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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, December 09, 1922, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042243/1922-12-09/ed-1/seq-3/

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SIX MILLION
I
&
I
Figures Show Enormous Out­
put of Dairy Industry, in
North Dakota. in Year
UNDER BAD CONDITIONS:
Dairymen in North Dakotawi'ecciv
ed almost' six million dollars for the
butterfat they sold to the creamer­
ies of the state during the year end­
ing June 22, 1!)22. These figures arc
from the tabulations of the State
Dairy Department and have been
worked out under the direction of
Robert Flint," State Dairy Commit
sioner. The exact amount the dai/v
mnn received, according to Mr.
Flint, was $5,93-1,543.00. It will be
observed that- this is the amount re­
ceived in the short feed year of 1921
and ending at ,a date that allowed
for little of the benefit of the e:
ceptiontil feed for the summer of
1922.
Mr. Flint received two sets of re­
ports upon the creamery business of
the state, and the two tabulations
furnish practically the sam'o fig­
ures, lffe considers the figures to be
'extremely accurate.
In addition to the amount receiv­
ed by the dairymen, the employes at
cream stations, draying companies
and the transportation companies re­
ceived $460,094 making the total cost
of the* creameries, six and a third
imillion dollars.
I The fifty creameries on the state
manufactured from the cream, 21,
359,031 pounds of butter or 1130
!carloads. This is equivalent to 23
Jcarloads of 50 cars each, or accord­
ing to Mr. Flint equal to one train
'almost ten miles long.
jiJEWETT RURAL
CREDITS PLAW
ji IS EBbORSED
^Northwest Wheat Growers
!jj
Go on Record Favoring
i! New National Legislation
jfe
Minneapolis, Minn., Dee. 9.—The
Imecting of the board of trustees of
ithe Northwest Wheat Growers, As
fsociated, representing the states of
jfe
Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Mont
iflana artd North Dakota, in session
'here today, went on record through
ifan adopted resolution, favoring a
^federal rural credits plan presented
4by Geo. C. Jewett, general manager,
fTliis plan will be presented to the
((American Inter-cooperative confer
|ence- to be held in Washington, D.
|C., December 14, 15, and 16, at
'which time recommendations will be
fim'ade to Congress for legislation
,|along thTs line.
8 The plan, as outlined at tlid mcet
i.• 'i-fihg today, provides, agricultural
'iicredits through a new federal'struc
ijture or under the present Federal
'(.Farm Loan Board, including the es­
tablishment of regional banks,
[{capitalized by the federal govern
ifmcnt. These banks would re-dis.,
jcount agricultural- paper' for c.oun-
Ijtry banks, with a maturity of nine
months, and would loan directly to
approved livestock associations with
a three year limit.
This plan would also enable co­
operative marketing associations tti
jlget credits on approved collateral
{directly through government sourc
ftes, independent of. the present bank
Tiing system, if necessary.
Ii Following the temporary adjourn
ilment of the meeting of the board of
jptrustees of the Northwest" Wheat
^Growers association a national con.,
r.jfcrence or representatives from all
i-.of the growing states of the
i[countrywheatheld
in
fi
j!
was with a view of es­
tablishing a national organization,
'and a central selling agency.
[RAIL WORKERS FOR
ONE BIG UNION
(By the Associated Press)
Chicago, Dec. 9.—Nearly 500 dele
\|gi'tes claiming to represent between
|(6,000 and 7.000 railroad union local*
I
Jin tile 16 standard organizations of
:*rail road employes were gathered
f* f'jhere for a conferencc today and tu
j:!iiiorrow for the announced purpose
:|of starting a national movement
ii with ultimate object of effecting an
amalgamation of the sixteen unions
[into one body.
i7' The report of Otto Wangerin, scj
rctary-treasurer of the national ^om
mittee having the formulation of
'plans fo'- amalgapintion in hand, was
to be delivered this afternoon. Not
before Sunday in the amalgamation
program as worked out by the -com­
mittee expected to be presented to
the conference.
