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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, December 14, 1916, Image 1

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|*HIETY«XTH YEAR, NO. 297
ite and FederalCommissioners
of Education Found New
1
-:. Normal Necessary
PADS AND FANCIE8 SHOULD
FOR PRACTICAL NEEDS
fAdvised That 8cience and Forest­
ry Give Way to Farming
and Mechanics
Endorsement for the Dickinson Nor­
mal school from a high source comes
in the advance sheets of the .. long
awaited feport of the educational sur­
vey conducted in North Dakota a year
|f ago by Commissioner of Education E.
B. Craighead, with the assistance of
P. P. Ciaxton, United States commis­
sioner of education, and| the latter's
staff.
While the recognition comes too
late to have any effect on the recent
election where a favorable majority
of nearly 20,000 indicates that it was
not needed, it is 'gratifying to friends
of the new institution to And its es­
tablishment Justified by. so illustrious
an authority.
Aggi and Uni Duplicate.
The commission, composed of Drs.
Craighead and Ciaxton and Dr. Baw
den, industrial expert of the United
States bureau of education, finds that
in North Dakota, as in other Btates
where the university and agricultural
colleges are maintained as separate
institutions, there is much duplication
The report recommends the policy of
so co-ordihating the work of these
two institutions that the major effort
of the agricultural college shall not
be duplicated by the university, nor
the agricultural college endeavor to
give Us students courses which are
offered by the university.
Division of Engineering.
Specifically, the commission recom­
mends that there be maintained in
North Dakot* but one law school, one
college of professional engineering,
not closely related to.agriculture one
school of medfcine, and one graduate
school for the pursuit of the. liberal
arts and pure, science* ,*!! of .which
it contends should be at tbe univer­
sity.
Agriculture First. At
At the agricultural college there
Should be maintained first of all, the
commission bof{s, a complete college
of agriculture,' a- school of home econ­
omics, a
SCI109I
•& 1 if* Jtf
MAY
of veterinary medi­
cine, and a school of engineering, hav­
ing for its purpose the development of
agriculture and the interests related
thereto, such
as
irrigation drainage,
road-making, farm machinery, the
'manufacturing of farm products, any
engineering, in fact, that may relieve
the burden upon the farmer by light­
ening his toil, develop rural civiliza­
tion, or add to the pleasure, wealth
or comfort of the rpral or industrial
classes. The agricultural college,
through the government experiment
station, will continue to carry on re­
search work for tbe purpose of adding
to the knowledge bf agriculture and
allied sciences.
Preparation of Teachers, 1
The preparation of teachers for
high and cotiiolidated schools is en­
trusted to thtese two institutions, the
university to train expert teachers in
mathematics,, lierature and the pure
sciences and to prepare city superin­
tendents and supervisors the agricu
tural college to develop teachers of
agriculture, domestic science, the in­
dustrial arts, and to train principals
of consolidated rural schools and city
industrial schools.
Rural Teachers. Needed.
The commission impresses upon
normal schools the f^ct that the great
demand is for more carefully trained
rural teachers, and advises especial
attention to this class of pedagogues,
without neglect for city instructors.
A Sat tho Forestry School.
The commission-fails to recognize
the value in a treeless state of the
Bottineau school of forestry, and re­
commend that it be continued as an
agricultural trades school, offering
practical courses in farming, forestry
and horticulture, for boys and home
making for girls, taking the place of
the agricultural college with students
who cannot indulge in the more ex­
tensive courses.
Mechanics vs. Science.
Practical mechanics will play a
more important part in the develop­
ment of the state than the sciences,
the commission believes, and it recom­
mends that the state school of science
at Wahpeton become a mechanic
trades school, with agriculture as a
minor subject,
Education a la Carte.
The commission has outlined a
state-wide system of education which
will enable every boy and girl to find
in some institution in North Dakota
the lines of studies, which he or she
dost needs in training for a chosen
Vocation. Education is made essen
itlally a responsibility of the state.
The interests of the state are placed
labove those of any school or town or
fieommunity.
Copies Available.
