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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, December 03, 1924, Image 3

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1924
STORY TOLD OF
BRINING BODY
OF GIRL HERE
(Continued from page one.)
months and were known as husband
and wife, they were never married.
The witness testified that the two
hnd kept company for four years and
were engaged; that the dead woman
learned her condition in November
1923; that she was in her usual
health up to the time she left for
Flasher and cooked the meals and
looked after other' household duties
besides holding her position in dental
o (Tices.
Left Home
Cross examined by Defense Coun
sel, Holla testified that the dead girl
left Bismarck at 3 P. M. February
:> in Bus, that he did not know
where site was going and did not in
quire. lie believed that she was
hound for Mandan and would return
that night, ho said. The following
otniii;’- he received a letter from
her written at Flasher. That night
n - received a telephone call- from
Shortridge and took a taxi immediate
ly for Flasher, lie returned to Bis
marck in a taxi and met the Short
lidge car hearing the body, near the
flat and an hour later helped carry
(lie body to the apartment. ,
Malta said that following the fun
eral lx- left for .Minneapolis and Hint
Stales Attorneys Connolly ami Allen
of Morton and Burleigh counties and
his father came to see him there.
The witness declared that did
not tell him that extradition_papers
had been issued for him and that lie
returned of his own free will.
While in Minneapolis he’ lived un
der his right name Angelo Ingbaldo
Jlolla. Previous t<> the tragedy he
worked in a Bismarck jewelry store.
Holta’s testimony and cross exam
ination was concluded at 11 o’clock
and the driver of the Shortridge ear
was called to the stand by the state.
President in Message
Also Urges Consid
eration of Slops
(Continued from pope one.)
-ion of members of their own
I’ami I ies.”
Transfer to the Emergency Fleet
Corporation of “the whole responsi
bility of operations of the fleet and
other property, leaving to the Ship
ping Board solely the duty of de
terminingl ceitain major policies
u inch require deliberative action.’’
Sab’ or long-time lease of .Muscle
Shoals to private interests “under
rigid guaranties of commercial
nitrogen production at reasonable
prices for agricultural use” with a
subcommittee of Lite Senate and
House Agriculture Committees em
powered to conduct negotiations
\ ilii the private interests.
I-Tocil Control Urged
Development of flood control on
’ uch rivers as the Mississippi, and
Colorado, of inland waterway trans
portation, of navigation from the*
Great Lakes to the Atlantic by way
of the St. Lawrence river, and of
improvements generally to harbors
on the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts.
Acquisition of the Cape Canal by
th< federal government,.
Extension of the national laws
governing the choice of members of
Congress “to include appropriate re
presentation of the respective
parties at the ballot box and
equality of representation on the
Imagine
bow it warms
our hearts
to have
; customer
after
customer
come in & thank
us (ourselves , per
sonal) for intro
ducing them to
, CANTILEVERS...
and then, like as not, they
turn right’round and go for
us, lively, for not spread*
ing the good news more
abroad, that, in one place
in town, are the most com*
Portable shoes ever I •
That’s what vve bought
this newspaper space for
•.. and to picture these nice
Oxfords:
CantUerers to»
Comfort-Lover.
A. W. LUCAS CO.
AND KATIE DOESN’T GET DIZZY
-
xatie Schmidt acts as the human dish-rag for Nicholson, stun! slcalo r
at St. Moritz. Switzerland.
various registration boards wherever
they <*• ist.”
Transfer to the Civil Service of
i first, sc. ond. and third class post
i masters, and ‘'without covering in
jtho present membership the field
I force of proh iirition enforcement.”
Reorganizing Depart mi nis
Enactment of legislation reorgan
izing the governmental departments.
Ihe President also commended to
i the attention of Congress the legi
lative program of the American
Legion; urged that steps tie taken
ito accord to the negroes “their full
•constitutional rights, that they
'should be- protected from all of those
j impositions to which from their
position they naturally fall a prey,
j especially from the crime of lynch
ing”; recommended prompt payment
of the French spoliation claims; ap
proved certain changes in court pro
cedure to hasten the administration
jof juct.ice; suggested establishment
'of federal reformatories for young
i men and women and first offenders;
i and of a national police bureau; and
; asked for suitable recognition to the
| world fliers.
j He opposed procedure under Sec
tion 23 or preferential rate provi
j sion of the Merchant Marine Ad
“until Congress can reconsider tin*
entire question in the light of the
experience that has developed since
i its enactment,'* and also opposed
i inauguration of any new valuation
Jof railroitd property until the rc
; suits of the present valuation are
known and can lie considered.
