OCR Interpretation


The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, July 09, 1917, Image 4

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042243/1917-07-09/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

wm
V',?
it
SJfc
r'l
IIJ
THE TRIBUNE
Kntered at the Postoftlce, Biamarck. N.
P.. a» Second Class Matter.
BYEfiY DAY EXjCEi-/ SUNDAY
ISSUES
BUBSC
RIPTION RATES PAYABLE IN
ADVANCE
by mall or carrier, per
th I
Fargo
-1
tn
60
Daily, by m&ll, one year In North
Dakota *0°
Daily, by mail In North Dakota,
three months
by mail outside of North
tota, one year
by mail outside of North
^_xota, three months J-gJJ
Weekly, by mall, per year l.oQ
O. LOGAN PAYNE COMPANY
Special Foreign Representative
NEW YORK, Fifth Ave. Bldg. CHICAGO.
Marquette Bldg. BOSTON, Winter
St. DETROIT, Kresge Bldg. MINNE
APOLIS, 810 Lumber Exchange.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation
fHE STATE'S OLDEST NEWSPAPER
(Established 1872)
WEATHER REPORT
For 24 hours ending at noon, July 9.
Temperature at 7 A. J3
Temperature at noon 71
Highest yesterday 90
lowest yesterday 63
Lowest last rflght 62
Precipitation
41
Highest wind velocity 2C-S
Forecast
For North Dakota: Fair tonight
and Tuesday, becoming unsettled
west portion Tuesday warmer west
portion tonight.
Lowest
Temperatures
5,5
Williston CS
Grand Forks 51
Jterre 72
St. Paul
Winnipeg
Helena GO
Chicago
Swift Current, Sask 5G
Kansas City 70
San Francisco 50
ORRIS W. ROBERTS,
Meteorologist.
Nothing great was ever
achieved without enthusiasm.
—Emerson.
«5» »j *8'
PARTIALLY DRY.
Had it not been for the pestiferous
prohibition lobby at Washington, com­
prised chiefly of men who have left
the ministry for politics and the lob
my, the nation might have been bone
dry today.
The defeat of the bone dry aniend
ttletot IS'a rebuke to the lobbyists who
sought" t(j!,'block' imperative legisla­
tion., fty ^fflxing an, impossible rider
upon: the food control bill. 'People re­
sent such subterfuges. The nation
is ready now for a bone dry law, but
it will never consent othe tactics
'practiced by the lobbyists in placing
in Jeopardy legislation of vital inter­
est to the peace and safety of a na­
tion.
A reverend gentleman, writing to
the New York World recently, illus
trated the spirit of the lobby which
sought tfr1force its will upon the Am
•ricaill^ople, wh£n he said:
t.iioKi'.'If! you are fighting Germany
and the kaiser go ahead and
don't bother with us. We are
fighting hell and the devil and
have no time for your puny little
wars."
North Dakota has the same brand
of foplish zealots in its Watkinses
and Wnwalls. These men have done
more to delay bone dry legislation
than any other agency in the state
because of an unyielding intolerance
which seeks to inject moral issues
into every piece of legislation that
arises.
President Wilson's attitude* early in
the prohibition agitation assured vic
tory for those who sought to wipe
out the whiskey traffic. If the pro­
hibition lobby had :been content with
victory a step at a time rather than
in one long leap, the nation would
be nearer a bone dry law than it is
today.
The lobby intrusted with national
prohibition has lost its power at
Washington for months to come,
probably years, because it endanger­
ed a piece of urgent war legislation
rather than yield temporarily until
congress, with the food legislation off
its hands, could take up the prohibi­
tion issue on its merits.
As the New York World well says,
the prohibition lobby is made up to
some extent of "reverend gentlemen
who long ago found politics more con­
genial than religion and lobbying
more profitable than preaching."
The nation is to be congraulated
that the "booze" business is wiped
out. May it be not only a war meas­
ure, but a permanent one. But the
victory is marred by the foolish op­
portunists who, by wiles and threats,
have delayed real national prohibi­
tion for some time to come.
