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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, March 13, 1931, Image 12

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12
SIXTY HIGH SCHOOL
CAGERS GATHER FOR
j DISTRICT TOURNEY
Will Hold. Consolation Series at
State Taining School Gym
nasium Saturday
Sixty basketball players, making up
seven high school teams, and their
coaches were gathering in Mandan
Friday afternoon for the annual fifth
district tournament which will be
opened at the state training school
at 7 p. m. Friday.
The Linton Lions will meet the
Wishek high school cagers in the first
game. The Mandan Braves will
tangle with the Ashley “Aces’* in the
second game of the first round Friday
at Bp. m. The final Friday night
game will find the Steele quint fac
ing the New Salem “Holsteins” at 9
o’clock to conclude the first round.
Hazelton’s “Tigers,” who drew a bye
In the first round, will tangle with
the winner of the Linton-Wishek
game Saturday morning.
Starting at 10 a. m. Saturday the
Winner of the contest between Man
dan and Ashley will meet the winners
Of the Steele-New Salem tilt.
The consolation series will begin
at 11 a. m. Saturday when the losers
of the Mandan-Ashley tilt will face
the losers of the Steel-New Salem
battle. At 7 o’clock Saturday night
the losers of the Steele-New Salem
the winner of the first consolation
match. Finals for the district title
are scheduled for 9 p. m. Saturday.
Members of the seven teams com
peting in the tournament and their
coaches, follow:
The Linton “Lions”—G. I. Rust,
coach, Joe Martin, Math Kraft, Reu
ben Maeir, George Brooks, John
Bosch, Alvin Graf, Ralph Haugse and
Chris Bosch.
The New Salem “Holsteins”—M. S.
Burke, coach, Agon Kirchmeier, Roy
Just, Howard Hoffman, Lawrence
Kruger, Iver Anderson, Max Thiele,
.Walter Coleman, Christoff Backsen
land Harvey Just.
The Ashley “Aces”—Ed Doerr,
coach, William Doerr, A. Kempf, H.
Spitzer, Art Gieser, W. Weber, C.
Johnson, Bud Reummele and A.
Reummele.
The Hazelton “Tigers”—J. L. Stone,
coach, Norbert Zirbes, Robert Gough
nouf, Elmer Dutton, Darel Brown,
Duane Brown, Robert Chalfln and
[William Walker.
The Steele high school cagers—Rob
ert Baer, Lloyd Brosseau, John Dorn
acker, Lyman Jaynes, Roland Loerch,
Roland Olney, Frank Omodt, Gerald
Prescott, Budd Quam. Lester Roes
sler, George Selness and Arthur Sel
gtess.
Wishek —Coach Reque, Adolph Gall,
Arthur Will, Alvin Kreim, Gideon
Kreim, Gus Stroh, Henry Herr, Wil
bur Erbele and Forest Pritchard.
The Mandan “Braves”— Frank
Boehm, Sterling Byerly, Lloyd Diet
rich, Jake Hecker, Bob Saunders.
Byron Spielman, Leonard House and
Don Solum.
Describes Fighting
Qualities of British
Grand Forks, N. D., March 13.
CP)— Fighting qualities of the British
troops at Ypres were described by
Major A. C. Young, Bismarck, at the
Friday morning session of the North
Dakota national guard officers school
here.
Chemical warfare was under Cap
tain & F. Boruski of the regular
army and defense was described by
Captain J. C. Glaspel of Grafton. A
lecture by Captain Fred Mann, Devils
Lake, closed the school Friday after
noon.
pancorporation Will
Pay 45-Cent Dividend
Minneapolis, March 13.—(5*) —The
f>oard of directors of the Northwest
Banqorporation Thursday declared
the regular quarterly dividend of 45
cents per share on the 503,940 shares
& outstanding capital stock.
The dividend is payable April 1 to
stockholders of record March *2O. All
(Officers, headed by Edward W. Deck
er, Minneapolis, president, were re
flected.
[Toy Pistol Brings
Nine Months Term
' Fargo, N. D., March 13.— IJPl— A toy
pistol may not be a dangerous weap
on, but because he frightened per-
Sons with it Mike Sutton, Fargo,
jnust serve nine months in jail.
