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Bismarck daily tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, September 27, 1916, Image 1

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The Weather
8H0WER8
Man Wanders Into Minnesota
Town Who Answers Descrip­
tion of Escaped Criminal
OFFICERS POSITIVE HE
IS THE MAN SOUGHT
Derelict Is Placed Under Arrest
Refuses To Answer All
Questions
Blackduck, Minn., Sept. 26.—Travel
stained, and showing signs of long
exposure, a man, who refuses to give
his name, arrived in this city today
with a rural mail driver, and, accord­
ing to deputy sheriff, Frank Carson,
who placed the man under arrest, he
answers the description of the assail­
ant of Olga Dahl, Round Lake school­
teacher, in every particular.
The man has refused to give his
name and will give no information
regarding himself except to say he
walked nearly all the way from Cass
Lake. When asked regarding his
whereabouts during the past week, he
said the greater part of the time was
spent in the journey thru the woods.
Deputy Sheriff Frank Carson is
positive the man he has under arrest
is the one for which the posse of
more than 200 men, under Sheriff
Charles Gunderson, of Itaska county,
have been searching for thru the
woods and swamps in the vicinity of
Round Lake, where a week ago Misa
Olga Dahl was found tied to a tree,
where .she. had 4w$n assaulted, shot
twice in the face, and left tied to
a tree, until found 24 hours later by
persons who went to search for her.
The only detail of the description
given by the. wounded girl, which is
not fulfilled by the man under arrest
here, is his shoes. According to Miss
Dahl's statement, the man, who as­
saulted and shot her, wore buttoned
shoes. The stfan under arrest is wear­
ing laced shoes, which are much too
large for him.
OF
SOLDO IS F:
Unidentified Trooper Discovered
Dead Near El Valle Commo­
tion- Among. Expedition
El Pasq,(f)Texas, Sept.- 26.—An uni­
dentified American soldier's body was
found near El Valle yesterday, ac­
cording to a report brought here from
the punitfte camp in Mexico. It is
believed the body is one of the party
of the Fifth United States Cavalry
that took part In the brawl at El
Valle last Friday night, and who was
missing when the troops reached the
field base at El Valle, following an
encounter 'between Carranza Soldiers
and the Xniert&ni -ttbopers, during
which a Carranza sargeant is said
to have been killed.
The finding of the American's body
is said to have cast a deep gloom over
the camp of the punitive expedition,
following the celebration of General
John J. Pershing's promotion to Ma­
jor General.
HIE WES BUSINESS
HI
Syracuse, N. Y., Sept. 26.—Fire ear­
ly yesterday destroyed the entire
business district and more than half
the industrial section of the town of
Phoenix, causing a loss or more than
$1,000|000. One person is known to
have perished. Eighty-two buildings
were destroyed.
]. *. KSICOTT LEADS III
JEISEV niUIIES
Trenton, N. J., Sept. 26.—Returns
from 31 election districts out of 1,
793 in New Jersey's state-wide pri­
mary today gave John W. Westcott,
583 votes for the democratic nomina­
tion for U. S. Senator, as compared
with 341 for James E. Martine, the
present incumbent. Returns from 34
districts give Joseph F. Frelinghuy
sen, 1.147 votes, and Franklin Mur­
phy, 928, in the republican contest
for Senator.
(UN.
VILLISTAS AND U. S.
TROOPS EXCHANGE
SHOTS, SAYS DISPATCH
Chihuahua City, Mex., Sept. 26.—
An exploring column under General
Cavazos encountered a body of Vil
listas west of Fresno, a station on
the Mexico-Northwestern Railway,
about ten mileq out of Chihuahua
City, but after an exchange of shots,
the Carranxistas retired to Fresno
to await the coming of General Ra­
mos, with a body of cavalry. This is
the .report that General Cavazos made
a special trip to town town to give
to General Wevino. There were no
casualties, he said.
