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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, November 11, 1922, Image 3

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SURPRISES IN
MANYWESTERH
COUNTY VOTES
Weather Cuts A)«n
Vote on Slope and .Many
Leaguers Suffer Reverses
STARK STILL SOLID
Gives O'Connor and Nestos
Majority, But Shipley Is
Beaten for the House
The styrmy weather in the west­
ern part fcf the state just preceding
th/ election cut dbwn the vqte ma­
terially. In Stark county 500 less
votes were cast than in tKe primary.
T)ie result of the lessened vote'was
severe preserves for the Nonpartisan
league candidates^for various county
places and a Reduced number of votes
for Lemke. and Frazier.
"Solid Stark" Remains
Stark county -retained its name,
"Solid Stark," so far as the heads of
the Independent ticket were con­
cerned. In 36 out of the 37 prccincts
of the county O'Connor had a lead
Of 267 votes while Nestos had a lead
of 1,119 over Lemke. The vote was:
O'Connor 1,849 Frazier 1,582 Nes­
tos 2,118 Lemke 999. In the same
precincts E. J. Hughes, Democratic
candidate for congressman, had
J. L. Hughes^ county auditor, was
defeated by A. S. Ward of Belfield
in a close race. Frank X. Wanner
was elected clerk of court. Sheriff'
George Brown was reelected. Peter
Splichal was elected treasurer over
John Reuter Jrt Others chosen were:
States Attorney, James P. Cain Re­
gister of Deeds, John Leask County
Judge, Fred Mascr Coroner, A. D.
Davis County Superintendent, H. 0.
Pippin, all unopposed. W. R. Veigel
was reelected surveyor over W. S.
Stratton in a close race.
Approximately 3,300 votes were
cast in the election as compared to
3,500 in the primary. There are about
4,000 registered. The bad roads which
followed a snow and rain storm kept
many farmers from the polls.
Morton County
Every county officers elected in
Morton county is. an Independent.
Tt"! n»ost remarkable race, was that
of Charles McDonald for sheriff,
who won on stickeijs in an eight-day
1
campaign, following the death \of
Jack Brady. The victory of L. H. Con­
nolly for states attorney was by,a
strong margin. Bad roads cut down
the farmer vote.
Hettinger County
Frazier got 1,127 votes to 632 for
O'Connor, and Nestos got 780 to 959
for Lemke. The Mott Pioneer-Press,
league, was chosen official paper.
County Superintendent Mrs. Martha
Bratcfier, league, won. Other county
officers elected included: Sheriff
Gus Buehler Auditor Henry Noble
Register of Deeds, Wagedorf Coun
-ty Judge, McCoy Clerk, Henry
Barry. J. K. Murray won for states
attorney, 1,028 to 773.
Billings County
Governor Nestos carried Billings
county, heretofore league, by a smaU^
margin. Miss Mabel Rapp was re-.
electetT county superintendent. Willis
F. King defeated O. G. Lindhe for
county auditor. Paul Lebo was chos­
en county auditor.
Slope County
League candidates had their own
way in Slope county. Judge Fred
White, known all over the Slope 'for
his work for the Red C^oss, was ap­
parently beaten for county judge in
a close race. C. P. Browntee, the only
other anti-leaguer holding office,
was defeated for states attorney by
T. T. Hiner, former preacher of
Marmarth.
Logan County
The O'Connor-Nestos ticket car­
ried the county. Complete returns
gave:. Frazier 700 O'Connor 786
Nestos 939 Lemke 495. 26 of 27 pre­
cincts gave George M. Young 881
J. W. Demrticy 160. The grain grad­
ing measure lost 730 to 736 in these
precincts. County officers chosen in­
cluded: County superintendent, Ar­
thur J. Solien "Sheriff, John J.
Wentz auditor, Carl Kaz treasurer,
Andreafe1 Baltzer clerk, ^acob Rott
county judge, J. J. Silbernagel, states
attorney, A. B. Atkins. Kretschmar
Apparently won over John Wishek
for joint senator.