President Wilson and his advisers,
together with a few level-headed re­
publicans in the House and Senate,
are responsible for the kind of na­
tional prohibition the bill passed Sat­
urday gives the nation, not the long­
haired men and short-haired women
deluded with the idea thajt they are
divinely appointed to fight "hell and
the devil," even though their mili­
tancy against an invisible foe ham­
pers the nation from tackling the
kaiser.
If the kaiser really did stki.'c Us
Angers into East St. Louis he prob­
ably figures by now that he got noth­
ing more than another blister
of the mess.
LABOR AND THE NEGRO.
To what extent the race riots in
East St. Louis are due to "labor agi
tators"—official or unofficial—will
probably never be known.
But this may be set down as a fact
—organized labor is as ready as any­
body else to give' the negro a square
deal.
Every man who becomes a member
of the American Federation of La­
bor obligates himself "never to dis­
criminate against a fellow-worker on
account of creed, color or national­
ity."
This is as high a standard as one
can find anywhere and, in a general
way, it expresses the attitude of or­
ganized labor toward the negro
throughout the entire country.
It is true that in some parts of the
United States, there is a prejudice
against the negro among trade union­
ists, but whenever this is the case
these trade unionists simply reflect
the opinion of the so-called better
classes of the community.
For example, in such communities,
it is safe to say, it is easier for a
colored man to join a white man's
union than it is for a colored man
to join a white man's church.
Ordinarily when there is a preju­
dice against the negro, either on the
part of a working man or any other
kind of a man, it is due to the negro's
character and not to his color.
Suffragists will have realized an
age old ambition when men wear
kilts and women put on overalls.
THE SENTIMENTAL SAVAGE.
Recently there was published in
some of the newspapers a personal
narrative by one of the German avi­
ators who took part in the murderous
game of dropping bombs upon civil­
ians in the city of London.
He told about his departure with
the rest of the aviators, when "the
sun seemed to be laughing at the
world" and when their commander,
addressing a few words to them, end­
ed softly, with "God bljess you, lads."
Picture it—this sentimental delight
in the bright blue sky and the shin­
ing sun, and this soft calling of the
blessing of God upon the aviators.
The ordinary student of human na­
ture'would say that here were men
aibo'iii to depart upon some errand of
mercy,!/ some mission of love and
charity.
And within a very few hours they
were engaged in the hellish work of
dropping bombs upon a quiet school
house, blowing the tender and inno­
cent bodies of little boys and girls
into bleeding fragments, catching men
and women in the peaceful pursuits
of their home lives and mangling and
blinding them.
All this done in the name of Fath
Pf glory, of honorable war­
fares
"What is one to make of such a
People? How fathom the mental pro­
cesses of assassins who mouth about
sunlight and God before they com­
mit their foul murders?
It is this that makes them the
grave danger to the world. They are
war crazy. They must be curbed and
restrained and confined just as any
other maniacs with murderous tend­
encies are. There is no room for
such sentimental savages and there
can be no peace so long as they have
free range. Uncle Sam must be one
of the policemen who will place the
Prussian in a straight-jacket and ren­
der him impotent to follow the bent
to which his mania drives him.
Censorship may be eheerfuHy look­
ed upon as only another form of our
national war on waste—this time in
words and their destructive effects.
PROTECT THE CHILDREN.
This world war into which we have
entered to make the world safe for
democracy must not be allowed to de­
stroy any of the safeguards we have
by slow,.painful steps erected for the
cause of democracy.
Aside from the strain and stress
of battle, danger lurks in every war.
The unsleeping forces of greed and
selfishness are always on watch to
regain lost ground.
Much has been said, and rightly so,
as to how this country can profit
from the experiences of those other
great democracies—-England and
I1 ranee. Our allies can teach us
much about warfare in the trenches
and on the seas. They can also give
us much guidance concerning mat­
ters at home.
And one of the lessons the Allies
can teach us is that we must not
throw our children into the furnace
of war. There must toe no wholesale
suspension of restrictions of the
hours children are permitted to labor.
There must be no let-up in child wel­
fare work. There must be no paraly­
sis of school systems.
At the beginning of the war in
England and France, in the frantic
endeavor to increase the industrial
output necessary for carrying on the
struggle, children were thrown into
the factories as if they were so much
fuel for a fire. The cry was that
everyone, even the children, must do
their bit.
