OCR Interpretation


The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, September 19, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042243/1918-09-19/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I'-''
$1
.X
-v J- \''V\
(. 'v
4"
BEGIN GOING TO
First Ten Percent Mailed Out tor
19 to 36 Class ,M$n by Local
Boaids -Today y.
CLASSIFICATIONPWITHHELD
Entries Will Not Be Ivlade Until
Lottery Drawing and Assign­
ment of Numbers
The first ten percent of question­
naires 'were mailed from 53'' ldbal se­
lective service boards in North Da­
kota today to men ot 19. and 21 and of
32 to 36 inclusive who registered last
Thursday. Each day for the-ensuing
nine»days another ten per .cent will
go forward to the addresses given by
the registrant^ when they .signed up
to wofk or fight for Unole Sam.
Adjutant general -Fraser has re­
layed to local boards toe following tei
egramvfroin Provost Marshal General
crowdfer:
Beginning today and continuing for
nine days thereafter, questionnaires of
the third edition shall be sent' each
(lay to ten per cent of the registrants
who were on Sept. 12, 1918, between
the ages of 19 and .36, both inclusive.
^Questionnaires shall be sent', to all
registrants within such ages who reg­
istered on Sept. 12, 1918, or who hitfe
registered thereafter, §xcept British At least 10,000 are expected to visit
subjects including Canadians. the Liberty Loan Relic Train which
registrants and shall defer making tiny
entries on the classification list until
after the order numbers have been as-,
.signed in abcprdance with regulations
suosequently tp be promulgated.
Space i'o? the -prder numbers on the
questionnaire^lhall be leftjslank, the
order riunuers to. be flilefl in after
they have been'^determined and the
questionnaires are returned: After the
order, numbers have been, determined
thennames shall be enured upon the
classification list in ordeir of their
liability for serviee as will be pre
acribed under.. lgter., rj^atagyUmd
the date on which thequ!re Is
mailed to each registrant shall .Ihen
be entered in column JUf the classify
cation'list. For aucn purpose a ten­
tative list of the dates&n which the,
questionnaires were mailed must be'
kept by each local board.
if in the opinion of thevlocal board,
iwth due regard to the convenience of
the registrants'and the work of the
gal advisory boards, questionnaires',,
can lie mailed more rapidly UumltUy
the rate of 10 per cent per day, the lo­
cal board may mail more expeditious­
ly, but not, however, at a rate of less
than 10 per cent per
day.<p></p>ORCHESTRA
PIPE
"tin «». 4.
ORGAN HAKES
BIG HIT
An audiebpe which packed the Bis­
marck theatre to. the limit last night
gave their unstinted, apreciation of
fhe new orchestral pipe .organ which
enhanced the realism of the picture
fully one hundred per cent..
it was aptly termed by 6ne of the
patrons: "The soul of the. film." There
is no descriptive demand which a film
story can tnake but that i( is able to
meet it, no episbde that it cannot
render more touching, more thrilling,
more Enjoyable to'th£ audience.. On
it can be interpreted, every shade of.
emotion registered by the silent pay­
ers the sorrow of the life stories re­
flected in the heart-seajchtng melodies
of the great organ's voice, or the zest
and life to a comedy film which puts
a new hustle and spirit into the fun
making. In quality of tone shading
and personal expression it i? unrivaled
ahd it will Insure at all times the best
and most fitting music for every pic
lure. a
—MTf.ll
N
Expansion of War
t-•. Tax is Approved^
Washington. Sept. 19.—lSxpansion of
the proposed war* tax of-$10.00 pei
year on business or occupation so as
to fnclu^ all persons in professions
or trades'earning $2,000 per nnnum or
more was today approved by the house
ways and means committee..
5
-MIW.J.1——''
Today's Weather
Tor twenty-four hours ending at
noon, Sept. 19.
Temperature at 7 a. m. ...
Temperature at noon
Highest yesterday ........
tuowest yesterday .........
Lowest last night .........
Precipitation
Highest wind Telocity
0m ...-is
***•:$$ hoffim-'Et iaftRSoN
vs...
'•/. '-.e"
J-
None
26-N/
Forecast.
For North Dakota: Fair tonight and
Friday farmer Friday and northwest
portion tonight.
