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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, March 01, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042243/1918-03-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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MI
„.•'' *0''jiy'',
THE WEATHER
*T.
Mtld' temperature,
•.*.
THntTTUOHTH TSAR. No
Exact Location of Minenwerfer
Battery Disclosed bySur
vey—Patrols Busy
With the American Army in
France, Thursday, Feb. 28.—(By
Associated Press.)—Swift retri­
bution has fallen upon the Ger­
man batteries which this week
bombarded the American trench­
es northwest of Toul with gas
shells. American heavy artil­
lery concentrated its fire on the
German minenwerfer batteries
for half an hour today and oblit­
erated the position.
Many direct hits with high ex
plosive shells were made by the
American gunners.. Timbers were
thrown high in the air- and-ex­
plosions, probably of enemy am­
munition and gas, resulted. The
ground about the German bat­
teries was turned upside down
and if there were any German
soldiers 'there they, certainly suf­
fered death. Thus far six men
have died .from the effects of the
German, gas shells. Mbre than
eighty are: in hospitals suffering
from gas f»oisoning. Most of these
however, are sllghtly injured and
only one {(nan is reported to be
in a gravi condition.
Aerop|ane Photos Help.
Aeroplane! photographs aided the
American gunners in their destruc­
tive fire against the German batVer
les. The photograph taken yester
day disclosed tbevexact JooaJtlon, -of
the minenwerfer with tllgTMiftt that
It did not take the gunners long to
even up the score *iththeenemy.
While the number of'etfavny shells
falling within the American lines has
defeased slightly within the last'24
hours, nevertheless the artillery fight­
ing has beta lively.
While att empty ammunition train
Was halted at a place called Dead
Man's Point, a stray enemy shell
dropped nearby and killed two men,
two horses Which had run away, and
wounded four men.
Telephone Men Heroes.
In a certain town behind the front.,
a German shell exploded near. the
dbor leading to a telephone .dugout,
blocking the passageway. The 6per
ators in the dugout although in con­
siderable danger, continued to work
the important line at.the same time
calling for help. Soldiers were sent
to the dugout and the passageway re­
opened.
The American artillery has kept up
a constant harrasatng and destructive
fire on many vital enemy points such
as cross-roads and towns. German
working parties were dispersed effec­
tively, and once tthe 75's fired vigor­
ously on a number of Germans Jn a
first line trench, quickly blowing in
the entire trench system Ground
mist and rain have prevented free
observation, but the guns had the ea
emy targets so well registered that
they have been able to work effec
tively.
German Guns Wild,
1
Liate today the Germans attempted
to retaliate for the destruction of the
minenwerfer batteries. They, bom­
barded the American hciavy artillery
with their biggest guns, but their
shooting had little effect.
American patrols were all over 'No
Man's Land last night, but did not,
encounter any Geqpians. The (Amer­
ican sector if now an ocean of mud,
and constant work is necessary to
keep the tretfches, gun pits and dug-,
outs tree froin water. From informa­
tion reaching the American»lines, it
lis apparent the enemy, is taking ad
vahtag^ of the low visibility1 to do
much- work in. .its positldps. Many
Ises of kinds impossible to Sup
Is# and other information make thia
in.-/,
TO GET
LAND FIGHT
IS LAST WORDS
/Bpy Contracts Fatal At
/i of Pneumonia on Way
to Draft Board
Mm
•"Vjiach, N. D., March l.-*-"I want to
a well so that I can fight tor Uncle
on over there," were the last words
Ralph Kranick, aged 26, who died
rom pneumonia contracted in riding
to Wibaux on a cold, bluittery day,
to present himself for physical exam­
ination wider the draft. Thedeceaser
'was a eoa of Thomas Knufck and a
favorite nepflew of the late 3. B. Stod
dard, one of North Dakota's biggest
livestock men, ttpoa whoae rahch
Kranick was empioyediislMr w&m
ago his brother HarryjNMBBtlail in
local coal j»^|c^li|iit
v-
SAMMIES AYENGE DEATHS OF
AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHS
ASSIST AMERICANS' AIM
A»:B)gPP-im HEAVY GUNS
Artillery,jBombardment Turns German Strongholds Into
Charnel House—Explosion of Gas Bombs and
Shells Adds to Destruction of Enemy
•r
&'•
1
,-'
-v "••', V1'
SPECIAL RATES AND
SERVICE FOR BOYS I
IN BLUE AND GRAY
Washington, D. C.r March 1.—
Director-General McAdoo has de
cided that the confederate veter
ans shall have special rates and
no interference of transportation
to their reunion this summer at
Tylsa, Olfla., and that the Grand
Army of the Republic shall have
the. same for its meeting at Port
land, Ore.