Sutton was sentenced in CMS
bounty district court Dec. 5, 1927, to
one year in jail for carrying conceal
ed weapons, being arrested on com-
Slaint of a Fargo woman, who al
>ged Sutton threatened her.
After serving three months, the
balance of Sutton’s sentence was
suspended. Recently Sutton was al*
leged to have threatened the same
Woman again. He was arrested and
ft toy pistol which the woman said
Sutton had pointed at her several
times, was found on his person.
Judge A. T. Colle issued a bench
Warrant for Sutton and ordered the
Suspended sentence revoked.
—i
NOTICE OF EXPIRATION ©r
REDEMPTION
gtate of North Dakota, County of Bur-
Office* 1 of bounty Auditor, Bismarck,
Dak
To J. C. Hallum, 3450 Portland Ave.,
Minneapolis, Minn. ......
You are hereby notified that the
tract of land hereinafter described and
■which was assessed in your name for
taxation for the year 1926 was on the
13th day of December, 1927, duly sold,
us provided by law, for the delinquent
taxes of the year 1926, and that the
time for redemption from said sale
will expire ninety days from the com
pleted service of this notice.
Said land is described as follows:
Driscoll, Ist. Addition, Lot «,
Block 10.
Amount sold for, SI.OO.
Subsequent takes paid by purcbMer,
• o 95
Amount required to redeem at thie
date, $3.08. .
In addition to the above amount you
{rill be required to pay the costs of
he service of this notice and interest
•a provided by law and unless you, re
deem said land from saMTsale before
the expiration of the time for redemp
tion as above stated, a deed thereof
atriu issue to the holder of the tax sale
Certificate as provided by law.
■Witness my hand and off icial seal
this 12th day of March, 1931.
plus A c ISAMIMGER.
(Seal) Auditor Burleigh County,
■ " North Dakota.
\ First March 13, 1931.
Studio Is of Special Construction
Although it may look like any other room, the studio of a broadcasting station
has a lot of hidden qualities. For one thing, it is built of material designed
to prevent echoes. Regardless of appearance, the studio must be acoustical
ly perfect. Above is shown a corner of the KPYR studio at Bismarck.
WITH® FAMILY
PIONEERED IN WEST
Facts About Early Bismarck
Resident Who Died Recent
ly Given by Brother
George Langdon Whitford, early
resident of Bismarck, who recently
died in Washington, D. C., was a
member of a family that was prom
inently identified with the early de
velopment of Bismarck and North
Dakota, according to a letter received
by The Tribune from R. O. Whitford,
Minneapolis, brother of the dead
man. *
He was the grandson of Nehcmiah
G. Ordway, first governor at Bis
marck and territorial governor at
Yankton. His father, Colonel Edward
L. Whitford, together with N. G.
Ordway and C. B. Little, organized
the Capitol National Bank which is
now the First National Bank of Bis
marck.
After attending the public schools
of Bismarck, Whitford attended the
University of Minnesota and for a
time surveyed for the Northern Pa
cific railroad in North Dakota. Later,
after graduating from George Wash
ington University at Washington he
entered the practice of law in that
city and was prominently identified
with its growth.
Whitford, whose legal residence
was In New Hampshire, was a close
personal friend and legal advisor of
Senator George H. Moses. His nom
ination for the governorship of Porto
Rico was expected until the appoint
ment of Colonel Theodore Roosevelt,
was made by the president.
Whitford leaves his widow, two
daughters, two sisters and two broth
ers and his mother, Mrs. Mabel Ord
way Whitford.
Burial was made at Warner, N. H.
In his letter, R. O. Whitford said
he was born on Rosser St., in Bis
marck, in territorial days and was
well acquainted with James Foley,
North Dakota poet who once edited
The Tribune and with Col. M. H.
Jewell, pioneer publisher of The Trib
une.
John Lee Coulter
Gives Farm Advice
Grand Forks, N. D., March 13.— (fP)
—lncreased attention to poultry,
dairy, fruit and garden produce, which
can be consumed oil the farm or sold
at local markets, was the prescrip
tion for immediate farm relief given
Friday by Dr. John Lee Courter,
member of the tariff commission.
