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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, June 29, 1912, Image 1

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THE WEATHEB
PROBABLE SHOWERS.
MAYNOT
Delegates are Anxious That
the Deadlock Should Ead
Tnobjkt
CONVENTION BULLETINS.
Baltimore, June, 29.—Conven
tion was called to order at
1:06. Thirteenth ballot being 6»
called.
2 O'CLOCK.
Baltimore, June 29.—•Four
teenth ballot no nomination.
Fourtenth Ballot: Clark 550,
Wilaon 362, Underwood 113,
Harmon 29, Marshall 30, Bry
an 2, Kern 2.
Clark 554 Wilton 356'/2 Un
derwood 115*/^ Harmon 29 Mar
shall 30 Foes 8 Bryan 1.
The fifteenth ballot was taken
0 at 4 O'ClOck with t*v w*wlvw.
By Associated Press.
BALTIMORE, June 29.—The Demo
cratic national convention is again in
session this afternoon trying to break
the deadlock on the nomination of
presidential candidates.
Immediately after convening the
thirteenth ballot was taken without
result. Choice under the two thirds
rule seemed a long way off.
BRYANS UPROAR.
BALTIMORE, June 29.—Under the
guise of explaining the change of the
vote in the Nebraska delegation W.
J. Bryan got another hearing in the
Democratic national convention today,
and precipitated a disorderly uproar.
During the fourteenth ballot Bryan
caused an uproar by the declaration
that as long as New York's votes are
cast for Clark, he withheld his vote
from him. The commoner was grant
ed the platform to explain his vote.
He said the vote of New York repre
sented the wishes of one man, Chas.
F. Murphy, declared Bryan and he re
presented the same interests that
sopght to nominate the Chicago con
vention.
Uncertain of the situation over the
naming of the presidential ticket has
given rise today to much speculation
among the leaders as to what the
move would be made, if any, by Bry
an to break the deadlock, but in an
interview just before noon to learn
Nebraskan's plan of Bryan disclosed
nothing.
Bryan closed with a declaration
that he would cast his vote for Wilson
and pandemonium again broke loose.
BALTIMORE, June 29.—After sev
eral informal conferences among the
leaders this morning it was decided
that no session of the National Com
mittee would be held and that the
situation would have worked itself
out.
CLARK STANDS. PAT.
WASHINGTON, June 29.—"I'm go
ing to read the returns until I hear
I'm nominated," said Clark today.
The Speaker was back'at his desk
at the Capital before noon, eagerly
reading all reports from Baltimore.
Somebody asked him what he knew
about the situation.
"I know I've had a majority on sev
eral ballots and I ought to be nomi
nated before night," was his reply.
When the speaker read Senator
Bankhead's comment that the votes
of the Underwood delegates would
not lead-to his nomination he return
ed with a show of spirit.
"Let those delegates come to me
and see if it won't start something.
A snowball grows larger as it rolls
down hill."
New York's Position.
BALTIMORE. Md., June 29.—In an
effort to break the deadlock in the
presidential nomination situation be
fore the Democratic convention the
fContinued on page 8.)
CLARK STILL AHEAD IN DEMOCRATIC
CONVENTION INSISTS THAT
TWO-THIRD RULE PREVAIL
New York Delegates Voted ANOTHER GOOD DAY
for Clark hot May Switch
Anytime
Clark tad Majority on the
Twelfth Ballot hutHas Beea
Losing Since
FOR TOE FARM TRAIN
Ho Weather Does Not Take
Away Interest in Travel
ing Institute
Special to The Tribune.
By J. K. Doran.
CASSELTON, June 29— Yesterday
was a hard bot day for the people on
the Farmers' Institute special. Put
it was a profitable one. The train
covered the Cooperstown branch,
which is without doubt one of the
prettiest and best farming parts of
JfcrUi Dakota.
At Rogers there was one of the best
sized Ciowds of the entire trip for a
town of its population. In dress and
manners these people compare well
with, the cities and the questions ask
ed showed an intelligent apprecia
tion of the situation.
