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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, September 04, 1929, Image 10

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10
.L WASHINGTON
yyp LETTER
L BY RODNEY DITCHER
f (NEA Service Writer)
' Washington. Sept. 4.-Thc ladies of
the educational division of the pro
hibition unit, though their wings arc
clipped, arc nevertheless pursuing
their work with as much real as is
permitted.
This division is the one captained
by Miss Anna B Sutler, which re
cently started to push out pamphlets
designed to aid school teacher .. m in
structing their pupils concerning wha*
a splendid tiling prohibition had
turned out to be. Education of tin
tort was to be worked into course
in drawing, history, arithmetic, music,
geography and other subjects. Pro'-i
--dent Hoover is supposed to have h:‘
the ceiling when lie heard about it
At any rate. Miss Sutter and her
girl associates were hastily called oil
and the pamphlets destroyed.
Miss Sutter's head is unbowed. She
has had many sympathetic letters
from school teachers. The next pro
duction from her office for scholastic
and other use will be a sub-tantial
pamphlet on alcohol.
This work will not undertake to
prove that alcohol as a beverage 1
an evil thing, but, one understands,
will rather tell of its industrial use.
the government's supervision over n
and other things of interest about al
cohol which no one will object to
when imparted to students.
More pamphlets will follow the al
cohol pamphlet. In these it is aimed
only to tell the plain facts of pro
hibition enforcement and matters grr
malne. The facts, that is, that the
government prefers to talk about.
• Among the things at least tem
porarily held up since the squelching
Of Miss Sutter's propaganda efforts
NEW YORK
New York. Sept. 4.— Yes. tilings like ,
this really do happen in New York:
It was on the stage just the other |
day during Earl Carroll's "chorus
call." Some five or six hundred |
maidens had gathered, in and out of
bathing suits, for the tedious business
of selection. With the fine thespian
ism he displays on such occasions.
Carroll had been striding back and
forth on the semi-circular rim of the
orchestra pit, urging the young wom
en to turn now to the right and now
to the left.
Hours arc required in weeding out
a few from the many. Suddenly, an
attractively faced and figured girl
who had been waiting in a line near
the back of the stage left her position
and approached the producer. She
was wearing a trim white bathing
suit, which matched well the tan of
her fair skin and her sun-burned
blond hair.
“Mr. Carroll.” she began. "I'm going
to ask you if you'll pass on me right
away. I’ve got to be going, and 1
can't wait much longer.”
Such interruptions are “not done."
A girl is presumed to take her turn
with the others. Naturally, he asked
her: "What's your hurry?”
"Well, I have to be at another re
hearsal.”
“Oh, you already have a job. Where
arc you working?"
The girl blushed, which is rare for
a chorine, and finally mentioned the
name of a second rate burlesque
house. Of course, we all raised our
eyebrows. For in such company, a girl
Of her type was completely out of
(dace. On a tough burlesque route,
ahe would have been miles off her
true course. For she seemed young
and fresh and without much stage
experience.
“How much are you to be paid
there?” the producer inquired.
“Thirty a week."
"Well pay you more than twice that
much If you’re taken.’’
“YOUR. I
CHILDREN j
I btevef&erts&crtm
mm*** tiwteow
To be or not to be —is the baby to
■e to kindergarten or not this fall,
nr to most mothers four-year-old
Buddy or Betty is still a baby. Why
1 ' tft Just seems m month since he was
t born!
Are these little people going to
: start to school before their lives arc
f well begun, to watch the clock every
■ morning, or have someone watch it
for them, hunt up hats and coats.
i overshoes umbrellas and march
off down the street and out of our
1 lives Just like the older children do?
I For it Is with a grim heartache, we
l Trail— that once they turn the corner
I we never really wholly possess them
I again for our very own, not until high
f school and college days are over. And
' not even then, for then they will be
grown, they’ve reached man’s estate
and will need us less than ever.
