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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, December 08, 1922, Image 1

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For Bismarck and vicinity:
Fair tonight and Saturday not
much change in temperature.
ESTABLISHED 1873
ORDER DRAWN
BY ATTORNEYS
IS DEFECTIVE
Decision Arrived at by Judge
After Much Considera­
tion
NO JURY THIS MONTH
Status of Criminal Cases of
State Are Left "Up in
The Air"
Holding that the order pre­
sented by the attorney-gener­
al's office for the drawing of
the Burleigh county grand
jury was defective, after
great study and deliberation,
stating that "court has no
other wish than to carry out
the mandates of the people"
but pointing out that persons
ought not to suffer the stigma
of indictment by a jury ille­
gally drawn and which indict­
ments could be held invalid,
Judge James A. Coffey at
noon today discharged the
grand jury panel.
All of the questions pre­
sented by States Attorney F.
E. McCurdy and former Gov­
ernor John Burke for the
state and the arguments of
J. M. Hanley and J. F. Sulli­
van for defehdants, were
carefully weighed, together
wtih numerous citations and
decisions, before Judge Coffey
arrived at, he said, a very
clear decisidh that the grand
jury panel was not in accord­
ance with law..
The defect in the order was
that it provided for the draw­
ing of a grand jury of men
under the old form of statute
Both attorneys for the state
ana the defense ,agreed that
tVmt qfitntp had
that statute naa since
amended by implication ana,
that men and women both
should have been
Judge Coffey pointed out that
the drawing of a grand
in North Dakota is done aC-
cording to statutes, and that
ing if the grand jury were to
be legal. if'0"*
No Jury This Term
The decision came after
arguments on three separate!
days and much study 'by at-
torneys and the court in the
meantime.
As under the law a grand
jury can only be drawn at the
beginning of a te^m of court,
and since Judge Coffey is re­
quired under the law to hold
terms of court in four other
cities in his district in succes­
sion, it is a question as to
Had a grand jury not been
called the cases would have
been for trial at this term of
court.
Attack on Petitions
The matter of the attack
upon the petitions on which
the grand jury was called did
not come up in court, since
the question of_ the petitions
as the basis for a new jury
was
not
rparViprl
as nor
"RUBE" TURNS
OUT TO BE
OH SLICKER
(By the Associated Press)
Fort Madison,1 Iowa, Dec.
Dressed in out of date fashion
young woman stopped into a
TURKS URGE
NEW PLAN ON
DARDANELLES
Ask Guarantees Against Sur­
prise Attacks on Land
Or Sea
ALLIES CONSIDER OFFER
Entente Solidly United
Against Russian Position
On Near East
'Lausanne, Dec. 8.-Turkey pre­
sented to the Near East conference
today counter suggestions concern­
ing control of the straits of the
Dardanelles and the Bosphorus.
The Turks ask:
Guarantees against surprise at­
tacks from land or sea threatening
the security of the straits of Con-
stantino
pi? or of the sea of Mar-
mora.
^ince been
Limitation of naval forces
Blaek geai so that they wlU
not constitut
included.
contrary
a danger to the zone
I extending between _th« two straltf
I to the Black Sea (Turkey expresses
+Viof the view t:
of light
'ST.X
juryjpioy0d for the protection
national commerce.)
+ViQ+ 4-Vin of
war
tnat
lne
it was necessary
statutes be followed in
SO
concerning
whether or when another j«ions!yallowed
grand jury may be called.
The situation also left the(
matter of several pending
cases, in which informations
have been filed up in the air.
These include several liquor
cases, an embezzlement case,
a homicide case and an arson
case. States Attorney Mc­
Curdy asked Judge Coffey
whether the state should pro­
ceed to file informations un­
der the circumstances, but
Judge Coffey replied that was
a matter for the states at­
torney and for the attorney
general's office which first
presented the matters to him
to dispose of after careful
study that it was not the
duty of the court to advise
them what to do.
Attorneys
reacnea.