Emmons County
Winners in county fights were^
States'1 Attorney, Charles Coventry
treasurer, E. T. Atha sheriff, Joe
Volks, Jr. Register of Deeds, A. H.
Irvine clerk of court, John Bickler,
county judge, Adam Thomas^ offi­
cial paper, Emmons County Record,
edited by Frank Streeter. The so
called German ticket was successful
in most of the county scraps.'Nestos
had a majority of about 250 and
O'Connor, lost the county by between
50 and 100.
Mercer County
David Schwartz of Golden Valley
was elected states attorney ^ovcr
John Cass of Stanton. Felix Conr&th
won for sheriff over Henry C. Klinds
worth while Herbert Roberts, Non­
partisan, won for treasurer. Haevis
cher won for clerk of court. Paul
Leupp was reelected county auditor.
Henry Giffey was chosen register
of deeds and E. R. Thomas county
superintendent. The results on the
county were four offices for Inde­
pendents and two fOr-the league. T1
"Hazen Star was chosen official aper.
The county was overwhelmingly fcr
Frazier and for L&mke by a less ma­
jority.
Grant County
William Nultemeier was elected
sherif#of Grant county by a '"te of
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11,1922 THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE
I',327 to 1,221 over H. M. Carter. llic
Carson PreBS was chosen official pa­
per. The league carried the county
on the'qtate ticket.
Dunn County
Thomas A. G. Johnson of Killdcer' igtaff, among the hostages
was eloctcd states attorney over T.
H. H. Thoreson, leaguer, it appear­
ed with returns about al) in, C. J.
Hempftling was rc-elccted county
auditor and James Joslin, clerk of
court. Miss Marion A. Fleming ap
llpeared winner for county superin
lOiai tenant oyer Miss Murle L. Hill. The
Dunn County Farmers Journal,
league organ, was elected official
paper, the Halliday Promoter run­
ning second and the Killdeer Herald
third.
Win For Legislature
In the Thirty-ninth district com­
prising Billings^ Golden Valley, Slope
^nd Bowman counties, Frank Hardy,
Q, C, Martin and John Quam, all
leaguers, were elected to the hoitse
without opposition.
The Forty-ejghth district, com­
posed of Dunn, Mercer and Oliver
counties, elected Charles Whitmer'jto
the senate and R. H. Walker, G. \V.
Morton and J. F. Link in the house.
All these men are leaguers.
McLean County
Thirty-ninfc out of 50 precincts
gave this comparative vote: Frazier
2,161 O'Connor 1,427. Lemke 1,682
Nestos 1,440. Primary, Frazier 2,110
McCumber 1,724 Baker 1,209 Nes­
tos 1,493. The majority for Frazier
will be abott#""l,100 ns compared to
800 in the primary.
EARTH SHOCKS
FELT IN CHILE
(By the Associated Press)
Santiago, Nov. 11. Severe
eapth shocks were felt in various
'parts of Chile shortly before mid­
night and again early today. From
various points in central Chile came
reports of houses falling and other
damage. A report from Antofagasta.
north of Valparaiso, 'said that a
tidal wave came in shortly after mid­
night. smashing small vessels and
sweeping over homes of the fisher­
men and workers.
a
majority of 313 over J. H. Sinclair.
D. E. Shipley, one of the Inde­
pendent leaders in the last legisla­
ture, who 4nade the race for legis­
lature in the individual column, made
a good race but lost. Pius Kopp was
re-elected by the largest majority,
getting 2,367 votes in 34 precincts.
O. H. Starke was second with 1,781
and Herman Raabe was third in. the
race with 1,778 votes, three being
chosen as representatives.
So far no loss of life has been re­
ported, but communication lin
from many points have been knock­
ed out of order.
Reports received just before
dswn said the Ishocks were continu­
ing at Lapel, Unadices and Laser
ena The latter city was wrecked
by a severe earthqusree in 1907.
The sea was rising there this
morning. A d:spatch at 2:50
o'clock said a heavy shock la|?tmg
five' minutes had just been felt at
Laserena. It brought down many
walls and telegraph., poles, putting
the city in -darkness.y
Telephone' communications from
Laserena to the port of Coquimbo
was broken off shortly after 1
o'clock when the operator at Co­
quimbo left his post upon hearing
a report that th0 sea was advanc­
ing inland. At that- hour fire waT
reported to hsve broken out at
Coquimbo.