Lowest
Temperatures,
•s%
Fanro
Williston 22
Orand Forks 30
SL Paul
«ton» ........t jio
To' Probe Purchase
Of Newspaper
W^shidgton, Sept. 19.—Investigation
bf the reported charge of alien prop-,
erty, Custodian "Palmer, that a group
of brewers bought a Washington news­
paper to further the interests of the
brewers was today authorized by the
senate.
Investigation of the political propa­
ganda carried on by the national
brewers' I? to be probstf. It is alleged
that money was paid government of-i
ficials
vand
Every Indication That Great
Crowd Will Greet War Relics
Train Here
HERMAN "77" IN EXHIBIT
In mailing questionnaires be govern- will be in Bismarck from 7:45 a. m. to
e'd by'the provisions of section 92 and J1& 0 p. m. Saturday. As soon as
the last paragraph of section 99 as the train arrives, the band from the
amended, Selective Service Regula- Great Lakes training^tation, which is
tionsvexcept as othferwiseyhereiiypro
videii jind except that in mailing ques­
tionnaires local boards shall proceed
according tp serial numbers of such street.
tMtKing the tour, will parade up
Fourth street. The train will be/Sta
tioned at the tracks across Third
Three soldiers, none of -them ora­
tors, but all. men who -have, been in
the thick of the fight, will tell what
the IJbert'y Loan does for the boys.
Frank Nutter, Jr., in charge of the
train, will introduce the men. W es­
ley C. McDowell, state director of
the loanf will, also speak, as he ac­
companies the -train from Fargo
through the. state. Loan chairmen of
the surrounding counties will be* here
for the stajr.
One of the biggest .. attractions of
the exhibit is a eGrman "77" which
was captured by he, Vnite(! States
marines at "the .battle of Chateiau
Thierry. A big mouthed-French mor:
tar. French and Oerman machine
guns' perforated,With many bullets,
are'also in the display.
»uv
w.<p></p>AHERICAN
Lit
-1
THIRTY-EIGHTH YEAR. No. 231. BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, SEPT. '19, 191ft.
that a newspaper was pur­
chased to mold public opinion in favor
of the brewing interests. Pledges are
said ^o have .been enacted and on
file from "congressmen and United
States senators/' It is charged that
newspapers have ben subsidized
through advertising contracts ^6ntin
gent upon a liberal amount'of editorial
mention, the literary material fqr the
space to be supplied from the New
York headquarters of the brewers.
TENYHOUSAND
EXPECTED W
SEE TROPHIES
AGE
s. ».
ODDS UNEQUAL
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
With the American Army in France,
Sept. 1$.—'First Lieutenant Putnam
of Xewton. Mass., an ace of the aces,
was killed late Wednesday afternoon
while on patrol duty along the* Ameri­
can line. He was flyiiig with Lieut.
Robertson when attacked by seven
German planeeu- 'Four made for him
and three for Robertson. The attack
was sudden and unexpected. Lieuten­
ant Putnam was shot twice through
the heart. .His machine landed with.
in the American lines. Lieut. Robert­
son returned safely, -v
Lieutenant Putnam was a descend­
ant of Israel Putnam of Revolution­
ary fame. He was credited with 12
victories. He brought! down his first
enemy planp early in the war /when a
member of the Lafayette division of
flyers and was transferred 4P the
11/ Cl «UU TV »D li VU ,vv»ww.,
American Aerial corps. 'June 10 he November
brought down five German planes in
one dky. His record was unequalled
until recently when Lieut. Fonck^ a
French aviator, destroyed six ma­
chines -i none day. Lieut. Putnam's
last /victory was on Sept. 2.
W
BRUMU
-v.
FAVORABLE
TO DRIVE AT METZ BY
Lorraine Warmer ,Than Dakotas, Which Are in
Same Latitude Alsatian Mountain Snows
Present Chief Military Obstacle
In Ofder to get. the matter'of
weather/ clearly in mind it is neces
sacy to place the position of France
exactly. France) with regard to avea
and latitude* corresponds with the
location of North and South Dakota/ A
part of France- is even farther north
and would overlap in, Canada Th4
position ot paris VeTdun and the St.
Mihiel salieiiit would be right jii the
boundary line between North Dakota
and Canadh.
