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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, April 21, 1916, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1916-04-21/ed-1/seq-6/

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MUTT and JEFF
WBLL. X. MUST
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BACK TO Russ/A MOU/ SO
1 M(bHY
UJZLL Le^e
^eeu»^u. moyp
Many Interesting Features for
Event Named for May
26 and 27.
Plenty of Honey for Good ApplicatiaM
Write Us if You Want a Lou
No trouble to do business by miil
Interstate Securities Co*
Oneida Building Minneapolis) Minn.
The
US
Primrose
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6
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AN)^
fcSAY rr
Dates Set for Ninth Annual
Inter-State Meet at Fargo
The ninth annual intvrstalo high
school meet, will he held at the North
Dakota Agricultural college May liii
and 27. Returns from announce­
ments mailed a week ago indicate
that it will be the biggest meet in the
history of the school.
To Embrace Other Branches
The interstate meet this year will
embrace several branches instead of
only track and declamation as form­
erly. This year there will he in addi­
tion a baseball tournament, a tennis
tournament and band contests as well
as other features.
Interest in Meet General
With the addition of these depart­
ments interest in the affair has be­
come general and has grown by leaps
and bounds. It is expected that every
high school of any size in North Da­
kota and western Minnesota will par­
ticipate.
Number of Entries Made.
A large number of entries have
been made for the declamation con­
test so the success of the event is as­
sured. Medals will be awarded as
usual—gold for first, silver for sec­
ond, and bronze for third. Three priz­
es will be awarded in each of the acti­
vities to the winning teams with the
exception of baseball. The winning
baseball team will be given a silver
loving cup.
'Notice the big Sale advt. on the
hack page of this issue. It should
interest you.
Money to Loan on Improved Farms
cz^«
OH, C*AK.«
WOMOeR
itmat Boo a
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VOTG
111!.!
BEET MAY_lB19-2fl
Fine Program of Events. Big
Majority for Another Day
This Year
Thursday, Friday and Saturday,
May IS, 1!) and 20, have been selected
as dates for the Annual High School
Conference, .Athletic Meet, and Debat­
ing and Declamatory Contest to be
held at the university. An unusually
interesting program has been arrang­
ed by the committee in charge at the
university: Dean Joseph Kennedy,
Dean Vernon P. Squires, Dr. J. M.
Oillette, Dr. A. J. Ladd and Prof. G. C.
Schmidt.
Hy an overwhelming majority the
high school men of the state voted to
have an extra day devoted this year
to the Annual Meet. 'Heretofore the
program has been too crowded "when
limited to two days.
The first day, Thursday, May IS,
will be given over to the High School
Conference, proper. In the forenoon
of that day, beginning at 10 a. m., it
is proposed to have a series of ten
short, addresses, each to be limited
strictly to ten minutes each, on the
question of "The Most Important and
Essential Consideration for Second­
ary Education in North Dakota." The
speakers have not yet been chosen for
these addresses but. will be made
known at an early date.
Free Lunch
A free lunch will be provided by
the university in its Commons build
irg, both on Thursday and on Friday.
Thursday afternoon at 2 p. m.,
President McVey presiding, will come
the annual reports of the state exami­
ner, the state high sevhool inspector
At Last-A One-Adjustment
Cream Separator
EFORE you buy any cream separator, come
in and iook at the
Primrose.
adjustment is needed to keep it in perfect oper­
ating
condition. This adjustment is a simple
one for keeping the bowl
at
the correct height—an
adjustment that you or your wife
can
The adjustment is made from the outside of the
separator by either raising or lowering the bearing
containing the hardened steel point, upon which the
spindle revolves. A slight turn with a screwdriver, perhaps
onco a year, does the work.
But one
safely make.
is a well-constructed, close-skimming,
durable cream separator, one it will pay you well to buy.
When can you arrange to see it
'. International Harvester Company o! America
(hestpsratd)
?i"' t,
r'f.