Noting that the Constitution pro
ivides that the {'resident, shall ro
| port to Congress on the state of
I the Union, Mr. Coolidge said “the
(present state of the Union is such
jiliat it may he regarded with encour
agement and satisfaction by every
American.”
Economic I'roblcnis
“Our domestic problems are for
the most part economic,” he added.
j
I “We have our enormous debt to pay
and we are (laying it. We have the
high cost of government to diminish
and we are diminishing it. We have
j a heavy Inn den of taxation to reduce
'and we are reducing it.”
The nation, lu* said, has definitely
relinqui Hied “tile old standards of
dealing with other countries by ter
ror and force and is definitely com
! milted to the new standard of deal
i ing with them through friendship
! and understanding.”
I “J shall resist any attempt to re
j sort to the obi methods arid the old
[ standards,” he added, “I am espo
j cially solicitous that foreign nations
: should comprehend the candor and
sincerity with which we have adopt
[oil this position.”
HIGHER WAGES IN HAWAII
I)UAW NATIVES FROM LUZON
Manila, Doc. 3.—Women have re
placed men in many kinds of work in
the two Ilocos provinces in north
western Luzon, according to Director
Cruz of the bureau of labor, who has
received reports that a large per
centage of the laborers in the fields
and in the construction of public
works are women. Many of the men
are leaving those provinces for Ha
waii where higher wages are obtain
able in the sugar-cane fields, the pre
vailing wage for farm labor in the
Ilocos provinces being only 20 cents
a day.
Director Cruz, however, is not in
favor of the bill now before the leg
islature permitting the importation
of foreign laborers, because he says
there are thousands of Filipinos with
out work in various parts of the ar
chipelago.
ALASKA TURNS TO FOX HUNTING
Seattle, Dec. It.—Fox raising is be
coming one of the. most important
industries to southeastern Alaska,
according to Dr. V. R. Cline, fur
animal specialist of Petersburg.
Alaska, who brought 40 pairs of blue
foxes here from Ketchikan, Wrang
ell, and Petersburg, for shipment to
Shishmaref, on the Arctic Ocean
north ( f Alaska. t 'h> uni
mals were valued at $20,000. Fox
farming has l-een started at Shish
maref.
Many foxes are shipped to the
eastern part of the United .States
FIRST HOME-GROWN SABLES
• •• .»x«-.••*• * ••• •
£••• •* 'Wv.
jgi-;:: H MS
****■:■ f V** . - r 4 m
\ '"Tg V "
These are the first cables to-be bred and reared in captivity. They
are on a Silver fox farm at Ausable Chasm, X. V. They weigh one
pound and are worth SIOOO each.
from Alaska. One of the largest
tax farms in Alaska is near Ketch-
ST. THOMAS TO
FLAY BISONS
Minneapolis, Dec. Despite the
iact that it was denied admittance,
;-i.. Thomas is expected to schedule
several games with North Central
opponents. A contract was closed
with the North Dakota Bison for an
o:her two year football contract.
'The first ganu* will be played with
the Bison at Fargo, either Oct. 3
<>’• HI followed by the final game at
St. Thomas in 1926.
Trades Players
For Airplane
—— ■ i
Hartford, Conn., Dec. 3. An inno
vat ion it: trades in organized base
hull was made at the national a*
social ion meeting here when Barney
I’m eli, president of the Omaha,
Neb., We tern league club, traded
a pitcher and a catcher to Edward
J. Tracey, president of the St. Jo
seph, Mo., dub. in exchange for
an airplane.
Wilder Goes to St. Jo
• ho deal is a legal Imst-bnl] trans
action involving pitcher It. Liiebhe
and i atelier F. J. Wilder, who will
report to tin- St. Joseph club at the
-tart of next season in 192.”.
According to the rules of the na
tional association, two percent of
tin* purchase price of the player
must go into the treasury of the
association, and the Western league
magnates were puzzled for ometiiue
its tu how ibis might lie handled.
President Hindi solved the problem
by offering to give Fee ret ary Joint
F. Farrell, a ride from his home in
Auburn, \. \ ~ to ft. .Joseph, Alo., and
hack in one day to take care of the
two percent.