It was only after her arrest in an­
other case that West became con­
vinced that the Godman woman was
a member of the band, and not a
fellow victim, he said today. Her as­
sumed mortification and fear of publi­
city had been the cause of his con­
tributing the money rather than fac­
ing prosecution as a white slaver,
he said. She convinced him, he told
Federal authorities, that she was an
innocent convent girl, and it was to
save her that he finally met the de­
mands of the blackmailers.
West said he and the woman were
brought from New York to Chicago
in custody of the blackmailers, whom
he thought were agents of the De­
partment of Justice, taken into the
Federal building here and to the very
door of the Government investigators
before he decided to give over the
money to save prosecution.
Later, they were taken to an office
building, which a member of the gang,
who represented himself to be a Unit­
ed States Commissioner, advised him
to ketfp the case out of the courts by
paying his captors.
NO LIVES LOST WHEN
STEAMER GOES DOWN
Oswego, N. Y„ Sept. 26.—Four
members of the crew of the steamer
Robervale of Ottawa, which founder­
ed yesterday in Lake Ontario, nine
miles from here, were picked up late
today on an improvised, raft, after
being buffeted by the sea for twenty
hours without food. Two others re­
ported missing'were seen in a yawl
forty miles from here near the Cana­
dian shore, it was reported tonight
This would indicate that no lives were
lost in the disaster.
FAN TRIED FOR
ASSAULTING UIPS
Toledo, O., Sept. 126—Charged with
assault with intent to kill, George
Johnson, American Association Um­
pire, Jacob Scholkey, twenty-four
years old, was indicted by a grand
jury here today.
During the game with St. Paul at
Swain fleld last July 23 Umpire John­
son was struck in the head by a pop
bottle thrown from the grand stand
and he was knocked unconscious.
FRAZIER INVITED TO SPEAK.
Sanborn, N. D„ Sept. 26.—Lynn
Frazier. Republican nominee for gov­
ernor, has been invited to deliver the
principal address at the Markey Day
celebration, which will be held here
October 14.—Committees have been
named to make preparations for the
event.
fVfomatrd
STRIKE TO HE
INDUSTRIES OF NEW
Ill
INTRICATE HOT
Girl Drags M&n Into Clutches of
Law Through Violation of
Mann Act
GETS $15,000 HUSH
MONEY FROM VICTIM
Chicago, Sept. 26.—Buda Godman,
who is accused of having entrapped
£Mtt0JCd,IkjKest, a wealthy merchant
here, into a violation of the Mann
White Slavfe Acft, and paving the way
Tor three of her men confederates to
extort $15,000 from him, was released
on $2,500 bonds today after being
questioned by investigators for the
Department of Justice.
GOMBLES CAPTURED BY ENTENTE
Trades Council Called for Thurs­
day May Widen Scope of
Labor Crisis
ALL INDUSTRIES WILL
SUFFER FROM ACTION
Act Urged to Fine Corporations
$5,000 Which Refuse to
Arbitrate Disputes
'New York, Sept. 26—With the an
nfiuncement by labor leaders that ap­
proximately .250,000 union workers in
various trades would quit their places
tomorrow in aid of the striking car­
men here, it was believed that, the
effort to tie up virtually all industries
in Greater New York had reached an
acute stage. The union officials de­
clared that an additional
100,000
workers would strike Thursday and
another 100,000 Friday, making a to­
tal of 4&0.000 out by the end of the
week.
It was asserted that 6,000 brewery
workers, 115,000 employes in the
building trades, and 250,000 members
of the United Hebrew Trades were
in favor of a sympathetic strike.
Building Trades to Act.
Twelve thousand teamsters also
were reported ready to quit work
Thursday or Friday. A meeting of
the executive council of the JniUitfng.
trades was called for Thursday to
take action," after the business agents
in Manhattan and the Bronx had vot­
ed for the strike.
Mayor Mitchell, whose efforts to
settle the differences between the
striking carmen and the transit com­
panies have failed repeatedly, sum­
moned labor leaders before him when
he heard of their plans. He said he
desired to be informed directly as
to what might be expected tomorrow.
