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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, March 04, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042243/1918-03-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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Partly cloudy and colder, -sf
THIRTY-EIGHTH YEAR. No. 61.
Q.y
BLOODY DUEL TAKES
PLACE IN STREETS
Several Bullets Fired Ipto Body
of Dying Man—One in
Hospital Here
.+
With a bullet lodged in
his brain, another in his
abdomen and a third in his
shoulder, R. S. Piatt, agent
for the Standard Oil Co. at
Hazelton, lies in the Bis­
marck hospital in an uncon­
scious condition. His pul^e
is very weak, and there is
very little possibility that
he will recover. The prob­
abilities are that before the
night is over, Clarence
White, Hazelton gun-fight-:
er, who this .morning shot
and instantly killed Charles
D. Sloan and later turAed:
his smoking gun on Piatt,
wi(l have a second life to an­
swer for.
Piatt's youhg wife ja at
his side. He recognizes no,
one and has uttered not a
word since he'reached the
who acfconipamed himiiither.
from Hazeltojn, and Drs.
Ramstad and Bodjnitab'.
are in attendance. Ex-ray
examinations hive .been
made disclosing -the "loca­
tion of the bullets, but' no
operations can be performed
unless the patient rallies.
The bullet in Piatt's brain
entered below his left eye
and lodged back of the optic
cavity. A scond bullet is
embedded in his stomach
and a third in his shoulder.
The bullet in his brain is
the one which probably will
produce his death, The
wounded man would have a
chance of recovering from
his other injuries,
Hazelton, N. D., March
4.—Charles
empty
D. Sloan, a prominent termer resid- pendent elevators everywhere,
ing four miles south of Haaelton, was
shot and instantly killed, abd R. S.
'Piatt was probably fatally wounded
when Clarence White ran amuck on
the streets ot Hazelton this morn­
ing. There had been bad blood be­
tween White and Sloan for some time,
over some family matter, it is alleged.
This morning as Sloan stepped out
of his automobile, shortly before &
o'clock, White walked out of the pool
room where he had been employed.
When the two were still several pa­
ces apart White whipped out.a re­
volver and began firing. The first
shot is believed to have severad
Sloan's Jugular vein, inflicting a. fatal
wound, but two more bullets were
pumped into his body before he fell.
R. S. Piatt, Standard oil agent at
this point, learning of the murder of
Sloan, who is his halfbrother, jusJk
ed home and procured a gun. Wh»te
was still in the stfeet when Piatt re­
appeared. The latter took a long­
distance shot at White and
white ducked into, the Hazelton Mer­
cantile store, and Piatt followed, him
in. Inside the store several shots
were exchanged. Piatt fpll with a
bullet through his left eye «d two
in his body. White, unscathed, band­
ed over his
gun and gave him­
self up. Piatt was at once rushed to
a Northern Pacific train .and taken to
Bismarck with Dr Winchester' in
attendance. White is under arrest
and has been«urned over to the sher­
iff pad state's attorney, who immed­
iately came up from Linton. Inas­
much as the killing of Sloan was
clearly established, there was thought
to be no need for the services of a
coroner.
Worked for Sloan.
sii" White is originally .from Unton.
'For some years he had wprlfea in
the county as a farm hand. 'Last fail
while in the employ of Sloan, and en­
gaged in cutting ensilage on a neigh­
bor's farm, he lost his left arm. Af­
ter recovering from his injury, he
took employment in a local pool: room.
Bad blood had existed between Sloan
and White for some time, over Bome
personal mttter. Sloan
.i
iS*
•.i.i.l^ *8* •'•.•' 4*
HAZELTON SHOOTING AFFRAY
Aggrieved Farm Hand, After Months of Ill-Feeling and
Quarrelling, Takes Former Employer's
Life and Injures Brother
IN
"CALL RULE" ON THE
CHICAGO BOARD LEGAL
-\7 I
Washington, D". C., March 4.—
The "call rule" for grain "to ar­
rive' established in 1908 by the
Chicago board of trade was held
by the supreme court today not
to be in restraint of trade un
der the antitrust law.