Add:tional shocks of intensity
were felt here just before 3 a. m.
NUMBER UNKNOWN
Shanghai// Nov. 11.—It seemed
apparent today that the number
of lives lost in the burning of the
river steamer Ta Shing, near here
yesterday estimated at 00, pro­
bably neveT will be learned de­
finitely. No records are kept of
the numbers carried by such boats,
which daily are jammed with
passengers of the 'poorest coolie
classes Scores of bodies have been
recovered- and more probably are
in the destroyed bulk of the ves­
sel.
TIDAL WAVE FOLLOWS.'
(By the Associated Press)
Buenos Aires, Nov. 11.—Advices
received by the Ail-American Cable
Company here this forenoon, says it
is feared the ^earthAuake in Chile
caused a catastrophe Antofagasta.
Previous news from Sandiago said
the earthquake had been accompanied
by a tidal wave which swept the fish­
ermen's settlement.
MOTHER
PLACES FEEL SHQCK
Buenos Ayes, Nov. 11.—An un­
usual earthquake («,hock was felt
in Buenos Aires and in the Argen­
tine provinces in the Andes re­
gional, thirty five minutes after
midnight this morning. No dam­
age was reported. The Ail-Amer­
ican Cpble lines are interrupted.
Later Santiago advices said that
while the 'tidal wave that swept
oyer the houses of fishermen and
workers at Antofagasta had smash­
ed small vessels against houses and
rocks, no loss of life had been re­
ported. The inhabitants fled in
terror.
Dispatches from Val Paraiso said
all the land lines communicating"
with Antofagasta were groken.
500 HOUSES
DESTROYED.'
(By the Associated Preas)
Santaigo, Chile, Nov. 11.—Five hun­
dred houses were destroyed in" to­
day's earthquake at Coquimbo, be­
tween Val Paraiso and Antofagasta
and some lives were lost.
RELEASED BY BRIGANDS.
Shanghai, Nov. 11.—Two American
missionaries unnamed, are .among
foreign captives held by bandits in
Honan province according to word
received here today from Madame
Sodcrstrom of the Lutheran mission,
who has been released by the Brig­
ands and has arrived at Yingchowfu,
She also reported that she saw II, F.
Lcdgard of thfi.C|iina inland mission
Three Undefeated
Western Teams
Meet Foes Outside
(Continued 9om Page One)
for one or more of the leaders,
who then would probably be eli­
minated from the chase ^or the
b!g ten title.
General- interest throughout th§
conferencc is :airl_v evenly divid­
ed between the'three big conflicts
today. The intense rivalry be­
tween the Maroons and Buckeye/?,
the strained relations between
Illinois and- Wisconsin as a result
of the Ineligibility squabble, and
the fight Iowa is making to retain
the big ten title won last year,
adds to the interest in the decision
engagements today.
Michigan, fouith member of the
undefeated quartet, has,an idle
day.
Northwestern and Purdue clafch
before-a home coming crowd at
Evanston.
Indians, defeated last Saturday
by Notre Dame, the Amy's foe to­
day, plays another conference out
west, Virginia, at Indiana­
polis.
MEET ARMY.
West Point N. Y. Army and Notre
Dame both undefeated so far this
season, meet in their annual inter­
sectional gridiron tussle with both
elevens presenting their strongest
lineups, 't'he ?adets have made much
Vreperation for an anticipated aerial
attack from the Hoosier team.. Notre
Dame won last years game, 28 to 0.
HOME-COMING AT IOWA.
Iowa City, la., Nov. 11.—Iowa City
was the mccca today of thousands of
alumni of the University of .Iowa,
who returned to the city of their
school days to w,itne.-s the annual
home-coming football came between
Minnesota and the Western Confer­
ence champions.