(.FORGE KI.IOT
LETTERS DESTROYED
London, Dec. b. Hundreds of in
teresting letters from George Flint
to her neice. Miss Emily Susannah
Clarke of Thanet, have been destroy
ed as requested in the will of Miss
Clarke, who died recently. A rel
ative who burned the letters sail!
that if given to the world they might
have formed a remarkable contribu
tion to literature, in addition io fur
nishing an intimate autobiography
of tin.* authoress.
JAPAN TO MARK PERMANENT
’ AIR ROUTE ACROSS EMPIRE
Tokio. Dec. 2.—Aerial routes across
Japan, already blazed by American,
British and French aviators, are to
be permanently established and
equipped as trunk air routes, accord
ing to plans of the aviation bureau
of the Department of Communica
tions. The department’s estimates
for tin* 1 t)25-2(> budget contain an
item of 0,000,0(10 yen for ■' these
routes.
The program outlined by the avia
tion bureau covers five years, calling
for a total expenditure of 21,000,000
yen. The 5.000,000 yen to be asked
for the next fiscal year would be
spent as follows: 500,000 yen for or
dinary maintenance of flying fields,
hangars and other.equipment on the
tonics; 2,500,000 yen for the estab
lishment of air current, altitude and
other observatories and the estab
lishment of new fields; and the re
maining million yen for subsidies to
civilian aviation enterprises.
LONDON TURNS TO PET PARROTS
London, Dec. 2.—Parrots are re
placing pet Pekingese dogs in the
affections of some society people,
in Hyde Park recently several wo
men hhd green parrots with them in
their motorcars. Many people have
been seen walking with parrots on
their shoulders, or with the birds
sitting beside them on public seats.
West End stores report an increas
ing demand for parrots as pets.
Cleaner, Safer and Cheaper.
Cook bv Electricity.
THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE
! HEAVY PROFITS
ARE REALIZED
| BY DEALERS
London, Dec. 3. —Old Japanese
; prints, sis a result of the Japanese
! earthquake, are becoming so scarce
j in London, formerly their greatest
1 mai ket, that the tirices have more
; than trebled during the last six
j months. The collections of the Lon
don art dealers are nearly exhausted
I and the hitherto enormous stocks of
1 the famous Japanese collections no
; longer exist. Specimens of the best
; schools are no longer obtainable, and
iso much in demand arc the rarer
types that dealers in this little heard
of trade arc buying all available
! prints even before they reach the
[ ain’t ion rooms.
i There arc at present less than 306
i of these old prints in London, accord
ing to Japanese experts. The result,
is, they say, that there are many
I pi into being offered today whose an
tiquity does not predate the earth
• quake, and many have been sold
here and on the continent as genu-|
; me, whereas, they ate not worth
i more than a few pence,
j For several years hefoic the war,
| about T.Otit) old prints annually were \
j sent from Japan to he sold in Lon- i
! uon. Despite this large number, it i
j is estimated that one-half of the ex-[
j isting prints more than 400 years old i
\ were destroyed in the quake. Among'
i them was one by Hoku.--.ai for which ;
, 1 .ftOrt was paid in London just after j
1 the war.
j The British Museum now possesses!
i the finest collection of old Japanese I
! prints outside Japan, largely collect-'
i ml during the Russo-Japanese war. i
OFFICERS OF - :
BUILDERS TO
BE ELECTED
Fargo, Dec. 3. OlVicers will be
elected and a program of addresses
is planned for the annual meeting of
thi’ North Dakota Builders and Trad
ers exchange in the Fargo Commer
cial club Thursday, Dec. 4, Victor 11.
I. secretary of the Fargo unit
announces. Some 74 persons are ex
pected to attend.
The Fargo exchange will also hold
it- business meeting on Thursday and
will give a banquet for the state or
ganization at 6:30 (i. in. in the com-,
mercial dub rooms.
Business matters will be lakc-t up
at (lie afternoon meeting which up, ns
at 2 p. m. Talks are to be given fol
lowing the dinner in the evening.
E. S. Keene, dean of the school of
engineering, North Dakota Agricul
tural college, will discuss “Trade
Schools.” \t illiam Kurke, Fargo
architect, is expected to take up some
aspect of the building material prob
lem. Matt Contilsch will talk on the
supply and demand of plumbing ma
te rials.
“Looking at 192. r > Through (ilass” is
the subject of a talk by F. J. Scholl- ;
bi-ig of tin l Fargo Glass company.
11. ]•’. Meinceke, president of the Fat
go exchange will introduce other i
speakers who will give short talks.
George Cook of the St. Faul Foundry
company will discuss business con-!
ditions.