Injunctions issued by Federal
District Judge Landis restraining
the rule's operations were set
aside. Boar,d officials contended I
I the rule incfeased instead of de
creasing competition an^l prevent
ed monopoly, but it was abro
gdted after the government's suit
was filed in 1913,
FARMER GRAIN
DEALERS HERE
Three Days' Convention of tnde
pendent Elevator Men to
Begin Tuesday
INTERESTING PROGRAMS
-f
Prominent in Orgahiftiiioii
and in Government
Service Slated
With representatives of the United
States department of agriculture and
men of national prominence in farm
prganizattpn movements on the pro­
gram, the'Farmer Grain Dealers' as­
sociation of North Dakota, composed
of managers and stockholders inde­
pendent farmers' elevators, will open
its seventh annual convention at Bis­
marck auditorium tomorrow afternoon
tor an interesting three days' session.
Peculiar interest attaches to the con­
vention this year because the fed­
eral regulation of grain grading and
marketing and the supervision of the
manufacture and marketing of flour
has presented new problems for the
farmer grain dealers—problems, a
prominent western farmers' elevator
manager stated recently, which
threaten the very existence of inde-
MWays
came
morning to look after, a
In this
car|°*d,_
bogs. He i*ad expected to meet White
and ?1ettie their tconbtjH" frlgida be-,
lievtng that some ^pceMrat
reacted., Whit®
Sloan started toward itfiaajfe fattain
The convention win be called to
order tomorrow afternoon by Presi­
dent A. A. Lane fof Sherbrook. An
address of welcome from Secretary
George N. Kenlston of the Bismarck
Commercial club and the response of board of regents.
the president will be followed by an
address by Governor Frazier, J. M.
Still of. Beach, Charles E. lEckerle,
general organizer, and R. C. Miller,
federal grain supervisor of: the United
States department of agriculture,
have places on the afternoon program.
In the "evening M. R. Meyers will
speak o'n "Cooperation and Democra
cy."
C. H. Bailey of the United States
bureau of chemistry will talk on "Re­
ducing the Grain Dust Explosion Ha
oar#*' Wednesday morning, and G.
L. Packard of Elliot and P. E. Knud
son of Eckleson will have places on
the program. Wednesday afternoon
J. W. Shorthill, secretary of the Ne­
braska Farmers' Elevator coihpanies,
and a member of the national agricul­
tural congress who has been selected
by the administration as a member of
the price-fixing board for farm pro­
ducts, will talk on "The Organized
Farmer at Washington." Cliffird
Thorne, ex-chairman of the Iowa rail­
way commission, will talk on "The
Railroad and are American Farmer,"
F. S. Betz of Chicago, 111., on "Audit­
ing and Bookkeeping," and James
u'
A.
Litle, rate expert with the North Da­
kota railway commission, will give an
address. 'The annual smoker and so-
/it' I I
'4 ..
V.
cial session will be held Wednesday' the county, a number of the farmers
evening. changed their minds. A number of
Thurcday morning Attorney Gener-1 petitions were also filed asking that
al William S. Langer will, discuss the county not be bonded and assert-
and Means of Detecting and ing that'there is an abundance of
ttfegfliating Discrimination In Price Be- seed in the county. It was alleged
tween Farmers' Elevator Companies that County Auditor Karl Semmler,
and the Mills," and there will be seeking to make political capital of
papers dealing with the value of local-! the new bonding act, had mailed
ly-ownbd' mills in conectlon with, ele- printed applications for aid. with his
petition and a print of himself en­
closed, to farmers, bankers, business
men and laborers, broadcast over the
county. A number of farmers who
had returned these petitions signed
explained to the board that they did
it as a matter of course, believing
that only their personal notes would
be needed as secority tdt1 the' seed
'Price Fixing,
vatotf companies and
and Who Did It."
The annual business session will be
held Thursday afternoon. An attend­
ance of several hundred delegates and
visitors Is promised. The weather ot
the last week has been unusually mild,
ifed it |t continues, many farmers'
men from centifcl North
*Jikoti ^r»l b* a))le to dVlv«^& With
t&mfaft mmber ot entertnniii^t
k. and a sncesBfur convMHbn is
... .. -.""A-
BRITISH TROOPS ADVANCE
IN THE HOLY LAND.
