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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, May 29, 1917, Image 4

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THE TRIBUNE
•t ttl P—1BMB»
D., •iiobI Ctaw Ihttv.
N.
OflUKD KVHRT DAT KZCKPT SUNDAY
lUMCUFTION liin FATAXUI IN
1D71NC1
tilly, by mall or carrier,
pif BOfttb 9 »W
Dally. by mall, one year In
North Dakota 4.00
Dally, by mall outalde of
North Dakota, one year ..... 1.00
Dally, by mall outtlde of
North Dakota, three monthi. 1.10
Dally, by mall In North Dakota
three months 1-25
Weekly, by mall, per year 1.60
Mamfeer Audit Bureau of Clrovlatloa
COT •TATHTS OLDEST NSWIPAPl
(Drtal»Ilate41ITI
WEATHER REPORT
24 hours ending at noon May
For
291
Temperature at 7:00 a. :.. 49
Temperature at noon r2
Highest yesterday
r'
Lowest yesterday 48
Lowest last night 4P
(Precipitation •2
Highest wind velocity jNE—IS
Forecast.
For North iDakota: Unsettled to­
night probably rain in south por­
tion cooler in east and south por­
tions Wednesday probably fair not
so cool in west and central portions.
Fargo
11
Lowest
Temperatures
46
Williston 38
Grand Forks 46
Pierre 54
St. Paul 52
Winnipeg 40
Helena 38
Chicago 48
Swift Current 20
Kansas City 58
San Francisco 48
ORRIS W. 'ROBERTS,
Meteorologist.
He that would have his vir
tue published is not the ser
vant of virtue, but glory.—
Ben Jonson.
"CYCLONE BILL."
The press agent of Attorney Gen
eral Langer in a Boswellian article
confides that during his first year in
college "Cyclone Bill" made the rec­
ord of "being out only five nights in
one year."
The degree of restraint can only be
appreciated when it is known that
"Cyclone Bill" attended Columbia,
where the Great White Way constant­
ly allures.
But here is the gem of the eulogy:
"The clock was striking the hou:
of 10:45, when shouts, the pounding
of doors, the speeding of automobiles
and the fact that crowds began pour­
ing out on the streets, made it evi­
dent that something of more than
usual intreset was in progress that
night, May 8, in the city of Minot.
'What's the matter? Wihat's go­
ing on?' asked bystanders.
'Bill Langer's coming to town.
Bill Langer's here,' was the answer,
and the 'Magic City' fairly shook un­
der the answer. The underworld of
that city had long feared the coming
to town of "Cyclone Bill.'
Why these words? Why try to
paint the lily?
In future when hard put for super­
latives to describe "Cyclone Bill" we
commend this verse to the Non-parti
san Daily:
"See what a grace is seated on this
brow
yperiop's curls, the front of Jove
1
An eye like Mars,
to
threaten and
command
A combination and a form, indeed,
Where every god did seem to set his
seal
To give the world assurance of a
man."
Our nurses and doctors are in Lon
doi$#^f ehrtpeers "have landed their
vanguard there, our navy is after the
U-boats.
DIRECT ACTION.
Jackson Carlisle found his apart­
ment too cold for comfort.
Whereupon he got hot and, going
downstairs, shot his landlord in the
shoulder.
This happened in Chicago, but the
case will be watched with eager in­
terest by a large and steadily in­
creasing army of flat-dwellers every­
where.
In the between seasons the matter
of apartment bouse heat has become
a serious problem. Radiator rapping
has proved futile except as a method
of relieving the feelings of the rap­
per.
Remonstrances with janitors are of
little avail when that individual'
mind has turned from firing to fl
screens.
Shooting the landlord is an ex­
treme application of the direct ac
tiontion theory and, of course, we are
properly shocked.
Just the same we hope the pep­
pery Mr. Carlisle will be tried before
a judge who is himself a flat-dweller.
Germany's food supply
ing shorter. Let's hasten
when they bite the dust.
LBuy
becom-
the time
a ibond for your June bride
That'll be at least one pleasant bond
between
BUY LIBERTY BONDS.
Picture the immigrant. He has
landed at Ellis Island and is won­
dering whether the bars will be let
down for him. He has staked his all
upon the move from the Old World
to the New. He has left behind him
king worship, rank worship, castle
worship.