The new stadium which has a scat,
ing'capacity of 24,000 is expected to
be crowded by the time the game
starts at 2 p. m. The city has been
crowded cince noon yesterday and
every road coming into Iowa City"
today was thronged with automo­
biles loaded with Hawkeye support­
ers. In coming trians brought in
hundreds of others also.
The Iowa team benefitted by hav­
ing no game last Saturday and is in
excellent condition for todays battle.
Minnesota players stopped at Cedar
Rapids, enroute to Iowa City and
practiced o-i Coc field there yester­
day afternoon.
A light drizzle -began here this,
morning. Coach Spalding of the
Gophers said a wet field would
hinder the attack of his team.
HARVARD MEETS YALE
N.jw York, Nov. 11.—Eastern
football begins to reach its climax
today at Cambridge, Mass. when
the first of the "Big, three con­
tests is pl iycd between Harvard
and Princcton. .The outcome gen­
erally is regarded as a toss up,
with'few o: the experts willing to
risk their reputations by predict­
ing the winner.
On previous form, Harvard ap­
pears to shade the Tiger, but in
the human, fighting equivalent
The Laughter
Leader
GRANDMAS BOY'
His ftMT 5
P*BTP,CTU^®
Prepare for Winter
EJvery car owner dreads starting a Sick motor in. cold weather. Avoid
this condition by putting your car in proper condition now. Valves should
be ground, bearings tightened, carbon cleaned out, electrical connections
checked, oil lines cleaned and fresh liffht oil put in crank case, and car
greased all over. Then store for the winter in cur heated*garage at the
low moiithly rate of $8.00 which includes free delivery of your car at y6ur_
home.
CORWIN MBTBR Cfl
there is no choice. The crimson,
among its victims, numbers Holy
CrcMs, Dartmouth, CJentre and
Florida, while Princeton's record!
was established fey victories over
Colgate, Maryland, Swarthmorc
and Chicago.
Yale, the other mexrtber. of the
"Big thjtee" will toy with Mary-
land today in preparation for its
tuFslc with the 'Tiger njjxt Satur­
day,
In the major claBg alsci are the
^•national meeting atv Smcus
with McGrll of Canada ana tne in
tersectional clash of Washington
and Jefferson and Wabash at
Washington, Pennsylvania.
Princeton never has won a game
in the Harvard stadium Harvard
neyer has gained a de^isioh of the
Tigers during Bob Usher's coach­
ing regime. Harvard w§| defeat
feated last year at, Princeton and
in 1919 and 1920, the teams battled
to a tie.
when its
on,y
Professor O. Abel, while admitting
that the primitive history of the seal
is obscure, says the most probably
supposition is that these creatures
originated from bear4.
TWO $125 JOBS
"TURNED DOWN"
All graduates of Dakota Business
College Fargo, N. D-, werel'al­
ready "placed" when the Wash­
burn Lignite Coal Co. and the N.
P. Railroad Co. phoned for'twe
$125-a-mortth employes recent!v.
D. B. C. graduates ^ct "firsc cjaH"
and make (rood everywhere. /jvPV
225 have beconic bank officers* the
]atcst 'being E. G. Ur.-iatcn, ncv",
asst. caVjiici" of the Citizens St.afe
Bank of Ambrose.
"Follow the $uccc$5ful." ]',nra^
NOW. Send names of interestet
friends and get Success Ma^izinc
free. Write F. LvWatkir.r,.. Pres.,
806 Front St., Fargo, N, D.
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
Something new for Lloyd
the- romance of a
"Fraidy Cat" boy.
You'll laugh at Lloyd!
You'll love his grandma!
The story is a surprise.
The finish is a roar.
Some Joy in Grandma's
Boy."
