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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, November 20, 1916, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1916-11-20/ed-1/seq-6/

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SIX
SCOOP
REPORTER
'•Hey-scoop- Sro?
'AAINUTE-I VVrtNT Youls
LOOK MtOVER. IN IMY NEW
OVERCOAT-GET AN
FULL OF
IT-BOY-
Hard to Realize Team
That Defeated Badgers
Humbled By Illinois
The defeat of the Wisconsin eleven
by the Gophers Saturday defends the
early predictions of sport writers that
"Doc" Williams' combination is the
strongest in the conference Ihis sea­
son. It was hard to realize that the
Minnesota team was the same one
which was defeated by Illinois two
weeks ago by all to 9 score.
With forward passes Illinois excell­
ed in that game. With the same style
of play Minnesota upset the fond hones
of the Badgers, making long gains.
From the start of the Minnesota-Wis­
consin classic, it was evident to the
4f,,00i( spectators that it belonged to
Minnesota. TIhj features of the first
half, according to the Twin City writ­
ers, was a series of three forward pass­
es in the first (iiiart^r, which scored
Minnesota's third touchdown. 'Start­
ing on the til-vard line—from Wiscon-
mil MBES
«PULPIT
In Six Years' Time, LaFayette
Minister Gives Out Only Two
Defeats
Lafayette. Jnd., Nov. 20.—The Rev.
Frank Hole, pastor of the Christian
church at Pine Village, Ind., enters his
pulpit on Sunday evening, looks over
the auditorium of the church, and then
announces the Pine Village football
score for the day. In his six years at
the church the minister has announced
but two defeats for the town team.
Pine Village went down twice this sea­
son. for the first defeats in 1'! years.
There is no demonstration following
ihe weekly announcement bv the min­
ister, but always there is a buzz of con­
versation for a minute or two relative
to the game, during which Mr. Hole
prepares to deliver the regular even­
ing sermon. Lesley Hole, a son of the
minister, is a substitute on the team,
and the minister, when it is possible
to get away from his work, practices
with the team. The majority of the
members of the team attend the
church.
BROWN CALLS OFF HIS
TRIP TO AUSTRALIA
Chic'ago, Xov. 20.—George "Knock­
out" Brown, a Chicago middleweight,
has called off his trip to Australia. Ho
was to have sailed from San Francisco,
Nov. 27.
The reason for the cancellation was
because Brown wouldn't consent to
give thirty percent of his earnings to
the British war fund. The Chicagoan
had contracted to box live middle
weights in the antipodes, among them
Les Darcy.
"They ought to give me a 'war fund'
for having nerve enouglKto get into a
ring with Darcy," Brown explained.
CAPITAL &
SURPLUS
$200,000.00
r.
Leaving the west's greatest game of
tlie week and turning to the east, Yale
is seen victorious over Harvard by a
score of 10 to 0. Such a score indi­
cates football. And surely it must
thave been. The Minnesota-Wisconsin
game offers no comparison. Yale out­
played Harvard, dopesters say. The
score, however, fails to show it. Yale
scored three points in the third period
when Braden backed for a kick and
shot a Held goal squarely between the
posts from the 27-yard line. In the last
quarter Legore crashed through left
tackle for the touchdown. It was the
third smash at the Princeton line.
Carreford kicked goal.
be mighty hard on some of the south­
ern hotel keepers.
A Voice Fron the Dead.
Carl Morris wants to fight again.
They might have an overflow
game for those 2^,000 fans who can't
get into the Title-Harvard gj»me—
like Billy Sunday holds, y* know.
If there's got to be a railroad strike
let'it come while some of these light­
weight champions are preparing for a
tour.
Our Daily Prediction.
Wofford, ID—Furman, 3. Bet you
didn't know they were going to play.
New York police department better
rap
wh*y N«rr put em
UP IN T«"
build some bomb roofs when the Na­
tional league arrives.
Wanted—Corn for feed. It can bo
snapped with the husk on. George
CJussner. 11-19-20-21
"To be of service to YOU" is the aim of this bank
in every business transaction, letter or interview.