Back there a man remains very
largely in the station in life in which
he was born. Back there he has to
serve in the army, whether it is war
time or peace time. Back there little
opportunity presented itself to him
and less to his children.
Suppose now Uncle Sam said to
him: "IIow much will you give to
be admitted to my country?" Don't
you know that he would put up al­
most every cent he had on earth and
would be willing to pledge a part
his earnings, no matter what sacri
lice it entailed?
Because, once within the gates, he
would be in the land of opportuni
ties. Nothing would be .'barred
him that his energies and his talentr
could attain.
Here there is no king and no rank
and no caste. Every man is what
he makes of himself. He may be a
workman drawing a good union wage,
or a shopkeeper, or a great merchant
He may become mayor of his city, or
congressman of his district, or gover­
nor of his state. Even the pre
dency is open to his sons born in
this country. And be very sure of
it, the immigrant appreciates to the
full all these chances in life.
But do you appreciate them, you
who were born in this country and
who take all these blessings for
granted? Do you appreciate them,
you who were naturalized so long ago
that your perceptions of things have
become dulled?
If not, it is time to wake up. AJ
that America is to us, all that it cat
be to our children and to future gen
erations, is at stake.
German autocracy is still a menace
to the world. German militarism it
still uncrushed. It is up to all o'
us either to enlist or invest. Thosp
of us who can't serve in the army
should help" support the army /b
work and by money.
Buy Liberty Bonds.
Pay what you thins it is worth to
be an American citizen.
CAPITOL NOTES
PLAY DAY.—
'Michigan, N. D., May 29.—IMore
than 600 school children participated
in the annual Nelson county play day
here. Three ibanners and 95 medals
were awarded winning contestants.
SCHOOL MONEYS.—
N. C, Macdonald today announces
the apportionment of the state tui­
tion fund of $392,920.71. Cass county
draws the largest share, $20,653.22.
The amount per capita is $2.03 for
193.&57 children enrolled in the pub­
lic schools.
BOWMAN ON BOARD—
Governor Frazier on Saturday nam
ed Rep. E. A. Bowman of Kulm the
floor leader for the Nonpartisan
league in the last house of represen­
tatives, member of the North Dakota
national defense council, which meets
here Monday.
MASON BACK—
After eleven days in the hospital,
N. A. Mason, secretary to Governor
Frazier, is again on duty and is feel­
ing fine. Mr. Mason was seized with
an acute attack of appendicitis and
went to a local hospital to toe oper­
ated upon.
WEDNESDAY HOLIDAY—
Wednesday, Memorial day, will 1
religiously observed as a holiday at
the capitol, and every department will
be closed throughout the day. A ma­
jority of the heads of departments
have accepted invitations to make
Memorial day addresses at various
points in the state.
ON NORTH LINE—
The railway commission, as repre­
sented by Commissioners Johnson
and Bleick, with Secretary Calder
head, left this afternoon for Stanton,
where 'Sanger's telephone troubles
and Stanton's request for a new cross­
ing will 'be considered this evening.
Sangerites will join the board at
•Sanger, and it is possible that affairs
affecting the local exchange may be
settled en route to Stanton. F. L.
Shuman, district manager of the
North Dakota Independent Telephone
company, goes to Stanton for the
hearing, which will affect the com­
pany's long distance business. Tomor­
row the commission goes to Hazen to
look into an elevator site petition.
HIGH HUIE
TO KISIEII Flit Hilt
35 Workmen Engaged by N. A.
Mutchler Show Patriotic
Spirit-Big Flax Field
W'hen C. W. Streeter, registrar for
Crofte township, began to registar
the working crew of H. A Mutchler.
it would have done any true Ameri­
can good to see the way the foreign­
ers rushed up to register. It would
have taken the recruiting officer no
time to have enlisted the whole
bunch.
Mr. Mutchler has a force of about
35 men working for him digging rock
and preparing the ground. He is
putting in about l'O.OOO acres of flax
this year, and up to the present has
several hundred acres in.
IM RATHEC SURPRISED!
ptp.jeuo THAT V0U Believe /M WAR
MAVBMV OUSTED VET-I BDr IF THEI SHOULD
SoO
HAve NO TIBS
TO Keep Soo
FROM
GOING-
SAN, WOO Whitf FOLKS
AfcE SITTfHG
Two Women Announce They Seek
Places in Interests of Child
Conservation
ROVIG AND WARREN NOT
READY TO QUIT BATTLE
Mrs. W. W. Fuller and Mrs. R. R.