Director-General MoAdoo dec id
ed today he could promise train
facilities and special rates of
1 cent a mile.
NEW PROPOSAL
FROM RUSSIA
TO JAPANESE?
Fact That Viscount Uchida Has
Postponed Departure From
Petrograd Significant
Loiidop, March 1.—Tokio ad­
vices forwarded in a- Rteuter dis­
patch frdm Shanghai say that the
Japanese ambassador to Russia,
Viscount Uchida, has postponed
his departure from Petrograd. It
is believed, the dispatch says,
that the Russian government has
made a new proposal.
Assistant. Attorney General
Brennan Rules Lien Has
Same Effect as Tax Claim
NO INTERFERENCE SHOWN
Opinion Holds That If Land
Bank Declines Aid It Acts
on Its Own Volition
That the operations of the North
Dakota seed and feed bonding act, in­
asmuch as the proposed lein to pro
vide payment for se6d and feed does
not attaoh to the land until October
15 of the year in which bonds are
issued, will not prevent the, farm land
bank for this district from obtaining
a first mortgage on the land at the
time loans are made, prior to Octo­
ber 15 of each year, and the ac:
should not* militate against the mak­
ing of federal far mloans in this state,
rules Assistant Attorney General
Daniel V.. Brennan in an opinion fi­
nished today to' Fred W. McLean, reu
istrar attorney tor the federal taroi
loan bank at St. Paul.
The seed and feed bonding act lien,
when it does attach to the lar.d, Will
take priority over all first mortgages
executed after January 30, 1913, i\ir.
Brennan'rules. He holds, however,
that inasmuch as this lien does, not
attach until after the crop has been
harvested, and inasmuch as the laVr
first provides a lien on the crop it­
self, the farmer who borrows frorr
the county under this bonding act ua
ually. ,wil have had opportunity to
pay off the loan before the date up­
on whltih this Jien attaches.
"There is nothing in the federal
farm loan act which will prevent the
loaning of federal, funds to-North Da­
kota farmers who take, ad va a tags of
the seed and feed bonding act,' said
Mr. Brennan today. "The (arm loan
bank will simply take a first mort­
gage with the notation that it is sub­
ject to a first lien to secure the coun­
ty seed and feed bonds, should these
not be paid ftrior to October 15 of
the year in which they issue. The
same thing is done now with respect
to taxes. If the bank refuses to
these ^conditions it will be acting on
its own volition and not under com­
pulsion, and it would be an act which
I would consider neither politic nor
patriotic at this time."
The question raised by ^Registrar
McLean also had been transferred to
the attorney general's office by R. J.
J. Montgomery, president of the
North Dakota Farmers' union, and
(Mr. Brenhan's opinion is an answer
tor both patties.
SPANISH CABINET
„, CRISIS IS OVER
Madrid, 'March l.The Marquis ile
Alhucemas notified the king last night
that he definitely accepted the offer
tVy fNiin in poorer. All but two of
Dthe^membefS ofuthe cabinet retained
R'^WF-"'
j* ,",A
ANCHOR LINE
8UNK
New York, N. Y.,'March 1—The
British merchant steamship Ti
beria, of 4,880 tons gross, owned
by the Anchor Line, was sunk by
a German submarine while bound
for this port, February 27, ac­
cording to information received
in shipping circles today. The
crew was rescued.
RED COUNCIL
WILL RETURN
TOPETROGRAD
Decision of People's Commis­
sioners Announced in Offi­
cial Statement Today
SHIP AWAY VALUABLES
Everything. Not Needed for De­
fense of City Being Trans­
ported to Safe Place
London, March 1.—The Rusian
council of Peoples' commissioners
has decided to return to Petro­
grad, says an official Russian
statement received here today.
The removal of elements of the
population valueless in the de­
fense of the capital is being con­
tinued,' however. Gold and other
valueabtes continue to be shipped
away from the city, the statement
adds.
No previous indication that the
Peoples' commissioners had left Pet­
rograd has been contained in the Rus­
sian' idvices. These commissioners,
who comprise the governing body
under th?' Bolshevik! regime, have
had their headquarters at the Sraolny
il^stitiite in Petrograd.
