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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, June 24, 1916, Image 2

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regular army.
The amendment making it declare
that, In the opinion of congress, such
an emergency has arisen now, as in­
troduced by Mr. Hay himself, and was
adopted. After a consultation with
Mr. Mann, Mr. Hay also changed the
language of the amendment so that
the period during which the men
could be drafted would be three years.
A provision for relief of guards­
men's families has been prepared by
Chairman Hay as a separate bill.
A proposal by Representative Gard­
ner to extend similar aid to the fam­
ilies of t}ie regular army men was
ruled out !of order.
Sill Sent to Senate.
As soon as the final vote on the
resolution had been taken, it was sent
over to the senate, where it arrived
just as adjournment was being taken,
it was referred to the military com­
mittee, with the announcement that
unanimous consent would be asked to
consider it tomorrow.
A proposal to authorize the presi­
dent to draft members of the naval
militia in time of emergency was also
introduced in tBe house today. It was
attached to a naval militia pay bill,
submitted: by Chairman Padgett of the
naval committee, and would give auth­
ority for enrollment of naval militia­
men as "National naval volunteers."
whenever the president should see fit
to call upon thetn.
Aflree on Building Program.
A building program including four
superdreadnaughts and four battle
cruisers for the coming year was
agreed u^on today by the senate naval
sub-comnfittee, after a conference
with Secretary Daniels and Rear Ad­
mirals Taylor and Rlue. The' sub­
committee also decided to recommend
an increase of 20,700 in the enlisted
strength of the navy, bringing the to­
tal up to 74,700.
REPORT CREATES BIG
STIR AT WASHINGTON
(Continued from page 1)
It was nearly midnight when the sec­
retary cajled the White House and
told officials that he wanted to talk
with President Wilson. j.,-
The conversation between the pres­
ident and his secretary of war lasted
several minutes, and afterward Mr.
Wilson remained up half an hour
waiting for possible receipt pf further
developments of which the secretary
told him. He then retired, without
talking with others who were waiting
there:
TENTS WILL ARRIVE
IN CITY MONDAY
Continued from page 1,.
Soo to Bismarck in a special train,
arriving here at 1 p. m. Sunday.
Co. of Grafton will leave over the
Great-Northern Saturday night in a
special which will pick up the ma­
chine gun company and Co. of
Grand Forks and Co. of Hillsbora
and proceed to Fargo, when it will be
brought over the Northern Pacific to
Bismarck, leaving Fargo not later than
10
a.
m, Sunday and arriving during
the afternoon.
Another special from Fargo will
"bring the.hospital corps and band
from Lisbon qnd several companies,
as per following schedule:
Co.
I, Wahpeton, will leave on No. 9
and
arrive
at Fargo
city at 7
Today—Demonstrating
MELBA
TOILET APTICii.ES
Mrs- Lillian Thorue, special rpprespiilsitivc of the Melliu
Company will te at tint store -0(1 oiirtli street today and
Monday*will be at the new store, Hroadivay and Fourth
htreet, formerly occupied by Kupitz and company.
ALL LADIES INVITED
MILITIA TO BE RUSHED
TO BORDER UNDER NEW
(Continued from Page One!
mittee, author of the resolution, told
the house that it was presented by
the administration as a measure ne­
cessary in the recent situation, and
not as a declaration that a stale of
war existed or was to be contemplat­
ed.
Authorized to Draft Men.
As introduced, the resolution mere­
ly authorized the president to draft
guardsmen, '"whenever in his opinion
an emergency exists, which demands
at 5:15 Sunday
morning.
The hospital corps and band will
eave Lisbon at l:lo Saturday and will
remain over nigfat at Fargo.
With the foregoing
and
organizations
Co. of Fargo
will leave that
a.
m.
Sunday and will
up Co. at Valley City at
DRUG STORE
the "use "of troops in addition to the little detachment. is believed t^
pick
8:55, Co.
of Jamestown at 10:15
and will
ar­
rive at-Fort Lincoln at 1:40 p. m.
Co. K- of Dickinson
at
IMaadan,
m»im,
day
will leave on
No. 8 Sunday and will pick up
Co.
arriving
p. n., going
here at 2 90
direct to the fort.
IJoth (GOT. Hanna and Gen.
son are reclving
from
men
Tharald-
many messages daily,
and women offering their
eerrices to their country. Gen. Treu-
former adjutant general, tele
gmphed
that
he
was
any
**ition.
I
$:
H-V"
I
ready to take
He
was
in command of
the boy* in the Spanish-American
if
wail
to word received yester­
W. A. McDonald, Northern Pa-
tilic si at ion agent. \V. G. I*?o. presi­
dent of the Brotherhood of Trainmen,
lias declared that there is no founda­
tion for the reports that the organized
trainmen will withdraw or postpone
their demands. The threatened war
will have no effect on their plans. The
trainmen would provide enough men
to operate troop and suppiy trains.
