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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, February 15, 1923, Image 1

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WEATHER FORECAST.
Fair ami continued cold tonight
and probably Friday.
ESTABLISHED 1873
13 LOSE LIVES IN STORM AREA
JAMESTOWN WOMAN DIES IN BLIZZARD
EXHAUSTED
SHE IS LEFT
IN SNOWBANK
Husband Digs Her Into Cave
of Snow When She Can
Travel no Longer
DIES WHILE HE WORKS
Husband Seeks Help to Find
Hody but Cannot Locate
Spot
Jamestown, N. D., Feb. 15.
—Searchers are still unable
to discover the body of Mrs.
Jules Hagenson, a young
mother of the Spiritwood
vicinity who died during the
blizzard Tuesday when she
was left in a snow bank.
Mr. and Mrs. Hagenson
had been to a dance at the
home of her parents, W. Lor
enz, eight miles north of
Spiritwood Monday night.
They reached the Hanson
farm one and a half miles
from there early Tuesday
morning and later attempted
to make the distance to their
own farm. About 4a- m. the
horses became exhausted and
they started to walk, but Mrs.
Hagenson became exhausted
despite her husband’s assist
ance. Her husband tried to
protect her by digging in and
banking the snow about 'her,
but she died while he labored.
He covered her with blank
ets and snow and finally
reached the Walter Bowman
farm but, was unable to tell
where he had left her for
some time. He was badly
frozen and was unable to tell
of the tragedy.
Mrs. Hagenson is the moth
er of three children, the
youngest being three months
old.
COMMITTEE
NAMEDUPON
CITY BAND
| Association of Commerce In-
A ' vestigates Proposition
Through Committee
At the meeting of tho board of
director of the Association of Com
merce last evening reports from the
corn show committee and the regis
tration bureau were heard and vari
ous other important subjects cams
under consideration.
A committee of three composed ol
Spencer Boise, Bert Dunn, and Fred
Peterson 'was appointed to discus
sion the feasibility of the organiza
tion of a juvenile band in Bismairck.
The committee will recommend a
plan to the board of directors at
their next meeting. They were also
asked to ascertain the expense of
maintaining a leader for a year or
more.
The plan would be for the mem
bers of the band to give free con
certs during the spring and summer
months and make expenses by giv
ing paid concerts at the auditorium
during the winter season. <
A committee of three were appoint
ed to investigate the selection of an
auto-camp and report to the direc
tors at their next meeting. Mem
bers of the committee included S. W.
Corwin, R. B. Lobach and Al. Rosen.
The balance of the committed’s work
is to anticipate the summer tourists
season.
The aim is to obtain a location
wherp there can be police Control,
sanitation, good location in connec
tions with the business district cf
the city, and a pleasant safe lo
cation.
While no definite action was taken
on. the agricultural exhibit, the'sub
ject will be taken up for discussion
nt the next meting. . It is expected
that an exhibit will be- assembled
and placed on display at some f.dran
tageous point.
A total of about twenty subjects
were scheduled for discussion at tK.
directors meeting last night.
POS+PONE CONVENTION
Owing to the recent storm the
North Dakota Dairymen’s convention
scheduled for Fargo on Feb. 14-16
has been postponed qntil March 7.
THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE
*
| GIRL ASK $200,000 FROM CULT HEAD IN SUIT
MB lipl; M
flflß /
\ -'- - BBHBKmKf
\ :
V. •. : <^v^ : ; ' f '-^R;
Mrs. Gladys Bamford Kubel, 19, nell, 01, (‘below), founder, high priest; Purnell caused them to be brought'
(left) and Mrs. Hath Banaford Reed and “king" of the Israelite House of to bis borne at a tender age to be
(right), sisters, of Detroit, Midi., David, religious cult at Benton Bar- j» itiat ed into love rites. The affi
have started suit for $200,000 dam- bor, Midi. Affidavits introduced in- forced both \ved 1 they i
ages against Benjamin Franklin Pur- to court by the girls’ counsel allege did not know.
ALLEGED INSULT TO GOVERNOR,
DEMAND FOR RETRACTION, MARK
EXCITING SESSION OF THE HOUSE
Remark of Rep- Maddock
Made During Debate on
Mill and Elevator Measure
Followed by Demand for
Retraction House in Tie
Vote on the Demand for
This Action Nopartisans
Oppose Changes in Bank
of North Dakota or Mill
and Elevator Laws.
An alleged . disrespectful remaik
concerning Governor Nestos, a de
mand that Representative Walter
Maddock, Mountraill county, apolo
gize for it, and debate oVer meas
ures affecting the state mill and
elevator at Grand Forks were high
lights in an exciting session of the
house of representatives today. It
was not recorded and the exact word
ing was not given differently.