Dispatches from .Petrograd, bearing
Monday's date, reported the removal
Qf .the government!? military activities
to a .camp outmae^Petrograa, out tne
commissioners expected to remain at'
the institute'.
LA FOLLETTE AND
HIS HUNNISM UP
FOR DISCUSSION
Entire Question Will Be Gone
Into Thoroughly by Bad­
ger Assembly
Madison, Wis., March 1.—The entire
subject of Senator La Folette's stand
on the war and of stacks on him to­
day went on the program for a thor­
ough discussion before the state as­
sembly. It may start tomorrow or
perhaps not until Monday, depending
on the rapidity with which members
respond to the call for assembly auth­
orized today.
The La Follette forces are prepar­
ing an elaborate defense, questioning
theorigin of anti-La Follette resolution
adopted by many prominent organiz­
ations all over the country. They hope
that a vote will not be reached until
Monday, so that the Intervening hours
may be spent in collecting data and
evidence.
TEACHERS HAVE
NARROW ESCAPE
IN BAD STORM
Young Women Wander for
Hours Before They Finally
Fetch Up at Ranch House
Bowman, N. D., March 1.—Florence
Thompson and Velma- Maynard, teach­
ers in the Golden Valley district near
Austin narrowly, escaped -death in a
blizzard when their buggy broke down
while they, were driving.to P.hame/en
route hither to take the teachers' ex­
amination. The young women sought
to continue the' J&urney on foot, but
the storm-was so thick they lost their
way on the prairie and "Wandered
about for hours before they stumbled
onto Carl Olson's home, two miles out
of Rhame.
LARIMORE PIONEER
PASSES IN CANADA
Larimore, N. D., March 1.—Mathew
Doyle, a pioneer who came to Lari­
more in 1882 and was for years en­
gaged in business here, is dead at Bat
tleford, Sask., at the age 'of 72. Mrs.
AbJ)ie D. Watt of this city is a daught­
er ofthe deceased.
EXPERT DRIVERS
TO HANDLE BIG
f$
/,
1
1
1
TRUCKS IN ARMY
John Gradette and Louis Clooten,
expert automobile mechanics and driv­
ers, leave tonight for Fort Leaven­
worth, Kans., having .been inducted
into the land division of the signal
corps, with which they will serve as
driven in the motor iirack division.
Both are velk kso*n Bismarck young
men, and iargeDtwrty o( their frieads
are planning to beenthem ofT.
vfc*
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA^
IS PREDICTED
Regarded Probable at" Washing­
ton Protection of Vltu^vostok
Will Be Asstiried
LONDON FAVORS PROGRAM
Believes Celestials Should Have
Free Hand and That They
May Be Trusted
Washington, D. CI, 1.—
Japan's proposal for Actioij in Si­
beria has crowded Chancellor
Von Hertling's speech in^o sec­
ond place in consideration by of­
ficials here and there are indica­
tions here today that conditions
were being formed which would
show themselves in some ar­
rangement of international char­
acter to prevent the vast stores
at Vladivostok and control of the
Trans-Siberian railway from
falling in the hands, of the ad­
vancing Germant^t^k"
The expectation that President Wil­
son woul-J address congress soon in
reply to Von Hertling's speech was
dissipated today in evidences thai
the president is making no such plans
at this time, and prdbably does not
consider it necessary to reply to the
German chancellor for the' present, a:
least. Before the president speaks
there doubtless will be an interchange
of oriews from London and Pari .o
that if Mr. Wilson speaks he will ex­
press the views Of all the co-belliger­
ents as on previous oc'caAions.
Outward indications today were
that the president was studying the
'.uestfon of American participation
\yith the Japanese in Siberia to the
exclusion of other subjects.
if?
PLAN
London, Slarch' i.—'Japan's propos­
als with regard to Siberia and their
reception in Washington has brought
the question of Japan's active parti­
cipation in military operations to the
forefront here, the developments dom­
inating the news columns of the pa­
pers
The bulk of the opinion favors Ja­
pan's proposed action without quali
flcation, and the plea is made in some
quarter^ that she act implicitly be
trusted and be given a free hand.