ONLY SEVEN SURVIVE
CLASH WITH MEXICANS
(Continued from Page Ono)
on three sides, with the tire of an
,TlP slaU (,f tho
hav®
oilicj^rs here,
been fierce by olhcjors here, it is
thought that only stupendous luck,
backed by desperate valor, could have
extricated Captain Boyd's men from
the trap.
Many Are Killed.
The reports from the Mexican bor­
der places the number killed, includ­
ing two officers, at from twelve to
forty. It is reported that seventeen
were taken captives into 'Chihuahua
City. The accepted percentage of
wounded to those kilted in modern
warfare would place the wounded at
from thirty-five to forty at the lowest
estimate. The strength of the two
troops, "C." and "K," is not known
here, but it is estimated that they
could not exceed 130 men, allowing
for those sick and on detached ser­
vice. With but seven survivors re­
ported as arriving at the main col­
umn, the number of those accounted
for at least speculatively is pitifully
smal. The reports from General
Pershing stated the stories of sur­
vivors were confused and did not con­
form with reports made ly the first
arrivals from the battle field. Gen­
eral Pershing reported that tliere wa*
a scene of wild confusion when the
Mexicans opened fire and their cav­
alry charged. The stragglers ap­
parently were cut off in an effort of
Captain Boyd to extricate his men
from the jaws of the trap, -which was
closing on his command, or fled before
the outcome of the battle could be
learned.
General Pershing, according to his
report, having received no word from
the two battalions of the Eleventh
cavalry, which he sent to rescue the
remnants of Captain BOyd's expedi­
tion. stated he has taken no measures
to support the squadron of the Elev­
enth cavalry.
General Funston said tonight, that
he had received no message regard­
ing a report that General Dell had
crossed the border at El Paso, and
that no confirmation had been re­
ceived of rumors of reported bandit
taids near Hachita, N. M„ and
Brownsville.
Cavalrymen Pursuing Mexicans.
Columbus. N. M., June 23— An
American cavalry patrol tonight was
pursuing a small band of Mexicans,
who today were reported to have
raided the Parker ranch, thirty-five
miles southwest of Hachita, N. M.
3AM ptfXrO
•TUFSON
CKJAYMA5
Establishment of an advanced line
of American troops across northern
Mexico, from gulf to gulf, is proposed
In Washington as the first step in the
possible military occupation of the
northern portion of that republic.
With American troops holding the
larger towns and important passes in
Reports to Col. H. D. Sickle, com­
manding the border patrol here, indi­
cated that the Mexicans were making
for the border.
Mexican Consul Resigns.
Kansas City, June 23.—Jack Denit
zer, Mexican consul here, resigned
yesterday, according to an announce­
ment today. He said hie sympathies
were with the United States.
Million Can Be Raised.
101 Paso, June 23—The Mexican
government states that fully a million
men have offered to take up arms .Vt
defense of their country since the
crisis with Washington came to hand,
according to a dispatch from Mexico
City to the consulate here today.
Ranchers Going to Fight.
Douglas. June 23—Five American
ranchers, led by "Red" Seeley, known
throughout Arizona for his ability as
a fighter, are making their way over­
land from the ranches at Nacozari
district of Sonora to Xaco, Ariz., ac­
cording to word received here today.
One report from Nacozari, which
United States officials were trying to
confirm, said a body of Mexican sol­
diers were endeavoring to locate the
ranchers. Some apprehension was
felt for their safety.
Dies as Result of Wound.
San Diego, Cal., June 23.—Second
Class Boatwainsmate Laughter of the
United States gunboat Annapolis, who
was shot during a fight at Mazatlan
last Sunday with Carranza soldiers,
died the following morning, according
to raddiogram received here today.
Citizens Greatly Perturbed.
El Paso, June 23— Battle practice
by the brigade of American troops
stationed here threw citizens of El
Paso and Juarez, already perturbed,
into great excitement late today.
Cavalry, infantry and artillery from
Fort Bliss took part in the maneuvers,
and a number of motor trucks in the
city were commandered for the prac­
tice, as the kahki clad line of troops
in heavy marching equipment swung,
shoulder to shoulder, through the
streets. Rumors spread through the
city that the soldiers were on their
way to occupy Juarez.
General George Bell, Jr., command­
ing the El Paso military district, saiS
that the parade was merely precau­
tionary practice and unexpected by
the troops.