Hedtke have been selected as the
women candidates to oppose Messrs.
John Ilovig and H. H. Warren for
places on the city board of education.
The election is to be held at the city
hall on Tuesday, June 5, Registration
day. The ladies are being supported
by the Child Conservation league, and
it is promised one of the most inter­
esting school elections held in Man
dan for some time will be held at
that time.
Petitions Filed. ..'
'i
V$hen asked if they in.ijbndeH tq|r|
mafn in the race after tlje aniioiwe
ment that the ladies were going' to
run with the support of the league,
Messrs. Rovig and Warren said, "AVell,
I should say we are." Both Rovig
and Warren have filed their petitions.
As yet Mesdames Fuller and Hedtke
BISMAUCE HAILY TBIBDNS
DOINGS OF THE DUFFS.
THE WORD DRAFT WAS ENOUGH
HA-HA-
I PPH
1
-•mm
Ibl
40ITE
A DRAUGHT HERE
A
WHAT?
Mandan News Bureau
DRAFT
have not filed, but thoy will more
tha^-ljr^Jjf t}0 SO
Judges Named.
ClerkONoakes ofWithe city school
board an'nounced yesterday that Serg.
Flannagan anil Sam T. McVey had
been engaged' as judges for the elec­
tion, and that they will be assisted by
Clerks Ed Miller and John Melzner.
Are Appointed Officers.
Rovig and /Warren are the members
appointed to. take places on the school
board, which were vacated a short
time ago.
Called .Horrfe—J)|r. and Mrs. E. L.
Pope departed this morning on No. I
for Caledonia, 'Minn., having been
called'to' the bedside of the "former's
mother, who is said'tb too in a very
critichil'/c0ndition.'
i'liv n'«':r t-i.
Mrs. Martin i'rt Mandarr—Mrs. Edgar
Martin and daughter passed through
Mandan yesterday afternoon en route
homo from Bismarck, where the lat­
ter had 'been a patient in a Bismarck
hospital for a few days. The Mar­
tins formerly lived in Mandan, but
now are located at Hazen, where Mr.
Martin has a drug store.
Employed at Cary's—Arnold Wilkin­
son has accepted a position as stenog­
rapher in the office of L. N. Cary.
Bleick to Stanton—Charles Bleick
of the state railroad commission left
yesterday afternoon for Stanton,
where he with the other commission­
ers will hold a hearing concerning
the locating of an elevator site.
Mrs. Voss Here—Mrs. Fritz Voss,
formerly of Mandan, is here for a few
clays visiting with relatives. Her son,
Harvard university recruits are here shown learning to dig trenches
under direction of French army office rs. They are' learning the arts of
modern warfare in the open plain ne ar the university at Cambridge, Mass.
jBv
Possible TWeV will,
A llman
hoc
GO
MAKE V*
afraid And
MAKE
I TWNK I WOULD
TMAM VouTM/rtKt—A VERH ooD aotwee,
bur irt TWe tfroeR.
Feuovi*GO
I
WAVE.
THe PATRIOTIC spiwt
blT-
Ilorton, is with her and will possibly
spend the summer in Mandan with his
grandmother.
HOSPITAL NOTES.
Mrs. Paul McKaig, who had bcten* a
patient, Ja the hospital for' a
number of d^s^wai^jfpjpaspfl yester­
day and hafoyi^fp^ to'j&er^lipme at
Fort Rice. .j, .,
ri/
1
Mrs. Charles PitlQ'Rourke, who had
been a patient in the .hospital for a,
few days, was yesterday afternoon re­
leased from that institution.
Mrs. Michael Bollinger and baby re­
turned to their home in the Bt.| An.
thony district after having been at
the Mandan hospital for a few days.
Friends of H. L. Hartman, who has
been in a critical condition at the hos­
pital, suffering with an attack of pneu­
monia, will"6$J$l£3^tf,lTfo leArn that
ho is cottV'&ieSfl&iW! jaMf'WIll'^q.jable
to resume OTfftw'W
the Palace'' 'irf!&'1'&mpl#I
weeks.
:iu
Mrs. Rose Seidle of St. Anthony
was entered at the hospital yesterday
for a few days' treatment.
