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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, June 08, 1918, Image 4

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THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE
fcatend at the Postoffice, Bismarck, N. D., as Second
Class Matter
Iffltor
GEORGE D. MANN
67LOGAN
PAYNE COMPANY,
Special Foreign Representative
NEW YORK, Fifth Ave. Bldg. CHICAGO, Marquette
Bids.: BOSTON, 3 Winter St. DETROIT, Kresege
Bid*. MINNEAPOLIS, 810 Lumber Exchange.
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news credited to it or not other­
wise credited in this paper and also the local news pub­
lished herein. ..
A
All rights of publication of special dispatches herein
are also reserved.
All rights of publication of special dispatches herein
are also reserved.
MEMBER AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATION
SUBSCRIPTION RATES PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Daily by carrier per year W-w
Daily by mail per year.........
Daily by mail per year (in state) J-w
Daily by mail outside of North Dakota 8-00
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
(In North Dakota)
On* year by mail... IJJO
Six months by mail.. j*[
Three months by mail
(Outside of North Dakota)
One year Ȥ.00
Six months fg®
Three months
City Carrier Service
month!
Ope month
IBB STATU) OLDB8T NHWBPAF1B.
(Ustabllshad l»7t)
'XAMINATIONS
In many American cities they have abolished the
plan of holding examinations at the end of each
school term to determine whether the children are to
be promote^ to higher grades. There the children
are judged on records kept during the entire term
and are promoted or not according tp what they
did from the first day to the last, f'
This modern educational method robs childhood
of all its "examination horrors/' and at the same
time teaches youngsters that they are not graded
on what they mal happen to have on the tip of their
tongues on some particular day but on their day-to­
day work, just as they will be rewarded in later
years for their week-in and week-out achievements.
However, in many schools the torture system of
term and examinations still prevails., Children are
prodded into reviews and their little minds are over­
taxed for a few days and often far into the nights
to -pass the examination."
.Thk scholroom nightmare has harmed the bodies
and minds of many children:
.Thing of a shop foreman who based his judgment
of his workmen's ability and effort upon periodic
Examination rather than daily and hourly observ­
ance! Yet that is what the examination system asks
of teacher.
HELPING US TO SAVE
^Gladly and cheerfully the postmen have added
another task Jo the many burdens they daily carry
up one street arid, down another, criss-crossing back
arid jfdrth from home to hom. Now they are boost­
er* sellers of Thrift Stamps and War Savings
Stamps. Wherever they stop and often at homes
where seldom they have letters to deliver, they
preach the gospel of thrift to help win the war.
From a letter postmen leave at ho meswe take
this paragraph:
"We postmen have to crowd an awful lot of work
into a day, and I thought we had about reached
the limit when Uncle Sam came along with his
Thrift Stamps. We all can do a little more if we
want to, and I am mighty glad that I can help win
this war by turning in a few dollars each day to the
United States Treasury."
Our postman explained that he warited our help.
He wanted us to tell him that we would acquire the
Thrift Stamp habit and said he would deliver them
regularly.
Probably your postman has had the same con­
versation with you.
We are not doing anything for the postman when
we buy Thrift Stamps of him. Rather do we add
to his daily toil. But we do help ourselves whefo we
salve money—and that is what we do when we buy
Thrift Stamps and War Savings Stamps. Also, we
help Uncle Sam finance our war.
The postman's stamp selling campaign should be
made as easy for him as possible by making ar­
rangements with him to deliver a certain number of
stamps each day, semi-weekly or weekly, as our sav­
ings permit.
MORE FIGHT, NOT FEAR
German submarine raiding of the American coast
may help the kaiser in his mad effort to delude his
own people with stories of "victories" and tales
of "fear" striking the hearts of Germany's foes, and
more or less damage may be done to allied shipping,
but the largest result of the U-boat raids will be
America's increased determination,to fight "over
there" with larger forces, more powerful and more
courageously than ever.
The Huns err if they think they have brought the
war to America by their submarine operations off
our coasts. What they did was to plant in every
American's heart the desire and determination to
keep the war "over there" and not let up an ounce
of fighting energy until the war has been brought
to the Rhine and from there carried to the throne
of the imperial personification of frightfulness in
Potsdam.
U-boats have sunk unarmed merchantmen near our
porta. They may sink more of them. By the time
this is read they may have fired shells into an
American port. In so doing they do more to arouse
the fighting blood of Americans than a million ora
tonfcoiild hope to do.
The sound of a German bomb bursting on this
l3R
Hohenzollern. It makes us want to fight. If we
had heard these bombs over there earlier more oi'
us would be "oVer there" this minute fighting the
world's great fight against your hordes of brutalized
soldiers.
The more American ships you destroy, the'more
we will build!
The more of our food you sink, the more we will
grow and savell
The more you try. to frighten us, the more we will
fight!
THE POSITIVE AMERICAN
To be merely American is not enough. One must
be a positive American.
It isn't sufficient to be anti-German. One must
need "he pro-American, to be a real Americari.