REGIMENT WILL BE READY
TO START FOR MEXICAN
(Continued from Page One)
thirty men in the ranks under the
direction of First Lieutenant F. Otto
Cross who were being rounded into
condition that would lead the civilian
observer to believe,, they were old
members of the military organization.
An officer of the company in com­
menting on the class of recruits being
received said that they were not onty
rapidly learning, the manual of arms,
"but," said he, "they know now to
shoot. I would not be afraid to put
the members of Co. against four
times their number of enemy and know
that they would be victors. They are
boys of good judgment, capable and
efficient, and they can take care or
themselves as individuals and work
with machine-like precis:on In tne
larger units. I am much mistaken if
Co. does not give an account of it­
self at the front that will be a matter
of patriotic pride to the city from
which it is being recruited."'
The company does not have equip­
ment at the local armory ror all those
who may join the standard, but the
uniforms and accounterments and
arms will be ready at the concentra­
tion camp, the adjutant general be­
lieving it best to ship the extra requi­
sitions direct to that point rather than
to the local companies *n order to
prevent any uelay should rush orders
be received to assemble the compa­
nies.
Reports from over the state indicate
abundance of enthusiasm over the call
to arms. Grand Forks raised $1,000
to provide food for the local company
while it was under orders and before
leaving for the concentration camp.
The citizens also tendered the mem­
bers of the company a picnic in the
park. A number of concerns employ­
ing members of the companies have
notied the boys that their place
would be ready for them when they
returned and one man notified a mem­
ber who was in his employ that his
COAST-TO-COAST BUFFER ACROSS NORTH MEXICO
URGED AS FIRST STEP TO MILITARY OCCUPANCY!
UNITED
paso
CHIHU
MONCLOVA
S ALTILLO
"ZATLAN
I MEXICO
ManzAnill
BISMARCK DAILY JHUBUNE
STATES
DALLAS
HOUSTON
& ANTONIO
EACH. 6
BROWfOVN
rrAMPi
acapulco
this manner, it is pointed out, danger
of border raids or surprise attacks in
the country north of this line would
be gone.
American forces in Saltillo, Mon
clova. Chihuahua and other cities
would -be in position to cut in behind
any force that attempted a raid on the
border, and the northern zone of the
pay check would be delivered to his
wife Saturday while he was away. In
a number of cases members of the
professions have volunteered to looK
after the business of their fellow mem­
bers and win turn over the proceeds
of such business to the soldiers.
From all parts of the Fta come the
indications that members of the com­
panies are not entering upon the work
before them as a lark. Both officers
and privates realize that it is a stern
duty that confronts them and that
is the cal of the nation and the pro­
tection of its integrity that is sum­
moning them to the front.
V. J. Quinn, the patriotic manager
of the Lyceum theater, has turned the
9 o'clock performance at the thearer
tomorrow night over to the members
of Co. D, so far as the proceeds *re
concerned. He believes in doing
something for the men wtio are ready
and willing to fight for those who slay
at home. The plan for tne perform­
ance is for every pqfeittic citizen who
shares his spirit -attend the per­
formance.
SPANISH WAR VETERANS
JOIN JAMESTOWN COMPANY
Jamestown, June 23.—All of Co. H's
equipment is to be shipped to Fort
Lincoln immediately and those re­
cruiting after the company leaves will
be sent to Bismarck, here they will
be fully equipped when they arrive.
Captain Gray received tlie following
message Wednesday even?ng: "Th:s
state has been notified that all govern­
ment property required will be sent
direct to the mobilization camp a:
Fort Lincoln. This is to notify ail
company commanders that hereafter
all the equipment, including that now
on hand for issue, will be turned over
to the regimental commanders of the
first infantry to be issued upon their
arrival at camp."
ye*A CRUZ
MEXICO
CJTY
GENERALWFLQ THBFI^TFIYS PERSUING:
Steps have been taken to arouse
the spirit of patriotism and get more
to enlist in the company. Eig posters,
24x30 inches, are being distribute*
over the surrounding district. At the
top of the poster is the big eagle, the
national emblem. Following in big
red and black letters, the poster says:
"Are you loyal? If so, report to Com­
devastated nation could mo?e easily
be ridded of bandits.
The railroads in the border zone
also could be repaired and fcept ready
for United States troops movements
in case of a long campaign.
Tbe shaded portion on the map
shows the probable location of the
coast-to-coast buffer.
Mcjm
MM
Gen.. cJaciirfo Trevino
He precipitated the latest Mexican 'crisis by warning Gen. Pershing
that any rhbvement Of the American troops except in the direction of the
border would be considered hostile, and bring about an attack by the Car
ranzistas. Pershing liioved in defiance of Trevino's declaration, but Tre­
vino didn't attack.
pany armory, Jamestown. N. 1)., to
Lieut. C. II. Smith, recruiting officer.