London, March 4.—British troops
operating north of Jerusalem in
Palestine have made an advance
along a front of 12 miles to a min­
imum depth of 3,000 yards astride
and west of the Jferusalem-Nabu
lus road, the-war office announced
today.
SUPPLEMENTARY
HUNS REPORTED
|Thought Germany Reserves Free
Hand for Self Outside of
Greater Russia
INVASIONS TO CONTINUE
No Cessation of the Inroads on
Ukraine and Finland Seen in
the Press Dispatches
London, March 4.—Supplementary
treaties between the central powers
I and the Bolshevik! government were
signed at Brest-Litovsk in addition to
the main peace treaty, according to
a telegram from Rrest-Li'tovsk by way
of Vienna and Amsterdam, which
gives no detail^ of the treaties.
Formal announcement of the sign­
ing has not yet been received from
the Russian side, but a late radio­
gram from Petrograd said the treaty
would be signed Sunday.
As the German official statement
of-Sunday, night mentions, only the
cessation of operations in Great Rus­
sia, it is inferred in some .quarts
*•*-"1 here *hatr
rt$#aaj^bri
Sdynwce in the
Ukraine and Finland will continue
while the Germans reserve for them­
selves a'.free haiid outside the limits
of Great 'Russia.
FRAZIER LOSES
ANOTHER ROUND
INREGENT ROW
Cooley Grants Injunction Prayed
Crawford
—Judge C. M. Cooley today
handed down a decision grant-1ment
ing the petition of L. F. Craw­
ford to restrain Governor Fra
zier appointees from removing
Him from office as president of
H. A. bronson, assistant at­
torney general announced he
would appeal Supreme coutt and
asked for a thirty day stay of
proceedings.13
MERCER COUNTY
BOARD MEETING
ON SEED BONDS
Division of Sentiment Is Found
Among Farmers as to the
Necessity for Action
r'r^ir
rw( "*•*rv\?-
^!»3\
BISMARCK, NORTH
1
Stanton, N. D., March 4.—The Mer­
cer ^county, commission is meeting
again today to consider application
for aid under the new seed and feed
bonding act from Mercer county farm
ers. One hundred petitions awaited
the consideration of fhe board when I
It meta week ago. When they learn
ed, however, that they must give a
first lien on their farm and other po
sessions, including crop, as security
for the seed and feed advanced by
and pros­
perous farmer bf thb. Krem liduiitiHr,
ifiM^rd inappoiit^i to
ing, declarltog it entlfeiy unnec-
£5%% .*
wi
fVl
\/-fV V-1' 'V '''".-] ,.• •"^''i\V-4• "... •.•••..•
i£it
BRIDGES TO
Intent to Prevetit Invasion front
North Seen in Crippling
of Railroads
A A O O N A N I S
Possibility of American Ambas­
sador's Reaching Vladivos
tock Is Remote
Washington, D. C., Mardh 4—The
Russians have been destroying
bridges on the trans-Siberian railroad
between Lake Baikal and the Chi­
nese frontier. John F. Stevens, chair­
man of the American railway mission,
reported this today to. the state de
partment. This may prevent Ambar
sador Francis from reaching Valdivos
tok.
While without details, officials here
believe the Russians are destroying
the bridges to prevent... an expected
advance of Japanese troops. A large
number of other structures have been
mined, 'Mr. Stevens also ^reported so
they could be readily destroyed.
INDICTED AS
iOne of Mcintosh County's Weal­
thiest Men Is Cited by the
^"^Federal Grand jftrv'-'
OPPOSED TO ENLISTMENTS
Fargo, N. D., Mar. 4.—John H.
Wishek, former candidate for
governor of North Dakota, was
indicted by the federal grand
jury for sedition, it was learned
here
Wishek, *who is a well known bank­
er of Ashley, a community composed
largely of Germans, was indicted on
Ave ot six counts, which allege that
'. he is declared to have made the state-
1 1
inent that banks having large hold-
ings of liberty bonds were unsafe for
h«r ri.oi.man AtvSa I persons to keep their money in. At
py unairman i^ewis r.
torneys for Wishek notified federal
authorities that arrangements would
be made today to secure bonds for
I their client.