Our officers are always pleased to advise with you
on business or financial matters our employes en
deavor to render polite and courteous service our
equipment is modern and up to-date.
We shall be peased to serve YOU. x'
!yl
The
Oldest and Lart
in this Section of the State
"UWi
HOWDYOH UKfc,
\nyny00r J[
CHATTER
Jacobs of Pittsburg with a baiting
average of .075 is the Athletics of
the National league.
Hughie .Jennings wants to shorten
the training sdason. It might 'be all
right for the ball players, but it would
1EH-AN TM0S6
5AY-XGfU6SS^HBR^
AtW -SOME* OPH0L57ER!N(ri
.TO THIS tf/7 WM0USIN6.'
•o-
sin's goal—Wyman passed the ball 30
yards to Haston on the next play ho
did ft yards to Baston and then 2"
•yards to Long who was waiting over
"the goal line. It must have been a re
markable exhibition of aerial work.
1883
1884
1886
1387
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
UNITED
STATES
DEPOSITORY
BISMABCK DAILY TRIBUNE
HOIWEEN'S it SPOIL VALE'S
GIMIIGES IP WIN BIG CONTEST
HOBWEEN
•USI WIN ELEVEN
TO Mil UP ME W1H ME
Although Harvard has won football consistently frpm Yalie iin the last
four years and it looks as though the Crimson was due for another vict­
ory this year, Harvard would have to win every game for 11 years to ev­
en up the score with their Bulldog rivals.
Yale and Harvard have played for 36 seasoris beginning in 1875. (No
games were played in 1877, 1885, 1888, 1895 and 1896). 01' this number
Yale has won 21, Harvard 10 and five were tied.
In the accompanying table games played under the old' scoring system
are. not included.
The Blue team has not been able to triumph over the Crimson since the
first year Percy Haughton topic charge of the Cambridge team in 1909.
Scoreless ties resulted the next two years, and Harvard has won since.
Results of Yale-Harvard games since 1882 follow:
Won, by Yale, 17 by Harvard, 8. Tied 4.
BIG CELEBRATION
FORDE BUSH
Brainerd, (Minn., Nov. 20— Joseph
Bush, sensational twirler of the
Philadelphia "White Elephants," was
today the guest of honor of the citi­
zens of Brainerd. This is the first
-time that Brainerd has ever had a
claim on a man that ever pitched a
no-hit game, such as Joe did last sea­
son against Cleveland, and Brainerd
is cut today to show its appreciation.
"Bullet"' Joe Bush, Col. C. D. John­
son and Little Tom Wood will be
speakers at a banquet in Joe's honor
tonight. Another feature of the home­
coming celebration will be singing by
the Imperial Trio, former Senator A.
F. Alderman. A1 Mraz and Rollie Jen­
kins.
BOXING MAY BE LEGALIZED
IN STAfrE OF MICHIGAN
Detroit, Mich., Xov. 20.—Michigan
boxing fans who have been closely
Truth Crushed To Earth Shall Rise Again And Beat It!
(rEE. ?0^-IT5
5W64-L" BOT
A
BAl
rvard Yale Harvard Yale
2 23 23
0 48 19C3 ... 16
4 29 0 12
8 17 6
0 6 1906 .. 0
12 6 0 12
0 10 1908 .. 4 0
0 0 0 8
0 8 1910 .. 0 0
4 12 1911 ... 0 0
0 0 0
17 0 1913 .. 15 5
0 0 1914 .. 36 0
0 &8 1915 .. 41 0
22 0
COMBINATION-
NOlXarOT A BRAND
NEWLlMOUflliE,
BOPV-PUT
watching efforts of promoters to tilt
the lid in this city, are interested in
a report that an effort may be made
to pass a bill legalizing boxing at the
next legislature. A state commission
to regulate the game probably will be
provided for in the proposed bill.
STEAM HAMMER IS
ADDED TO EQUIPMENT
Mandan, X1. D., Xov. 20.—The Nor­
thern Pacific is installing a 12,000
pound steam hammer in the local
blacksmith shop here. The huge
mass of iron cost $1,200 and was pur
chased from the Chatnbersburg Weld­
ing company, Chambersburg, X.
Y.