Ismet Makes
Aw*®1
After hearing Ismet Pasha's ad.
dress the conference took a recess
until afternoon to give the allies
time to Study the Turkish sugges-
tfonfc.
Some of the European delegates
express their opinion that the points
raised by the Turks should not
make a final accord difficult.
The Near East conference today
awaited with interest divulgence of
Turkey's plans for control of the
straits". Ismet Pasha, who has cau-
Russia and
entente is solidly united against the
Russian position and gave Ismet as
the Soviet delegation at the expense I
of cordial relations with the naval
Th" entente plan went far to-
generally expected the Turks would
demand a greater latitude in or­
der that Constantinople might be
be free «nd capable of defense in an
emergency.
break
!WOMAN HELD
c'oa'i
Store here a few days ago and asked Birk
permission to use the telephone. Ap- Offered Gunman $20,000
parently ignorant of how to operate
one, she turned the crank of a pencil! ror JOD
sharpener on a desk and then with
out raising the receive'.-, tried to
talk. Store attaches laughed. Thev! FRAMEUP SAYS WIFE
were convinced she was a "rube.
She then bought dress, giving a j'
check for fifty dollars. Yesterday
the check came back marked "no
funds."
of inter-
the maintenance
interdiction on
shlPs
111 the
oea, ana
liberty of passage for merchantmen
do- jn^time "of peace »nd
war-
The Turkish position on the ques-
who we a historical Ision
,h«
1\0 Jliry inis icrm (declaring Turkey never had acted'
a
to international treaties ®y
that
waterway.
farm.
th®
tente to tell their plans in detail,
has sparred for time for many days
without a frank statement of
Turkey's views.
Ismet Pasha learned that the
United States practically stands
with the entente powers and the I
little entente in opposing the Rus­
sian plan which contemplated ab.
solute control of the straits by
Turkey, barring the waterway to the
warships of all nations except
Turkey.
The visit of Premier Mussolini
here yesterday gave notice that the
..
Russia and Turkey might, therefore I from tax payments.
on the
Attorneys
Hanley and oUlllvan, however, I },uj]d
•who yesterday afternoon said
^(.Continued on Page
Turks do not want t0 be
a
6)
'•DRY' ENFORCEMENT, RELIEF FOR
FARMERS URGED BY HARDING
WOMAN HELD
ON CHARGE OF
MURDER PLOT
Police Clami to Have Strong
Case Against Detroit
Persons
Detroit, Mich., Dec. 8.—Mrs. May
Blenn Ford, solicited the services
of a. gunman to kill her wealthy!
1
husband, Ney J. Ford, offered the
gunman $20,000 for the "job' and
gave him* a photograph of her hus-j
band to make sure the right man
was slain, according to sworn state
ments of four detectives whose in
vestigation resulted in Mrs. Ford's
detention on a charge of attempting
to commit murder today.
Denying the charge Mrs. Ford de
clared she was the victim of a
"frameup" that grew out of her
domestic difficulties. These diffi­
culties include a suit for divorce,
filed last August, in which she
charges cruelty.
Mrs. Ford was arrested last night
when, it is alleged, she was about
to meet Edward Kunath, a detective
lieutenant, for a second conference
on her reported plans for the slay­
ing of her husband. Kunath, it was
said, posed as "a Kansas City gun­
man", Wednesday night when the
alleged plot was first revealed by 1
Mrs. Ford.
The first meeting," according to
the detectives, took place in an
apartment, especially rented for
that purpose. Three detectives
claim to have overheard the conver­
sation in which the woman is said
to have gone over the details with
Kunath.
Several plans for the killing were
presented by Mrs. Ford, the officers
declared. One, they said, was that
he be shot at his farm home west of
Detroit and the others were that he
be shot or slugged while working
about the barns, the body to be
burned in a hay stack. Before de.