The "Why” of Kindergarten
Why not keep them at home with
us a year or two longer! What good
[ is kindergarten anyway? They only
( «|ro there and they can play at home
! just as well, we argue. We make up
our to telephone the kinder-
I r LITTLE joe 1
L AIAIUWAC "POLISH BV
TRIBUNE’S PAGE OF COMIC STRIPS AND FEATURES
i, the matter of a prohibition poster
which was to have been broadcast
over the nation. But other diffi
eiiltic. than objection by superior of
fiters interposed here. Of a large
number of posters submitted by art
i Ist s not one really "clicked" with Miss
1 Sutter, Commissioner Doran and
others who viewed them. Also, the
( rlimited cost of placarding the na
l »am with :uch a poster is about $25,-
: orto. and the educational division's ap
• p.opiiaMon from congress is a mere
$50,000.
* * *
It now :<’<'m;s established that Mrs.
My!r\, Poindexter was not alone rc
. pon ible for tlu> Peruvian govern
ment' dismissal of Dr. Alfredo Gon
zalez Prude, as first secretary of its
embassy here. It seems that the
Pradu lamily in Lima has not been
keeping on the right side of President
Leguia. Alfredo's father is a Peru
vian journalist ol note and the elder
Pradu has been sounding sour notes
on his editorial bazoo over Peru's
Taena-Anea treaty with Chile.
The most interesting angle of the
j incident from the Washington view
point was that it presented the spec
, tucle of an American woman pro
testing directly to the head of a for
eign government about the loss of a
servant to one of its diplomats. For
it appears that Mrs. Poindexter wrote
-t might to President Leguia when her
ervaiit. Cornelio, imported from Lima,
went into Pruda s service for higher
' wages. The Peruvian foreign office
told Fraria to return the servant and
apologize and Prada told it to go
i enaso itself. Prada is heading for
Europe, which probably is good judg
; aunt, as one of Peru's bastiles for
i political prisoners doubtless yawns for
j him at home.
"I know, but at least I know I have
it."
"H-mm. and you have to do from
14 to 18 shows a week, you know . . ."
There was a pause. Tears had
gathered in the youngster's eyes.
"Oh. I might as well tell you the
truth. They told me if I came for
rehearsal today, they'd give me an
advance on my salary," she admit
ted.
"How much?”
"Twenty-five dollars . . "
"Hmm . . . that's not much in New
York . . .”
"Not much—but it'll keep me from
being thrown out in the street. Here
it is the middle of the month and I
haven't paid my room rent. I haven't
—and I can't. And unless I get some
money, well—l’m tired of dodging
the landlady. I've been trying to get
a chorus job, and I haven't landed
1 yet—and i can't pay my bills. And
i I won't go back home without a job.
I've been down from upstate for two
months now—and my money's run
i out . .
i "You wouldn't go home—but you
would go out with a bunch of bur
lesque wigglers—"
* * *
Well, that may not seem much of
a story. Carroll told me he was go
ing to hire the girl—in all probabil
ity.
The point is. there are hundreds
such m Broadway. Clean cut, trim
j ly figured girls, hitting one back
! stage after another in search of a
j job. No money in their pockets.
! Stalling the landlord and getting "boy
j friends” 1o buy their lunches—and
| desperately winding up in a cheap
wiggle dance.
And I hope that somewhere, a
| stage-struck girl reads it, and learns
| the lesson—don't come to New York
! unless you're prepared to meet the
i landlord on the first of the month.
I GILBERT SWAN.
| (Copyright, 1929. NEA Service, Inc.)
garten teacher that she needn’t ex
pect Buddy this year—then we hold
back, because under it, all we feel
vaguely that there must be a reason
and a good one for kindergartens.
Why do other children go?
’ Something more than just play.”
said one of the neighbors. We wish
we knew exactly what that "some
thing- ’ is. Then we'd be able to
think it over more intelligently.
These arc a few of the things we
need to know about kindergarten.
Kindergarten means "children's
garden.” It is a German word. Froe
bel, one of the world’s greatest hu
manitarians and educators, started
the "garden" for little children years
ago in Germany.
The games and plays in kinder
garten arc not merely time killers.
Neither are they purely for the pur
pose of amusing the children. They
are carefully and scientifically
thought out to develop every mental
process. Some games develop the
power of selection. Some develop
quick thinking. Others ingenuity, or
iginality and reason.
Co-ordination Is Aim
Co-ordination also is aimed at in
their plays. Thought, with quick
muscle reaction. Eye and car im
pressions with quick mental reaction.