BRONSON WILL APPEAL) OPPOSED ENLISTMENT
Ashley, X. D„ March 4.—It is re
Grand Forks, N. D., March 4.
ported here that Wishek's indictment
{Is a result of his attitude toward enlist-
ln the United States
p'
N
army'11
••'.•.. ,.• •••,.?".•
~Yv.-,..,•
"i
Ifv
A, MONDAY, MARCH 4, 1918.
,s
also alleged that Wishek objected to
his son's taking employment in a fed­
eral munitions plant or some similar
branch, through the United States
public reserve. A large number of
prominent Mcintosh county people
were recently called to Fargo to tes­
tify in this case. It is said that
Wishek very frequently and openly ex­
pressed his views on the present war
John Wishek was formerly a member
state senate. He was born in
Pennsylvania, of German and French
parentage, and is one of Mcintosh
county's wealthiest men. He has had
a strong politic*! influence in !McIn:
tosh and adjoining counties.
MONARCHY
DUAL
FORCES CAPTURE
RUSSIAN SPOILS
v«nna via London, March 4.—Aus
tro-Hungarian forces operating in Pa
making satisfactory progress, says an
official statement issued by the Aus­
trian war office. More than 770 Rus­
sian guns and huge quantities of w%.r
material have been captured.
THE WEATHER I
For 24 hourd ending at noon March
4, 1918:
Temperature at 7 •a. m.......
Temperature at noon .......
Highest yesterday
Lqwest yesterday
Lowest last night ... ..... i..
Precipitation
Highest wind velocity
.. 32
31
.. o2
.. 31
.. 28
.None
.. 20-S
.Forecast
For North Dakota: Snow and cold­
er tonight with cold wave Tuesday
partly cloudy and colder .east and
south portions strong northerly Wind.
Lowest
Temp
Temperatures
34
Fargo si
'WUllston .. v.vv
fpSt. Paul
34
24
28
36
12
Ait...'.
Oinik
.Kansas
gift
GROVERMAN TO PAY
US OUT OUR FUEL
Washington, D. C., March 4.—W.
I H. Groverman was made district
representative of the fuel admin-
istration today for lake docks on
Lake Superior and on the west
shore of Lake Michigan, with
headquarters at Minneapolis. He
will allot among northwestern 1
ments of coal. .... 1
™D:tobe"
OCCUPIED HUNS
ROOM SWEDEN
Official Protest to Be Filed with
Berlin Against Further
Encroachment
A "MILITARY NECESSITY"
Old Plea Made by Germans
Justify Invasion of Neu­
tral Territory
TALK DUTCH TO
LANGER ABOUT
THE US. FLAG
Belgian Declared He Would Tell
Attorney General Where
to Head in
PREFERRED OLD TROUSERS
Fargo,
!N.
D„ March 4.—Miss May
Burt, seventeen-year-old school teach­
er, the first witness called by the gov­
ernment in its case against Henry
Von Bank, a Belgian, president oi
school district No. 79 of Cass county,
on trial in the United States district
court charged with violation of the
espionage act in the use of language
abusive *o the American flag, testified
undqr direct examination today that
Von Bank had told -her that he "would
rather see a pair of old trousers fly­
ing from the schoolhouse than the
United States flag," in a conversa­
tion she had with him on December
15, last.
J. W. Reilly, superintendent of Cass
county schools, also testified that he
had asked Von Bank whether or not
he had made the statement about the
trousers to the teacher, and that he
said he did. The superintendent said,
he called Von Bank's attention to the
fact that no flag was floating over the
school house and that Attorney Gen­
eral Langer of North Dakota had re­
quested all the countv superintend­
ents in the state to enforce that reg­
ulation.
"I dont care about the law, and we
are rot going to spend any of the
school district's money for the pur­
chase of a flig." Mr Reill" •wstiftei
the defendant told him. "The next
time hill Lancer says anything about
the flag not floating over the school
house just send him to me and I will
talk 'Dutch" to him," Reilly testified
the defendant said, adding: "Well.
am not going to upt a flag up there."