For many miles around the country
was covered by automobile rides, and
the soil and crops closely examined.
The stock farms of Frank Sanford, C.
J. Christianson and others werevis
ited and many fine horses and good
cattle were seen.
A Fine Farm and Crop Rotation.
The Sanford farm has about 220g
farnf 500"acres in flax, 750 wheat, 300
oats, 200 corn, 75 alfalfa, 100 timothy,
25 broom grass and the lauds needed
for house, barns, gardens, etc. The
buildings are good and the stock on
the farm consists of 46 head of hors
es, 150 head Aberdeen Angus cattle,
the same number of Duroc Jersey
hogs and other stock.
There has been a system of crop
rotation on this farm for about fif
teen years and the yields last year
were for wheat 17 bushels, flax 12,
oats 50 and the corn crop was about
6,000 bushels.
Just Changed Ownership.
In west of the Sanford farm was
seen a beautiful herd of stock cattle
consisting of 55 in number. Inquiry
revealed the act that the cattle were
on the Christianson farm but had just
been sold by Mr. Christianson to Ed.
Quist.
Land in this neighborhood is very
fertile but should have careful rota
tion and much grass as it is, in places,
inclined to blow.
Beautiful Groves, Large
Barns and Good Houses.
From Rogers to Cooperstown is
seen one of the most beautiful groves,
the largest barns and finest houses in
the state. It looks like the most fer
tile part of Indiana or Illinois where
the farmers are largely interested in
the stock business. Land is worth
540 to $75 per acre.
There is much stock around Coop
erstown but not as much as there
ought to be. E. C. Butler, of Fin
ley, is engaged in raising short horn
cattle for breeding purposes. He
says that the demand now for good
breeding animals is far beyond the
supply and that if the people are not
very careful there will soon be a ser
ious shortage of the meat supply and
that prices are going to be higher
than ever.
A Beautiful City.
Cooperstown is one of the prettiest
places In the state.
The attendance was good and espe
cially so when it is considered that
Gollinar Brothers circus was in town.
At McHenry the cars were crowded
until long after the time advertised
for closing.
H. S. Halverson has been practising
crop rotation for some years ami dur
ing the short crops of two years ago
in the neighborhood he had fifteen
bushels of wheat on ground that had
be/m cultivated to potatoes the pre
vious year and land just across the
road that had been constantly cropp
ed in wheat had three to four. Last
year he had 23 bushels of flax on old
land that had been thoroughly pre
pared. Mr. Halverson is now plan
ning a seven year rotation. Mr. Hal
verson's plan should be followed by
others.
HEAVY SHIPMENTS.
NEW SALEM. June 29—Eleven
thousand five hundred and twenty
pounds of creamery butter were ship
ped from this station in one day this
week, the product of the local corpor
ation creameries for three days.
Thirty-second Year, No. 157 BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 1912.
FOUND GOOD CROPS
AROUND BUFFALO
Farm Train Attendants Found
Good Conditionson Their
Route
Special to The Tribune.
By J. K. Datran.
BUFFALO, June 29.—The Farmers'
Institute train came in to Buffalo ov
er an hour late today. This was the
first delay caused by anything con
nected with the train so it was not
iceable. The delay was caused by a
hot box.
Weather is very hot the lecturers
tierd, but the work koes right along
without a break anywhere. Too much
credit cannot be given these people.
The people of Buffalo made a good
appearance and turned out in large
numbers to greet the train. The band
was out and rendered good music.
The crops around Buffalo are fine.
Barley is beading out and other grains
show up equally well. The ground
is now beginning to dry out the surf
ace and a shower would do great
good. But at one place in the field
just north of town in a dense patch
of oats the land was made wet pulling
up the stalks where caught at the
ground. This was just after noon and
the sun's rays were direct all day.
But where the straw was shorted the
dew dried up early. So ar little rain
would do wonders.
Clover and timothy is growing like
weeds by the roadside here and this
ought to be a great country for such
hap crops.
WIL80N AT LETTERS AND GOLF.