BEACH'S FIRST
WAR VICTIM IS
DEAD IN FRANCE
E. E. Salzman, Member of Co. M,
Dies in Base Hospital
.... at Front
Beach, N. D., March 1.—(Beach's
first war victim is Harley B. Salzman,
word of whose death in a hospital in
France on January 25 has just reach­
ed his father, E. E. Salzman. Harley
Salzman was only 19 years old, and
was not subject to the draft, but he
was one of the first to enlist in Co.
of the Second North Dakota regiment.
He later was assigned, to Service with
the. 164th ambulance corps, 116th sni
tary train* which, sailed, for France
some time in
Ddte'eitafer.v
No details
of his death have been received.
BREAKSHIPAND
DRAGS* HERSELF
/ALONG THE ROAD
Binford Woman Has Agonizing
Experience Following Pain­
ful Accident
Binford, N. D., March 1.—Breaking
her hip in a fall on the ice while on
her way to the home of her son Oscar,
Mrs. F. Greenland dragged heself
along the frozen ground for a conbid
ierable distance before she was discov­
ered by Steve Rorvig and her husband
who carried here home. She later
was removed to the Fargo hdspital,
where she is reported to be improving.
BE A PATRIOT
Is it patriotic #t this tim^
when dur united energies
are needed to -defeat the
Hun and defend democracy
to etnbroil YOUR city in fac­
tional strife and bitterness
engendered by an unneces­
sary, uncalled-for city elec­
tion?
THINK IT OVER
BE PATRIOT! I
f-Be' a true bliiitf Atmerican
Before it is. too late,
WITHDRAW YOUR NAME
FROM TFTE RECALL PE
TFTIONSm plha-good^iti-
•, V
"V'1! W'^U
i» •.,1.'.
FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1918
&mt-
T^^f.s
HOSTILITIES TO CEASE
WHEN PEA&E IS SIGNED.
London, March l.-r-The Russian
peace delegates at iBrest-'Litovsk
were Informed that hostilities
would cease only when the peace
treaty was signed, says an offi­
cial Russian statement received
here. Three days were allowed
for the negotiations, beginning to­
day.
CENSORSHIP IS
WRONG ASSERTS
GENERAL MARCH
Chief of Staff of United States
Army Would Take Lid Off
of War News
SAMMIES REAL SOLDIERS
Prepared to Reflect Credit on
Their Country in This
Great Struggle
An Atlantic Port, March 1.—Major
General Peyton March, new chief of
staff of the United States army, ar­
rived here today after nine months
abroad as chief ot artillery of the
American expeditionary force, lie
will go at once to Washington.
Describing the American troops in
France as so well trained in modern
warfare as to be able to handle
themselves, "with entire credit to the
United States," General March said
the .censorship was "lamentable," and
intimated he would advocate that the
regulations in. this respect be made
less stringent, so that the people in
America might learn as much as pos­
sible about the activities, of the ex­
peditionary forces.
American of fitters in France can­
not.. understand the present censor­
ship methods, General IMarch said,
adding:..
"I know of ho gentle method of
conducting a war. bf 'thW magnitude,
and no army can expect not to have
somebody hurt."
"The American forces are remark­
able' for their morale, and health," he
declared.
MISSOURI RIVER
BREAKING UP AT
OLD FT. BENTON
Average Date for This Event
Preserved in Bust-Up Which
Was Reported Thursday
The breaking of the ice in the Mis­
souri river at Fort Benton, Mont., at
6 p. m. Thursday, was reported today
by 0. W. Roberts, head of the U. S.
weather bureau service for North Da­
kota. There is nothing exceptional in
the going out of the ice at that point
on this date, states Mr. Roberts. The
ice in the Madison, Jefferson and Gal­
latin rivers, which form the Missouri,
generally breaks in January or Feb­
ruary, and this is ah average date for
the break up in the Missouri at Fort
Benton. Unless gorges should form
below Fort Benton, an early break-up
at that point is desirable, as it gives
an opportunity for flood waters to
flow away under the ice further down
the river.
Troubles come when the ice goes
out in both the Yellowstone and the
Missouri at Williston at the same
time. There is nothing in the present
situation to cause alarm. The snow­
fall north of Bismarck has been about
normal this winter, but so much of
the flood water already had been car­
ried off that flood conditions approxi­
mating those of last spring are not
anticipated.
WILLISTON MAN
GETS MINOT JOB
Supt. L. C. White Succeeds
Francis at Magic City
Minot, N. D., Mar. 1.—The Minor
school board has unanimously elect­
ed
iL.