As soon as the presses can grind
them out, the s'tate board of regents
will have available 10,000 copies of
this report for general distribution.
"Anyone interested in the subject may
apply to the secretary of the board for
a copy, which will be forwarded to
the applicant without charge to any­
on on
itWfl
UNCLE SAM
AEROPLANE MAIL SERVICE
5E5S?
OF THE FRENCH ARMY
General
Nivsllf*
Gen: Nivelle may succeed Gen. Jof
fre as supreme commander of the
French forces, upon reported retire­
ment of the aged chief. Gen. Nivelle
made his mark at the Verdun front,
under Gen. Petain, who now favors
this officer for Joffre's place.
NBEB
is
Only Way They Can Make Reas­
onable Profit Is Con
tention
CHICAGO NEC* OF
r:' RAT»LR^Y«B1JRT0N
1 (EDITOR'S NOTE—This is-aii
other in series of stories by
Correspondent Burton, in which
he is tryitag to find out the rea­
sons for the present skyrocket­
ing of meat prices, and What rem­
edies there are for this, if any.
This article, and those following,
take up and expose the meat sit­
uation in tbe United States more
thoroughly and accurately than it
has ever 'been done before.)
By H. P. BURTON.
'Chicago, Dec. 14.—"Wholesale
slaughtering and meat packing consti­
tute the chief outlet for market stock
suitable for slaughter in the United
States. The most extensive develop­
ment of meat packing is found at Chi­
cago and 'Missouri river points. The
total volume of the products of whole­
sale slaughtering and meat packing in
this country in 1914 was $1,652,76&,
424. Concentration of ownership is
one of the striking features of the
packing Industry."
This is practically the opening part
graph in a report on certain phases of
the current meat situation in the Unit­
ed States just issued by the national
secretary of agriculture. It recog­
nises, in direct wording the almost ex­
clusive control the few bigN Chicago
packers have on the meat trade of
America. Therefore, in dealing with
the packers, we would seem not to be
making false assumption in consider­
ing them as the small neck of the bot­
tle through which practically all meat
must pass from the reservoir of the
producer into the great ^American
home. "For," the report continues,
"probably two-thirds or more of the
beef, mutton and pork consumed is
the product of animals which pass
through the large, centralized mar­
kets."
The important question for us to
consider here is what has' brought
about this system of centralized mar­
kets, one which has no counterpart in
any of the other livestock producing
countries of the world! Louis D.
Hall, noted government specialist in
this subject, analyzing the situation
for the United States department of
agriculture, says:
Some Factors.
"Its development has been due pri­
marily to the fact that the livestock
industry is developed mainly In the
central and western states, while one
half the population lives in the man­
ufacturing region east of the Missis­
sippi and north of the Ohio and Po-,
tomac rivers. The exportation of
meat animals and meat products from
Atlantic ports has also contributed
largely toward the centralization of
livestock markets at points interme­
diate between these ports and the
areas of production (that is, Chicago,
Kansas City, Omaha, etc.).
"Other factors which have exerted
a like influence are:
"Rapid extension of railroad, facili­
tating the shipment of. stock from
grazing and feeding areas the appli­
cation of refrigeration to the shipment
of .fresh meats, cutting down the cost
of distribution by the reduction of
bulk and shrinkage, besides making
it possible to deliver meats to more
distant points and in better condition
than when shipped on foot the In­
vention of the tin can and its adapta­
tion to the preservation of meats and
meat products in such form as to per
(Continued on page 4)
Only Thing Remaining Is Choice
of Machine To Be
Used
FIRST LANDING NEAR
WILLIAMSPORT, PA.
Relay, Station To Be Locat­
ed in Illinois'
Town
Washington, Dec. 14.—Regular 14
hour aeroplane mail service will be es­
tablished by the postoffice department
between Chicago and New York. De­
tails are all practically arranged, All
that is necessary is to select the type
of machine to be used.
Service can be installed at a cost
of $100,000 yearly. It is proposed to
carry from 500 to 1,000, pounds of mail
each trip.