HUN PRISONERS
WERE AMERICAN
PATROL PARTY
No Captives Taken from the
Trenches in Recent Raids
Made by Germans
rw*: fmwwf'^1^%
1
4
'u
to
Washington, D. C., March 4.—Ger
many's occupation of the Aland is
lands is only a preliminary to the to
tal occupation of Finland.
Official dispatches to the Swedish
legation today say Germany has an­
nounced to the Stockholm foreign of
ftice her intention to occupy Finland
and that Sweden has protested.
Germany advised Sweden, the dis­
patches say. that it was necessary to
temporarily occupy Finland to restore
order, but gave assurances' that she
had no intention to take permanent
possession of the territory.: Sweden
protested also against the Aland
islands being placed in the war zone.
The occupation of the Aland Is­
lands, the dispatches say, is to make
them a base for supplying the Germar
occupation of Finland. There are 500
Swedish troops on the islands for
police purposes' Their commander
was notified by the German command­
er of his intention, and while so far
there has been no clash reported, the
Swedish troops have not been with­
drawn and the feeling is described
here as being very tense.
4'
1
ViA'ri.'- k,' .,' rf •."". •'"•.•:•••? si#-. f- •,
TWO
1
BRITISH DROP MORE
BOMBS THAN ENEMY
London, Mar. 4.—In the month
of January, says an official state­
ment issued today by the war of­
fice, the Germans dropped 1,482
bombs in the area occupied by
British troops in France. In the
same period British aviators drop­
ped 7,653 bombs in enemy areas.
INVASION OF
RUSSIA HALTS
FORNEWPEACE
Further Concessions by Bolshe
viki May Save a Strip of
Their Country
GERMANS TAKING FINLAND
Leave Only Narrow Ribbon
Along the Gulif—-To Expel i.«
Revolutionists....
(Associated-Press.)
Russia's delegates at Brest-Litovsk
have halted the German invasion of
Great Russia by agreeing to the peace
terms offered February 21. Peace
was made, they report to the Bolshevi
ki government, because every day of
delay meant more demands by the
Germans. Added provisions require
the Russians not only to retire from
Turkey's Asiatic provinces, but also
from territory in the regions of Kars,
Battrnm, and Karabagh, taken from
the Turks during the past
Avars.
'Berlin also announces the singing
of peace terms and the cessation ot
operations. When the forward move­
ment halted the invader's were at
Narva, 100 miles west of Petrograd
and appoaching Luga, 88 miles south­
west of Petrograd.
Huns Grab Finland.
Germany apparently is determined
to give the Bolsheviki but a narrow
strip along the Gulf of Finland and
at the request of the Finnish govern­
ment is to undertake the expulsion of
the Finnish revolutionists and Bol
Flnland.
On the western front, the Germans
raiding operations have increased in
scope, and are approaching the size
of planned attacks. The attacks on
the American sector, against the
French in Champagne and elsewhere.
and against the British lines, were in
greater strength than last week and
has been usual heretofore. The en­
emy artillery fire also is ^Wiwrnpr-D'
on all fronts. Except in Flanders ML.KCER COUNTl
The weather has been more favorable'
to military operations and the her­
alded German blow or blows may be
made soon.
AGREEMENT AS
TO RAILWAYS''
COMPENSATION
Government Pay on Basis
Average Net Income for
Last Three Years
'With the American Ahmy In France,
Saturday, March 2.—(By the A. P.)
The Americans the Qermans claim
to have captured on the.Chemin,De» jwuii y*,:*"*"
Dames probably i*ere Jthp U»f(^r. wrji
of a patrol bf Stnen who went oat
When the rall began and have not
of
Washington, D. C., 'Starch 4.—Agree­
ment on compensation of railroads
while under government control bas­
ed on the average of their net in­
come for their three years ending
June 30 last, and substantially in the
form aproved by the senate, was
reached today by the conferees on the
administration railroad bill. The
house conferees accepted the senate
provision providing that no allowance
shall be made on money spent on im­
provements during the last few
months preceding the federal control.
This would reduce the compensation
about $6,500,000 annually.