Thought and ingenuity combined with
cleverness of the fingers. Co-ordina
tion again. The little things they
make are not so innocent as they
look. They all represent fundamental
processes of brain and fingers.
Then there is the character side,
the most Important of all. These lit
tle children are learning "group liv
ing." that is, being with other chil
dren. Their highest social instincts
and emotions are thus trained at a
time when they should be trained.
Children are more plastic before six
years of age than after it.
Of course not all children of four
or five can go to kindergarten. Some
are not well, perhaps the distance Is
too great, or they are still too physi
cally tender to be away from a moth
er’s care for two and one-half hours
every morning. The— tilings the par
ents themselves must decide.
The above facts, however, may help
some perplexed mothers to make a
decision.
91— FOB EACH STUDENT
\ Jamestown. N. D., Sept. 4 —James
town boys and girls reeelved school
ing the past yaar at an averago.east
each of sl——, according figures
released by the superintendent of
f sE<u>ND_pßi*E.r>i
I W UiS nKEIuWNtM. ORE- ie * LUCKY PERSON WHO -) WOTRW m- g|
m after days of careful \it mr Phillips in J'j r one SPUT bamboo box m- \
% fCkINSYAKiNG AMD B* l BAIT AND PLY CASTING I ASK YOU-/ONBOK-ONi^M
!CONCENTRATED EFFORTS-
, decided on yme winners 1 yS I '• / JSaRipP/
i YME EIGHT WHO HAVE Sm ‘ VOF STANAROSVIU.E J / / IRON BY ED. LOA 1 \ *INNt* SEES - „
/ nnon prizes— I* V /A mfc \ sbo* sooth may st., 1 >->% vhimSCLP »n tnis
-1 ,HO WHO HOVtIN M,S j -
Freckles and His Friends
WITSSeAAS L\U£ FQECUV.ES AN* )J f VOU LOOU. UkE NoU LOST )
JT> TA6ALON6 WANE BEEN (SONS \ VOOR LAST FRIEND, JOMBO 7 *
FOR TEN VEARS-MEBBE 4- n \ AU - P, <SOQED 7WAT L^T
THEY nener INTEND 10 y \ TA(3 JOST V , /
( * GONE' UOAAE.'• Jjr-r ■ OONT GARE ABOUT ANY
1 r l OF US ANYMORE-” L^Pfrfrf
..T f *y~/~ '' ' '
MOM'N POP
SALESMAN SAM
- ow ool.tuis is ik PttcCttVs
C CLASS* WOF\€, SWEET HotdE-<HfeSS
W** has i'll home in before it melt*,
rented ah g
(OUI-GtAK*, .'I
'wp* op
MOTTO, W |
PRCPARATORN V
Tb TXftOUJO
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
<T6 A HIT WUTIt ME,AU. VUgCLtCff ttOf’IBttOUTHBJK
hot 006. L W6ht—wr,\sfofti rrfc com- L vk»-\p i wire haboowh)
-WERIOM KIND* TRHI,COMPARED TIME DO L OM \6iNND VJUTtt k
TH’ BEACH / WITH NOUR W 014 W 60 ANIFUUtf f HURT BOWK LACE 3M,
f ß Mat? ML , , • «.wlumo thv t . J 6vu«feokte woou>
1—.427 was paid out In teachers* sal
aries. 167—2 was spent for per
manent improvements, and there is
still a balance of approximately $30,-
0— In the treasury.
Milwaukee Erects New
Water-Treating Tank
(Triiaae Special Sendee)
Hettinger, N. D., Bent. 4.—Em
ploy— of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St.
Paul and B—tflc railway art now at
work constructing a large water tank
Rett—gar to be used whan eom
—tt-ae a water treating plant. The
lias vi iM—ig a—r the task
THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 4.'1929'
now in use and the water will be
pumped from the lake to the new
tank where it will be chemically
treated to eoften It ***** than p***
to the old tank from whore it will
bo taken by the engines.