First landing station westward will
be near Williamsport. First relay
station at De Niles, O., whpre another
'machine will continue the flight.
TWO DEAD AS
RESULT OF THE
FL
Minnesota Farmer Found Dead
Beside Over-Turned Cutter
St. Paul Man Succumbs
COLD WAVE PASSES EAST
TEMPERATURE AT NOON 16
Two dead in Minnesota, with train
schedules slightly, deranged from one
U} fpur hours on both mainland branch
rlitiesin
the northwest, Is jthe. result
of the first cold wave of the seasoh,
which has hbveredr over the Canadian
northwest and thti prairie states since
last Friday, when the mercury in gov­
ernment thermometers commenced to
take a sudden plunge reaching 32 be­
low as the lowest, at iPrince Albert,
the night before last, itnd 22 below at
Moorhead last night, which was the
coldest point on the weather map. Re­
lief from the cold snap is promised
in warmer and generally fair tonight.
No suffering has been reported as to
coal shortages.
(Farmer Frozen to Death.
With a temperature 22 below zero,
II. J. McCarthy, a farmer, living near
Glyndon, Minn., froze to death last
night, within a half mile of his home.
He was found beside an over-turned
cutter. His horses 'broke from the
cutter and were found this morning,
browsing in a straw-Stack, a short
distance from where his body was
found by neighbors, who became
alarmed because of his failure to re­
turn. He was a resident of the Glyn­
don district 40 years. 'A widow and
three daughters survive.
William Britton, 42 years old, was
found frozen to death in St. Paul this
morning. The temperature in the Min­
nesota capital at 7 o'clock this morn­
ing was 18 below.
20 Below Here Last Night.
Bismarck's lowest temperature last
night was 20 degrees, compared with
24 degrees below Tuesday night,
which was the minimum for the sea­
son. Moorhead reported 22 sub-zero
weather and 'Williston 20 'below, and
Winnipeg, —18., At Prince 'Albert,
where on Tuesday night the mercury
dropped to 32 below, a government
report was sent out this morning that
it was 10 below there last night.
"Generally fair tonight and Friday
warmer tonight with strong southwest
to west winds," reads the official fore­
cast issued this' morning." That the
cold snap is passing is shown in the
official reading made at noon today.
The temperature at 12 o'clock was 16
above.
High Pressure Moving Eastward.
The high pressure area which has
caused such low temperatures during
tbe past few days, is slowly moving
eastward and decreasing in intensity.
Over the north a low has made its
appearance and in its southeastward
passage will result, in generally fair
weather tonight and Friday.
London, Dec. 14.—The house of
lords has dismissed the appeal of Mr.
and Mrs. E. H. Slingsby of San Fran­
cisco, who sought the estate of Rev.
Charles Slingsby for "Teddy," their
supposed son.
BOWIAN WOIAN KILLED
(Special to The Tribune.)
Bowman, N. D., Dec. 14.—Mrs. Carl
Senz of Chenoweth, N. D., was instant­
ly killed this morning in the over­
turning of the automobile which her
father, John Wright, was driving and
who lost control of the machine.
js$3-
f.'WTP
ARRANGED
Judge Crawford of Dickinson En­
joins Boar^itaM
Any Vacancies
MATTER RETURNABLE
v:
Off DECEMBER 23
Second Chapter in Hettinger
County Fight To Open in
Distriet Court
(Special to The Tribune.)
Mott, N. P., Dec. 14.—Within ten
minutes after Governor Hanna's order
ousting the members of the Hettinger
county commission was filed here a
petition for appealhad been perfected
and filed in the Tenth district court at
Dickinson and Judge Crawford had is­
sued temporary injunction, suspending
the governor's order,, restraining the
appointing officiate from taking any
action toward filling the places of the
county' commissionets involved, and
setting Saturday, December 23, at
Dickinson, as the date for hearing.
Commissioners Retain Office.
In the meantime tbe county commis­
sioners, Colgrove, Schmidt and Rieg
er, retain their places. The hands of
the appointing board composed of the
judge or probate, county auditor and
the treasurer, acting in place of the
chairman of the county board, who is
disqualified, are tied.