Subject to final approval, the sen­
ate conferees agreed to include all
short line railroads underHhe act in­
stead of only competing short lines.
BUFFALO GLASSES
TO HUNTFORSUBS
Mott, N. D., March 4.—A pair of
micrometers used by Charles Merry,
Mott rancher, in spying pu^.buttalfc
ant^^pe
Jn the ^ione^t, qay»
Ve&tera North! Dakota, %iU 4o
part now, in furnishing^ aye* for Onk tbMinM oa
navy,
forwarded them: to the navy depart-
if"
SAMMIES TOO MODEST IN CLAIflSIW
President of French Council in Official Statement Warmly
Compliments United States Forces on Success
in Repelling Germans
$»V v^1
,**I*
aim-- -.
Volunteers from American units
along the Chemin Des Dames searched
No Man's Land in a rain of machine
gun bullets for thirteen missing men
of a patrol party but did not find
any trace of them except one man,
had been instantly killed. It is cer
taih the Germans obtained prisoners
from this patrol.
Details ot the German attack which
failed completely to reach the trenches
are now available. American artillery
men laid down a barrage fire as soon
as the Germans started theirs I
rAf
*^.*1
...
EVENING E
CANDIDATES IN
LINE FOR JOBS
Number of Men Who Would
Serve Public Have Hats in
Political Ring Early .,
Stanton, N. D., March 4.—Ed Wal
baum of Stanton and C. A.. Heine-/
meyer are avowed candidates for the
Mercer county shreivalty, and It Is
said that Felix Conrath, a member of
the county commission from BetilSh.
who resigned last winter to succeed
Sheriff Haevischer, but did not suc­
ceed, will be a candidate. H. J. Giffey
of Stanton is an avowed candidate
for register of deeds and Theor Maler
of Beulah is a candidate prospective
and receptive. For clerk of court, BSd^v
Schafer, the encumbent, will he oppos­
ed by William Haevischer, present*
sheriff. Carl Semmler, who has been
county auditor for eight years, wants
some more of it, and Paul Leupp
has announced his candidaey. F' R.
Cruden of Stanton is being consider­
ed as a candidate for the county com­
mission from the first district, fcs
is M. E. Fowler,
.- ...
OPERATIONS IN
RUSSIA STOPPED
BY THE TEUTONS
1
*. IKfii"'
PRICE FIVE CRNlB.'f/V? (t {J
Wj fV
'1^
1» t!^
4.m^oM
fj
5.^1
•A
'i'
CHECK MORE SEVERE
THAN FIRST THOUGHT
$v
Number of Hun Dead Between
Lines Testifies to Good
Marksmanship
By Associated Press)
Paris, Sunday, Mar. 3.—Pre­
mier Clemenceau visited the
American troops today and re­
viewed the soldiers who repulsed
the German attack Friday. The
following semi-official note was
issued:
"The president of the council
desires personally to congratu­
late the American troops in the
sector where they have just re­
pelled brilliantly a strong enemy
attack. The battalion frftich
took part in this operation7#!?
reviewed by the premier^ in
whose presence the generjtf com­
manding the ai'my. decorated
with the war cross certaip. pffi
cers arid privates^Kosa brav^jy
had been particularly remark-,
able. •, vv
Check-Was^S^re )2^'3'
"This check to the enejny
was moreover/far morfei
yere than first.. iitforjiMftidri
showed. The American
ment had modestly announc^
that some of the enemy had been
killed, and some made.prisoners.
As a matter of fact the'latest
reconnaissances have shown th^t
in addition to these losses, ihfe
Germans left quite a large nuifr.
ber of corpses between the lines.
"It was a very fine success, re­
flecting great honor on the ten­
acity of the American infantry
and the accuracy of the artillery
fire, which had thus shown they
are capable of attaining the max­
imum effect from the French
material which they have now
adopted."
»i.
*V''
Berlin, March 4.—Military opfcr*
tlons in Russia stopped yes^tiay,
says the official statement issaeiito-'
day by the Giraun gcbaiiri stijl^?!^
thp weel^^ (n^:ainMb«i MltolaA^ giitfW
troops ware
,*1
:r'

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