Ford shou]d have come int0
of hcr
Isniet Pasha, wno gave dn Thf» rrtnfrrpri/»o with
"M"' ft "Th' till w™
arranged, police said,
early today Patterson police
the body of Miss Evelyn Mabel
Harter wag to hospital in
a dying con(fition
much information ^^urope at- A note evidently wriUen after hf}
titude toward the Dardanelles pues-
hfld ghot flnd ki]led Misg Rainb
tion as he could hope to obtain, wflg foun(J near Hapters bo(Jy
-A®'e®men read: "Good bye, give my watch and
ilany ur is ea ers, ring to David, my son. I am asking
preman mun«»11pd I ^'s forgiveness for the deed which Ii
regime Russia, have counselled !, ,*» ... ...
against too close cooperation with
have
?onf-
me
ICOV. RUSSELL
OF MISSISSIPPI
Alleged Mrs. May Blem Ford age suit filed by Miss Francis C.
TAKES STAND
(By the Associated Press)
Oxford, Miss., Dec. 8.—Testimony
for the- defense in the $100,000 dam-
khead, stenographer, against Gov
ernor Lee M. Russell of Mississippi,
continued before Judge E. R. Holmes
in federal district court here today.
When court' opened there weii
prospects that the^cross examination
of Governor Russell who was in the
chair when court adjourned yester­
day, would be reopened.
Governoi) Russell was called as the
first witness by the defense after
"ng counsel had rested their
Op 150:
case.
GRAIN GRADING
LAW HELD UP
BY INJUNCTION
I
Suit Started by 75 Plaintiffs
To Test Validity of Initi­
ated Law
HEARING D/VTE IS SET
Federal Judge Miller Will
Hear Arguments in Fed
eral Court Dec. 16
Enforcement of the state grata
grading act initiated into law by the
election of November 7th was held
up by issuance of an injunction on
petition of approximately 75 plain­
tiffs, mostly farmers elevators, by
Federal Judge Andrew Miller.
Members of the state railroad
commission, the Attorney-General
and Governor were directed to ap
pars in federal court in St. Paul on
December 16 to show cause, if any,
why an injunction' should not issue
out of federal court.
The plaintiffs alleged that the
grain grading act was unconstitu­
tional, and with the Embden case in
mi
struction of the body, Ford's gold
teeth were to Ibe removed to fore- which the former grain grading act
stall indentification should the plot was held unconstitutional by the
-posges,
United States Supreme Court. The
miscarry, it was said.
The $20,000 was to be paid, the plaintiffs alleged they would suffer
detectives declared, as soon as Mrs. I irreparable injury through enforce-
iment of
husband*' estate. that grain was commodity moving
th°
on'y
t0
heard Mrs. Ford" was
Rain
am the ltn
They maintained
the law. They maintained
ciihiorfc
in interstate Commerce and subject
federal regulation.
The
looking for a gunman." !*he railroad from "in anyway com
The officers added that FoW had plying with the requirements of the
bean warned several days ago
I
m'
heart
to th
mU8i.c st^dio
and drove
™s signed H. Harter.
Miss Rainbow had conducted a
at
wards giving Turkey absolute sove- turning from a concert tour in Eur
reignty over the straits, but it was °Pe
her home since re­
nine
months ago.
CONSIDER TAX? PROVISIONS
(By the Associated Press.)
Washington, De» 8.—Tax provi­
sions of thei administration shipping
The tenacity with which Foreign hill were considered today by the
Minister Tchitcherin has held to senate commerce committee and ex
his demand that Turkey be given perts taxation were call«d in to ex
absolute control of the straits made plain the complicated features under
it seem probable that Russia would which shipping companies would be Decemhor 1 amounted to
approve no other program and that allowed to make certain exemptions, P"or
Dardanelles issue. The The committee continued to make
forced tq I slow progress with the measure and
the aid of'the European powers in gislation would not be presented to island, the census bureau announced
tiavy and are eager to obtain predictions were general that the le
{reconstructing their country. [the senate before next week. today.
restraining order prevents
'aw
against continued residence at his Attorneys bringing the case were
KILLS WOMAN
THEN TRIES
TO END LIFE
David F. Simpson of Minneapolis, of
the firm of Lancaster, Simpson,
Junell and Dorsey, and H. A. Libby
of Grand Forks.