Law Unconstitutional.
Reasons assigned'in the petition
filed by Attorneys J. K. Murray, H. P.
Jacobson and L. A. Simpson, repre­
senting the commissioners, are:
First, the law under, which the gov­
ernor made his decision, is unconsti­
tutional.
Second, there is io evidence against
the commissioners to sustain the gov­
ernors decision.
Third, it is alleged that undue pres­
sure was brought to bear upon the
governor by Hettjnger county politi­
cians, inducing him to change his de­
cision after he hpd^niade his first con­
clusions. *. .. 1
NOT TURNTED
Men and women) who are in anxiety
of mind on account of tho appearance
of cancer in their ancestry or immed­
iate family, may dismiss 8uch anxie­
ties as there is no statistical evidence
at the present time that the disease
of cancer is transmitted by inheri­
tance in mankind.
After two years' study of original in­
surance statistics, this feature lias
been brought to light, according to a
paper presented to the Association of
Life Insurance Presidents by Presi­
dent Arthui* Hunter of the Actuarial
Society of America.
BIT ASSEMBLY
Fargo, N. D.,-Dec. 14.—A demand
upon the next legislature that it "vin­
dicate John H. Worst, former presi­
dent of the North Dakota Agricultural
college, by electing him president em­
eritus of the college," was made today
'by the Co-pperators' Herald, the Soci­
ety of Equity piper.
Mr. Worst has been twice elected
president emeritus, each time by
boards governing the institution, but
tfye tender was made under conditions
"humiliating and unjustified," and
each time it was refused, says the
Herald.
8
A
1
The announcement by the publica­
tion is taken as indicating Worst's
personal attitude on the question, and
the proposition is practically assured
of being given legislative attention.
MIDMCHT FIRE
FATAL TO ONE
Cedar Rapids, la., Dec. 14.—William
Black of Fairfax was suffocated and
several others were overcome by
smoke from afire which 'broke out
at midnight in the Stark hotel here.
SHOPPING
mts
•NTH
CHRISTMAS
vf
•i v:v. v-v:T-P
UNITED PRI88 BISMARCK, NORTH DAXOtA, THURSDAY, DEC. 14, 1916. ASSOCIATED PRESS FIVE CENTS
PRINCE WHO WORKS TO
BETHRONE BROTHER
PWNCEr ANTON KARL
Prince Anton Karl of Hohenzollern
is a brother of the king of Rumania,
but a commander in the German arihy
invading Rumania and the man try­
ing to dethrone his brother. Anton
Karl has issued a proclamation to the
people of tbe invaded territory, saying
he has come, to punieh their felon
king.
SEEK TO LEM
TRAGIC DEATH
Inquest Over Exhumed Remains
Being Conducted at Hazen
Today
TRAP SET FOR WRITER
OF BLACKMAIL LETTER
Hazen, N. D., Dec. 14.—The Fotoplay,
moving picture house today is staging
an interesting "episode" in a real
drama. There is being conducted the
inquest into the death of Karl Maier,
ordered by Attorney General Linde,
and the little picture-house is well
filled with witnesses and spectators
attracted by the grewsome entertain­
ment offered.
Contend 'Twat Not Suicide.
"The state is proceeding on the
theory that Karl Maier did not—could
not—commit suicide," said Assistant
State's Attorney Barry before opening
the inquest this morning. During the
forenoon a number of witnesses were
placed on the stand, but no new or
particularly sensational evidence was
presented.
Remains Brought In.
The remains of Karl Maier were
brought to Hazen from Hanover yes­
terday. After sleeping for alpiost a
month in a grave at the village near
which Maier met'his death, the body
today lies amid the grotesque trap­
pings of the picture theater—the only
building ff suitable size available for
the inquest.
Chris G. Olson is attending as spe­
cial reporter for Attorney General. H.
J. Linde, who has been interested in
the case since the middle of Novem­
ber, and whose reports fr#m Burns
operatives engaged by him will con­
stitute a major portion of the evi­
dence to be presented for the state.