The remark of Mr. Maddock wao
to the effect that the proposed mill
and elevator measure was not neces
sary and, as heard by those demand
ing retraction, was that he
not support any measure to aid the
Chamber of Commerce or - other
forces behind King Rangvald The
First.
As explained by Mr. Maddock the
remarks contained no reference to
the Chamber of Commerce.
Rep, Twichell demanded Mr. Mad
dock retract.
Mr. Maddock said if he had done
any injustice to the Governor or in
jured anyone’s feelings he was sor
ry, but that the remarks were not
such that he felt an apology was
necessary and wanted the house to
decide.
The vote was 54 to 54, with five
absent, the apology not being de
manded by the house.
During the discussion Rep. Deli
Patterson was declared out of order
by. Speaker Johnson and when he
did not immediately sit down the
Speaker ordered the sergeant-at
arms to accomplish this. Rep. Pat
terson sat down before any such
action was taken.
Bill* Passed t
The Nonpartisans, with one or two
exceptions, opposed the Freeman
billqi fl. B. 243 and 254, intended to
permit the Industrial Commission to
issue bonds up to $1,000,000 on wheat
and flour to provide a revolving fund
for the mill and elevator.
Independents said the measure
was necessary to finance the mill
and accused Nonpartisans of trying
to prevent this. Leaguers declared
there was ample law, and feared u
change might weaken present laws.
Both bills were passed by a narrow
vot^.
Block Bank Changes
Nonpartisans in the House of Re
presentatives blocked proposed
changes in the Bank of North Da
kota law, designed, it was asserted
by Rep. Carr, the author, to correct
(Continued on page 3.)
'RAILROADS
PLOW WAY
: OUT OF SNOW
Transportation Over North
west Assuming Normal Af
ter 24 Hours Tie-up
Rt. Paul, Feb. 15. —Further relief
from transportation difficulties re
sulting after tho blizzard was ex
pected in the northwest today. Rail
roads were preparing to resume in
terrupted main line trains to points
west on branches. Coast trains ori
Paciifc and Chicago and Milwaukee
started out last night, the first in
twenty-four hours.
Heavy winds which swept Minne
sota and North Dakota had died
down today and railroad snow plows
could clear the lines.
The Great Northern plaiined to
send out first coast train in more
than twenty-four hours. /
Temperatures ranged 20 degrees
below.
Three trains from the East reach
ed in Filrgo today, and a number of
others reported on time. Train con
ditions are becoming normal.
STONE SHOW
WILL APPEAR
HEREPROMPTLY
Cancels Fargo Date in Order
to Appear in Bismarck
Tonight
“Tip Top,” the Fred Stone show,
will show at the Auditorium in Bis
iflarck tonight.
Definite word that the special
train carrying the trouDe and scen
ery . would arrive in Bismarck in
time was received early this morn
ing by Manager Vesperman of the
Auditorium. The special train of five
cars was at Jamestown at 9 a. m.,
and was to make a leisurely trip to
Bismarck, arriving early this after
noon. The curtain is scheduled for
8:10 p. m.
In order to make Bismarck, the
show passed up its Fargo date of last
night, the capacity of the Auditori
um here being much larger than the
theater in which it was to show in
Fargo. Every seat in the Auditorium
here was sold within three hours
after the seat sale opened.
The show is coming direct here
from Duluth. \
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1923
WOULD PERMIT j
PHYSICIANS TO 1
GIVE LIQUOR
Senate Amends “Air-Tight”
Prohibition Bill and
Passes It
24 BILLS PASSED
Senate Puts on Its Working
Clothes After Enforced
Holiday
Physicians of North Dakota will
not be restricted to the use of alco
hol when their professional duties
call for the administration of a stim
ulant but may use any intoxicating
liquor they see fit to under an
amendment to House Kill 50, the new
airtight state prohibition bill, which
was passed by the senate yesterday
afternoon. The bill will go back to
the house on the question of con
curring in the senate amendment.
The amendment permitting the use
of otherHiquor than straight alcohol
was proposed by Senator Porter of
Cavalier county, himself a physician.
It was opposed by Senator Miklethun
of Griggs county, chairman of the,
committee on temperance, and spon
sor of the bill as fat as the upper
house is concerned.
Senator Miklethun declared that
the amendment was a backward step
in the way of law enforcement and
that liquor could longer be re
garded as a medicine,
“Straight alcohol cannot be given
in many cases,” answered Senator
Porter, “but*.l know of many cases,
including children, when the use of
brandy or wine may save a life. I
say if a child is sick for God’s
let us save its life. As far as the
doctors are concerned I can assuie
the senator that if they want to get
drunk they can get much drunker
on the same amount of alcohol than
they can on whiskey or brandy.”
