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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, May 29, 1929, Image 13

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r PAGE TWELVE
; x * TRIBUNE’S PAGE OF COMIC STRIPS AND FEATURES w
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i BY RODNEY DETCHER
(NEA Service Writer)
Washington, May 29.—Administra
tions change, but the lame ducks limp
on forever.
The gent in congress who is willing
to change his political principles can
still be reasonably sure of being ap
pointed to something or other when
the people of his district or state have
booted him out. Once he gets a fed
eral Job he stays in. Few die, as the
saying is, and none resign.
There are several visible examples
of the workings of the system under
which senators and representatives
serve through a session of congress
after being defeated for reelection,
while the successors elected by their
constituents ordinarily have to wait
13 months for a chance to participate
in legislation.
The prize lame duck of the season
is former Senator Irvine Luther Lon
root of Wisconsin, who has been con
firmed by the senate as a judge of
the court of customs appeals.
Pew lame ducks ever worked as
hard as Lenroot toward his reward.
Some of them do all sorts of odd jobs
for the administration during their
final session and some of them hop
aboard a presidential candidate's
band wagon and work feverishly in
his behalf.
Some, with or without hope of po
litical reward, go to work for special
interests which are engaged in pro
moting or blocking legislation and are
glad to hire someone who has the
privilege of the floor in the senate
or the house. Lenroot did all three
of those things
Lenroot took his licking in 1926, at
the hands of John J Blaine, after he
had deserted the LaFollette organiza
tion. In the ensuing lame duck ses
sion he became a general handy man
for the Coolidge administration, act
ing as a spokesman whenever pos
sible and giving no further sign what
ever of his one-time political inde
pendence. Still, when his term ex
pired March 4, he was given no fed
eral job and accepted a job with the
public utility interests which paid
him $20,000. He has been called the
head of the big power lobby which
was operating here at the time, but
despite that he often appeared on the
senate floor.
y t
Subsequently Lenroot saw the
handwriting on the wall and grabbed
Crystal's question was no nearer an
answer when George Pruitt arrived
for her at dusk on Sunday than
when she had first asked herself,
‘But—do I love him?" in the dark
watches of her sleepless Saturday
night. With dawn she had suddenly
come to a decision: ‘I shall not
worry my head about it any longer.
If he asks me, he will kiss me, and
not until he kisses me can I know
whether I want to be his wife or
not." She had fallen asleep then and
had scarcely stirred until noon.
Now, at five, her bags were packed,
and she was looking about the pleas
ant room which she had shared for
a week with Tony Tarver, the room
which had been the scene of Tony's
sudden, heartbreaking step from care
less free girlhood into womanhood.
In this room Tony had decided that
she must marry Dick Talbot, to satis
fy her own quixotic sense of honor
and to pay the debt which he merci
lessly claimed she owed him. In this
room, Rhoda Jonson had talked
shyly but rapturously of her engage
ment to Ben Grayson, with never a
backward glance at the operatic
career she had abandoned. In this
room the new Crystal, who had come
to it tremblingly weak after a long
illness, had grown strong and well,
eager to take up the life she had
almost lost by her own folly. Queer
that a guest room in Cherry Jonsons
Colonial farmhouse should have been
the scene of so much heart drama
that the very pattern of its wall
paper could never be forgotten.
“Yoo, hoo, Crys! George has come!"
Cherry yodeled from below, and Crys
tal, when she had answered, snapped
the locks of her bags and ran down
the stairs.
Flushed and breathless, she almost
landed In George Pruitt's arms for
he and Cherry were waiting for her.
BARBS
Gene Tunney calls that $500,000
breach of promise suit a joke. Not
nearly so much of a joke, however,
as that million dollar Chicago fight
was on Jack Dempsey.
Now and then you see a woman as
pretty as a picture, and it turns out
that she’s just another talkie.
The next thing for Dr. Schacht, the
German reparations expert, to turn
his hand to might be the writing of
a book entitled, “Famous Installment
Collectors I Have Fooled, and How.”
We’re a little ahead of Mexico,
anyway—we don’t call our bank rob
bers revolutionists yet.
A dozen boys at Towanda, Pa.,
wire discovered to be making moon
shine during the school recess period.
The thing to do in that case, it
seems to us, is to make a law against
reeea periods.
A New York girl who blackjacked
and robbed victims was captured by
VOTE YES
TWO TIMES
.Qty Bette. M»y 31
* * *
a Hoover banner. It was Lenroot who
was given the job of answering some
attacks on him. Later, according to
Senator Norris of Nebraska, Lenroot
went down south to round up colored
delegates for the national convention.