The fall father in this section of
France, is usually pleasant, especially
duririg September and October. How­
ever, the raiqfall becomes heavier. In
fact, this is the season of maximum
I rainfall. The winter /weather is un­
pleasant and cold, with "much cloudi­
ness, frequent rains and. s6me snow,
but the temperature never reaches the
extremes of heat and cold that we
hav in this country.
A fair comparison would be be­
tween the city of Metz and Bismarck.
N. D., which is in about the same
latitude. The figures are for the aver­
age mean temperature each month:
January ..
'February
March
April .....
May
June
July
August ...
September
October
December'
The imminence of an American of^entivc Into Germany by way
of AI*aefe.Loi-raine makes timely an investigation inttf the kind of
country the Americans will have to kdvamce /in and the kind of
weather they will .encounter. /The following^ is
'the first extensive
exposition of available data that has been offered in thir country :v
since the Yanks parried the eyes of the world upon Metz.
by MILTON BRONNER v':
N. E. A. Staff Correspondent
Wijat kind of country and what kind of weather will be Yanfts
have to encounter if Pershing and Foch decide to take the Ameri­
can flag to'the "Rhine this fall
/By wiping out the St. Mihiel salient, Pershing has ^rought
hislineup to Pagny, from which town it i^ but a step across the
Ad-diVM
'Map showing ^the latitude of France compared with that of the Unit­
ed States. Metz is on a latitudinal line with Bismarck.
boundary Mnto -German Lorraine, ^and only 14 nfiiles northeast to
Metz..
The Lorraine country where our troops now are is mainly
made up of wooded Wlls from G00 to 1200 feet above sea-level. To
the southeast in Alsace the topography is entirely different. Here
is the 150-mile range of the Vosges\mountains, with some peaks
reaching 4500 feet above sea-level. The slopes are marked by a
gradual descent on Che side facing France and by a steep fall to­
ward the Rhine. For attack, therefpre, the easiest side is pre­
sented to our troops. Once past thitae mountains, there is com­
paratively low country broken
?'.!»
Bis­
Metz.
36
42
47
48
58
6?
66
ss
51
47
39
38
marck.
7
a
.22
55
54
it
57
44
26
15
In 1912, the last -year for which-,
German weather reports are avail^
able, there were 16 days of snow'
fall—2 in January, 2 in February, 2 in
won't last long under Yankee v' -V
V.
THE ENVIRONS AND FORTIFICATIONS OF METZ
IHKTCi
According to latest 'cable dispatches, American long-range guns are now bombarding the forts surrounding Mete shown on this
map. Port Prinz August, von Wuerttemberg»!to She sooUiwest of the city, isthe biggest And strongest of the Mttafortifieations, but
S
...
March, 5 jn April, 2 in November and
3 in December. The rains are more
frequent and heavy.
Enow in the Vosges mountains
would present a more serious military
obstacle. It is prevalent in these
ranges for about six months, and
sometimes from the'beginning of Oc
tober until June. Stornls haVe been
known in* which 6 1-2 feet of snow
fell in 48 hours. Winter temperatures
of below zero are not uncommon. On
the lower slopes rains are frequent.
It is evident that if the Americans
this fall and winter should- attempt
a big offensive into Xorraine and Al­
sace, they will have to whip npt only
General 'Ludendorff^but General Rain
and General fenow.
MINERS
TAKE MINES
-BUY
Vt.
«. S.-
Btte, Mont., Sept. 19.—A general
meeting of the craft employed at the
mines her^ has been cailled for Sun­
day afternoon.
The metal trades council at a meet­
ing last night decided to make such a
resolution, and^ after the n\en have re­
turned to work will 'ask that they
unite in a plan that the government
assume control of the mines.
•"Mine operators reported that the
number of men applying lor wo^k
show an increase.
WOtPPYj
»•**4
BOY'S HEAD IS
CRUSHED IN
WAGON RACKS
George Berenson, Son of II. H.
Rerenson Killed at Thresh­
ing Rig Near Steele
TRYING TO STOP TEAM
George E'crenson, fifteen years of
age., son ot' If. H. Berenson, a farmer
near Steele, was killed instantly yes­
terday when he tried to stop his team
which was moving away from him.
