Senator Nixon submitted to an op
eration for a catarrhal obstruction last
Thursday. Spinal meningilrs subse
quently developed. Specialists from
Baltimore were summoned 'hastily.
Senator Oliver of Pennsylvania was
anions those who called at the hospi
tal today and to him doubt was ex
pressed that Senator Nixon would live
throughout the day.
Senator Xixon is 32 years of age.
A fan snapped hopper within which,
is a movable blade, forms an imple
ment patented by aa Englishman for
quickley slicing fruit for marmalade.
CASTOR IA
For Infanta and Children,
fill Kind You Have Always Bough
Bears the
8ig&atur
•o'2*vfl^l§5Stf
[Ah
Service
Some guarantees are like
a Are department which will
put out your fire if you bring
your building around while
it is burning.
Burroughs Service comes
tp the "fire" before the idle
ness of your machine causes
a serious loss.
An insurance policy does
not remove the need) of a
fire department. Neither
can perfect material and
workmanship in. the product
prevent accidents in its use.
When a manufacturer tells
you his product is so perfect
you don't need service—that
he won't give service—bet
ter compare his guarantee to
a stationary fire department.
Perfect construction is
good. We can't afford to
make it anything but "fire
proof," because have to
take care of the "fire."
Let us send you the Bur
roughs Service Book "$300
000 a Year."
Burroughs Adding Machine Co.
P. K. RUSSELL, Sales Manager
I MmgUl Bids.. Farto. N. D.
WILLARD HOTEL
10th and St. Peter Street
ST. PAUL
Aiirlcii Pin $2.00 pir .if Einitii PI„
frli
Sptclal Wttkly Ratts
Take Hamline Union Depot Car to 10th Street

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