Plaintiffs include: Farmers Grain
Co., of Embden Farmers Elevator
Co., of Wimbeldon Berwick Farm­
er's Grain Co. Grandin Fanners
Grain Co., Hampden Farme.rs Eleva
itor Co. Walhalla Cooperative Ele­
vator Co. Glenfield Cooperative As­
sociation Benedict Cooperative
Farmers Elevator Co. Farmers Elc
vator and Mercantile Co. I. L. Berg
Elevator Co. Kensal Farmers Ele-
(By the Associated Press.) |vator Co. Gwinner Farmers Grain
Patterson, N. J., Dec .8.—Respond- Co..
ing to an anonymous telephone call The law provides for the inspec- J]e
found'tion
-l^ent, grading on the basis of U. S.
bow, a concert singer, on the floor grades, gave the supervisor power Prlsoner whcn
1
in the basement of her husband's f'x margins of profit and in other
home. She had been shot twicel^ays regulate the weighing, grad
through the heart. Nearby lay Harry
an^
Harterj a widower who boarded at licencing of elevators of the state,
the Rainbow home, dangerously I
wounded. He had been shot in the
right temple and under the heart. I
supervisor power
inspection of grain, and
HERRIN MINE
RIOT JURY
IS SECURED
(By the Associate 1 Press.)
Marion, 111., Dec. 8.—Completion of
the jury to try five men charged with
murder in connection with the Her
rin mine riots last June was possi­
ble as Williamson county circuit
court convened today to resume ex­
amination of talesmen,
Eight of the 12 jurors have been
chosen, and three prospective jurors
are being held tentatively by the
defense, which is in the lead in the
questioning of veniremen.
COTTON GINNED.
Washington, Dec. 8.—Cotton ginned
t0
°'ce™J«r
1 a
™,„
9,818,144 runing bales, including 167,-
ba)es counted as ha]f
bales 22,610 bales of American
Egyptian, and 4,945 bales of sea
BISMARCK TRIBUNE
DGE COFFEY HOLDS GRAND JURY ILLEGAL
MANY SUBJECTS
DEALT WITH
IN MESSAGE
President Would Abolish
Labor Board, Co-ordinate
Railroads
WAR EFFECT NOT OVER
America Aiding in Removing
Clouds of War, Declares
President
Washington, Dec. 8.—President
Harding, in his annual message de- I
livefred today to congress in person,
deals with nearly a score of sub
jects, chief among them prohibition,
farm credits, the transportat.on
problem, child labor and immigra
tion.
The executive announces his pur
pose to invite the governors of the
states and territories to an early
conference witli the federal execu­
tive authority with a view to adopt- I
ing definite policies of national and
state ctfbperation in administering I
the prohibition laws. He says the
day is unlikely to come when the
prohibition amendment will be re
pealed and that the nation should
adapt its course accordingly.
President Harding told congress
that if the statutory provisions for
prohibition enforcement are contra­
ry to deliberate public opinion,
which he does not believe, the ri­
gorous and literal enforcement will
concentrate public attention on any
requisite modification.
Saves Humiliation
"Such a course" he adds, "Con­
forms with the law and saves the
humiliation of the government and
the humiliation of our people before
the world and challenges the des­
tructive forces engaged in wide­
spread violation, official corruption
and individual demoralization."
With regard to the transportation
problem, Mr. Harding proposes that
the railroad labor board be abolish­
ed with the substitution of a labor
division in the Interstate Commerce
Commission with power to require
(Continued on Page Three)
IRISH STATE
EXECUTESFOUR
INSURGENTS
Prominent Republicans Killed
As Example to All Con­
spirators
Dublin, Dec. 8.—Rory O'Connor I
and Liam Mellowes, together with
two other Irish rebels were executed
in Mount Joy prison this morning,!
it was officially announced.