MAIL SEBVICE AIIUBED
Cooperstown, H. D., Sept. 4.—Coop
erstown has bean practically assured
of a morning mall sorvl— by Wetter
M. chief clerk of this poatal
district, who called at the loeal pact
office to Inv-tisati the matter of
iSSnttS. mm thTsoa Urn would
carry the matt If prtmnt ptons me-
THE GUMPS-THE PRIZE WINNERS
The Camping Trip Goes in a Hole
Now What’s Up?
ft«**TOf frU-/tiiOOG«,t'U~ tIOMC. 6000 Off )
Motor Power Company
Moves Into Building
(Tribune gfdil Service)
Dickinson, H. D., Sept. 4.—Motor
Power equipment company, dealers In
implements and other farm machin
ery, took possession today of the
building on last VUlard street which
frm bent offwpted by the Dickinson
OldsmoMle company. The place has
been leased* lor the
nrsosnt a portion of the h ‘ i||<| i"t win
be used for public automobile storage.
The foemer quarters of the Motor
fnwsr Couisment company on Bast
vnaara street am nmmrrotnmoa me
'• ■ f
Some of Their Own Medicine
7 w/,sav!! IP 7Lty *MtN J 1 .YK**M >WUT ro 00 If r)~ / "
y s*mc a wow foe. Am of / S '»ws You? ro pick op a& <
( OS, DO YOU TUINU FOR A \ [6O ANJAV SONEPLAcE AM*
V MINUTE TWEVD STAY AN4AV S YUEVD M 1 | I
J HUE TUtS ? NO/ OF / MISS ME, JUST LIUE
. ' « • wjfr.
mo\ \ ( DON'T SPIN \ \vitUL, DAMltt\ f 1 KNOW WO\*TV^VT'LL TAKE
YOU'RE. CLLAP \ ) YHL \NHttLS. 1 BOONE .YDU < \ QOY \N. JUST I ATtA* \
\u to the /[ u only wcs j sure Picked a \ ml homu \J of elcphahtsi
Y FCNDWS'. / V IN t>tLPE.R J NICE SOFT SPOT ) CAN GCT OUT l TO OO »T,lf ]
TO Do YOUR \ YOU ask me J
Jus’ Visitin’!
Sf cm \ st*. v r\
WWW Mi AWFUL U YOU WOULD]
YOllH) MNOEAKODIN6 I TWMK Of f
which owe yoo J tmw . - f
use as a warehouse. An unloading
dock win be bunt at the roar and
uiore •y l !— *** installed within the
building.
Four Threshing Rigs
Born at New England
new England. N. D., Sept. 4.—Fires
breaking out in harvest fields in ter
ritory around Mew England have
taken a toll of four threshing ma
chines. Machines were last by TYr
fPflif, Sohlmiff, ffffWMlft Qsb
bert and Maul Wiegand. Wtogand suf
fered severe burns on the (made in
vmlll/fer. GOSH ][ '
Vlestucucw
COUNMUf
Bp : Oiscoyewo
■r *****oa
w .. oi*-
M Enffi W TSWW-OOC ;
,• rj V , Mscoutorfrsir j
essff vdUi n; ,
; K. ! 11
ISjssEs
SO acres of Wheat when his
caught fire.
Harvest 7 Bushels to
Acre Around McClusky
(Tribune Special Service)
McClusky, N. D., Sept. 4.-Wlth
thrashing well advanced in this re
gion. farmers look, for a general av
erage of seven bushels of wheat to the
acre. Wheat threshed during the last
few days has returned an average of
six to 13 bushels. A few good yields
will bring 10 bushels.
Hard wring wheat marketed to date
raased from IS to U pounds to toe
Off . €'hpyrifSt (
bushel. Samplee tasted Wow a pro*
tain mutant of ISA to 14A par m*itr
Barley has averaged 10 hnehels to
the acre and la frm from ergot, which
damaged lut year's crop. Two rains
the find of last busk benefited earn
and flax.
roue takes Ur
Stanley. M. D., Sept. 4.—A oooald
erable amount of hay waa destroyed
in an extanstva prairie fbt.: which
burned an area four ntba wide and
to mam long, worthaaal of Loahmsd.
The original Mam alerted from an
auto which caught flit and burned.
The fleam* were thought to hove
*???_ M*** tonttOL Hand
fIfBIB raUEnMp m wp iHEfc. r :
. * ." .. V
£ \V. ■ s4+i '* . 0
'*• vfi
% .
Byßloaser
By Cowan
By Small
By Martin

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