And then came
out
4the afte*tpat|h.
Young girls jand Jfc«*&£}#
3fw
C\•J-.iftf'.
&
the physical strain^of long* hours of
confinement in the factories, whether
doing day or night work.
England and France were fighting
to make the liberties of the next
generations secure and, while doing
so, were denying those very genera­
tions the chance to grow up strong
in body, educated in mind and clean
in spirit. The result was there had
to be a speedy return to restriction of
child labor, to enforcement of school
laws and to all safeguards necessary
for child life.
The danger England and France
faced and speedily took steps to over­
come, is facing us now. Already in
highly industrialized states, like New
Jersey, Pennsylvania and New York,
there have beep "defense" proposals
to suspend or rfepeal child labor laws
which were put upon the statute
books only after the bitterest fight
with special interests. If not prompt­
ly checked, this move will spread.
There is no excuse for enslaving
the weak bodies of growing chil­
dren.
It would be nothing less than sui­
cide for the United States to risk
the flower of her manhood in the
trenches of blood-soaked France,
while at home we were subjecting
our future men and women to a kill­
ing blight that would break down
their bodies, blunt their' minds and
abate their morals.
A Massachusetts joy rider, female
persuasion, stoli the star from the
cop who halted her. Thus does bu­
colic authority suffer another jmt at
the hands of progress.
EXPJL/VN£TK!N
tolfPtfa Cou«£ Rct^ntfo* tftp {reg­
ular-: little devil ?r.'' No use. aiming:
nothing worries tlirft old boy. He's
got an explanation right on the tip of
his pen, ho matter what happens.
Here we land an army of American
fighting men in Europe and get all
set to land a smash right in the teeth
of the German front line.
Does Reventlow bat an eye? Never
bat. He mjerely informs Germany
there are no Americans in France—1
that is, no American fighting men.
"If there were it would be kept
secret," he says.
So the count doesn't believe our
army is in France.
Well, the truth is, we don't care a
pink rose whether he believes it or
not. B'ut we pass along to the doubt­
er the tip that the American army
now in France will make suitable
announcement of its presence in due
time, and whether or not Reventlow
believes it, there will be some bat­
tered German boys in the trenches
who'll be willing to believe it fast
enough!
What Reventlow thinks,about the
presence of American fighters in
France is as important as whether
the ladies on Mars are crimping their
hair this year.
Except that some day maybe the
Qerman plain folk will have their
own little way of dealing with the
kaiser's official liars.
Mushrooms Go to Waste.
Mushrooms are allowed to go to
waste in enormous quantities every
year, but in part this is on acconnt of
the grave risks involved in the selec­
tion of edible varieties from among
the poisonous kinds that grow in woods
and fields. If everyone were able to
discriminate with certainty and pre­
cision between the safe and unsafe
mushrooms that nature sows profuse­
ly about the country uncounted thou­
sands of tons of good food might be
added to the supplies* already po»
Somewhere in France!
»u
•A
DISAGREES WITH KAHN.
Bismarck, July 9, 1917.
Editor Tribune:—
Herewith is a translation of a news
story and comment from the "Staats
Anzeiger" published at Bismarck and
edited iby Mr. Brandt, employed as a
federal official, ,in the land office.
The)re evidently are two kinds of
Berman-Americ^ns in this country.
"Mr. KajinjRepresents th$.,t,ype. who is
thoroughly jAmerican .and, wa^ts no
exemption from miji^ry service
wants no oiqe to do hip, fighting for
him. Mr Kahn evidently agrees with
President Wilson that' this is not a
war against the German people, but
rather for their liberation from Prus­
sian autocracy, which Mr. Brandt has
upon one occasion sought to defend.
Fortunately to))xthe S'.ope, the great
majority of German-Americans belong
in the Kahn clnsgi. Here is a transla­
tion of a news item and editorial com­
ment on the same
Dublishcd in
the
"Gtaata-Anzeiger" of Bismarck, North
Dakota: 11
fm Prldayi ,July ti, 1917.
"New, Yfirk, Jtily &imJulius Kahn.