The two other men executed wee
named Richard .Barrett, and Joseph
McKelvey, all prominent Republi­
cans.
Roderick (Rory) O'Connor and
Liam Mellowes were leaders of the
band of Irish insurgents that held
oar
of. grain by the state depart, s.
Courts building in Dublin
"gainst,
the Free State
Junc-
El
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1922 (Leased Wire of Associated Press) PRICE FIVE CENTS
^. was taken
the
building was cap-
tured after a three-day siege.
Irish Republicans, say a dispatch
to the Evening Standard from Dub
lin, have issued a manifesto des-j
cribing Timothy Healy, the Gover
nor-'General as a life long enemy of
the nation. The manifesto adds:
"The fight will go fes long as there
is a man in Ireland. It is war to
the death." I
Any official_army representative
state that the four men were exe
cuted as a reprisal for the assassi-1
nation of Sean Hales, the deputy
shot yesterday, and as a solemn
warning to those associated with
them "in the conspiracy of assassi
nation against the representatives of
the Irish people."
•"he prisoners were tried by a
military court martial during the
night, found guilty and sentenced to
death.
The death sentence was carried out
at 9:20 o'clock this morning.
The priests were present. The.
prisoners, blindfolded, were march
ed to the place of execution. O'Con
nor had to be-assisted to the scaf­
fold.
London, Dec. 8.—The Dublin cor
respondent of the Evening Standard!
reports that a party of men today
entered the Mercers hospital and
shot a free state soldier lying in
one of the beds in reprisal for the
executions of Rory O'Connor and
Liam Mellowes.
FIRE AT ASTORIA
-o-
DAUGHERTY
In boyhood, a country youth help­
ing to support a widowed mother.
In manhood, closest friend and
counseler of America's executive and
a keen student of .politics.
Such is t^e story of Attorney^ Gen­
eral Kerry M. Daugherty.
l:i Duugherty's career, politics
have played a prime part. But he
has held only one elective office, as
legislator from an Ohio county in
1889.
In 1888 he unsuccessfully sought
the Republican Congressional nomi­
nation from his Ohio district. In
1899 the Hanna group defeated his
boom for governor. Myron T. Hor
rick defeated him in 100G for the
senatorial nomination in Ohio,
Despite his defeats, Daugherty is
considered the best posted man in
the Harding cabinet on American
politics.
Daugherty was born in Washing­
ton Court House, O., Jan. 20, 18!0.
His father died when he wan four
years old. The boy worked as an
errand boy, as a gardener and 'a
grocery clerk while attending school
and saved money to put himself
through the Univ#rsity of Michigan.
In 1881, Daugherty took up law
and entered politics in Washington
Court House. He attended the legis­
lature froim hei'j and becamo
skilled in district leadership.
Exonerated Af Charges.
The legislative session Daugherty
attended was followed by charges of
bribery in connection with the vote
for John Sherman, candidate for
U.* S. senator. Daugherty's name
was mentioned in connection with
the charges, but he was exonerated
in 1892.
That year Daugherty moved to Co­
lumbus, where he practiced law and
took a prominent part in state poli­
tics. He was a Republican state cen­
tral committee chairman in 1898.
^In 1902 he formed the law firm of
Daugherty, Todd & Rarey, with
which he became associated when he
became attorney general. The firm's
clients included some of the biggest
corporations in America.
But politics largely occupied
Daugherty's attention. He was on
the Taft steering committee at the
1908 Republican national conven­
tion.
An act for which his political op­
ponents berate him is his participa­
tion in getting commutation of the
sentence of Charles W. Morse, con­
victed of false entries in the books
of the Bank of North America.
Harding's Friend.
Twenty years ago Warren G.
Harding came to the Ohio Legisla­
ture from. Marion. Daugherty met
him and a close friendship started.
Daugherty lost no opportunity tc
advance Harding politically.
In 1904 he helped elect Harding
lieutenant governor of Ohio. He also
promoted Harding's senatorial cam­
paign.