Announcement has been made that
the annual graduation of nurses from
the Mandan hospital will be held on
Thursday evening at the Mandan
Commercial clulb rooms. Dr. Martin
Kranz will deliver the chief address
of the evening.
Gilbreath in Mandan—Roy Gilbreath
arrived in the city yesterday and de­
parted last evening for his home in
Minneapolis, after having spent sev­
eral weeks at his farm in the Mott
locality, supervising the seeding of
approximately 2,000 acres of land.
Mrs. Regan Home—Mrs. Joseph Re­
gan, who was visiting Dickinson rela­
tives and friends for some time, has
returned home.
Estep Returns—Carl Estep, popular
express clerk of this city, returned
home yesterday morning from Glen
dive, where he had been a patient in
the Northern Pacific hospital for a
number of days.
Sticks to the Job—GVliss Minnie
Kidd, who was in Mandan over Sun­
day visiting relatives and friends, re­
turned to Glendive yesterday to re­
sume her duties in the Northern Paci­
fic roundhouse. Miss Kidd says that
she intends to "stick to her Job."
Mrs. Rosen in Cities—Mrs. Morris
Rosen wfcnt to the twin cities yester­
day for a few days' visit with rela­
tives and friends.
Manager in Mandan—A. R. Glass
mann, manager of the Bingenheimer
Mercantile company at Sweet Briar,
was in Mandan yesterday attending
to business matters.
Golden Here on Business—J. W.
Golden, operator for the Northern Pa­
cific at Sweet Briar, was in .Mandan
yesterday afternoon.
Entertain Friends—Mesdames G. F.
Jones and J. K. Porter entertained a
number of friends at the home of
the latter this afternoon at luncheon
and will again entertain tomorrow.
Hunke Transfers John Hunke,
Northern Pacific brakeman, stated
yesterday that he intended to trans­
fer to the second district owing to
the sudden "slump" in 'business.
Visiting Parents.— Mrs. Charles
Woodward is in Driscoll spending a
few days visiting with her parents.
John Schafer Married—John Schaf
er of this city and Miss Frances Wirts
of Dickinson were united in marriage
at Dickinson this morning at 9 o'clock.
Relatives of the contracting parties
The circus is here!
The parade of Cole Brothers' world
toured show was given in Bismarck
this forenoon and it was witnessed
by a good-sized crowd. The after­
noon performance was well attended
and another big crowd will be pres­
ent tonight.
Wlien the big procession passed
through the crowded streets there
wore many expressions of approval
for the people seemed to have felt
repaid for the ti«p down town. The
costumes of the riders were new,
from the buglers at the head of the
parade to Madam Liberta Zona Miles,
the Hindu princess, who drove Myr­
tle, the ibig elephant, from her seat
in the two-wheeled cart.
Animals Appear Excellent.
The animals were all sleek and/ap-
peared to ha,ve passed a comfortable
winter in their quarters.' Every wag­
on in line had been treated to a fresh
coat of paint, with new decorations
of gold and silver leaf.
The animal acts as presented at
this' afternoon's performance were
probably the best ever seen here.
1Ch6erful
living in Mandan attended the wed­
ding.
Mrs. Cary Leaves—Mrs. L. IN. Cary
departed yesterday for Pittsburgh,
Pa., for a few weeks' visit with her'
son, who i3 attending school in tfifeii
city.
Mrs. B. E. Schultz Here—'Mrs. B. E
Schultz of Carson arrived in the city
yesterday and is spending a few days
in Mandan visiting with friends.
Goes to Minneapolis—Mrs. R. E
Brown leaves tomorrow morning for
Minneapolis, where she will spend an
indefinite period. Mrs. Brown has
been in Mandan visiting with friends
for the past several days. 'She has
accepted the superintendency of the
Bismarck nurses corps who will go
to France. Just as soon as Mrs.
Brown is advised that the party is
to leave she will make preparations
to join them in Minneapolis.
New Bank Clerk—W. P. Parezek of
Lidgerwood assumed a position as
bookkeeper in the Farmers' Equity
bank yesterday morning.
Dawson in City—John Dawson, well
known proprietor of the Oak Coulee
ranch, was in Mandan yesterday mak­
ing arrangements to ship a registered
Aberdeen-Angus bull to John Tavis
jit Glen Ullin. Mr. Dawson says that
ne is selling a large number of his
registered bulls this spring.