The company will mobilize immedi­
ately, but. Lieut. Smith will be at
Jamestown for several days to com-
ICES
plete recruiting. Recruits must be be­
tween 18 and 45 years under 21 must
have parents' consent. There are
many advantages in the service, train­
ing, travel, possibility of promotion,
service to your country, etc. The Na­
tional Guard will be called to the
Mexican border within a short time,
to serve on border patrol duty under
experienced officers and with the reg­
ular army. Eighty men are needed to
complete the roster. Your country
needs you." The poster Quickly at­
tracts the eye and will be posted all
over the county.
Old members are coming back to
join the ranks from the west. 3. C.
Johnson left his claim in Montana,
and applied to Captain Gray immedi­
ately. Johnson had served two years
before going west. "Bill" Severn, an
old member who went with Co. to
the Philippines, telegraphed to Cap­
tain Gray this morning from Montana
that he will come back if he could get
his old job in the guard. The captain
answered he could. He is expected to
arrive Friday.
.Mayor Flint has issued the follow­
ing proclamation:
"Therefore, as mayor of Jamestown,
I call upon all the citizens or James­
town to meet at the armory on
Thursday evening, June 22, at S p. m.
in a mass meeting for the purpose of
showing to the men who are members
of Company and who have enlist­
ed since the call was made our ap­
preciation of their loyalty and patriot­
ism and for the purpose of expressing
in the strongest manner possible our
sentiments as loyal citizens of the
United States, and
hereby appoint Alfred Steel,
Pierce Ulewett and Dr. A. W. Guest
and their wives a committee to ar­
range a. fitting and proper program
for this meeting.
"II. C. FLINT, Mayor."
Wrigley
wonderful
Write lor the Sprightly Spearmen's funny
Gum ption book of jingles with a moral
Address Wm, Wrigley Jr. Co., 1602 Keener
Building, Chicago.
l-jr" •Sit
IS. M' Jag"
deif
GRAND FORKS RAISES
ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS
Grand Forks, June 23.—Grand Forks
citizens have again been appealed to
to aid in raising a hood fund for the drugs tailed to (.o.
local National'Guard organizations.
F. B'. Feetham, who is in charge of
the company fund campaign, stale*
that while many citizens have con­
tributed liberally others have not done
so, and he urges that all who are able
to make contributions do so at once.
"It is the duty and privilege of
every true-minded, patriotic citizen to
in it it
ihiiuMiin
est
gum in
world
Sealed Pac
are three big reasons. And the Value it
gives in long-lasting, beneficial enjoyment
is a point that people appreciate. The
air-tight package keeps the flavor and
quality as fine as when made in the
factories.
1 1
SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1916.
help in this worthy cause of furnish­
ing comforts !or the .local boys while
in camp," said Mr. Feetham Wednes­
day. Subscriptions large or small will
be'gratefully received.
All subscriptions sholud be sent to
F. B. Feetham, who has charge of tho
fund.
Grand Forks has now raised moio
than $1,000 for the special fund.
VALLEY CITY PRESENTS
FLAG TO MILITiA
Valley City, June
23.—Valiey
CLEANSE THE BLOOD
City
lodge, No. 1110, B. P. O. night
presented a company flag to the boys
of Co. G. The city is making arrange­
ments to give the troops a royal send
off.
If you desire to have a pleasant
stay when in Minneapolis on your
wedding trip, stop at the Hotel Dyclc
man, on Sixth street, near Nicolle.
Rheumatism Due to Bad Blood
Thousands have been made well.
People in the poorest health, suffer­
ing from Rheumatism, with whom
pain was constant. Who believed that
their vitality was sapped beyond re­
pair. It was proven to them that tho
cause of their trouble was the blood
that Uric Acid, the most faithful ally
of Rheumatism, had gripped them.
The poison in the blood had sapped
its strength. The weakened blood
had allowed poison and impurities to
accumulate, and all energy was gone.
They felt "poorly," were listless, pain
was ever present, with poor digestion
and dyspepsia. They tried S. S. S.—•
nature's blood tonic. They gave up
drugs. This compound of nature's
remedies of roots and herbs did what
It. literally wash­
ed the blood free from poison, and
with the How of pure blood came
back health, strength, vigor and map
piness. Get S. S. S. from your drug­
gist. Insist, upon S. S. S. If yours is
a long standing case, write for medi­
cal advice to Swift Specific Cov At­
lanta, Ga., but begin taking S. 43. S.
at once. I 'iiilHM!
*1 »i y» W
rtmmiij
WRAPPED
fWtfT-SHAtttlG
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