In 1920, Daugherty managed Hard
ings presidential campaign. The
Ohio state records show that more
than $18,000 of the $20,000 spent for
Harding's nomination was contribut­
ed by his old friend and adviser,
Harry M. Daugherty.
Seleetion of Daugherty for the
cabinet followed.
Daugherty's wife has long been an
invalid, a fact, it is believed, that
has caused Daugherty repeatedly to
refuse offices which would necessi­
tate their moving from their home in
Columbus.
FIFTH SPEECH
TO END TIGER'S
CAPITAL TOUR
Washington, Dec. 8.—Georges
Clemenceau, war time premier of
France, will conclude his visit to
Washington today with the fifth
"formal" address of his American
tour.
He already has spoken twice here
—at the War College before offi­
cers who commanded troops over­
seas, and before the Southern Socie­
ty, but he regards the address to be
delivered this afternoon before the
International Lyceum and Chautau­
qua Association as the most import­
ant of his Washington appearances.
Invitations to attend have been
extended to government officials
and leaders of congress, as well as
to members of the diplomatic corps.
Clemenceau planned to spend most
of the day in seclusion, marshal­
ing his facts and making last min­
ute preperations for presenting
them. After the address he planned
to return to the home of Henry
White, his Washington host, for a
brief rest before going to his pri_
vate car for the trip to Philadelphia,
his next stop.
PARLIAMENT
ENDS DEC. 15
London, Dec. 8.—The prorogation
of the British parliament will occur
December 15. Prime Minister Bonar
Law, told the house of commons to
day.
-0- -0- -o- -0- -0-
Politics Has Played a Major^Part in the Life of
The U. S. Attorney General
HARRY M. DAUGHERTY
iORRKCO
IN HOT REPLY
TO ARMOURS
r,
Take Exception to State­
ments of J. Ogden
Armour
Chicago, Dec. 8.—An unexpected
turn in the discussed merger of the
two large packing firms, Morris ana
Company and Armour and Company,
became known today when a signed
statement, isued by the former firm
was made public. It was over the
signatures of Nelson Morris, chair­
man of the board of directors, and
Edward Morris, president of the
company.
The statement said that J. Ogden
Armour of Armour and Company, in
visits to Washington and confer­
ences with officials of the govern­
ment on the proposed merger has
not taken officials of Morris and
Company into his confidence. At
least part of Morris and Company's
officials knowledge of his actions, as
indicated by the statement, was ob­
tained from newspaper reports.
The Morris and Company state­
ment read:
''We note by Thursday morning's
pa pen. that Mr. Armour has advised
President Harding we are anxious to
be out of the packing business.
"This is»news to us.
"While we realized that Mr. Ar­
mour is very anxious to acquire our
business and organization up to the
present time we have not put any
price on sameand he has^not made
us an offer.
"Even' if Mr. Armour should pur­
chase our business it would not
mean that we wpuld long remain
out of the packing business."
It was said in some quarters
following the issuance of the state­
ment, that it indicated, although
the Morris and Company holdings
might be acquired by Armour and
Company, the former firm would
not fotVake the packing business fo*
any length of time. This, the
observers pointed out, might cul­
minate in a packers war.
Air Squadron
To Go in Search
Of Lost Aviator
El Paso, Tex., Dec. $.—The twelfth
observation squadron at Fort Bliss
with six airplanes and nine pilots, is
in readiness to search for Colonel
Marshall and Lieutenant Webber, re­
ported lost on their way to Tuc, on
from San Diego.
The squadron is waiting radio or­
ders to go to hunt the missing plane
rom eighth corps area headquarters
at San Antonio, expected, the officer
said, momentarily.
ADVANCES DATE
Chicago, Dcc. 8.—President Ban
Johnson of the American League, to­
day advanced the date of the Ameri­
can League club owners annual meet­
ing in Chicago to Tuesday, Decem­
ber 12, to enable the club owners to
atend the joint meeting of the major
leagues called by Commissioner Lan
dis for December 14 in New York
City, according to a long distance
telephone emssage from Mr. Johnson
in Excelsior Springs, Mo., today.