Primrose dresat separator* are sold by
COMAS HARDWARE CO.
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA
i'l'. -'Jh?'
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wHP,r Does
ft
and any other business that may come
before the meeting.
At this meeting also a paper will be
read by one of the city superintend­
ents on the Junior High School, and
reports will be given by several other
superintendents who have had the
Junior High School in operation for
some time.
Evening Meeting
An evening meeting will be held on
Thursday, May 18, at which Dr. A. J.
Ladd of the State university will give
an address on "The Relation of the
State University to the High Schools."
This paper and the general subject
will then be discussed by three of the
high school men whose names will be
announced later.
On Friday forenoon at 9:30, Inspec­
tor E. R. Edwards will conduct a
round-table on topics which will be
duly announced in the regular pro­
gram. This round-table will be of spe­
cial interest to the principals and sup­
erintendents of the smaller high
schools and to those who have recent­
ly come to our state. While all oth­
ers are cordially invited to attend
this round-table, there are many top­
ics, such as classification of schools!
examinations, grading, etc., which
will be especially interesting and val­
uable to those who have recentlj
come to the state.
The Athletic tryouts will take place
on Friday afternoon, May 19. and the
Debating contest on Friday evening.
The regular Athletic Events and
Contests will occur on Saturday, May
20, and the Declamatory Contest, as
usual., on Saturday evening.
The university will be host to those
who are entered for the Athletic, De­
bating and Declamator contests.
It is expected that this will in every
wav excel any previous annual event.
Complete information in the way of
programs, announcements, etc., will
be given on or before May 1st.
TEACHERS FOR COMING
YEAR ARE NAMED BY
PORTAL CITY BOARD
I'ortal, 'N. D., April 20.—At a spe­
cial meeting of the board of education
the following teachers for the next
year were elected:
Superintendent—R. J. Van Voor
hees, Bradley, S. D.
High school—Miss Blanch Kaiser
Fayette, Iowa Miss Jessie Langton,
Lawton, X. D.
Grammar grades—Mrs Gibbons,
Portal.
Intermediate—Miss Hinos, Devils
Lake.
Primary—Miss Helen Slixrnde,
Litchville, N. D. Miss Krug, Valley
City, N. D.
Music and drawing—Miss Florence
Dunnell, Minot.
The Proper
Shoes for
Your Children
Mothers, be particular
about the shoes your
boys and girls wear. It is
important, for an ill-fit­
ting shoe worn
any length
of time will cause serious
foot troubles which will
take their minds from
study and play.
TheGotzianShoe
"Fits like your footprint"
In the "Hiawatha" Shoe* you
will find the right footwear
for your little ones, either for
dress of play- Look for the
store with'the GotsSaa trade
mark.
G. Gotzian & Company
St. PaOl, Minn.
Makers of dependable
shoe* for Men, Wotiien
.Sod Children.
Modein Saint Pavl
stnee 1855 .7
iiiiiiuniii
IK- .v
BISMARCK DAILY
J'
Oh My No! It Wasn't Really the Czar, Simply His Valet
^yirViAst# fovi-d
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STANDING OF THE CLUBS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Club— P. W. L. Pet
Philadelphia 6 5 1 .833
Boston 5 2 .600
Cincinnati 7 4 3 .571
St. Louis 6 3 3 .500
Chicago 6 3 3 .500
Pittsburg 7 3 4 .4:2$
Brooklyn 4 1 3 .250
New York 5 1 4 .200
Thursday's Games
Club— R. H. E
At Chicago 7 15 2
Cincinnati 6 15 1
Batteries—Hendrix, Seaton, Laven­
der, Packard and Fischer Schneider,
Toney, McKendry, Schulz and Clarke.
Eleven innings.
Club— R. H. E
At Pittsburg 0 5 3
St. Louis 5 8 2
Batteries—Manimaux, Cooper, Jac­
obs and Schmidt Meadows, Sallee
and Snyder.