With such an amalgamation, Mr
Wangerin said, conditions like those
during the recent shopmen's strike,
where nine crafts voted to stay at
work and seven strike, will not bo
possible.
The plan was formed by the Min­
nesota railroad shop crafts legisla­
tive committee which has been act­
ing as "a national committee since
September to push its amalgamation
program.
To Submit Briefs
On Drainage Project
(Py the Associated Press)
Thief River Falls, Minn., Dec. 9.—
,j Instructing opposing counsel to sub­
mit briefs covering the case, the
drainage and flood control hearing
be fort Judge C. W. Stanton of Be­
lli
idji. Minn., and Andrew Grin de
land of Warren was adjoitwied late
li st night.
The proceedings involve improving
the Red Lake river channel and the
r-
building of a dam at the outlet of
lied Jjjike on the lied Lt&ke Indian
reservation, under plans submitteij
by the Red Lake Drainage and Con
servation district.
Considerable opposition was voiced
by "farmers on account of assess
merits, especially in view of the
present agricultural depression. Aj
decision on the project which has,
been before the public 'for nearly
thirty ypars, is expected from th*i
judges soon.
St Georges Episcopal Church
10 a. ni. Sunday School.
11 a. m. sermon and Holy Co^i^
munion.
Archdeacon Martyr will have
charge ofsjpoth services.'
German Baptist Church
Corner 8th and Rosser Streets.
G. Sproek, Pastor.
Morning service 10:30.
Sunday school 11:30.
Young People's Meeting 7°:15.
Evening services 8:00 p. m.
All services conducted in German.
J. B. HAI'PEL, Pastor.
J. B. ALSBURY, A$jt. Pastor.
First Baptist Church
Ctcrner 4th St. alid Av. B.
L. R. Johnson, Pastor.
10:36, morning worship andf ser­
mon by the pastor, topic, "The
Cost of Being on the Right Side.
12:00, Sunday School, Mrs.
Evarts, Superintendent. Classes
for all. Care will he taken ot
small children in the primary
rooms so that mothers desiring tcr
attend the services may do so.
G:30, Senior and Intermediate
B. Y. P. U.
7:30, evening worship and ser­
mon, topic, "GodJs Severe Means
of Making Man Over."
8:00, Wednesday. mid-week
meeting for-prayer and conference
for the adult division of the
church and congregation. The
Babe and Baby-
Back on the farm in Sudbury,
Mass., ]5abe Rulh is working like
a Trojan to get into condition in
order to regain his btrtting crown
bext season. Here is Babe giving
little Dorothy Kuth a ride in a
wheelbarrow.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9,1922 THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE
I
Zion ^Lutheran Church
Avenue near Seventh Street.
10:30 a. m. German service, second
Advent sermon.
8:00 p. m. Last of the scries of
sermons on ]Paul: "Facing the Lno.
Friday evening, Bible Class.
Saturday morning,, Religious in­
struction for children.
VICTOR BARTLING, Pastor.
South Side Mission & Charity
Society
Regular services every Sunday at
10:30 a. m. in German.
"And at 3-o'clock p. m.Jn. English.
Sunday school from 2^to 3 in both
languages.
The Charity Society needs espe­
cially the help in clothing, shoes and
bed things. May the kind fnenas
look around and send it to the Mis­
sion, Sweet and 16th Street South,
or call phone 557.
Courageous Hello Girls Receive Medals
young- people's division will meet
Wednesday, Dec. 20.
Mr. Fred Hanson will sing at
the morning service and Mr. Grif­
fin and Mrs. Hughes in the even­
ing. There will be special selec­
tion by the Young people's chorus
in the evening:
Evangelical, Church
Church, Corner Seventh and Ross­
er Sts., Rev. C. F. Strutz, pastor.
German sermon from 9:45 to 10:45
a. m. All other services are con­
ducted in the English languages.
Sunday school^ at 10:45 a. m. In-(
teresting teachers and faithful teach­
ing. Immediately after Sunday school
there will be a brief Gospel message
by the pastor.