LAST EDITION
WIPES OUT
MAIN SECTION
LIVES LOST
Business District of Oregon
City Laid in Ruins by
Conflagration
16 BLOCKS BURNED
Various Reports Issued as to
Number of Dead and
Missing
Astoria, Ore., Dcc. 8.—The busi­
ness district of Astoria was laid in
ruins by a fire which broke out
shortly after 2 a. m., and despite ef­
forts of the local fire department
and reinforcements from Portland,
swept 16 blocks, causing a loss es­
timated at between $10,000,000 and
$15,000,000.
At 8 o'clock the fire had swept
over twenty-sevdn blocks. The
flames had eateii under the pave­
ment on Commercial Street, burn­
ing the. piling on which the city had
been built, and firemen were unable
to cope with this developement.
Patients were removed from St.
Mary's Hospital, all the windows of
which were shattered by explosions
of dynamite or gasoline tanks. The
Astoria Astorian, occupying a new
building on Commercial Street, dis­
tance from th^ devastated area, be­
gan moving out at 8 o'clock. The
Astorian's building is of concrete
but sparks were threatening the
roof.
One life was lost in the fire, ac­
cording to reports available at 8
o'clock. Morris Staples, automobile
dealer, and president of the Astoria
Bank of Commerce, dropped dead.
Two other business men who were
missing and believed dead later
were accounted for.
One man was reported dead and
another missing.
According to reports form the
fire swept area early today, Morrig
Staples, president of the Bank of
Commerce, had dropped dead. An­
other report said Brennan Van Du
scn, a business man, was missing.
W. H. Fellman, furniture dealer,
who had been reported dead earlier
in the morning, later was found to
be safe.
The entire district from the river,
five blocks sought to Exchange
street and cast and west between
Fourteenth and Tenth Streets, had
been wiped out at 7:30 o'clock, and
the flames had extended beyond Ex_
shange Street at that hour. Most of
the city's business houses arc in
that district.
The men reported to have lost
their lives were Morris Staples,
president of the Bank of Commerce
and W. H. felton, owner of the
largest furniture store in town.
The buildings destroyed included
the leading hotel, the principal
stores and all the banks.
The fire at 10 o'clock had swept
the entire district between Astor
Street, at the river front, south to
Exchange Street, and north and
south between Eighth and Sixteenth
Streets. Between Eleventh and
Twelfth, it had pentrated as far as
Franklin Street, at 10:15 o'clock the
fire crossed Sixteenth Street at
Commercial Street.
QUARREL ENDS
IN MURDER
International Falls, Minn., Dec. 8.
—One man was shot and killed, an
other was probably mortally wound
ed, and a man who gave his name
as James Conroy is held at the coun­
ty jail here, as the result of a
shooting affray at Ranier, four miles
I east of here, at 7 o'clock this morn
ing.
Pat Finnegan, a lumber jack, was
the man killed, while Jim Lessard,
an employe in his brother's soft
drink establishment where the shoot
ing took place, lies in a critical con­
dition at a hospital here. He was
wounded twice in the lungs.
Conroy, who arrived in Ranier
about midnight last night on a train
coming from Duluth, entered the
Le(-,sard soft drink parlor about 7
o'clock this morning, flourishing a
gun. Finnegan, Lessard and two
others were in the place at the time.
"What are you doing with that
gun?" Finnegan asked Conroy.
"Probably you want some of it,"
Conroy replied.
Finnegan according to the wit­
ness in the establishment, grabbed
for Conroy's gun and an altercation
and the subsequent shooting ensued.
New Spanish
Ministry Forme
(By the Associated Press.)
Madrid, Dec. 8.—A new Spanish
ministry was formed today by the
Marquis De Alhucemas as premier,
with Santiago Alba, foreign minist­
er, and Count Romanones minister
of justice.

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