OCR Interpretation


Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, September 01, 1916, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1916-09-01/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

SIX
SCOOP
City.
»J A A A
Name
SWATTERS IN WORK
BIG STICK THIS
Bismarck Baseball Team Estab­
lishes Enviable Record for
Themselves and the Capital
10
4)
Bat VI
ns
ns
O
O if Q.
22 66 26 .393
11 42 16 .381
23 69 25 .362
23 70 23 .328
23 60 19 .316
23 72 22 .306
23 65 20 .306
10 29 8 .281
8 21 5 .238
17 58 13 .224
8 25 5 .200
Frankenhoff, 1b
Flanagan, If
Shanley, 2b
Vivian, 3b
Peacock,
Elder, ss
Collins, cf
Goldrich,
Christiansen,
Kirk, rf
Taylor,
Team Average
23 577 182 .311
By "GILL"
During the present, baseball season
the plnyers composing the Bismarck
club and representing this city in this
line of sport established a remark­
able record for themselves. The boys
put up a wonderful exhibition of the
diamond sport since their appearance
here and copped the championship of
this section of the state after strenu­
ous efforts on the part of every mem­
ber of the team. Too much credit
cannot be given the boys for their
work of the past two months and
their pictures can well be given a
place of prominence on the sport cal­
endars. The record of "Dolly" Elder
and his crew of speed demons will go
down in the annals of the sport in
this city and surrounding communi­
ties as one worthy of praise from both
young and old.
The batting averages of the play­
ers have been compiled and are
shown above. During the season the
boys played 2" games, won 20, lost 2
and tied 1. The batting average of
the entire eleven players is ,311. This
average and also the individual mark
registered by each cavorter includes
every game, played by the local nine
with the exception of the two match­
es staged at Jamestown with the All
Nation club. These games were play­
ed at Jamestown as merely exhibition
affairs and it was thought best to
eliminate them in compiling the aver­
ages.
Frankenhoff, Bismarck's heavy hit­
ting initial sacker, cops first honors
with his ol' hickory. The big boy
played in 22 games, "wandered to the
plate on G6 occasions, secured 26
clean hits and grabs off .393 as his
batting average. When the hitting
averages of the players in the big
leagues are given the "once over" it
can be readily seen that this is a re­
markable record for any swatter, in
the big show or with a club in the
minor leagues.
Flanagan, who came here after
playing the early part of the season
with the fast Hazelton club, comes
second in the list of heavy hitters
with a percentage of .381. This is
also a great record and the speedy
outer gardener has hung up a mark
that he can well be proud of in years
to come.
Shanley comes third with .362.
ON HIS
TEHPEorCTUEBR
VACATION
U) SCOOP--
BEEN
WVST COUPLE
MVSP
rj
ON A MOHtfIS
VAWI6N
PRINCIPAL RING
BATTLES BILLED
FOR LABOR DAY
Freddie Welsh vs. Charlie
White, 20 rounds, Colorado
Springs, Colo., for world's light­
weight title.
Johnny Kilbane vs. George
Chane.v, 1 rounds, Cedar Point,
O., for world's featherweight
title.
Jack Dillon vs. Jim Coffey,
10 rounds, Brooklyn.
Johnny Griffiths vs. Joe Riv­
ers, 12 rounds, Canton, O.
Jimmy Duffy vs. Joe Welling,
10 rounds, Buffalo.
Joe Mandot Vs. Frankle Rus­
sell, 20 rounds, New Orleans.
Ad. Wolgast vs. Lee Morri­
son, 15 rounds, Idaho Falls,
Idaho.
Kid Williams vs. Louisiana,
15 rounds, Baltimore.
George (K. O.) Brown vs.
Bat l.evinsky, 10 rounds, East
Chicago, Ind.
Thomas has also registered a great
average and if the classy second sack­
er had not hit a slump the past two
weeks he would undoubtedly have led
his teammates.
Due to lack of space it is impos­
sible to go down the list and com­
ment on the work of the various play:
ers but by looking over the averages
as reproduced here it can easily be
noted that the Capital City has been
represented by a team of sluggers par
excellence. It is hoped and expected
that it will be possible to secure these
players again next season and every­
body will be looking forward to their
return with considerable anticipation.
Of
1
Forest Hills, N. Y„ Aug. 31.—In the.
third round of the National Singles
championship, completed at the West
Side club here today, .Maurice E.
McLaughlin defeated T. R. I'ell Wal­
lace F. Johnson won from H. H. Vos
hell Douglas S. Waters defeated A'
A. L. Dionne, by default William M.
Johnston, W. W. Niles, R. Norris Wil­
liams easily overcame .A. Major.
KOOB NEEDS SLOW
BALL TO BE GREAT
STAR, SAYS PLANK
Ernie Koob will be a perfect pitch­
er the moment he masters a slow
ball, according to .Eddi'e Plank.