—Also—
AESOP FABLE
MOyiE CHAT
MAN VS.i BEAST
.f
I
N
I. Vn A. JUDGES
HOLD LEAD
FOR BENCH
(Continued from Page One)
R°lc*tc.and ff
foms
Kt nv,
1 1'cJ!rc
certain to be in favor of the league
With 1,789 precincts reported the
vote stands
Birdzell, 79,320 Burr, 69,875 Eng
lert, 68,295 Johnaon, 84,205 Nues
sle, 76,294 Richardson, 2,007/
Of next importance on the day's
schedule is the Army-Notrj» Pame
annual battle, of interest, bcca.use
of its intersectional character, and
because the two teams Usually I the senatorial race it stood: Frazier,
play one'of the best gajnes of the Cj7f)gr). O'Connor, 90,635. For gov.
seasor). 1 crnor, 2,014 prccincts give Nestos,
With 2,015 precincts reported on
108(133 Lemk{!) 74 453
X&mes between Penny and Pitts-1
burg at?.Phiadelphia Cornell'and Independent Voters Association
Dartmouth in New York. -The In-j,,dded
a flfty
.eighth
memb
er to their
forces when the final returns of the
thirty-second district, composed of
Eddy and Foster counties were re­
ceived. In preliminary figures, E. F.
Johnson had been conceded the elec­
tion but the final figures showed that
John Burk, Democrat, and Inde­
pendent Voters Association had re
ceived 1,825 votea to 1,805 for Mt.
Johnson.
1
Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 11.—
Harvard and Princeton meet today
in the feature football game of the
day in the cast.
But one woman who Won in the
primaries was defeated for the North
Dakota legislature. The final re­
turns disclosed that Miss Lillian
Dinsmore of. Ellcnsdale, a candidate
in thCitwenty-fifth district had failed
of elections, he was third in a district
Harvard's greater.t test" hither­
to was in^the Dartmouth, game I electing two members,\winning her
cd on an intercepted forward pass.
'Centre has been the only eleven
to cross the Harvard goal Ijne.
Princeton in its intersectional
gamc with Chicago showed an of­
fense powerful eMPigh to bring it
from behind to win.
One of the highest mountains in
Germany has been successfully as
cendcd by an airplane^ which landed
on a small plateau 50 yards from
the actual summit.
Described as the most valuable in
the world and the only specimen in
existance, the one-cent British
guinea stamp of 1856 was recently,
offered for sale in Paris.
touchdown Was scor- flace over two Democratic candidates.
am T»t» CJC I A.
Forced out of t*hc lead for a short
time yesterday whfen the returns^rom
Cass county were added to 'the to­
tals, A. S. Olness and C. W. McDon­
nell, insuarncc commissioner and
railroad commissioner, respectively,
'jcored heavily in the later returns,
and today Olsness is reading with re­
turns from 1,358 precincts, 61,804 to,
52,202 for Lillibridge. McDonnell in
the later returns collccted more votes
than ^11 of his opponents or com­
panions and with 11,401 precincts ac­
counted for wasx leading .with 63,636.
The other figures werq: Harding,
61,903 Milhollnn, 62,703 Pollock,
£4,931 Dixon, 56,398 O'Leary, 54',
519.
C. W. McDonnell, continued to
maintain his lead for North Dakota
railroad commissioner with 1,688
':recinct^ reported. The vote at that
time was: McDonnell, 71,025 Mil
hollan, 68,159 Harding, 67,240
Dixon, 60,874 O'Leary, 60,776 Pol­
lock, 60,773.
In 1,478 precincts the vote is:
Lieutenant governor: Hyland, Ti,~
863 Bowman, 52,525.
Secretary ofsiate, 1,478 precincts.
Hall, 81,373 Moeller, 52,507.
State auditor, 1,478 precincts give:
Poindexter, 66,250 Anderson, 58,628.
For state treasurer, 1,478 prccincts
live: Steen, 81,839 Larson, 51,534.
For attorney general, 1,471 pre­
cincts give: Shafer, 76,206 Ulsrud,
51,567.
For insurance commissioner, l,45u
urecincts give: Olsness, 66,313 Lil­
libridge,, 55,717
ATTENTION MASONS!
Special^ meeting Bismarck
Lodge No. 5, A. F. & A. M.
Monday evening at 7:30. M.
M. Degree.
TONIGHT
SATURDAY
Wit,h
llcnry B. Walthall
Clair© Windsor
Milton Sill*
Joseph Dowllng
Irene Rich
Shannon Day
EdHhe Yorke—
PATHE NEWS
AESOP FABLE
MONDAY, NOV. ISth.