Congressman from California, who
made a Fourth of July speech here
yesterday before Tammany Hall,
characterize as an insult the sugges­
tion brough' forward that Americans
of German descent or German birth
should not bo placed on the battle
line in Europe, but should lie Kiven
duty which should not bring them in­
to direct contact with German troops.
Kahn is the leading Republican mem­
SAW^cMARtew, The WIFE
AHD
HA«e beem our
OF Tow*! FOR. A COUPLE OF
PANS AM? AOECOMWG BACK
AUD I WAS WONOEftirtG I
MOM A lime Pokes PARTY
V4O0LD
CO TOMCHT-
PARDC*T
Me Josf AMWUTE^HABICY, TMEBE
la some
JCNE AT
twe back
1
Have Yw Amy
OLD N6NSPAPERS
IN IMS AROtUND
/l
m.'ii
Readers' Column
ber of the Committee on Military Af­
fairs, and was born in Germany. He
thinks it to be unimaginable and ab­
solutely ridiculous to keep the Ameri­
cans of German biftn or descent away
fro mthe firing line. He thinks it
signifies the same as to say: 'They
may make bullets, but someone else
must shoot them.'"
"But there are many good Ameri­
cans of German birth or descent who
do not agree with Mr. Kahn, namely,
those who have brothers, brothers-in
law, and other, kin in the German
army. Such may very, likely take a
different view from Mr. Kahn!—Com­
ment by the Editor."(j
The editor of Der St'ifȣs'-Vnzejger"
does not seem to take into considera­
tion the claims of duty, common hqn
esty, honor and good faith »n(f tJ)P
sacred obligations of an oath, of al­
legiance. :i .:
Yours truly,
TRANSLATOR
Inconsistency.
Do we realize the tremendous neu­
tralizing power of even our habitual
inconsistency? An Inconsistency la
like the sleeve of a careless schoolboy
at his copybook he smears and blots
with his arm whnt he writes fair with
his hand. It is the smeared page that
the world looks at and Judges us by,
and not the care nnd pains with whicb
we may originally have tried to repro­
duce in our lives the precepts of the
Gospel.—Donald Sage Mackay.
DOINGS OF THE DUFFS. "By Allman
THE RAGMAN MAY HAVE BEEN A DAY TOO SOON
£0or.
I POM KNOW ABOUT
"THOSE TWIMGS AMD
VilFE »S j-J—
9
OUT OFTowM
ANN Oil) I Ron
OR OLD RAGS Foi*
SAMS, MISTER?
7
THIRTFFKTK
LTS*OH
AY
£11 bohkoo dabs parro«« lay
What do you o&ll &0©?
Ou' appolez.-VOUS1 UT)
Ka publay voo unS ah-??
Psaltery Ancient Band Instrument
AmoDg the instruments of the band
which played before Nebuchadnezzar's
golden Image on the plains of Dura
was the psaltery, a stringed instru­
ment
NOPE, NOTHIU6
doing
1
OH, SBE
MASSE. SOME
OLD bottles,
Mes?
MONDAY, JOW 9,1»17.
Th«r« an* many aices among rf
a a A a a
In these lessons the English phrase appears in the first line, the
French equivalent in the second line, and the-pronunciation in the third
line.
Unable to Fight, Convict
Would Buy Liberty Bonds 4
A
PRRPAWK
Aviaior iViat has brought down fiv» plane
aviateur qui a abaiio cinq avions
On8 avee&^uhr kee a .&bStO san^k Jsveeon*
~Tb« aviators* 3r« «y«s o"f t»he army.
L«s aviai«ors sont l«s yeuY. de
zaveeaiuhv* sonVl"ay zeuduli 1
Sir may
VY
MMEAPCHIHATO
In the pronunciation key, straight (lines over
the letters, A and U, denote the long sound, as In
"hAte" and "dUde" curved lines over these letters
indicate the short sound, as in "cAt" and "bUt"
two dots over the indicate a sound somewhat
similar to the German "ue," which Americans may
approach hy trying to pronounce long and long
E at the same time.
Cut out these lessons and paste them in your notebook.