Evangelical League of C. E. Mr.'
Geo. Cordon, leader, 6:45 p. m.
Evangelistic sermon at 7:30 p. m.
by the pastor.
Special music. A cordial invitation
by all.
1
Do not fail to attend the prayer
service Tuesday evening at 7:30. Let
there be a full attendance.
TRINITY ENGLISH LUTHERAN
CHURCH.
Cor. Ave. and 7th St.
Services Sunday morning and even­
ing. Tile Lord's Supper celebrated
at morning service. Morning topic:
Judgment Day. Evening: God and
t.he Heathens. Sunday school and
confirmation class right after morn­
ing service.
The Young Ladies' society meets
Monday evening with Mr. Kaulfuss,
820 Fifth St.
The Ladies Aid holds a parcel sale
Wednesday evening in the church
basement. Refreshments served.
The annual bus/ness meeting of
church will also be held Wednesday
evening. Members, active and pros
poctive, pleacc meet promptly at 7
o'clock. I. Monson, jiastor.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank our many
friends for their kindness and cour­
tesies extended to us' in the loss of
our husband and father, and for
their many beautiful floral offer­
ings, alsp the Knights of Columbus
for their attentive services and beau­
tiful floral offering, and the Mod­
ern Woodman of America for their
beautiful floial offering.
MRS. J. D. McDONALD,
DR. J. A. McDONALD AND
FAMILY OF CANDO.
DAN McDONALD AND FAM­
ILY.
IDENTIFY ONHOY
(By the Associated Press)
International Falls, Minn., Dec.
9.—Albert Jttssard, brother of
James Le.ssJW, who \yas*-shot and
perhaps mortally wounded a few
moments alter J'at Finnegan, 35
years old, had been shot and kill­
ed by James Conroy, %vho entered
the Lessard soft drink place at
Rainer early yesterday, identified
Conroy, alias "McDonald" as the
man who did the shooting at the
county jail today.
James Lessard is at a local hos­
pital, where physicians this morn­
ing held cut little hope for his re­
covery. He also identified Conroy
at the hospital as the man who
shot him.
To
our ounces
—an Honest quarter pound of
BAKER'S
Caracas Sweet
Chocolate
Pure
e««
Wholesome
Delicious
Made from c: £rcdo
Caracas cocoa, pure? enne
sugar and flr.vr:-ed v.'ll'.i
Mexican van:.I.1. l,r:.ns.
MADE ONLY
Walter Baker & Co,
vfor
These six telephone employes have just received silver medals and cash awards of $250 each from the Theodore N. Vail Memorial Fund for their heroism in the course of duty.'
They won their awards as follows: (left to right) Verda Ray Townldy, Freeport, Tex., stuck to her post, alone, after a tropical hurricane and flood, had driven the other girls away Etta'
Willcox,
operator
by
bctndale, Pa., fought 'a fire in the central office.
At the county "jail whore he. was
plaic-d following his capture by
Sheriff Hugh Reidy in the woods
shortly after the shooting, Conroy
refused to talk. An I. W. W. card,
besides a cnosiderable amount of
cash, was found on him when he
was searched by authorities.
After the shooting Conroy who
was said to have been drinking,
robbed the cash drawer and fled.
RIYER CLOSED
WITH 21 BELOW
Coldest Weather of Year Is
Reported in Bismarck
The coldest weather of the year
in North Dakota brought 21 below
temperature to Bismarck and closed,
the Missouri river. Although the
weather has hovered around zero
for several days the river was nqt
closed until last night, official
weather bureiki reports said.
Christmas
The Time of
Gifts.
Bonham
it!
Brothers
Gifts that
Please. fi
IE1 War Stamps f,g
& accepted for
jra
Gifts that
Gifts that
Last
NOW
THIS
Lid.
Established 1733
DORCHESTER, MASS.
Lozld-l C'niic' R:cip:: scr.i c:
I
I
beautiful Chippendale Con­
sole seems a particularly fitting
cabinet for the New Edison, which
so delightfully Re-Creates the'
music of famous artists.