Vote One-sided
Senators Hamilton and Peck, both
Nonpartisans, made strong pleas for
the passage of Senator Porter's
amendment, and Senator Miklethun
was almost alone in his opposition
on a non-record vote. !
Another amendment proposed by
Senator Miiklethun which would have
reduced the amount of liquor which
could be purchased by a physician
in the course of a ( year from five
gallons to six' quarts was voted
down, and the bill was' then passed,
the. vote standing 42 to 4. t
There was a near clash in the sen
ate during the afternoon between
Senators Ployhar and Baker over the
former’s bill to appropriate SIOO to
pay mileage and per diem to several
Valley City residents who were call
ed as witnesses before the senate
investigating committee during the
1921 session. .
“I’ll say they were worth the
money,” declared Senator Baker.
“They showed one of your witnesses
up as a liar and made him admit it.”
(Continued on Page Three)
PERIL TO BIG
BRITISH LINER
. IS INDICATED
S. O. S. Caught Front Steam
ship Ciurcan Prince in
North Pacific
STEAMER IS BURNED
All Members of Crew Taken
From Nika Which Is
Destroyed
Seattle, Wash., Feb. 15. — Peril to
tin* British steamship Guscnn Prince
somewhere in the North Pacific was
indicated at 4 o’clock this morning
when the utdio station caught an
“S. O. S. t Guscan Prince ashore. Po
sition bad.” At this point the wire
less broke off as if destroyed.
HOME PORT NEW FOUNDLANI)
San Francisco, Calif., Feb. 15.
The Guscan Prince, a freighter o"
5.275 tons owned by the French line
limited from San Francisco to
Seattle last Sunday. Her home port
i New Foundland.
GOES ON ROCKS
San Francisco, Feb. 15. The steam
ship Santa Rita which was searching
for the Mika steamer off the Wash
ington coast has gone on the rocks
at the entrance to Puget Sound, ac
cording to message received at 4
a. m. At 5:25 another message was
received saying that the Santa Rita
had appeared.
RESCUES PASSENGERS
Seattle, Wush.,i Feh. 15. - The const
wgise cutter Snowhomish has taken
all members of the crew from the
steamer Mika which was burned :;l
the water edge. This information
was continued in a message from tins
-commander of Snowhomjsh at 8:1
( a. m. No details were given as to p->-
I sition of ship.
TOTAL LOSS
Seattle, Wash. Feb. 15. —The
steamer Prince .which went ashore a
few miles south of Cape Flattery
early today is undoubtedly a total
loss, Harold Burchard, representa
tive here for the Furness-Whitey
Co., agents for the Prince line lim
ited of London owners said today.
The Prince was commanded by
J. Childers and had a crew of 12
men.
TWO BURNED TO DEATH
Redvers, Sask., Feb. 15--Mrs. Wil
liam Ellis, a widow, her son, D’Arcy,
ape 7 years, and daughter, Stella,
ape 5 years, were burned to death
' iien) a fire burned their home near
Tilsen, it became known here today
I I
STEAMER SINKING
New York, Feb. 15.-—The Italian
ship Monceisio sailing from Norfolk,
Va., was sinking today about 510
miles east of Cape Henry, Va., ac
cording to wireless reports picked
up here.
REPORTED ON FIRE
Seattle, Wash., Feb. 15. —The
steamer Kewanee, reported by wirz
less that a ship supposed to be the
Mika was reported to be on fire.
MILL READY
TO TURN OUT
STATE FLOUR
Industrial Commission Held
' Up at Grand Forks May
/ Leave Today
! Grand Forks, Feb. 15.— -The North
| Dakota Industrial commission has
i'fjnished the work of checking the
| contractors in their work on the
| North Dakota mill and elevator and
! as soon as train schedules are re
■ sumed will leave the city for Bis
| marck, where their work with the
; legislature will be continued. They
expected to leave today.
In a statement Lewis F. Crawforn,
secretary of the commission, said
that the flour produced at the milf
is of the highest grade of wheat
is desirable for making the
highest grade of flour. The mill has
excellent testing equipment. It was
said that the Drake mill also has ex
cellent testing equipment.
There'is yet some work in getting
the mill properly organized. The
plant is about reidy v to operate at
full capacity, said Mr. Crakrford, but
first he said that a market must tie
be founded for the product.