Club— '. R. H. E
At New York 611
Philadelphia 7 13 3
Batteries—Stroud, Palmero and Ri
ardan: Chalmers, McQuillan and E.
Burns."
Twelve innings.
Club— R. H.E
At Boston ...... ........ 8 10 1
Brooklyn 0 7 5
Batteries—Barnes and Gawdyt Mar
quardt, Coombs, Dell an& Miller.
.» STANDING OF THE CLUBS
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TRIBUNE
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syutrt cCfivb&vA' \Lf" CL/***stu,vCta &
Afavcr a, 4ttr€j£jsu *W 43*4X2
Ma tisyvUVUA.Osvi.
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$
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Vlc-C*.
Vodb* Zo x£ ®y*-.
HERE'S THE GIRL FIGHT MANAGER AND SECOND
$4* V.
,J
i?|. •:¥!$?
6 vJU «."u
Baseball
..v V-*™ '•7^
Garry Marshall, fWjfrerwei&ht, and Lozette Hoag, Hi# Sister and Second.
When Clarry Marshall, feather­
weight of New York, goes into the
ring his manager is there with him
as his second. The manager is Lo­
zette Hoag, sister of the fighter. She
4
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Club—
rP.
W. L. Pet
Boston 1 6 1 .837
Chicago 8 5 3 .625
New York 5 3 2 600
Detroit 1 4 3 .571
Washington 6 3 3 .500
St. Louis 6 3 3 .500
Cleveland 5 1 4 .200
Philadelphia 6 0 6 .000
Thursday's Games
Club— R. H.
At Detroit 2 9 0
Chicago 1 6 0
Batteries—Coveleskie, Boland and
Stallage Wolfgang and Schalke.
Club— B. H. E
At Washington 12 16 2
New York 4 9 3
Batteries—Johnson and Williams
Keatinz, Cullop, Love and Nunamak
er.
Club-—
Philadelphia
Boston
"-m.
kiii.
K. H. E
15 4
7 11 2
believes her brother will be a cham­
pion some day, and she is working
hard to make him win every fight.
He says he fights better when he
knows she is in his corner.
Batteries—Bush, Weaver and Mey­
er Ruth and Thomas.
Cleveland-St. Louis gampe postpon­
ed account rain.
4 «.•
STANDING OF THE CLUBS
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
Club— P. W. L. Pet
Toledo 2 2 0 1000
St. Paul 3 2 1 .667
Columbus 3 2 1 .667
Minneapolis 2 1 1 .500
Louisville 2 1 1 .500
Indianaplois 3 1 2 .333
Kansas City 3 1 2 .333
Milwaukee 2 0 2 .000
Thursday's Games
Club— R. H. E
At Indianapolis 3 8 0
St. Paul 1 7 2
Batteries—Carter and Schang Up
ham, Benton and Lamb.
Club— R. H. E
At Columbus 5 9 2
Kansas City 4 11 0
Batteries—Brady and Coleman
Gardner, Sanders and Berry, Hard
grave.
Milwaukee-Toledo game and the
Minneapolis-Louisville game were
both postponed account rain.
EQUITY ENGINEERING CO.
A new business enterprise, "The
Equity Engineering Co.," has lately
taken offices in this city. The presi­
dent, Ira S. Nelson, C. E., spent four
years at the iNorth Dakota Agricul­
tural. college, has had three ye^re'
Sewer designing and one year in the
Municipal Engineering department of
the city of Fargo, William Rommell,
Ch. E„ the vice president, is a grad
tfate of the Chemical Engineering de­
partment of the N. D. A. C., one year
Engineering
Gompany
Aw, por
T«e covie
OP NUK.G, MUTT.
$
PRELIMINARY SURVEYS,
PLANS,
SPECIFICATIONS,
ESTIMATES
SUPERVISING OF
CONSTRUCTION
Room 30, Huntington Blk.,
FARGO, N. DAK.