Trap for Blackmailer.
A neat trap was set last week for
the unknown who wrote John Maier, a
brother of the deceased, a blackmail­
ing letter in which he accused Maier
of the murder antf threatened to
"peach" if $300 was not left for him
on a certain telephone post north of
Beulah. John Maier planted a note
on the post indicated at the date spe­
cified, and he and the sheriff secreted
themselves in a school house nearby.
Their watch was unrewarded. The let­
ter has been regarded from the first
as a grewsome hoax, perpetrated by
someone possessing a morbid sense
of humor.
Sweetheart on Stand.
Important among the witnesses
quizzed today was the former sweet­
heart of JCarl Maier, who wrote him
from Hanover two days before his
death, telling him she could never
marry him John Maier, first to find
his brother after the latter had twice
been shot through the chest Maier's
succesful rival for the affections of
the young woman from Hanover a
second brother of the deceased, Phil­
ip Maier, and his brother-in-law, John
Albers, also were placed on the stand.
WILSON READY TO
OFFER SERVICES ERR PEACE
WHEIALUES EXPRESS INTENT OVER
ran
SUNT
Extreme Excitement in Berlin as
Crowds Wait for News From
Entente Powers
LLOYD.QEOROE TO TELL
VIEWS TO PARLIAMENT
Illness Keeps British Premier
From Attending To Official
Busin&s
Washington, Dec. 13.—Peace propos­
als have reached the state, depart­
ment. Secretary Crewe of the Berlin
embassy transmitted with the propos­
als a confidential note to President
Wilson and Secretary of State Lanc­
ing. This is to be used by them in
advance of dealing w|th the subject
of peace.
'Should Premier Lloyd-George next
Tuesday express a desire that parlia­
ment is willing to discuss peace pro­
posals, President Wilson will offer his
services, according to close advisers
of the chief executive. President Wil­
son is silent on the matter until be
gets word concerning the attitude of
the Allies.
Message Sent.
America's first step toward carry­
ing out the desires of the Central pow­
ers to convey peace offers to other
belligerents were taken today. Secre­
tary Lansing sent the communication
to London, Paris, Tokio, provisional
capitals of Rumania, Serbia and Bel­
gium. The United States represents
Germany in Belgium, Russia, England,
France, Japan, Serbia and Rumania.
She holds the same positions for Aus
tria. 1
The proposals were s'eitt without
comment. The United St8i.es adhered
strictly to the request made by the
Central Powers.
BERLIN EXCITED.
Berlin, Dec. 13.—Great crowds stood
all night outside of the Berlin, news­
paper offices awaiting news of the Al­
lies' attitude toward the peace pro
posals. Popular excitement and inter­
est as to what the Allies intend to do
i» unabated.
The kaiser returned to Berlin Tues­
day, and will remain until the Enteii
te Powers reply to Germany's peace
proposals.
LLOYD-GEORGE AT HOME.
London, Dec. 1?».—Lloyd-George's
illness continues to keep him indoors
and from atending to official business.
The physicians claim that he is pro­
gressing favorably.
Northcliffe's Views.
Lord NorthclifTe in a copyrighted in
terview to the United Press said:
"Germany's peace proposals are due
to the fact that interned neutral news
tral newspaper correspondents are not
allowed to- indicate that during the
last few weeks grave internal dissen
tions have arisen over 'the food short­
age.
"There has been a reign of terror.
The relations between the various
German and Austrian states and Tur­
key are strained. The Prussian gov*
ernment has learned that England,
is going to make a drive in 1917
equal to that of Germany in 1914. In
point of guns and shells, England has
three times as many as Germany has
had at any time during the war.
"Peace proposals are received here
with contempt. I am gratified' that
the Americans scent the humor and
see through the bluff."
PARK FALLSTFFIE
LOSS is mm
Park Falls, Wis., Dec. 14.—Fire,
which started in a downtown business
•block at 4:1& o'clock yesterday after­
noon, was checked at 4 o'clock this
morning, after firemen ,had battled
with the flames in a temperature be­
low zero.. The loss is estimated at
$150,04)0. which is mostly covered by
insurance.