A
A letter came to Uncle Sam A
from a prisoner in the Connect!
cut state penitentiary asking A
where and how to place a sub
scription for $1,500 worth of Lib
jft erty bonds. $
ft "As I am unable in my present S
position to be of service to my A
country' in the manner in which jg
I prefer," he wrote, "I should 8
& very much like to purchas^ two .S
Liberty Loan bonds, on^jf 'Jjll
& 000 and one of $5ti0, aq^ neln'out.
& a little In that,way." ,.bi*
Packrats Damage Forests.
On parts of the Angeles National
foreBt io California th« packrats are
so abundant that many of the young
pines planted by the United States for­
est service have been killed or injured
by the rodents. The damage seems to
take place chiefly In the late summer
and fall and is "niore extedtalvW in dry
than' in wiet seai^s. It'is thought
that the rats tear o(t the-tj|&^,'bark
of the trees to obtain at
ttnea when water Is scarc*
OTIS
40 BlilWN FEET
Estimated Production of Mills in
1916 Is Announced by For­
est Service.
WASHINGTON AGAIN IN HAD
1
"1ji.wum.i .!i'
Far Weetprp §tate H«ads L^' with
•,492,997,009!, la
Second andMlatiaaipfil
-'V Third. :-v"v"
total computed lumber cut for the
United States In 1916 of 89,807,251,000
board feet is announced by Uncle
Sam's forest service. This figure is
based on reports .received from 17,201
sawmills out of the 30,081 believed to
have operated last year. It is esti­
mated that the actnal' eUt wa* slightly
in excess of '40,000,000,1WO tiiU An
earlier e9tima!te based oh'' ivdtti&l re­
ports, indicated a tot#l'. otitpu'f1'if 41,•
750,000,000 feet. The figures now giv­
en are regarded as practically final.
The state of Washington was again
the largest producer with a lumber
cut of 4,492,997,000 feet Louisiana
was second with 4,200,000,000 feet, and
Mississippi third with 2,730,000,000
'feet.
Southern Yellow Pin* Lead*.
Southern yellow pine with a total
of 14,975,000,000 feet forms 87.6 per
cent of the entire cut. Douglas fir,
its nearuft competitor, ia credited
with 5,416,000,000, while oak, with a
cut of 8,500,000,000, is third.
Production la 1916 was, it ia stated,
'hampered -by ageneral lack of *ship
ping' "fattlHtifes and' lofear lihffrtorable
weather &>nditions which fended to­
ward curtailment. Among the lmaller
mills the scarcity of labor and the con­
sequent higher wages paid resulted in
a smaller output than would ordinarily
be the case in a year of good demand.
The number of mills operating and
reporting in 1916 was greater than for
the preceding year. These figures,
however, as well as the trade condi­
tions, were more nearly normal thau
in any year since 1913.
Cut in Various States.
The detailed figures are Bhown by
the following tabulation:
Computed
Quantity
wnithf £tate*
Washington 4,492,991
Louisiuua 4,200,(XX
Mississippi 2.73rt,OOC
Oreson
ie-^as moot
•A Kansas 191000C
c.uro,'"il
2!IOO!OOO
California and Nevada 1,420,000
1.720,WO
1.600,000
£!°^.d? 1,425,000
Xi'flnla 1,336,000
Michigan l2ft)A0n
West Virginia, l^jooo
Minnesota 1,145,000
38.000
Idaho OM «4
Georgia
V.V.V...lOOOOOO
South Carolina '830 000
Pennsylvania 7So'ooo
Tennessee 732|«00
Xlontans r»
Kentucky IS'XS
New York momo
New Hampshire ISSMM
nh}nhoma 24oiooo
^}nio 9fln/)QA
mooo
Indiana 980 000
Massachusetts 219000
%ermont 200,'000
Arizona
New Mexico nW
Maryland ...V S'77?
Colorado 77's79
Connecticut nn'flAA
Illinois VV: S'ooo
New Jersev .' WOOO
South Dakota
"""Y.Y.'.T.
»650
».... 20.000
Knode Island is aha
Wyoming SSm
9,883
Delaware 1400)
Kansas
NOTICE.
Anybody giving credit to Mrs.
George Junghans jrtll Jbe doirnr so at
he is
7-6-3t Signed: QBO. JUNGHANS.

xml | txt