5 5' "i*
.a
4
in the United States government
survey and three years' municipal en­
gineering, supervision of construc­
tion, sewer, water and paving. Geo.
E'. Schuyler, C. E„ the secretary
treasurer, is a graduate of the Penn­
sylvania State college, was for six
months in charge of the material de­
partment, Great Nouthern Railway
company, Seattle, Wash. six months
concrete construction, Cascade moun­
tains, Wash six months hydraulic
engineering, Glacier National Park,
Mont. six months land surveying,
western Montana and for one year in
the Municipal Engineering depart­
ment, city of Fargo. The Equity En­
gineering company would be pleased
to hear from anyone having anything
in their line and are located at Room
30, (Huntington Block, Fargo, N. D.
The P. O. box number is 368.
REV. GEO. C. SUMMERS
OF SYKESTON IS DEAD
Sykeston, N. D., April 20.—Rev. G.
C. Summers, pastor of the Congrega­
tional church here, died yesterday af­
ter a lingering illness, of Bright's dis­
ease and heart trouble. He had been
pastor of the church for two years
and a half, but had not been able to
attend to his duties since last Novem­
ber. He was Very much beloved by
all the people of Sykeston. He leaves
a wife and four young children, and
like many another faithful minister
of the gospel, in straightened circum
stances.
The funeral is to be held Tuesday
afternoon, and upon special request of
Mr. Summers, will be conducted by
Dr. Stickney of Fargo, the missionary
superintendent for the state. He will
be assisted by Rev. F. C. Pool, who is
now acting as pastor of the church,
l^he afflicted family have the sym­
*r',
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**HEABT SONGS"
jSf^aiiSS
FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 1916.
.t .if" ,P'i iu '!».
By Bud Fisher
COPVftllrfVT *V H.t./uc
pathy of the entire community in this
time of trouble.
URIC IN MEAT
CMS THE KIDR
Take a Glass of Salts if Your Back
Hurts or Bladder Bothers You
—Drink More Water.
If you rniust have meat every day,
eat it, but flush your kidneys with
salts occasionally, says a noted au­
thority, who tells us that meat forms
uric acid, which almost paralyzes the
kidneys in their efforts to expel It
from the blood. They become slug­
gish and weaken, then you suffer with
a dull misery in the kidney region,
sharp pains in the laok or sick head­
ache, dizziness, your stomach, sours,
tongue is coated an.d when the weath­
er is 'bad you have rheumatic twinges.
The urine gets cloudy, full of seGl
ment, the channels often get sore and
irritated, obliging you to seek relief
two or three times during the night
To neutralize those irritating acids,
to cleanse the kidneys and flush off
the Ibody's urinous waste, get four
ounces of Jad Salts from, any pharma­
cy here take a talblespoonful in a
glass of water before breakfast for a
few days and your kidneys will then
act fine. This famous salts Is mace
from the acid of grapes and lemon
juice, comibined with lithia. and has
been, used for generations to:finish and
stimulate sluggish kidneys, also to
neutralize the acids in urine, BO it no
longer irritates, thus ending bladder
weakness.
Jad Salts ia inexpensive cannot in­
jure, and maikea a delightful effer­
vescent lithia water drink.—Adv.
touvpSakl Somrihing
A. W. EPPINQER ESTATE
'SmMC'
HOW TO GET IT ALMOST FREE
Clip out and present six coUpons like the above, bearing
consecutive dates, together with our special price of 98c
"Book on display at office of
The BismarckuTribune
"98c S $2.50
Beautifully bound in rich Maroon—cover stamped in gold,
artistic inlay design, with 16 full-page portraits of
I
the-
world's most famous singers^ and coin-»»
dictionary of musical terms.
OUT-OF-TOWN READERS WILL ADD 10c EXTRA FOR POSTAGE
Volume
The song book with a soul! 400 cf
the song treasures of the woild in
one volume of 500 pa^cs. Chosen by 20,000 music lovers. Four years
to complete the book. Every song a gem of melody.
^2 vV-
A
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