Berenson was on tho ground be­
tween two ot* the racks when his team
.started off. He ran lip to catch the
reins, tho Wagon swferved and his
head was caught as in a vise between
tbe two wagon racks.
'IM® fqther who was on the other
side of the threshing rig did not see
the accident, but was at the side of
his boy's body in an instant.
Tho boy/ was killed instantly. His
head was .crushed in.
Geofge Eo/enson was extremely pop­
ular in that section and had been with
the rig since the season opened.
The iimerai will be held from the
farm home Sunday.
w.
s.<p></p>LOAN
FOURTH
QUOTA EQUALS
FIRST THREE
iuy
North Dakota Will Be Asked to
Subscribe for^$19,000,000
in Bonds
counties in the state.
"Our share of the Fourth Lib­
erty loan will be larger than the
sum total of what we were asked
to raise in/the first, second and
third loans," the telegram from
State Chairman McDowell -i*feads,
"It is tbe biggest task the people
of our state hav^ ever been,called
npon to perform, and it jp im­
portant: and necessary that your
county must do its full share, and
every citizen is urged to help
make a rscord for North Dakota
that will be. highly, creditable to
our state."
The state quota and apportion­
ments for the various counties are
soon to be announced, it was stated
this aftornoon. It is expected that
Cass county will be asked to take
•^,750,000.<p></p>DISCUSS
BUY W.
S.<p></p>SIZE
Washington, Sept. 1.1.—Tha sise. in­
terest rate, and other terms of the
Fourth-Liberty loan ware considered
today by Secretary McAdoo in con­
ference with his treasury advisers.
The amount is still expected to be
in the neighborhood »of billion dol­
lars and the interest rate 4 1t2 per
cent. The decision apparently only
awaits final action by uongress on tho
pending bill to extend rax exemptions
on liberty bonds.
JOUkH
TROW
awe
.1-^
1
N
North Dakota's quota in the Fourth
Liberty loan drive, which commences
September 28(- will be larger than the
total quotas ot the first, second and
third drives, 'according to a telegram ment
rhali-manotthey(Ls'("2?ubeTy
loan committee, from Wesley
PrileP-
c.
Mc-
Doweii, Marion, state chairman.
The wa has not been definitely
fixed, but will be approximately $1#,-!
000,000..
€ass county's quota, according to »i
ment
1
».
AND RATE OF
FOURTH LOAN
BRITISH TROOPS PLUNGE IHTO
HINDENBURG LINE NORTH OF
ST. JUENFFL DEFENSE LINE.
On Short Front .West of This City, the French Are
Workiftg Steadily Towajrd the Town and are
on Outskirts of Dellon
(By Associated Press)
British troops in desperate fighting are plunging further into
the Hindenburg line*north of St. Quentin while west of Cambrai
they have withstood vicious counter attacks. The enemy is mak­
ing every effort to retain his positions on the 30-mile front, and to
check the allied move which threatens Cambrai.
In Macedonia the Bulgarians are in flight northward in front
of the attack of the Serbians and French.
On the front attack Wednesday, the British are pushing ahead
in spite of bitter resistance, toward, the St. Quentin-Cambrai high­
road, railway and canal three important enemy defense lories.
From Lempire to Pontruet, which the British now hold the
Germans have been hurled from the forward line-of th? Hinden­
burg positon. The British at Lempire are four miles froril Le Cat
elet, an important town, while on a front of nearly six miles they
are within one mile of the high i*oad and the canal.
On the short front west of St. Quentin the French are working
steadily toward the town and are on the outskirts of Dellon.
1
HURLED BACK.
Gorman counter attacks at Trescault and Moeuvres, southwest
and west of Cambrai, were preceded by an intense artillery bom
bardment. At both points the Germans were hurled back with
terrible losses.
On this front best' maps fail to show the great difficulties at­
tending even a niinor advance. For 18 months the Germans have
been'strengthening their positons, which they considered almost
invulerable.
N
BULGARIAN FLIGHT.
The Bulgarian retreat from the Serbo-Greek border is report­
ed to be in the nature of a flight and the enemy is burning stores
ajid villages in his path. The allies have captured additional pris­
oners and war material, which have not been counted, so fast is
their advance. A score or more of Serbian villages have beeti re­
conquered and the Bulgarians driven beyond Rasembay, on the
Cerna river, fifteen miles, southwest, of Prilep. the immediate ob
jective.