The French Gothic grille of this
model, its long posts, and artistic
lines lend a dignity which harmon­
izes with any other type of furni­
ture—you may add the Chippen­
Heroism in Line of Duty
V-
The lowest last night was 21 be­
low. At 7 a. m. it. was 20 below-. At
noon it was 5 below. With virtually
no wind the cold was noticed very
little.
A number of spots Were colder
than Bismarck. Edmonton reported
2(i below, Prince Albert 24 below,
Williston 24 below. Swift Curivnt
21 below, Winnipeg 18 below, and
Moorhead, Minnesota, 14 below.
The forecast was«for fair weather
Sunday, not quite so cold.
Te Average closing date of the
river is Nov. 19. In 1917 it closed
December 7, in 1919 on Oct. 27, in
1920 on Dec. 16, in 1921 on Nov. 19.
14 BELOW AT FARGO
Fargo, N. D., Dec. 9.—Balmy
autumn breezes of 14 degrees below
zero played about Far^B and Moor-
SAY IT WITH
KLEIN'S TOGGERY
Adds Style,
Grace,
Carriage
To Any Man
Improves his figure and appearance too. We refer to
a top poat made by us to any man's measure and order.
Not the ordinary production. Don't imagine its easier
to buy a good fitting ready to buy coat than a suit—
it isn't.
ECONOMY PRICES HERE.
The NEW EDISON
Chippendale Console
lunini
$295
COWAN'S DRUG STORE
HAT
dale Cdnsole to any room and be
certain of its tasteful suitability.
Music-lovers will be delighted with
the tone quality achieved by the
perfect mechanism of the New
Edison, the result of Mr. Edison's
$3,000,000 laboratory experiments.
This is your ideal phonograph
may we demonstrate its musical
value at your convenience?
I head, Minn., last /light while other observer at Moorhead, by such sub-
I North Dakota towns were prevaded zero temperatures as: Williston, 24
accord,ing to R. S. Spencer, U. S. Bismarck, 21 and Devils Lake, 20*-
1922 Christmas 1922
Why Buy Unuseful Presents When You Can Buy
So Many Useful Ones.
Shirts $1.50 to $ 7.50
Ties 50 to 2.00
Sox .25 to" 1.25
Sweaters 5.00 to 9.00
Bath robes 5.00 to 16.50
Auto robes 10.C0 to 16.50
Emblem Blankets (Elks or Shrine) 13.50
Underwear (Mipsing) 2.00 to 10.00
Boys' suits (knee pants) 8.50 to 16.50
Shoes (Crossett) ..... 5.00 to 12.00
Bedroom slippers 1.50 to 2.75
We have the real useful ones.
The Boston
Best & Huyck
Bismarck, N, D.
Papers
If you read your insurance policies carefully
you will ndte a clause which states that the
policy does not cover negotiable papers.
This means, therefore, that stocks, bonds,
notes or similar papers are unprotected
while kept around the house.
A Safe Deposit Box at this bspik costs less
than a cent a day and gives the necessary
protection.
Bismarck Bank
Bismarck, N. D.
CAPITOL
WIIMHIIIIIfllMBfWIIIBfflSIIHIHilllllHIIIHIWIIlliBliMlltHH
PAGE THREE
"liaiii
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
LAST TIMES
TONIGHT
FRANKIE LEE
—in—
"THE CALL FROM THE WILD"
Also Harold Lloyd Comedy
—and—
Urban Classic.
Coming Wednesday
"FRENCH HEELS
—with—
IRENE CASTLE.
&Uinge
"BURNING SANDS"
with MILTON SILLS and WANDA HAWLEY
and
BUSTER KEATON
*in a new comedy
"THE FROZEN NORTH"
Pathe News
3londay
LIONEL BARRtMORE and SEENA OWEN in
"THE FACE IN THE FOG"
Coming
BETTY COMPSON and BERT LYTELL in
"TO HAVE AND TO HOLD"
SATURDAY
TONIGHT
SATURDAY

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