The other day a professor of a Missouri German
university in an address to an audience of German
origin, insisted that to be merely negatively loyal
and obedient to the laws was not enough they must
be spontaneous and unreserved in the expression of
devotion to America as their only country.
Negative Americanism, if it may be called that,
is 50 per cent anti-Americanism. It isn't a help in
winning the war, and may be a hindrance.
STRAW PROFITEERS
"Fact that million young men in U. S. will this
summer wear soldiers' headgear rather than straw
hats will not disturb straw hat industry, tariff com­
mission says... Decrease in sales will be compen­
sated by higrer prices for women's hats of more
expensive material arid more intricate patterns."
This from a Washington, newspaper, that ought to
know what it's talking about.
Oh, ye Gods!! After a whole year of the war this
is the kind of economy that th^y are still discussing
seriously down east! If a lot of those same young
men get themselves gassed, and then buried over in
Europe, Will undertakers here begin putting out
fancy coffins at fancy prices for the rest of us to
make up the difference? It's a pretty rude joke,
but at that it is logic cut from the same piece of
cloth as the announcement quoted' above.
Why couldn't those milliners, male and female,
who feel that they just must be up to something or
other, war or no war, join either the army or the
Ited Cross nursing brigade? We ask for a rising
vote on the question. 'T»
WHICH JUDGE IS RIGHT?
An eastern judge the other day found a man
guilty of disorderly conduct for kissing his wife
when she didn't want him to kiss her.
"It is a woman's inalienable ight to refuse to be
kissed if she doesn't wan to be kissed," this judge
said, adding, "and she doesn't forfeit this right
when she marriesr the man."
But on the other hand Judge Graham of San
Francisco officially rules that a husband may kiss
his wife whenever be pleases whether it pleases the
wife or not.
Indeed, so firm are the,judge's convictions upon
the subject that he was moved to put his decision
in verse:
"Be a cave man, seize your mate
If she shows you signs of hate
Let her scratch, let bite,
But kiss her, boy it is your right."
Take your choice of decisions, Mr. Married Man.
We
refrain from expressing our opinion as to which
is the right one. I We'rs married.
A Thrift Stamp a day isn't enough if you can
save more.
We now judge the indiviudal by what he does for
his country, not for himself.
The worst thing that can be said about any
man is that "he's a good Prussian."
The kind of fighting our soldiers are doing "over
there" these days makes veterans of them in short
order.
When you get down to brass tacks, the real Lib­
erty belle is the young woman working in a muni­
tion factory.
When an American stops talking about "doing
his bit" and begins doing his BEST he's really in
the war to win.
England is further increasing the high cost
of loving by taxing the co-respondent with the
divorce trial costs.
J.
Only after a street railway company has. put
into practice every possible scheme of economy
and efficiency should it ask fjpr an increased fare.
No doubt the kaiser will appreciate any as­
sistance lobbyists in Washington may render him
in defeating the president's war profits tax pro­
gram.
The true patriot doesn't sit on his front porch
of evenings and deplore the loss of food ships in
U-boat raids. He gets out in his war garden and
makes good that loss of food.
Again do health experts condemn the ol' swim
nun' hole, forgetting that those who read health
reports are too old to slide down mud banks and
those who do never read health reports.
"Greatest army eyer^nsported overseas by
any country in the history of the world," is Amer­
ica's first-year-in-war record. Which jWill onlybe
«jk'«Vi*
A
BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE
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53
Save Wheat
and Help Win the War
•|p ^publication of gie^&^&'Food
Administration, of January 26th, 1918,
is the following comment:
"A baking powder concern in Chicago is distributing
a placard thai consumers purchase double-size
packages of all food articles packed in tin,,thus
saving about 25% tin plate for use in ammunition.
Baking powder is also recommended with corn
bread and a special booklet of War Time Recipes
is offered housewives who are interested."
The baking powder concern referred to was the Calumet
Baking Powder Company and its efforts to conserve our
resources were thus commended.
Calumet Baking Powder always conserves resources
and promotes economy.
By its use wheat flour, corn meal, or any kind of flour,
always goes further, makes whiter and lighter bread,
biscuits, cakes, etc.
Calumet Baking Powder can be used to greatest advantage in- your war­
time or any other Recipes that call for Baking Powder. It is used in the
ARMY and NAVY. Uncle Sam chooses from all His selection should
show you which brand of baking powder is best fpr your use.
SERVE YOUR COUNTRY
By using it in your home. Save needed food-stuffs and prevent waste.
Serye your family by giving them pure, wholesome, tasty bakings.
Remember—Foods are as important as Fire Arms in War Times.
Remember—Calumet Baking Powder gives you positive protection
against bake-day Mures.
SEND FOR FREE CALUMET
War-Time Recipe Book
It contains scores of selected recipes that will help
you greatly in the use of corn and other coarse flours.
CALUMET BAKING POWDER CO.
4100 Fillmore Street Chicago,
WANTED
w&ws 10,000000
WOMEN
TO JOIN
THE
U.S.
*FOOD
administration
-rami use
CALUMET
to
nj..
ibki •iuu/ftsJ XtiC
SATURDAY JUNE 8,1918.
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