It is not unlikely the Bulgarians will continue their retire
at least to the improved road running ea&t and west through
west to Monastir and east to the Vardar. Should the allies suc-
ceed in pressing the'Bulgarians back to east of Prilep, a readjust-
of. the allied line virtually would be inevitable.
CONSOLIDATING LINES.
American troops are engaged, /ia consolidating..vthwc^tliniiwi
rC" Slaciws the bases of St. MihielVlient, which was wiped out last
week. The Germans are reported to be feverishly working to
strengthen their lines in this sectpr. A new American assault
to be made in this region seems inevitable.
I .A successful drive by the Americans, it seems, was for the
[purpose 0% wiping out the Et. Mihiel sector, a long standing
[menace.
1 This fact, when ta^Mfi«to consideration with the successful
attack made by BritisM MtHHTrenchijilong the St. Quentin shows
that Marshal Foch has frlnned down large bodies of the .enemy
forces in widely separated parts of the line. The Germans are
forced to man their lines heavily from before Metz clear down
through the Lorraine and Vosges sectors, while there is always a
very real threat at his vital pisitions north of Laon. In the mean­
time the line from Rheims to Verdun always presents itself as an
inviting field for an allied ofiensive.
BULGARIANS IN FULL FLIGHT.
London, Sept. 19.—The Bulgarians are in full flight in Mace­
donia according to Serbian official advices received here. The Al­
lied troops have advanced more than 12 miles and are moving so
fast that it has been impossible to count the prisoners and list
the captured guns and supplies. New regiments thrown in to stem
the onrush have been ineffective.
MAKE FURTHER PROGRESS.
London, Sept. 19.—The British last night made further prog­
ress into the Hindenburg line about St. Quentin, according to Field
Marshal Haig's official statement. The allies have reached the
outposts of the Hindenburg line. Australian troops have renewed
their attack and carried Hindenburg outposts,
URGES MESSAGE TO GERMANS
With the American Army on the Vesle, Sept. 19.—A German
prisoners captured recently suggested, that the Americans drop
notes behind-the German lines stating that tKey do not kill Ger­
mans captured prisoners. This report has been spread among the
men. He stated that many Germany soldiers would surrender
were they not under the impression tjiat they would be killed.
The Gernians have sent appeals within American lines by
means ofxbaloons and other devices offering the Americans great
opportunities in Germany.
SAYS PEOPLE ARE DISCOURAGED. ,•
(By Associated Press)
With the American Army on the Lorraine Front, Sept. 19.—
Five prisoners were captured byjthe Americans south of the Vil­
lage of Wol. They belonged to the famous Fourteenth storm ba
tallion. These troops are discouraged by the Franco-American
successes around St. Mihiel. They were rushed into the front line
in ah attempt to stop the American advance early in the drive.
They said that Germany was hard pressed for men.
The low morale of the German arm^, they said, was the rea­
son for the advance of the Americans. One of the prisoners, a
socialist, said that the people of Germany look upon the war as a
capitalist struggle, There is great depression throughout Ger­
many, he said, especially as the news of the American and British
advances become known.
"Germans are at last realizing," he said "that Americans are
great fighters. They appreciate the fact-that American successes
are encouraging to'the Allies and discouraging to the Germans."
These troops estimate that the Afnerican troops are their
"l"*1- firsts
CONTINUE PROGRESS.
Paris, Sept. 19.—French troops, last night continued their
progress in the region of St. Quentin and penetrated thie positions
at Contescourt, three fniles southwets of St. Quentin.
FRENCH ARE SUCCESFUL.
With the French Army in Picardy, Sept. 19.-r-The troops of
General Debeny who pushed the Germans from the region of Mont
dldier have after a few days lull, successfully resumed their at
tack in the region of St. Quentin. In spite of their long drive from
the Avre to the Somme, General Debeny are pressing th* enemy
and are, close to Dellon, less than two miles from St
They ale fighting the Germans on the Hindenburg line andjnwry
inch is being hotly disputed. The Germans seen 4ete*mined to
(Continned ,oa Pag* Tfcm.)
EDITION
PRICE FIVE CENTS
.'*HV /.'#'
5
N
Already their loss of the Sokol road endangers the road

xml | txt