C. White of Wiliston to be head
of the Magic City public schools be
ginning July 1, 1&18. Mr. White has
been superintendent of schools at
Williston for four years, and has en­
joyed remarkable success there. For
mberly he was engaged in a similar
(^pacity at Carrington. He succeeds
here Supt. Bruce Francis, who was
not a candidate for the position this
year.
LANCER AND BRIDE
RETURN TO STATE
Attorney General Addresses
Farmers at Maddock Today
Attorney General William S. Lan
ger, who was married in New York
on Wednesday to Miss (Elisabeth
Cady, cut his honeymoon short in
order to address a meeting at Mad
dock today. Mr. and Mrs. Langer
are expected to retjurn to Bismarck
this week. Their plans fot»a- resi­
dence here, hav* n0t been wvttlea
to their frleadis. .j •, .iV f.eMjowd.o
., •., ---i. .« •!_ "r£j A-\{r^-...Ill.1.1 :lU .WIP^MMifeliW
RESUMED: ALLIED
ARE DESERTING THE
ABDICATION DEMANDED
OF KING FEAOIiNAND.
London, March 1.—The peace
terms submitted to King Ferdl
nand of Roumania by Count Czer
nin, the Austro-Hungarian foreign
minister, included the king's ad
dication in favor of his brother,
Prince Wilhelm, or the taking of
a referendum in Roumania for
I his successor, according to a dis
patch from Amsterdam today.
NOTHIN' RUNNIN*
'ROUND N. Y. BUT
BARB WIRE FENCE
From Hun Tis Simply Immense
—Hoboken Is De­
serted
iNew York, March 1.—German
newspapers have informed their
readers that New York city for
its protection has girded itself
with a barbed wire fence, 625
miles in length. The Germans
have also been told that 50,000
soldiers are guarding .the port
of New York, and that rigorous
measures had been taken in Chi­
cago. and elsewhere and that Ho­
boken is deserted.
Rep. Rainey of Illinois Says
These Speeches Won't Be
Circulated in Germany
STORY CANNOT BE TOLD
Revelations Promised When Lid
Finally Is Taken Off of Con­
gressional Mess
Washington, D. C., March 1.—The
fuel administration's recent closing
order was defended* in the house to­
day by Rep. Rainey of Illinois, who
declared that when the "entire story,
is told there will be members of tb£
house who would be glad to expunge
from the record, if they could, speech­
es they made immediately after the
coal order's promulgation."
Speeches made in this house that
day—none of them on the democratic
side—Rep. Rainey said, "will not be
dropped from aeroplanes inside the
German lines and if an effusion from
an ex-attorney general of the United
States given circulation gets into
Germany at all, it will be sent there
by German agencies and-will splend­
idly encourage German armies in ths
crisis."
The Illinois representative asserted
that too much had already been dis­
closed regarding military movements.
"The entire story," he added, "can­
not now be told. After the war is
over it will be possible to give all the
reasons for the coal order of January
17, lkst."
WAkDCOUNTY'S
CHAIRMAN BUYS
SEED AND FEED
Grain Stored in Several Eleva­
tors Whence It Is to Be Dis­
tributed to Needy
Minot, N. D., Mar. 1 —'Chairman J.
Rohe of the Ward county bfu-'i
o' trjiijmissioners i.s hme from the
Twin Cities, whither he went to ouy
seed and feed for fanners of this
c^uL'ty. He endeavo-ed to contract
fo." 120,003 bushels of feed,
butl els of seed oat', 3.00 imsbels
of seed barley and 24,000 bushels of
seed wheat. The commissioners, be­
cause of the prevalence of soft corn
in the east, are not trying to buy
any of this grain for feed, but are
confining their purchases to oats.
The .feed and seed grain wil be stor­
ed in'elevators at Minot, Logan, Des
Lacs, Berthold, Lone Tree, Deering,
Clenburn, Plaza, Makoti, Kyder,
Douglas, IMax, Benedict, Kenmare,
Donnybrook, Carpio, Foxholm, Burl
ington and Sawyer, from fhich points
it will be apportioned out «o the
farmers* to each district whose appli
caDowr4u»iJifil0diJuifttik. -ike county
Itawl iniffrrain n"te
Committee on Public Information Verifies Report That
Ambassador Francis Has Left Petrograd—London
Reports Departure of the British Minister
TURN FOR WORSE SEEN
IN NEWS DISPATCHER
Believed Situation Is More Grave
Grave Than Recent Commun­
ications Have Indicated Jf-
Vologda, Russia, Thursday,!