Nor was he idle in the election cam
paign.
It was the grateful Mr. Coolidge
who first nominated Lenroot. When
the senate failed to act on that nom
ination at its last previous session
Mr. Hoover put in the nomination
again. Lenroot had made himself a
fair-haired boy for both presidents.
The reason the senate progressives
so bitterly opposed giving a former
senator this soft job was what they
considered his treachery to LaFollette
and the progressive cause. Lenroot
served in congress for 10 years and up
io the time he ran for the senate,
they say he owed everything he had
to LaFollette.
* * *
Among the other lame ducks re
cently given federal berths is John M.
Morm, former chairman of the house
military affairs committee, who has
been named to the Federal Work
men's Compensation Commission.
Another interesting phase in con
nection with the lame duck system
is Mrs. Ruth Hanna McCormick’s
campaign for the senate. If it had
not been for the special session, Mrs.
McCormick would not have taken her
seat in the house until next Decem
ber Yet. here she is, less than three
months in office, already campaign
ing for a bigger and better job for
which the election will not be held
for another 18 months.
Dcneen is apparently both sore and
worried. Sore because Mrs. McCor
mick has forced him to campaign
against her so early in the game and
worried because she has a good
chance to beat him for the Republi
can nomination in Illinois next year.
Mrs. McCormick’s is a special case,
but it tends to show how a member
of congress, elected in November of
one year and usually getting his first
legislative experience in December of
the next year, has to start campaign
ing for rc-election almost before he
gets on the job. Then, if he is de
feated for re-election, he serves
through another session before being
forced to go on about his business,
often tempted sorely to forget his con
stituents and carry water for the
administration in hopes of a lifetime
job.
“Look at her run!” Cherry cried
laughing. “When she came she could
hardly creep up and dow-n the stairs,
for she was so wreak. I don’t know
whether to give myself and the farm
credit, or whether she’s so crazy to
see you that love lends wings to her
feet."
“Oh. why do you want to spoil it
by joking?" Crystal’s heart demanded
with anger and despair. But aloud
she said, her voice shaking a little:
"I—l was so eager to know what
George's father thought of the pic
ture. Does he like it, George? He
must— ’’
She forced her eyes to look at him
then—eyes clear of all the doubt and
hope and fear that had tortured her
during the night. And she saw that
he. too, w r as laboring under a terrific
excitement.
“Yes, tell us quick what he thought
of the picture!” Cherry urged, stand
ing on tiptoe to shake his head by
grasping a handful of his thick, rust
red hair.
“He—Dad said—thinks—” George
stammered, his burning eyes seeking
Crystal's over the top of Cherry’s cop
per-and-gold head—“that the picture
is—" He seemed unable to go on.
“Don’t tease us!" Cherry protested,
shaking his head until It bobbed gro
tesquely.
George brought it out then, in a
low, almost frightened voice, his eyes
still on Crystal's pale face: “Dad
thinks the picture is—good.”
“Good!” Cherry scoffed. “It's a
work of genius. And it was painted
in my house! ... So you'll be going
abroad to study, George? Aren't you
glad for him, Crys?”
NEXT: “You’d better marry the
model”—
(Copyright, 1929. NEA Service, Inc.)
police the other day. In other words,
a knockout.
(Copyright, 1929, NEA Service, Inc.)
f LITTLE JOE 1
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L\V<CS Tt> M£AR A
TfeACHCtfS PASSlf*€>
~ WAARKS*
Freckles and His Friends
MOM’N POP
SALESMAN SAM
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES Still No Sign of Boots By Martin J
TRUTH and HONOR
Are Cardinal Principles of the American Legion
- Read Our Advertisement on Page 3, this Issue of The Tribune.
,yV>4-'. -4
AMERICAN LEGION MEMORIAL BUILDING CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE
THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE'
THE GUMPS- HO HUM!
It Gets Them All!
Checking Up on Himself
Rockabye Baby!
u. a ear. orr.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 29,1929
A WFY,
THE SKY WA&YOU.
C* TIMES,C*
BJERY OESOMPTIOa !
THOSE WHO cools
FLY, AND SOME WHO
COOLOtfT,CROPPED
BJERYTHttt6 TO
SEARCH
FOR HOOTS IU
MOT SINCE THE
STOWS RthCHEO VTS
WB6HTH AMD SHE
WAS VSGHTSM6 TO
GET AOOVIE \T,H*S
SOOTS* 9LAWE
BEEN SEEM
°
VOTE YES
TWO TIMES
AT
City Election, Aby 31
Bfrßlosser
By Cowan
By Small
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