Bankers to Beach—Bankers W. A.
Lanterman, George Janda and Joseph
iP. Hess departed yesterday for
Beach, where they are attending the
meeting of the Missouri slope bank­
ers.
BUSINESS HOUSES TO CLOSE.
Webb Bros., A. W. Lucas and com­
pany and Johnson Bros, will close
their places of business at noon Wed
nesd^y, in^ observance of Memorial
day.
TOO lift 10 CIASSIF*
FOR RE
at 223
T—Furnished
th' street.
TUESDAY, MAY 20, 191?.
Cole Brothers Circus Pleases
Animal Acts Win High Favor
every moment it seems that the train­
er is taking his life in his liandB, try­
ing to subdue the savage (beasts.
Miss Muriel Oroft, the little French
girl, who goes into the steel arena
with a group of leopards and pan­
thers, has an act that is really won­
derful.
The three riding lions is a new act
and very dangerous, for it places the
rider behind the animal, a thing that
is never done in handling wild ani­
mals. "Buck," the lion ballonist, is
also a new act. He swings back and
forth in a suspended balloon.
There was fun in plenty to relieve
the thrills, and the wild animal acts.
Twenty clowns forming the clown
band, under the leadership of Clown
Rue Enos, marched on and on to
screeching music. The Three Kobers
Miss Irene the girl with a voice louder than the band
Gardner, the elephant
traihrir, is true to his name, a happy
&d-lucky chap, who has trained the
troupe of elephants so that they work
faster than any other troupe in ex­
istence.
Charles Gay, the lion trainer, with
his |50,00( group of black maned
beasts of the jungle, presents a real
sensational act. These ferocious
beasts, although seemingly trained,
still keep the audicnce on the anxious
scat throughout the long act, as
front room
5-29-3t
FOR1 RtNT—June 1 modern flat fur
nishedr. Telephon^Nb. 672X:
v? »Uj i'm
I
4!
ilif. ftfi-s
til? at *5t»ftr»o! jff*
in' double trapeze and acrobatic
stunts, the Wittiest th« human butter­
flies, and the wizard, Duo, did some
exceptionally clever work on the
high wire. Ringmaster Rogers and
Mrs. Rogers won rounds of applause
in the Spanish dance with the aid of
two of the most attractive horses
ever seen.
From other cities where the Cole
Brothers have given their circus per­
formances, good reports are receiv­
ed. Under the big tops clean and
wholesome entertainment is offered
young and old.
The Cole Bros.' shows have not
been seen here since 1899, although
being the oldest show on the road,
they are making their 41st annual
tour, being best kjiown in the east
and central west.
MOT PRfPARIHG FOR
'S WAR, SAYS
Mew
vj.-
Oscar J. Seiler of Jamestown
States Board Is Preparing
for 1918 Crop
That little more can be done to in­
crease acreage this year, but that
much may and shall be done to insure
bigger crops next year was the opin­
ion expressed today by Attorney J.
Seiler of Jamestown, secretary of the
North Dakota efficiency commission.
"We are not preparing simply for one
year's war," said Mr. Seiler. "We
anticipate that the need will be great­
er a year hence than it is now. The
efficiency commission during the next
twelve months hopes to work out
plans for a great crop in 1918- What
we need most is more farmers- I
believe the* farmers we now have are
this year doing all that is humanly
possible. We must have more farm­
ers, and the efficiency commission
must find a way to bring them into
North Dakota."
To Rotate Labor
R- J. Leth, field agent under W- J
Spillman, chief of the office of farm
management in the United States de­
partment of agriculture, who is here
for the joint meeting of the effciency
commission and national defense coun­
cil today, advises that farm labor as
it finishes with the harvest in southern
states will be rotated to the north, in
an effort to supply the needs of every
state for skilled help as the harvest
season advances.
A plan of organization embracing a
committee in every county, with mem­
bers in each township, and consider­
ing a full survey of the state's acreage,
crop conditions and labor needs, was
announced at today's session.
John H- Worst of New Rockford.
former president of the state agri­
cultural college, heads the etficiency
commission. All of the members of
the organization are here today ex­
cept Horace Bagley, detained at home
by a speaking engagement.
Win. S. "'Hart is here^anil will be
seen at the Orpheum tonight only.

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