He said the Red River Valley of
fered the greatest opportunity for
diversified farming of any valley In
the world.
RADIO WAS AN EMPLOY
MENT STABILIZER
By JOHN H. VAN DEVENTER
Hats off to the Radio Industry!
It has acted as a life saver for a
good many thousands of Jobs dur
ing the depression.
Judging by the number of aerials
that one observes in city and coun
try, it might be thought that nearly
everyone had a radio set and that
the market had reached the satu
ration point some time ago. In
fact, this belief was
IQ Ol freely expressed in
t • many quarters.
AMFDYA Radio design and
fWIUMIn operation have made
Ar -A. rapid strides during
the past year. The
yT manufacturers of sets
Iwlg have been clever mer-
CYMWA/A r\r\ chandisers and cour
rVJKIYAKU ageous advertisers,
liinru They have not sat
IVIAnUI back, as so many have
done, and adopted a
passive resistance to dull times, the
enemy of business. They have gone
out, hot foot, after business. As
the result, the radio business has
been good, in spite of the fact that
the product is distinctly a luxury.
Philadelphia shows us what Radio
can do in the matter of employ
ment The Metal Manufacturer’s
Association of that city keeps ac
curate tabs on the fluctuation of
employment in member plants,
which represent over 70 per cent
of the total metal industry in the
area. Its records show an aver
age of SI,OOO people employed in
making radio sets and parts during
the last quarter of 1930, as com
pared with 18,000 people during the
last quarter of 1929. The peak
number of radio workers in 1930
was 29,000 against 26,500 in 1929.
Aa a result of the stimulation pro
vided by radio, employment, meas
ured in the number of workers in
the entire metal working industry
a metal working member plants of
1 kinds held up well in the Phila
delphia district. The average sum
rߣ*i.ir3?T n.S“- *“
Of course these figures are not
an accurate measure of volume of
business, because many of the
planes are working short time. But
It Is aa accurate measure of the
number of people who are still
connected with pay envelopes in
this industry.
Radio has been a big help to em
ployment in Philadelphia, and else
where as well. It lias proven that
the public will buy luxuries despite
dull times. ,
Copyright by United Business
Rdnitars' Bureau of Mooiumieo
Lord Privy Seal
Of England Dies
Maestog, Wales, March 13.—(/P)
Vernon Hartshorn, lord privy seal
since 1930 and formerly president of
the South Wales Miners’ Federation,
dropped dead at his home here Fri
day.
The Rt. Hon. Vernon Hartshorn,
lord privy seal since 1930, and M. P.
from the Ogmore division of Glamor
ganshire since 1918, was 59 years old.
FACES CHARGE OF
STEALING CARLOAD
Steve Ogburn, 24, Temvik, Said
to Have Stolen Father-in
\ Low's Stock
Fargo, N. D., March 13—(/P)—Theft
of a carload of livestock from the
Northern Pacific railroad Feb. 25 was
reported to Fargo police Friday by
railroad officials. A warrant charg
ing Steve Ogburn, 24, with the theft
has been issued and placed in the
hands of a United States marshal.
Ogburn was said by police to have
left Temvik, N. D., with a load of
stock billed for St. Paul, and owned
by his father-in-law. Ogburn was
acting as caretaker of the load. En
route, he obtained a bill of lading and
the stock was shipped to West Far
go.
Ogburn is charged with selling the
stock to the Armour and Company
plant and to have obtained a check
for $694.50 for it.
Ogburn was described as six feet
tall, weighing 220 pounds, having
auburn hair and ruddy complexion.
He had worked around stockyards
for commission firms and was fami
lar with the manner of stock ship
ments.
Grand Forks School
Damaged by Flames
Grand Forks, N. D., March 13.— (1P)
—Classes in the Belmont school here
were dismissed Friday because of
damage done by fire of unknown ori
gin Thursday night.