The local X. P. blacksmith shops
ftro being moved from their present
location into.the roundhouse. A large
supply of new tools have ibeen added
and much of the special work in
blacksmithing will be brought here to
be»done that has necessarily been
taken elsewhere.
BOTTH
OLD TiTMET
BRMS!
ELEVENS OF BIG
FLAYED II
El
Defeat of Illinois by Chicago Only
Surprise Sprung on Grid
Fans
Chicago, Xov. 20.—Football elevens
of the "Big Nine" came through Sat­
urday's g-ames playing true to form
with the exception of a single upset—
the. totally unexpected defeat of Illi­
nois at the hands of Chicago.
Northwestern disposed of Purdue,
burying tlie Boilermakers under a 38
to 6 score, and kent its slate clean for
the championship ame with the un­
defeated Ohio state eleven at Colum­
bus next Saturday. Ohio State had al­
ready finished its conference schedule,
with the exception of the clash with
Northwestern, and had little trouble
overwhelming Case 28 to 0.
Chcago Springs Surprise.
Touted as being a foe not to be giv­
en serious consideration, Chicago,
twice beaten in the conference race,
sprung one of the biggest surprises of
a, surprising season by upsetting Illi­
nois with a 20 to 7 victory, completely
stunned. The down-state eleven,
which two weeks ago caused a surpris­
ing upset by trouncing the powerful
Minnesota eleven, had been regarded
by critics as a certain winner.
The comeback of Minnesota, which
early in the season was regarded as
the "class" of the "Big Nine," was one
of the surprises of Saturday's* sche­
dule. The Gophers, beating Wisconsin
54 to 0, gave the Badger eleven the
worst drubbing in twenty years. .The
Minnesota eleven played almost per­
fect football, offensively and defensive­
ly.
Northwestern revealed the full
strength of its reserve powijr in its
game with Purdue. Beaten 6 to 3 at
the start of the second half, North­
western opened up an amazing dis­
play of forward passes and sweeping
enfl runs, and scored four touchdowns
in the third period within twelve min­
utes.
Ohio Bewildered Case.
Ohio State, after getting away tc^n
slow start, bewildered Case with its
smashing attack. Only once did the
Cleveland team make two consecutive
first downs, and only four first downs
were received by them. "Chick" Har
ley, the 21-year-old Chicagoan, again
was the star of Ohio's play-
Indiana kept its stars out of the
game with Florida so as to send its full
strength into the annual game with
Purdue next Saturday. The eleven
from Dixie got the jump on Indiana
and led 3 to 0 at the end of the first
half, but the Hoosiers came from be­
hind and registered two touchdowns
in the last two periods.
The standing of the conference fol­
lows:
Team— W. Pet.
Northwestern 4 0 1,000
Ohio State 3 0 1,000
Minnesota 1 .666
Chicago 3 2 .600
Illinois 2 2 .oOO
Wisconsin 1 2 .333
Iowa 1 2 .333
Indiana 0 -3 .000
Purdue 0 4 .000
Pennsy Gets Michigan.
Outside the conference, Michigan
bowed to the prowess of Pennsylvania
SMALL WE
H*T HIM
OR LET,
HIM GO
Although Wisconsin has been nos­
ed out of a chance
fir
the Big Nine
championship, the Harvard coaching
system established there this year
by Coach Withington, a Haughton
pupil, will be used next year and it is
already predicted Wisconsin. wll
turn out the rbest team in the confer­
ence.
There has been some talk in the
west of dropping the veteran A. A.
Stagg at Chicago and installing the
Harvard system. The general plan
is looked upon with favor by other
mid-western schools.
The Haughton system differs in
two distinct features from the old
Wisconsin system and the system in
vogue at Chicago.
The Harvard system demands
enough coaches to insure every play­
er individual attention.
The system relies as much upon
mental preparation and mental alert­
ness as on physical condition of the
men.
To prove this Withington takes his
Albion, Mich., Xov. 20.—One of the
most unusual plays in the history of
Michigan football was made here re­
cently in a game between the Albion
and Otsego high schools. On two
successive occasions an Albion player,
standing behind his own goal, hurled
short forward passes to a teammate
who caught the ball behind the line.