Feb. 28.—(By Associated rPees)
—The American and Japanese
ambassadors arrived here today
on a special train. Their trip
was an uneventful one.
Advice Froni Sisson
The advice came by cable from Ed
par G. SisBon, the committee's repre­
sentative- in the Russian capital.
Representatives of the Information
committee, it was said, will remain in
Perograd for the present. Late re­
ports sho^y that the circulation Of the
President's address on January 31^t
is practically thruout Russia. The tot-,
al is over four million copied it Is
said.
In addition, 1,300,000 mes8i|es
printed in German went thru {fee
northern lines of the German army.
About 200,000 were Successfully work
ed thru the southern and central
fronts.
The committee also said that
man and Austrian prisoners in Russia
were provided with copies of .the Ad­
dress.
ALLIES AL80 LEAVE.
London, March 1.—The British 'and
French embassies have left Petrograd
acording to a telegram from the Rus­
sian official news agency in Petrogrid
and which bears no date.
If it is indicated, Ambasador Francis
has left Petrograd, the departure of
the French and British embiasies takes
from the Petrograd capital the repre­
sentatives of three of the most im­
portant Entente countries. Sir Geortfe
W. Bushanan, the British ambassador
to Russia, some weeks ago left Petro­
grad on a leave of absence. K. -O.
Lindley, counsellbrof the embassy has
been charge d' affaires.
TURN FQirTME W^RSE
Stockholm, March l.-^The- Albert
can consul has left Petrograd, ^where
he remained alter the embassy'* de­
parture. The consulate has been fall­
en over by the Norwegian/consul,
This report appears to indicate'tblt
the situation in Perograd has taken
an unexpected turn for tha- worMe
...»
.V.- -*HY?FCR
EVENING
,.W
r'®
'. •. r-w
-V
11
Wrecked Railway No Block
A forward movement of the invad­
ers of some thirty-five miles beyond
Polotzk, midway between Dvlnsk and
Vitebsk is reported in these advices,
the Germans pushing on despite the
fact that the railway has been blown
up and the stores' provisions ia their'
way destroyed.
German troops are also, r^ported- to'
/be moving slowly from bug* tditikfd
Pskov, at which place they ire,*tihtil
to have copcentrated.a divislOfa- of In­
fantry, suported by cavalry aud'artll-.
lery. .j
1
The Germans, likewise, are declfr^d.',
to be moving on Sebgfeh, eight jnUtfr
.northeast of tfvihsb.
-.t
ty,
v1a
view of the fact that the latest pre­
vious me&ageS from the Russian capi­
tal said the American consul would
remain there after the departure of li
the^ambassador and his staff in order
to keep in communication with the
State Department.
WASHINGTON DISPATCH
Washington, D. C., March 1.—A
dispatch from Stockhom to the state
department today announces the de­
parture of the American consul front
Petrograd, but makes no reference to
Ambassador Francis of his staff.
Troops. Reach Dnelpsr.
Berlin, Mareh 1.—German troops
oontinuing their advance in Russia
have reached the Dnelper river, the
war office announces. Austro-Hnn-^
garian troops have begun an advsihe*
into the Ukraine.
ADMINISTRATION DRAFT
RECOMMENDATION* UP.
Washington, March 1.—The admin­
istration recommendation to include
men In the draft law as they became
bluest
twenty one years of age was hroegM
up in the seBate-.^bdarfMla'^iSBfattTtaH
a
•.
r'
London, March 1.—Dispatches
received by the Exchange Tele­
graph Co. filed in Perograd at
p. m. Thursday indicate that this
German advance into Russii hat
been resumed. V'AX'
i'sr'
4r
AMERICAN EMBASSY LEAVES
Washington, .D. C., Mar«K '1^
The commj^e c^ fl^ic^nb»«ii^ j.
tfon teday 'annftvniedt
vices from.ita repreaentatlvta. '9
Petifograd that AmbaisadeflFrin-]
cts and his.staff,, the, Americ^y
consulate, the military V'misalen,
and the Red Crort representatives
all left Petrograd for Vologda,
railroad on the hight of February^1'''
27.
A
I'
'4.
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