Amsterdam, Dec. 13.—Vienna dis­
patches announce the resignation of
the Austrian ministry. Alexander
Spitzmueller will attempt to form a
new one. If the Austrian cabinet re­
ally has resigned it has attained the
unique record of holding office the
shortest of any in recent years in
Europe.
mm TME SUCH
ran is is ran
London, Dec. 14.—Bonar Law an
nounced in the house 9f commons tlret
the government has titken such action
as is necessary in the case of Cap
tain Blaikie of the Caledonia, who
was taken prisoner by the Germans
and is supposed to be facing a possi­
ble execution for ramming a subma-(
rine.
'T¥
Mackensen and Falkenhayn Have
Practically Cleared the Enemy
From Before Them
WAR PLANS NOT TO
HALT FOR PEACE PARLEY!
Hindenburg Declares That Winfe
er Campaign Will Continue
Unabated
SINK THREE SHIPS.
London, Dec. 14.—A German
•ubmarlne tank a British steamer
bound frpm New York to England
with a cargo of 6,000 tons of war
material. It waa torpedoed in the
English channel. Between Nov.
28 and Dec. 6 Germany has auhk
vessels laden with 17,000 tons of
coal bound from England to
France.
The loss of the British steamer*
Harlington and Harlin withdraws
a
London, Dec. 14.—The new govern­
ment intends to create ministers of
food and labor, Lloyd-George, leader
of the house of commons, announced
today.
VILLA TAKES
SANTA ROSALIA
El Paso, Texas, Dec. 14.—Villa .fore*
es have captured Santa Rosalia. The
town was garrisoned by 300 Carransa
soldiers. Details of the action are
very meagre.
KOOO MSUBAHGE
rapt
Velva Woman Confers With Head
of Company Which Protected
Her Husband
Last April D. W. Burrill of Belva
started afire with gasoline which
he
found where he thought the kerosene
should be.
His widow is having some difficulty
in collecting a $5,000 policy on his life
which her husband had carried in the
Boosters' Accident association of Min­
neapolis.
This week President E. G. Helm
baugh of the Boosters' association nod
Mrs. Burrill met in the office of Com*'
missioner W. C. Taylor for a confer­
ence. There was no definite result so
far as immediate developments are
concerned, but Mrs. Murrill was per­
suaded of the necessity of supplying
the insurance association with certain
additional information which it has re­
quested. She has returned to Minot,
where she has been employed sines
the death of her husband, where she
will fill out necessary blanks under
the direction of her attorneys, Paid*
& Aaker.
Some very technical questions, such
as the right of a family to keep gaso­
line in kerosene cans, and whether a
policy such as the association issues
covers such occupation^ as kindlinf
fires, are involved.
answertoTt::
'PROTEST 2*L.-iT/ED
Washington, Dec. I- Co: army's
answer to the American irotest
against the deportation ui -elgians
was received at the stale department
today. The text is the same as reveal­
ed in press dispatches from Berlin.
•, vvi,
[Home Edition
AHEAD IN DRIVE
7
h.
steamir Ulsurli. .wasv jniitt^teed'.
by Lloyds late todkyiHfHi}|f:1^^f-
Berlin, Dec. 13.—Favorable prog­
ress is' being made on all Balkan
fronts by the Teutons. All of little
Wlallachia from Bucharest to south of
Cerhavoda has been cleared of the
enemy.
Despite peace pproposals, Field Mar*
shal von Hindenburg ^declares the Ger­
man armies will not cease their actlv*
ities. Military authority stated this
in commenting on the fact that Ger­
many weighed carefully the. question
of peace before any announcement
was made. He said that the Germans*'
know that England does not want
peace because the Allies plan ,fo
launch an enormous spring offensive.
The London war office, estimates
that it can supply an additional mil­
lion men of all ranks by March 31,
1917. This will make a total of five.'
million for the twelve-month period.
-4

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