The union officials, he announced, told
him they expected 200,000 workers
to strike as a "starter."
Capital Attacked.
After a meeting of the joint labor
conference committee, strikers were
supplied with pamphlets for distribu­
tion throughout the city, in which at
acks were made on the so-called Mor­
gan and Rockefeller interests.
"Rockefeller, Morgan and their as­
sociates control the transit of the
city of New York," the pamphlet
read, "and they also control the rail­
roads, mines, industries and public
Continued in Pae« Two)
THIRTY-SIXTH YEAS, NO. 833 (NEWS OP THE WORLD) BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, WEDNESDAY MORNINQ, SEPT. 27,1916. (BY ASSOCIATED PRESS) mi CENTS
FLOl PRICES
RICHEST SINCE
THE 111 WAR
Increase in Cost of Material
Sends Loaf of Bread Up
One Notch
BAKERS FORCED TO
RAISE THEIR PRICE
Flour by Barrel Goes to $9.10
Cheaper Graded Advance
Considerable
Chicago, Sept. 26.—Increase in the
price of flour today to the highest
point since the Civil war was follow­
ed tonight by an advertisement of
one of the largest bread making con­
cerns in the city that on Friday it
would increase the price of bread
from 5 to 6c a loaf, with a corre­
sponding Increase in the price of
biscuits and rolls. Other bakers are
expected to make similar increases.
Standard Minnesota patents, used
chiefly in private consumption, were
increased 20c a barrel, to $9.10, and,
according to the bakers, will defeat
the suggestion of the Women's Asso­
ciation of Commerce that, housewives
offset the bakers' increase by making
their own bread.
The cheaper grades of flour, used
in the baking trade, were also ad­
vanced from 10 to 15c a barrel.
COLLEGE PRESIDENT
E ON
Fargo, N D., Sept. 26.—J. W. Han­
sel, president of Fargo college, just
returned from a lengthy eastern trip,
during which he made an extended
automobile tour over the New Eng­
land states and New York, is firm In
the belief that the east is for Char­
les Evans Hughes for president.
President Hansel had an opportun­
ity, during his extended trip, to get
in touch with a great many people
remote from the larger centers of
the east, and he found Hughes senti­
ment very pronounced.
iMary Alice Smith, a tad $12-a-week stenographer in a big city, says
she has found happiness and health in the orchards and gardens of the
farm.
PUT INDEPENDENT IN FIELD
Hettinger, N. D„ Sept. 26.—At a
meeting of Nonpartisan league dele­
gates of this senatorial district, O. H.
Opland was endorsed for the state
senate, to run against H. P. Jackson,
the Republican nominee for the posi­
tion. Opland will run as an independ­
ent candidate.
$10,000 To Forget"The Loop"! Girl
Says She* 11 Win It by Life on a Farm!
®rilmuc.
PIVOTAL CERKAN POINT Oil
SOME FRONT FALLS BEFORE
TERRIFIC COMBINED ATTACK
THEIPVAL ALSO MEN
Invaders Sweep in From Three
Sides and Carry Important
Village
CASUALTIES TO THE
KAISER S MEN HEAVY
Russian Attacks on Eastern Front
Repulsed Greece May Enter
Great War
London, Sept. 26.—Combles, the
pivotal point in the German lines
guarding the approach to Bapaume,
oii the north, and Peronne, on the
south of the Somme front, has fallen
before the terrific attack of the
French and British, the Germans
fighting to the death or surrendering
when there was no longer any hope.
The French and British troops
swept in from three sides after their
capture of Morval and Fregicourt,
broke through the German defenses,
overran the town, and carried all be­
fore them. This place, with" Its "mar­
velous subterranean passages and
powerful fortifications, Had been
caught in the grip of the Entente!