Transvaal
Fields Produce
Much Gold
London, Dec. 2.—A large increase
in the gold production of the Trans
vaal is interesting several English
companies, who are organizing, pros
pecting expeditions into the little
explored regions of the district. The
reports of the advance agents of the
companies indicate that the gold
producing areas of the Transvaal are
by no means limited to the sections
now being exploited, but really ex
tend far into the interior, and it is
probable that gold may be found in
the waste lamLs to the north. The
companies are sending engineers to
South Africa immediately with or
ders to make investigations.
The total output of gold for the
Transvaal for July amounted to 82'.*.-
427 fine ounces, the largest ever
produced, and it is only the second
time in the history of Transvaal gold
mining that the monthly production
has been more than 800,000 ounces.
The value of the output for Julv was
£3,867,250.
The value of the gold produced for
the first six months of the present
year was £22.500,000, a record.
NATIVES TYPING
Uniontown, South Africa, Dec. 3.
—Hundreds of natives are being
schooled in the use of the typewriter.
In special classes for black pupils,
typewriting* is taught to the tune of
jazz phonograph records. Natives
| are said to become especially pro
i firient in the use of the marhine and
make very capable stenographers. *
A RELIABLE COUGH REMEDY
Why .experiment with unknown
remedies for that cough or cold when
you can secure FOLEY’S HONEY
AND TAR COMPOUND? It is a safe
and reliable remedy for the relief
of coughs, colds, hoarseness. Equally
beneficial for young and old, Mrs.
Anna Cornell, Bridgeton, N. .1.,
states: “I bought FOLEY’S HONEY
AND TAR COMPOUND for my cold
and find it great.” Insist upon the
genuine. Refuse substitutes.
—Adv.
TOY BANKS BACK IN GERMANY
Berlin, Dec. 3. —Savings banks for
children in the form of toys have
come as a reminder that the days
of the inflation period have passed.
Children are encouraged to save by
their parents, for the municipal sav
ing institutions pay interest ranging
•from 8 to 15 percent.
NOTICE
Do not experiment. To buy
Beulah Coal is winter wis
dom. Wachter Transfer Co.
Phones 62 and 63,
WEBB BROTHERS
“MERCHANDISE OF MERIT ONLY”
CLEARANCE
Coats and Dresses
SPECIAL CLEARANCE PRICES PREVAILING ON ALL
%' J HIGH GRADE COATS AND DRESSES, WORTH MANY
TV TIMES WHAT THEY ARE SELLING FOR IN THIS BIG
PRE-HOLIDAY (’LEARANC-E.
JKI The
sT Keramie, Bolivia, and Polo cloths, fashion the
«|Mw[rtr most clever models shown in Brown, Gray,
Navy, Black and Copper; they’re elaborately
khtBII * ur trimmed and silk lined throughout. myS*
■ The Dresses-ci'nt,':; FMm
IBIIh Georgette, Charmeuse and many beautiful
HI w materials, Lace, or Bead trimmings; a size for ML;".. jSOTgjff
HI IV every woman in the best styles of the season
| | COATS AND DRESSES IN FOUR -
WP«P LARGE GROUPS
1/ ( $15.00 $24.50 pji
$39.50 $49.50 IIS
ONLY 21 MORE j Toyland is Ready | •
Shopping Days and just bubbling over with toys of alt sorts to delight
Before the Kiddies; Dolls, Drums, Coasters, Horns, and every-
CHRISTM \S thing. The prices will surprise you and you’ll find it
' ’ pays to shop in—
siicp in «..d W E BBS BASE ME N T
Avoid the Rush. \lso Oet _
Best Selection.
I ——Hear The Brunswick Phonograph and Records
Too Late To Classify
FOli KENT—Strictly modern five
room duplex, attached garage,
immediate possession. Tel. 751
or 101. 10-6-tf.
FOR RENT Large well furnished
room in modern home, with hoard.
Hot water heat, suitable for two.
Call 883. 217 Bth St. 12-3-tf
FOR RENT Furnished rooms fur
light housekeeping, on street car
line. J3O 4th St. 12-3-1 w
FOR SALE At a bargain, ladies
$350.00 coon skin coat, size 38 to
40. Owner in warmer climate and
hits no use for same. Also two
ehairs. Call 'J77M after 6 P. M.
/i 3-3 t
FOUND In Post office, a pair of
gents gloves. Party <-an have
same by proving property and pity
ing for this ati. Inquire at Van
Horn Hotel. 12-3-lt
WANTED Odd jobs of pi astori ng,
brick and chimney and cement
work. Phone 754-J, 522 12th St.