Katherine MacDonald
—in—
"DOMESTIC RELATIONS"
Pathe Newa and Topics.
Armistice Day
This year we observe the fourth anniver­
sary of the signing of 'the Armistice which
ended the World War.
Dbring the period that has passed since
then preliminary gestures have been made
toward permanent peace. It is to be hoped
that these will be followed by even greater
efforts.
Meanwhile we can each provide for our­
selves and loved ones that peace and security
that financial independence brings.
This Institution is at your servicp.
Bismarck Bank
Bismarck, N. D.
MELVILLE DAVISSON POST
iiiiiviiiiviuiiiHiivmii
BROWN'S PAPER
IS WINNER
Dickinson, N. D., Nov. 11.—The
Recorder-Post, an independent news­
paper which .u printed both sides
of t'.s politi al figjit, was chosen
officl.'.l paper of Stark county over
the Dickinson Press, owned by
Ernie Peterson, by a majority of
233. The R6c.ordcr-Post is edited
by John B. Brown, formerly secre­
tary of the Workmen's Compensa­
tion Bureau.
WEATHER OUTLOOK.
Washington, Nov. 11.—Weather
outlook for tha week beginning
Monday:
Region of the great lakes: con
rderablc cloudiness and local
showers at the beginning followed
by generally fair and cool thereaf­
ter.1
Upper Mississippi" valley: cool
and generally fair first half, rising
temperature considerable cloud­
iness and local rains the latter
part.
If
And
«a. tKmodoTis. Jtezaia
ilbiBcd yon to
^For»lirec
Stat up
lb ia tie North*!£od£
Hundreds of
Avay fiom chvilizatigix
Alone vfth a
And a pdhsifid: dentlemaji ,,
Both professing love for you*
Aid there vdsaoposafcile il
Qaaoe ofes^pe
f.
dDiimiuiicdtioiiirauiecotia«
Aidvon kocv
If yon admitted love
Ibr one— ft meant
jr^ 'V
Lan^donMcQvmfckji Sensati
Presented ty Qrl Laemole
sm, HOUSE PETER/
^vr"y
PAGE THREl
NOTICE
To all concerned:
I will pot be responsible
make good any checks writte
by Frank Yeasley from
of this notice.
(Signed) Jake Yeasley.
Dance at Cosmopolitan t|
night.
FOR RENT—G'.io !bed roc|
with two large closets, with boaifl
Ladies preferred. 418 i9th St.
Pliny says that the Romans, mol
than 2000 years ago, importf
Roquefort cheese from France
add flavor to their banquets.
Cleaning, Dyeing, Repairing
Pressing
at new low prices. Mall orderl
looked after promptly. We pa]
postage one way.
Eagle Tailoring tc Hat Works!
Opposite P. O. Bismarcf
Don't Forget
P. J. Heltenberg's Sale—Sec. 14—Ft. Rice
Twp. Horses, Cattle, Pigs, Chickens,
Machinery, and Household Goods.
Tuesday, November 14th, at 10:30 a. m.
A UNIVERSAL Jewel Directed by Reginald Barker.
3 Days Commencing Monday, November 13th.
Performances 7:15—9:15
Matinee Tuesday at 2:30
Admission Adults 35c. Children 20c
A Remarkable Series oi Stories
BY A MASTER OF MYSTERY FICTION
MELVILLE DAVISSON POST
TRIUMPHS OF JONQUELLE"
KNOWN THE WORLD OVER FOR HIS BRILLIANT ACHIEVEMENTS
AS THE PREFECT OF POLICE OF PARIS
For all lovers of crime-detection and th" penetration of the^ darkest, most
baffling problems this series of stories of Monsieur Jonquelle goes straight
to the mark.
—Don't Miss a Single One—
STARTING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, IN
THE BISMARCK DAILY TRIBUNE
TkriUer
A.
lie other vodd KILLiim
VaMYnDo'Midtihe'.
ffcrrh'CMfanXjirlDid?
VIKCINIA VJU.U/,
A O O E A
AND A M6 /PKCIAI^CA/T

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