Allies, who, coming from the north!
and the south, had already advanced
far beyond it and cut off communica­
tion with the rear, except a narrow
strip, which was covered by the al­
lied guns. At the end' of the fight­
ing, the tpwn was filled with bodies
'of the Germans, wlio had fallen fight­
ing. The French official statement
says:
"Prior to the loss of Combles, the
effect of the victories of the French
and British armies, in the capture of
important strategic points on the pre­
vious day was reflected in the official
communication issued by the German
war office, which, after describing
briefly the great artillery bombard­
ment of the Entente Allies lasting
four days, and the attack between he
Ancre and the Somme, admits that
'the conquest of the villages on the
line of Goeudecourt must be recog­
nized,' and adds:
"Before all, we must think of our
heroic troops who faced the United
Anglo-French principal force, and the
massed employment of material of
the whole world's war industry, pre­
pared during many months."
Thiepval Falls to British.
Both Thiepval, at the northwestern
end of the British line, and the forti-
(Continued on Page woi
$12 a-Week Stenographer Whose
Youth Faded as She Lost
Life's Battle in Big City, Finds
"Way Out" in Country Ad­
vises Other Girls To Seek Free­
dom There.
(The first of two stories telling
how a girl stenographer, living in a
hall bedroom and trying to get along
in a big city on $12 a week, found
"the way out" by going to the country
where health and happiness have
been her lot.—Editor.)
By HONOR FANNING.
Amboy, 111., Sept. 26.—A year and
a-half ago Mary Alice Smith, 24, emp­
tied her pay envelope one Saturday
night and counted out $12—her
week's wages as stenographer in a
Chicago real estate office.
There was rent for a hall bedroom
to be paid a new hat to be bought,
old shoes to be mended and, well, she
figured it all up and the bill was $14.
The next Saturday night, and on
many other Saturday nights, she fac­
ed the job of stretching $12 over $14
worth of life. If she went to a pic­
ture show she paid for her fling at
joy with a dime "skimped" from her
lunch money.
The fun youth craved was paid for
with blood money! Her body was
starving, her youth was withering un­
der the blight of the city.
She decided she must find a way
out. She did find the way.
The $12-a-week stenographer is
now a $150,00i) daughter-housekeeper
in the home of "Uncle Jimmie" and
"Aunt Louisa" Pankhufst, wealthy
farmers at Amboy.
How the city girl was drawn from
the turmoil of the crowds to the cool
and quiet of the farm, Mary Alice
Smith told me as we walked through
(Continued on Face two)
FORCED TO LEAVE
NAVY BY SICKNESS
PRINCE
ALBERT
Prince Albert, second son of King
George of England, has been forced
by illness to again leave the British
navy and seek health in London.
OF S.
win uws
IS MED
Joint Commissioners Suggest
Amendment To Keep Ameri­
cans Out of Conflicts
DIPLOMATS MADE SOME
HEADWAY IN CONFERENCE
New London, Conn., Sept. 26.—Re­
vision of American neutrality laws,
with a view to discouraging Amer­
icans from participating in Mexican
factional conflicts, was suggested at
a conference of the Mexican-American
joint commission today. It was indi­
cated that Mexico would be able to
deal more effectively with rebels and
ordinary bands of outlaws If the neu­
trality laws were amended in such
manner as to make it an offense for
an American citizen to participate in
any way in a movement against a
government with which the United
States is at peace.
The Mexican commissioners charged
that the inadequacy of the American
law made possible the propagation of
conspiracies on American soil against
established order In Mexico. The con­
sideration of operation of neutrality
laws was not confined to those of the
United States, however. The Amer­
ican representatives, since the con­
ference began, have held that Mexico
should so govern her frontier so as to
make unnecessary the presence of
an American posse on the south side
if the boundary line.
The American commissioners sub­
mitted a list of border raids that had
been compiled by the war department.
The Mexican commissioners counter­
ed by the presentation of another list
specifying instances where American
soldiers or citizens had crossed the
boundary* into Mexico.