N
~.f» "uryaW-vote.
SEA GIRT. N. J., June 29—Gover
nor Woodrow Wilson kept in touch
with leaders of his campaign in Balti
more by telephone and over a tele
graph wire strung through the trees
surrounding New Jersey's "Little
White House" to a tent on tbe lawn.
During the forenoon he disposed or
correspondence and saw no callers.
He planned to spend the afternoon on
the golf links, where he received the
result of yesterday's vote on the tem
porary chairmanship of the conven
tion The governor had no comment
to make on the result of yesterday's
vote.
By Associated Pres»
BALTIMORE, .June 29.—This pic-
ffentitrck P*tli) ©rihtme.
SCIErWISTS ARE
HERE
American andEuropean Geo
graphers and Geologists
Will Visjtjisinarck
The Commercial club has jest had
word from Prof. Simpson, of the
State University, who has charge of
the itinerary of the American and
European geologists and geographers
who plan a trip over the entire coun
try this all, saying that arrangements
have been made by which the party
will reach Bisfarck early in the even
ing of September 1st and will be here
for two or three hours. There are
a number of interesting geological
formations near Bismarck owing to
the presence of the Missouri river
and he believes that his party will be
much interested in inspecting them.
The party will be composed of some
forty of the most noted men in these
lines of study in Europe and Ameri
ca. From Bismarck the party will go
to Medora, where they will look over
the formations of the Ead Lands.
SOCIALIST ASSAILS
COL ROOSEVELT
Compares RooseveltWith Lot
and His Family
ATTOBTOTI, .«.,
Seidel, former Socialist mayor of
Milwaukee, and candidate for vice
president on the National iSocialist
democratic ticket, in an address here
last night, attacked Roosevelt, calling
him a "faker." He compared the
Colonel with Lot and his family when
they were driven out of the city of
Sodom, and Lot's wife turned back
and turned into a pillar of salt.
"Just so it is wRh Teddy," who says
he will smash this great problem that
confronts the poor people today, and
the trusts. He goes only so far, and
then turns back to favor them," said
Seidel.
ST. LOUIS IDEAL CITY
TO TEST MOTOR CARS
Fascinating Sight to SeeCars
Start on Long Gruelling
Trips
Sjecial to The Tribune.
ST. LOUIS, June 29.—"St. Louis is
an ideal city in which to build and
test motor cars," said President J.
W. Moon of the Moon Motor Company.
The Mound City has climatic condi
tions that are nearly perfect. Mild
winters alow the road tests to be
made every day in the year.
It was certainly fascinating to see
the cars to be tested start out on
their long grueling trip. The immense
elevator brought them down from the
factory testing room. They had just
buen put through their four-day fac
tory test—one day the motors were
rui,\ on the blocks by factory power—
another twenty four hours under their
own power by gas"oline—then the as
sembled chasses were tested by fac
tory power and the fourth or final day
by gasoline under their own power.
They look like racers—the stripped
steel bodies, low slung, long and rak
President Moon's critical inspection,
they shot away at minute intervals on
their strenuous four-day road test.
Around the corner from the factory
Chey swung into high gear and went
mcing up the dreaded Bissell hill, 12
per cent grade, quarter mile long, 200
\'eet high.
Mere specks they appeared to us
ns they mounted the summit of Bis
sell Hill. Then away they headed,
north towards the Columbia Bottom
road where they would have to plow
throagh the stiffest stretches of sand
imaginable, and along river bottom
lands, up hills and down, where read-
ture of tb» Democratic national con- tbe assemblage to order and as he was
ention wYs made immediately after speaMng. To make the picture a score
ChJrmaiTNorman E. Mack had called of had been suspended
SIMPSON AND NORTON ARE CLOSE
FOR CONGRESS IN THIRD DISTRICT
ability would get a severe work out.