Two safeties were scored against Al­
bion as a result.
Ann Arbor, Mich., Nov. 20.—Harry
Tuthill, the well known trainer of the
University of 'Michigan football elev­
en, who also conditions the Detroit
{baseball team, has an unusual alabi
for Cornell's defeat of Michigan.
Maurie Dunne punted short at a crit
icaKperiod and this gave Cornell an
opportunity which they improved and
for its second defeat of the year, lost
ing 10 to 7.
Xotre Dame faced a stubborn foe in
the Michigan aggies, who held1the In­
diana team to a 14 to 0 count.
De Paul academy of Chicago has put
in a claim for the national "prep" foot­
ball championship as a 'result- of its
20 to 0 victory over St John's acad­
emy of Danvers, Mass., here yester­
day, The easterners had not lost a
game and were claimants of the east­
ern title.
Now, when the Fall Winds rage outside,
social life centers around the
Bowling provides real scientific, interesting pleasure. Every man and woman should
play—and play here where the alleys and surroundings are the best.
In basement of Hughes block—cross from Grand Pacific Hotel
MONDAY/ NOV. 20,1016.
T$owe
FOLK* A*K YOUR
opihiok^wojjt
PfCtWWKCr WST
tH'SHOCKOf^
^erriN^
players to a public dining- room on
the night before the game, permits
them to eat about what they want and
allows a glass of beer to the men who
wish it.
He does not permit them to discuss
the next day's game.
To supply enough coaches for the
Badger eleven, Withington brought
with him Eddie Soucy, Harvard's
great end in 1915, John Doherty, a
substitute quarterback at Harvard,
and Dick King, Harvard halfback and
All-American selection last year.
In addition there is Tom Jones,
formerly of Missouri university
Howard Buck, one of Wisconsin's'
greatest tackles Earl Driver, an all
American halfback in 1901 and 1902,
and Arlie Mucks, champion discus
hurler of the world.
With this talent, line, backfield,
ends, everyone gets his share of at­
tention, and if Wisconsin did not have
a championship team it did turn out
a finished product.
News And Gleanings
From All Sections Of
The World of Sports
'Detroit, Mich., 'Xov. 20.—Willie Hes
ton, the great Michigan- halfback of
a decade ago, won a hot campaign
for police justice here at the recent
election. Heston's first case was the
trial of a man who kicked a dog.
The former whirlwind of the grid­
iron, who bowled athletes over as if
they were tenpins, decided the pris­
oner had been too rough, and assess­
ed a sfaall fine.
won the game. Tuthill says that
Dunne worried so much about the de
feat of his father, who was a candi­
date for re-election as governor of II*
liiiois, that the strain went to his
toes.
Detroit, Mihc., Nov. 20.—The De­
troit Kennel club will hold its sec­
ond annual dog show at the armory
here on March 27 and 28.
Ann Arbor, Mioh., Nov. 20.—"Red"
McKee, catcher for the Detroit Am­
ericans, has a brother who is anr avia­
tor. The latter, whose name is Frank,
recently turned up his aeroplaine at
Saginaw and decided to sail over to
Ann lArbor to watch a Michigan foot
bell game. He not only made the
trip and saw the game, but entertain­
ed the crowd with daring feats 'be­
tween periods.
Chicago, Xov." 20.—Half a dozen
baseball leaders have been suggested
to succeed Joe Tinker as manager of
the Chicago Nationals next season,
but Tinker himself appears to be not
in the least concerned regarding the
rumored change. Among those who
have been suggested to pilot the Cubs
in 1917 is Frank Chance, former man­
ager fthe team, and Jack Hendricks,
manager of the Indianapolis club of
the American association.
Charles Weeghman, president of
the club, has been silent on his plans
for next ^reason, but persons supposed
to possess authoritative information
feel confident that Tinker will ibe re­
tained.
"Of course, I'd like to manage the
club again," Tinker said. "Xo man
in the prime of life likes to thlnK
about retiring. The ortly thing I know
about a successor is what I've read
in the newspapers."
Tinker has been hunting mqit of
the time since the season closed.
In
4

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