The kid southpaw, who hurdled
from the Western State Normal, Kal­
amazoo, Mich., to win fame with the
St. Louis Browns, already is an es­
tablished star, but he needs further
schooling in the slab craft.
"He has a cross-fire ahd a curve
that snaps sharper than any I have
ever seen," continued Plank. "His
control is a little bad, but that weak­
ness can be overcome. His slow ball
is good only at times, but when he
gets control of the ball, he'll have
no equal on earth."
Plank has taken Koob under his
wing and predicts a banner year for
the lad in 1917.
Ain't Nature Wonderful!
By GENE
A CADDIE.
Say, Norman! What's harder to
find than a fresh egg, an honest law-
yer, or a square foot of ground with­
out a flivver on it? Aw! Gee, George,
go easy! D'ye give up? Sure we do,
AHERN. if
M^THS VACATION MY FOOT-
VOO FOURLOSHEfcS'THAT
«S\T AROUMD m^' HOUSE^
MV AND CLAIM
\Voove. aw^Y ON A
knife!
f: x.
there ain't nothiii* harder. Is- that so?
Well, here it is. A Real Caddie.
What's "a real caddie," Eddie? "A
real caddie," Clarence, is one who's
right on the job, is down the course
when you drive off, keeps his glims on
the ball, doesn't laugh and talk about
you're bum playing to the other cad­
dies, and most of all, at the end of the
game when you say "Well, Pete, how
much do I owe you?" he says fight
out "Two bits, Mr. Johnstone," in
stead of the regular gag "I dunno.'
Well, Oswald, that's our idea of a reg
ular caddie. You'd better spend the
time looking for your lost golf balls,
Luke, than sleuthing for that kind of
a caddie, 'cause, as Julius Caesar once
said to Vernon Castle, "There ain't no
sich animal."
U)NrVACA5H
MAKE: ME
I
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE
Los Angeles, Cal., Aug. 31.—The to him while on a hunting,trip'in the
arm that won a heavyweight title
may be sacrificed under a surgeon's
1
Jim Jeffries, former champion of
the world and owner of the arm, is
under the care of surgeons as the
result of an accident which happened
SftY eefviNlV iF
You wanna SMOKE
AROUN'H£R£
fc
StfMce WH6N PID YOlJ
-5-fAKt -SMOKtM'
Why Have It If You Can*! Show It?
JIM JEFFRIES AND HIS TI*tE-WINNING RIGHT ARM
mountains near this cit^r.
A knife Jeff •Was using slipped and
cut deeply into his hand. Infection
followed and blood poisoning set in,
the hand and arm swelling to twice
the normal size. Surgeons hope to
save the title-winning arm, but say
Jeff must lose the first finger.
Jim Corbett, Bob Fitzsimmons, Gus
WELL, BENNY, IT 'S A CASE OF 50-50
oOr\
You'll H^v/Eto cur
Hotie
•smoking. ROPGS1
OF "TftPfT FVNK SMELLING
STUFF £oes-q$e eer-rgR
noBAcco-sge.2-
A F\6HT
'ort, A L0N6 ft60'
Y'know 6eoR6e-vA/H£t\l
was a soy ft doc-Tor
-L/\7--ZOl
S
.v:*r
OH I 2flHAT30^OEUL-
i-OOWi UKfc. A
MONtfA^ SUHBORM
&OKT V^T
I
Ruhlin and Jack Munroe were vic­
tims of the Jeffries kayo, while Tom
Sharkey, Joe Choynski, Joe Goddard,
Peter Jackson and scores of other
former greats found it a deadly prop­
osition.
Since retiring from the ring, after
his defeat at Reno, Jdff has lead the
simple life of cafe proprietor and
hunter.
BY
YeMf wgLL,-rW£se
You've aarf[
ARE. iW' eesT CkSARS
W£UL WHY owir?
vYoU
6tOP- 96MINJY1
I jJjW? ...
STANDING OF THE CLUBS $
9 4 $
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Clubs— P. W. L. Pet
ok 7 2 4 4 6 2 1
Boston 11$ «9 46 .600
Philadelphia 11-7 67 50 .573
New York 114 56 58 .491
Pittsburg 122 58 64 .475
St. Louis 123 55 68 .447
Chicago *123 »5 68 .447
Cincinnati ........ 124 46 78 .371
Thursday's Games
Clubs— R. H. E
At "St. Louis 17 9
Chicago
...r.
8 10 2
Batteries—Meadows, Currie and
Gonzales 'Packard and Archer.
dubs— R. H. E
!At iPrtsburg 3 10 2
Boston 2 4 1
Batteries—Mamaux and Schmidt^
Nehf, Ruelbach and Gowdy.
Called at end of 8th inning by agree­
ment.
Nto. others scheduled in National
league.
STANDING OF THE CLUBS $
AMERICAN
ClubB—
LEAGUE
P. W. L. Pet
123 71 52 .577
127 70 57 .E51
126 69 '57 .548
127 69 58 .543
127 67 60 .528
125 66 59 .528
122 60 62 .492
121 27 94 .223
Boston
Detroit w.. ...*.!,.