Mr. Moon said that the next day the
stripped chasses would be sent out.
south of St. Louis for about 100 miles
alcn? the natural speedway, always
climuing, until they reached the world
famous Iron mountains Pilot knob
Arcadia, the beautiful, and finally the
Arcadia Country Club, so complete
and magnificent, that it might be mis
taken for the private estate of some
St. Louis millionaire, nestled way up
high in the rugged Ozark mountains.
On the folowing two days these
tests would be made with the full
Moon equipment. Only after Ihe cars
pass the thorough four-day factory
and four-day road tests does President
Moon give his final O. K. In this way
the great big Moon Motor cars have
earned their world-wide title "The
Character Car."
TWO BOSTON PAPERS COMBINE.
The "Herald" Buys The "Traveler"—
Both One-Cent Dailies.
BOSTON, June 29.—The sale of the
Boston evening Traveler, one of the
oldest newspapers in the state, to the
Boston Herald has been announced.
The following statement was made by
J. W. Farley, publisher of the Herald:
"The Boston Herald, Inc., announc
es its purchase of the Boston Traveler
an evening newspaper which has been
published at No. 76 Summer Street,
Boston. On and after July 1, the
Traveler and the evening Herald will
be published together as a combined
newspaper from tie Herald plant, No.
1825 and for many years was ptfDiren.
ed by Roland Worthington. Both the
Traveler and Herald are one-cent
newspapers, and the sale will reduce
the number of one-cent evening pap
ers in the city to three.
.•. THE WEATHER.
North Dakota Increasing
cloudiness with probably show
•I. ers late tonight or Sunday,
Cooler Sunday and in north
portion tonight.
from the ceiling of 'he Fifth regiment
rnnory, and they were discharged
simultaneously ly electricity.
LAST EDITION
EIGHT PAGES"
FIVE CENTf
YOUNG HAS
WON OVER
COL. TUTTLE
Later Returns FromPrevious
Missing Precincts Favor
Congressional Races in the
Second and Third Districts
are Interesting
Hall Seems to Havethe Lead
for Nomination of Secre
tary of State
ab^urJ5^,t)l0PJ'tb'ptfin^togTn,..n':irtifallv
cast at the June primaries. For gov
ernor, Johnson seems to have polled
about 6,000 or 7,000. Hanna apparent
ly has a lead of about 1,800 or 2,000
on total first and second votes.
Incomplete returns indicate Simpson
has a plurality of about 7M or 800
votes for congress in the Third dis
trict. It is still too early to deter
mine how the congressional fight in
the second district is going. Hall
seems to have a lead f,or secretary of
state. Following are,partial returns
on governor. -„„utf
Harna, with returns practically
complete from every section of the
state, appears to have a plurality on
total first and second vote approxi
mating 1.R0O. The following returns
are complete with t»ie exception of
two counties:
HANNA.
1st. ch.
366
850
573
977
... 389
318
220
834
1508
303
203
422
430
192
424
177
537
112
679
408
274
460
699
403
336
513
500
1759
530
291
217
287
225
536
472
235
650*
254
397
498
850
173
803
597
264
3*0
472
530
606
County.
Adams
Barnes
Benson
Billings ..
Bottineau ...
Bowman ..
Burke ....
Burleigh ...
Cass
Cavalier
Dickey ..
Divide
Dunn
Eddy
Emirons
Foster .. ..
(J rand Forks
Griggs ..
Hettinger
Kidder .. ..
LaMoure ..
Logan
McHenry
Mcintosh ...
McKenzie ..
McLean ...
Mercer.
Morton ..
Mountrail
Nelson ..
Oliver
Pembina ...
Pierce
Ramsey ..
Ransom
Renville _^_..
Richland
Rolette
Sargent
Sheridan
Stark ..
Steele ..
Stutsman
Towner ..
Traill
Walsh
Ward
Wells .^.
Williams
2nd. ch.
80
M~
127
Total 23752
Oliver has one precinct
144
69
123!
65
54
125
46)
61
96
39
55
37
67
139
85
116
92
160
90
41
17
34
»5
95
49
*54
86
27
28
31
54
192
107
149
3229
lacking
(Continued on page 8.)

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