MAY POSTPONE CONVENTION
Grand Forks, Feb. 15.—An exe
cutive session of the North Dako
ta hardware men’s association was
hejd here this morning to decide if
the convention will 4>e held. The
action of the executive committee
depends upon the train service, C.
N. Barnes, secretary of the asso
ciation said.
FRENCH DISARM 10,000 POLICE
GUARD IN RUHR DISTRICT TO
•AVOID CLASH WITH TROOPS
Brussels, . Feb. 15. —Ten thousand German Security
policemen throughout the occupied portion of the Ruhr were
disarmed by order of Gen. Degoutte.
It was explained at French headquarters that this action
was advisable because of the general attitude taken by the
police toward the forces of occupation.
Hereafter the police are to be considered by the French
as the protectors of the Ruhr community without any con
nection with Berlin.
MEET IN CONFERENCE
London, Feb. 15.—British and French cabinet, ministers
met here today in conference which if it fails to get British
cooperation with the French and Belgians in solving the
Ruhr transportation problem may result in an early with
drawal of the British from the Cologne area.
The British ministers at the meeting were Prime Minister
Bonar Law, Lord Curson, secretary of foreign affairs, and
the Earl of Derby, secretary of war.
The French cabinet, was represented by M. Le Togquer,
the minister of public works.
PLACE ISLANDS
UNDER COAST
WISE LAWS
Washington, Fob. l. r >, Sherman
Lasker has announced that the ship
ping boutfd had decided to recom
mend to (President Harding to put
the Philippines under the American
coastwise law.
STATE LICENSE
DEPARTMENT
WILL REMAIN
House of Representatives
Refuses to Turn Funds
Back to Cities
HIT BARN DANCES
Discussed by Solons Bank
Interest Rate Bill Is
Killed by House
House bill No. 181, which provided
for abolition of the state pool hull
inspection department as at present
constituted and prescribed license
fees for pool halls, motion picture
theaters and other establishments
which local sub-divisions would col
lect and retain, was killed in the
house of representatives this after
noon hy n narrow margin.
After the house stood 54 to 54 on
a motion to indifinitely postpone, a
call of the house was ordered, Rer.
Elmer changed his vote, and a mo
tion to adopt the majority committee
report favoring the bill failed, 53 to
54. The house then indefinitely post
poned the bill, 54 to 47, and the
“clincher” was applied.
During a long session which tho
house devoted entirely to committee
reports and general orders, the
house killed H. B. 185, requiring
commission merchants buying grain
to be licensed and bonded by the
failroad commission; killed H. B. 155
making similar requirements for po
tato buyers; killed senate bill No. 71
reducing the legal contract rate of
interest from 10 to 9 per cent and
killed H. B. 292 creating an educa
tional commission to prescribe a uni
form course of study for schools, and
H. B. 22 creating the title of dental
hygienist and providing for exam
ination and certification.
In killing H. B. 181 the house, ex
cluding the absentees, in effect do
dared itself in favor of H. B. 20C,
to come up later, which re-enacts
and amend the state pool hall inspec
tiop law, and pr/.'ides for numerous
state inspectors.
Hit Bowery Dances.
H. B. 181 had ben amended to pro
vid that persons running dance hallo,
(Continued on Page Three)
REDISTRICTING IS PROPOSED IN
NEW BILL PRESENTED TO HOUSE
A bill changing several legislativz
districts, but leaving the total num
bers of the legislature the same, was
presented to the house by Rep.
Quade, Stutsman county, and refe
red to the delayed bills committee
which wilf decide whether or not
the bill snail be permitted to be in
troduced and acted upon.
The bill proposes tb make one dis
trict of Sheridan and Kidder coun
ties, Sheridan now being a district
in itself and Kidder being linked
with Emmons county.
It would make a single district of
Emmons county, split Stutsman coun
ty intjj two districts, provide Mc-
Henry county should be onte district
| TWO MILLION
! FIRE LOSS IN
: OMAHA PLANT
Armour Plant Suffers Heavy
Damage in Fire Still
Raging
DEFECTIVE MOTOR CAUSE
Many Firemen Injured and
Overcome by Amonia
Fumes
Omaha, Neb., Feb. 15. A fire that
was still raging early this morning
and described as one of the most de
struetive ever had in the packing in
dustry last night destroyed the nine
story bnildnig, 17, 18 and 19 of Ar
mour and Company’s plant in South
Omaha. ,
It had up to early today caused
losses of anti had thrown
moe than 1,000 men out of employ
mont and was this morning threuter-
ing buildings 20 and 21, one a re
finery which would cause further
losses. Firemen were trying to pro
tect the walls of No. 20 and 21 so
that if the walls hold the blaze will
be confined to buildings 17, 18 and
19.
j L .C. Willis, general manager oi
j the plant declared last night thu*
: the fire started in the ninth story of
■ building 19 from, a defective eleva
tor motor early yesterday morning.