North. Fred Bolter.
* 12-3-1 w
GIRL of 14 would like to work On
board and room and attend school.
Call 504-W. 12-V3t
FOR RENT Two nice clean rooms
furnished for light housekeeping.
Modern home. Hot water heat.
/ Ton%orrov*\
I Alright I
I IQ t mild, vegetable laxative to I
I |H relieve Constipation and Bill- I
I ouaness and keep the digestive and I
I eliminative functions normal. I
Chips off the Old Block
/fjjjh" \\
IV* One-third the regu- 11
I T*J"»*S»PJa3lar dose. Made o( II
II same ingredients,
11 then candy coated .MM
Ila For children and adults. ■ I
MZ, SOLD BY YOUR DRUCCIST_\
Also room for rent with or with
out hoard. Phono 111 It.
FALL MONTHS SEE RUSSIANS
ACTIVELY KICKING FOOTBALLS
Sofia. Bulgaria, Dec. 3.—“A1l Rus
sia is playing foothall,” said Dr. John
I . Nuclsen. bi.-hop of the Methodist
Hpiseopa! Chui.-h. on his arrival here
from a tour of Russia, on his way
to the United States. “Not only in
the large cities are they kicking the
pigskin, hut I saw them playing foot
ball with ardor in some of the small
est villages through which 1 passed
on my tour.
“\Vl(at is true of football is true
Files Can Be Curec
Without Surgery
An instinctive book has been pub
lished by I)r. A. S. McCleary, the
noted rectal specialist of Kansas
City. This book tells how sufferers
from Piles can be quickly and easily
cured without the use of knife, scis
sors, “hot” iron, electricity or any
other cutting or burning method,
without confinement to bed and no
hospital bills to pay. The method
has been a success for twenty-four
years and in more than eight thous
and cases. The book is sent post
paid free to persons afflicted with
piles or other rectal troubles who
clip this item and mail it with name
•nd address to Dr. McCleary, DS4i
Psrkview Sanitarium, Kansas City,
**o. —Adv.
HjCAPITOL
I? I THEATRE
TONIGHT
V
I : Shirley Mason
ilB . Vft
I “That French
I Lady”
| Sunshine Comedv
‘The Nickel Plated West'
of other forms of outdoor sport
in the Soviet republic. In one little
village I saw a lint* gymnasium,
equipped with improved appliances.
Young Russia is developing physi
cally."
AUTO ON PIPE
Paris, Dec. 3. Carl Lateau, a me
chanic, who drove the first racing
auto in Europe, with a large pipe
thaftias a miniature machine carved
on tin- stem. He has received of
fers of fabulous sums for the unique
pipe from automobile manufacturers
in this country.
Neuralgia
or headache —rub the forehead
—melt and inhale the vapors
VICKS
▼ Va ro Rub
Peer 17 Million Jar* U**d Yearly
Eves Examined Gl.is.t Unto!
Bring l*s Your Broken Glass: .
We Will Repair Them Promptly
And Save You Moitev.
F. A. KNOWLES
Jeweler Bismarck
ZAP
INDIAN HEAD
LIGNITE
$4.35 m Loads
Burns steadily and keeps
the heat regular for
long periods.
BISMARCK LUMBER CO.
Phone 17
OLDSMOBILE
SALES AND SERVICE
DAKOTA AUTO
SALES CO.
107 sth St. Phone 428
DR. R. S. ENGE
Chiropractor
Consultation Free
Lucas Blk. Bismarck, N. D,
PAGE THREE
NOTICE
Do not experiment. To buy
Beulah Coal is winter wis
dom. Wachter Transfer t «>.
Phones 62 and 63.
DR, M.E. BOLTON j!
Osteopathic Physician ||
ll»»i Mil SL Phone 2R) [j
BISMARCK. N. D.
Eltinge
Matinee Every Day At - :.‘U
TONIGHT Wednesday
MATT MOORE NIT A
NALDI GEORGE
FAWCETT PATSY
RUTHMILLER
“THE
BREAKING
POINT
By f.lary Roberts ilir.c’j.::
t/scA JV/iiic Prtxik&ifZ, ? T
"WEDDING \ j
SHOWERSVx ■?-
MtRMAJD \ . -V .
S* RBPMbp
0 •ccA.iJZN ’ - *" *
Tomorrow and
Friday - Saturday
J

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