BUYER ARRESTED
Del Rio, Tex., Sept. 26.—Joseph
Wilmeth of iChicago, a representa­
tive of the Chicago Cattle Loan Com­
pany, Who was arrested at Sabinas,
Mexico, where he went on a business
trip, with George Meyers, of Del Rio,
reached Eagle Pass, Tex., tonight, ac­
cording to word here. Wilmeth was
charged with violating the customs
laws in shipping cattle from Mexico.
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS
AT MINOT
Minot, Nr. D„ Sept. 26.—Public im­
provements made during the construc­
tion year now drawing to a close, to­
tal approximately $300,000, over a
third of that sum being in paving.
The establishment of a city sewage
disposal plant has also been a mark­
ed municipal improvement.
Next year it is expected that a simi­
lar amount will be spent.
Last Edition
OVER THE
'V'
CHALLENGED BY
Republican Nominee Issues Defy
To Deny Charge Made by
Himself
LAUDS HERRICK FOR
WORK AS AMBASSADOR
Candidate for President Well Re­
ceived on Trip' Through
Ohio Citief
Cleveland, O., Sept. 26.—Charles EL
Hughes tonight challenged the ad*
ministration to deny his charge that
John Lind was authorized by Presi­
dent Wilson in 1914 to say to "the
minister from a foreign power to
Mexico" that Huerta would be "put
out" of the presidency of Mexico
It
he did not voluntarily get out.
Mr. Hughes issued his challenge in
a speech before an audience in the
Central armory. In the same speech,
'Mr. Hughes lauded Myron T. Herrick*
sitting on the platform with hint, for
the manner in which he discharged
!the duties of ambassador to Frace
in the early days of the war, declared
that the appointment of a man to
succeed Mr. Herrick, "in a time of
great emergency, will ever remain a
blot upon the present admlniBtr*
tion."
The nominee's speech here tonight
was the last of eight delivered on
the second day of his campaign
through Ohio.
St. Charles Highway Bridge Falls
Before Flames Origin Is
Unknown
St. Charles, Mo., Sept 26.—The St.
Charles highway bridge, the only gen­
eral traffic structure spanning the Mis*
sourl river near here, was destroyed
by fire this aftenoon, causing a loss
estimated at from $175,000 to $400,000.
The bridge was built in 1904, at a
co&t of $750,000, and was half a mil*
long.
Fire fighting apparatus from St.
Louis was rushed fifteen miles to aid
ia preventing the flames from spread
ing to buildings on both sides of th«
riv«i.
The cause of the first has not been
determined.
MNHOiafW
mi io biiimg
Kildeer, N. D., Sept 26.—P. H.
Lee, formerly of this city, who was
arrested last October on the Charcot
of keeping and maintaining a eon*
mon nuisance, pleaded guilty to tho
charge before Judge Crawford and re*
ceived sentence. He was sentenced
to 100 days in jail and costs whfcfc
amounted to about $98. The sentence
was suspended during good behavior.
Mr. Lee, when a resident of thio
city, owned and operated a drag, atoro
here and last October he was arrest*
ed on the above charge. He pleadc'
not guilty and was bound over,to tho
district court on bonds. The case haa
been pending ever since and.onttt last
Saturday had not been settled., Mr.
Lee left this city last wlntar for Bis*
marck where he resides at present.
He is agent for the First National Life
Insurance Co. of Pierre, S, D., and la
doing well.
JACK LOOSENED MO
CRUSHES YOUNG UN
Hankinson, N. D., Sept 26.—A ter*
rible accident occurred at the homo
of Mr. and Mrs. Swan Carlson, re*
siding six miles southeast of White
Rock, when their eldest son, Carl*
was crushed to death under an auto­
mobile which he was engaged In re*
pairing. The young man was working
with his big Overland car in the an*
tomobile shed and had jacked U* the
rear end of the car and removed the
wheels. He was lying on his heck
under the rear axle making some re­
pairs, when the jack became loosened,
throwing the entire weight of the car
upon his body.

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