■ When the firemen reached tne place
they had difficulty in making watci
connections because of the sub-zero
| weather, now pressure further bin
derod them in fighting. Huge lAuiiis
iof snow which melted nullified the
1 efforts of the firemen.
The firemen became encrushed
1 with ice and some literally froze to
their hose lines.
Fire Chief M. J. Dineen was blown
eighten inches into the air hy an
explosion of ammonia and late in
the afternoon was removed to a hos
pital. ix other firemen were over
come and injured., They had to he
removed to hospitals for treatm* nt.
REP. YOIGHT
PROTESTS
RUHR MOYE
Washington, Feb. 15. —Rep. Voight
of Wisconsin, today introduced a res
olution protesting against France oc
cupation of the Ruhr, requesting the
President to call a world economic
conference and setting forth the
view of cnogress that France should
pay her war debt to the United
States.
instead of as at present, com
bine Sioux and Grant counties into
one district, and Hettinger and
Adams into one district.
Another bill presented, and which
also went to the delayed bills com
mittee, provided for an auditing
board to examine the State hail in
surance department, the highway
commission and workmen’s compen
sation bureau. Other bills present
ed included one amending the init
iated la,w of 1920 to provide the
board of auditors shall make an ex
amination, of state industries annu
ally instead of twice a year; And on.,
by the 'state affairs committee re
vising the rates charged by newspa
pers for legal notices.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
FOUR DEAD ON
PRAIRIES, NINE
FROM FIRES
Low Temperatures Causes
Many Accidents From
Overheated Stoves
3 CHILDREN FROZEN
Minnesota and South Dakota
Suffer from Intensity
of Storm Also
St. Paul, Feb. 15.—Thir
teen persons are known -To
have lost their lives in the
northwest as a result of the
terrific blizzard which laid its
icy hand on that section this
week.
Nine died in fires that re
sulted from over - heated
stoves of furnaces, while the
bodies of four were found
frozen on the prairies.
Scores of further deaths
are expected .when more com
plete reports are available.
Four children of C. N.
Gibbs were burned to death
at their farm home near Pine
City, Minn.; an aged woman
and a boy were cremated
when their store was destroy
ed near Richardson, Saskat
chewan; and a woman and
her daughter lost their lives
when their home near Cilston,
Sasktachewan, was burned.
The body of Henry Hennen
of Dumont, Minn., was found
frozen on the prairie near his
home while the bodies of
three children of Fred Beck,
a farmer living near Eureka,
So. Dak., were found frozen
in a sleigh.
SCHOOL BUS STALLED
Lidgerwood, No- Dak., Feb.
15.—An entire busload of
school children bound for a
consolidated school near Lid
gerwood was driven around
the prairie near Lidgerwood
almost all day Tuesday when
the driver got lost in a storm.
For hours the bus circled, the
driver becoming more and
more confused, unable to lo
cate the school building or
any other building.
Late in the afternoon the
bus reached a farm. None of
the children was frozen.
TRAINS ROLL
THROUGH HERE
ON NO. PACIFIC
Track Opened, and Many Pas
senger Trains Resume
Journeys
Trains were rolling over the Nor
thern Pacific between Bismarck and
Jamestown at a lively rate today,
and demoralized train schedules soon
would give way to the regular order
of 'things.
Five trains, all of which ran as
sections of No. 4, went east last
night, the first at about 7:40 p. m.
No, 2, from the west, due here at
9:35 this morning, was five hours
late.
The first train from the east in
two days arrived here at 7:40 a. m.
today, running as the first section
of No. 3. The second section arrived
at 9:15 a. m. The first No. 1 arrived
three hours later.
Train service had not been re
stored on the Soo line.
' THE WEATHER
For twenty-four hours ending at
noon today:
Temperature at 7 a. m
Highest yesterday*
Lowest yesterday
Lowest last night
Precipitation -.
Highest wind velocity
WEATHER FORECAST
For Bismarek and vicinity: Fair
and continued cold tonight and pro
bably Friday.
Weather Conditions
The pressure is high in afl sec
tions this morning with the*crests
over the Missouri Valley and Sas
katchewan. The weather is general
ly fair in all gections except in the
extreme Northwest. Temperatures
have risen slightly from the Missis
sippi River westward but it is still
abnormally coU) in all sectioaa. No
high winds prevail west of the Great
Lakes region/ i •
ORRIS W. ROBERTS,
Meteorologist.
—24

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