Chicago
St. Louis
Cleveland
New York
Washington
Philadelphia
Thursday's Games
Clubs— R. H. E
At New York 3 10 2
Detroit 7 8 0
Batteries—Mogridged, Love,, Rus
sel and Walters Mitchell and Mc
Kee.
Clubs— R. H. E
At Boston 1 7 1
St. Louis 2 7 0
Batteries—Ruth and Cady Kobb
and Severeid.
Clubs— R. H. E
At Philadelphia 1 4 2
Chicago 7 12 0
Batteries—Bush, Nabors and Picin
ich Benz and Schalk.
ClUbs— R. H.
At Washington 5 9 0
Cleveland .' 3 9 3
Batteries—Ayers and Henry Lam­
beth, Morton, Gould and O'Neil.
STANDING OF THE CLUBS
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
Clubs— P. W. L.
Indianapolis 131 76 55
Louisville ... k.. M2 7.6 56
Kansas City 183 61
Minneapolis 135 71 64
St. Paul 130 67 63
Toledo 129 64 65
Columbus 129 53 76
Milwaukee 133 47 86
TBinty. SEPTEMBER 1. MM.
UNDRESSED NOTHING:
A\NT X. ON A
0 OAT OF TAN?
•iSfifS,
Pet
.580
.576
.541
.526
.515
.496
.411
.353
Thursday's Games
First Game
Cltbs— R. H. E
At St. Paul ..8 6 3
Milwaukee .-5 7 5
Batteries—Douglass, Griner, Uph
am and Mayer Slapnicka and Martin.
Second Game
Clubs— R. H. E
At St. Paul 2 5 4
Milwaukee 6 10 5
Batteries—Leifield and Clemons
Shackleford and Stunpf.
S
bs
idi
At Indianapolis
R. H. E
••i-.-.v.-
rTiiii i'lir .•
Louisville 19 2
Batteries—Northrup ,anTBillings
Rogge and Schang.
First Game
Clubs— H.~E
At Minneapolis 6\J3 2
Kansas City 5\l 2
Batteries—Burk and OwenB l%an
and Berry.
Second Game t'.'-W.
Clubs— k. H.
At Minneapolis 7 7 2.
Kansas City 3 6 2
Batteries—Williams and Land
Hovlik, Sanders and Berry.
First Game
Clubs—
raw IBB
Fargo, iN. D., Atlg. 31 -i-lFaTgoJMbbr
head retained its game and a-half
lead for the Northern pennant today,
when both the local crew and Win­
nipeg won, Winnipeg defeating Du
luth at Winnipeg, 4 to 1, and the lo­
cals defeating Superior, 2 to 1.
Tomorrow the clubs go into the
finals, with Superior to "play Winni­
peg five games, and Duluth to meet
Fargo-Moorhead five games.
EVANS IS CHOICE TO WIN
TITLE IN NATIONAL EVENT
Chick Evans is due to break the
spell!
Golfers, speculating oh the prob­
able winner in the amateur champion­
ship of the United States to be played
at the Merion Cricket c)ub, Philadel­
phia, from Sept. 4 to 9, Inclusive, say
this is the Chicagoan's year.
Last year experts picked Evans,
Quimet and Travers as the winner but
not one of the trio survived the sec­
ond round. With Quimet and Trav­
ers out this season Evans remains
the lone favorite.
Evans reached {he semi-finals in
1910 and 1911. In 1912 he went Into
the final round. He was a semi-final­
ist again in 1913 but in 1914 and 1915
he was .distanced the first day.
The Merion course will suit Chick's
game. One of the essentials to suc­
cess is control of a king Iron shot and
there's where the Edgewater marvel
excels.
The question agitating the golfing
sharks is can Evans.putt at Merion
as well as he did at "Minikahda? If
he does he will cop the title without
a doubt.
Grand Forks: Accordng to word
received in this city, a recruiting de­
tail from Company and the ma­
chine gun company will be stationed
in Grand Forks within the next week
or ten days.
GORDON HATS
To say a hat is colored with
aniline dyes, that the "fur from
which it is made, the materials
that trim it, are as fine as they
were before raw materials ad­
vanced so abnormally, is saying
a good deal.
It's so about the Gordon.
a
R. R. E
4 9 0
16 1
^WellB
At Toledo
Columbus
Batteries—'Bedient and
George and Lalonge.
Second Game
Clubs— R. T. E
At Toledo 5 8 1
Columbus 5 8 1
Batteries—Pierce, Kaiserling and
Sweeney Bruck, Davis and Pratt.
Called 'in Ninth inning account of
darkness.
New York, Aug. 31.—Hilly IMiBltfe of
St. Paul knocked out Johnny How­
ard of Bayonne, N. J., in the last
round of a ten-round bout in Brook­
lyn tonight. The weights were:
Miske, 166 Howard, 161.
F.J/S
1
I

xml | txt