School officials estimated the loss
at $6,000, which was reported covered
by insurance. The flames were con
fined to one wing of the building. >
PRINCE HELPED MUSICIAN
Mar Del Plata, Argentina, March
13.— UP) — Through the patronge of the
Prince of Wales, Gordon Stretton,
Barbaros mulatto, has a popuiar or
chestra. Stretton wasn’t doing well
till the prince praised his music in
1925. No he’s the rage. The prince
dances to his music nightly.
Your Easter J^^jL
Special
/or Saturday
Every spring fashion
of Paris and New York UflK Hr
is among these stun- jT
ning new hats of felt,
felt and straw, and
straw bodies of baku or panamalac! Every color that is
smart for 1931 is now being shown here.
WE ALSO
Congratulate
KFYR
On affiliating with the
National Broadcasting System
Sarah Gold Shop
Style Without Extravagance
312 Main 47** Bismarck, N. Dak. Phone 566
THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1931
FESSENDEN IADY
FOR ALFALFA SHOW
Education and Recreation to
Mark Program Prepared
by Wells County City
Fessenden, N. D., March 13.—Mem
bers of the Fessendeh Lions club and
other citizens of this city were busy
Friday completing arrangements for
the annual observance March 16 of
Alfalfa Day, one of the big events in
this enterprising town.
The program, as now outlined, will
provide a pleasant mixture of educa
tion and recreation in an effort to
boost the already large alfalfa acre
age in Wells county and the neigh
boring area.
Alice Mae Albrecht has been chosen
as alfalfa queen, the ballots having
been cast by growers and purchasers
of seed and producers of alfalfa hay.
Six other candidates sought the
honor.
Miss Albrecht will be crowned at a
ceremony in which children from the
rural area will participate as attend
ants and warriors. This event, which
will be directed by Miss Evelyn Dar
kenwald, will show the value of the
alfalfa crop and the best methods of
raising it. J. W. Thornton, president
of the Lions club, will present the
queen with a watch.
Other items on the program are a
concert by the Fessenden Community
band, both before and after the cor
onation ceremony; an address of wel
come by Mayor H. Ingvaldson; ad
dresses by C. F. Monroe, extension
director at the Btate Agricultural col
lege and by S. J. Sanders, agricultural
agent for the Soo Line railroad; a
program by the Fessendeh high
school glee club; a 30-minute vaude
ville program by Jack Johnson and
the awarding of prizes to exhibitors
in the seed show.
A special motion picture show will
be offered at 4:30 and at 9 p. m. the
coronation ball will be held In the
auditorium. Only old-time music will
be played here, but a popular dance
for younger people will be held in the
school gymnasium at the same time.
Approximately $175 has been offer
ed in prizes for the seed show, which
is one of the leading events of the
celebration. Ten prizes will be offer
ed in the hay show.
The show will be held in the Price
garage building and a large number
of entries is expected. Business men
of Fessenden and organizations In
terested in promoting the growing of
alfalfa donate the prizes.
If the attendance this year equals
the average of the past more than
2,000 persons will be on hand.
E. G. Booth, agronomist at the
State Agricultural college, has classed
the local exhibit above any similar
show in the state. About 30 exhibits
of alfalfa hay were displayed last
year.
WOMEN LEAfcN JIU JITSU .
Mexico City, March 13—(AP) —Police-
women have effective training in Jiu
Jltsu here. Senorita Vloleta Gonzalez
found Jose Garcia stabbing a man.
She wrapped him in knots, took his
knife away and led him meekly to the
hoosegow.
Those Painful Swollen
Rheumatic Joints Need
Week-end Treatmen t
Agony Gong In 48 Hours or Money
Back Says Hall’s Drug Store And
85 Cents Buys A Large 8
Ounce Bottle
Here’s the new swift way to drive
Uric Acid from your joints and
muscles and free your body front
Rheumatism, Sciatica and Neuritis —
many call it the week-end treatment
—apd it is particularly valuable to
those who can not afford to lose time
thru the week.
Start to take Allenru as directed on
Friday night and keep to bed as much
as possible till Monday morning.
Allenru acts with double speed when
the sufferer is relaxed and resting.
Allenru is a powerful yet harmless
medicine—free from narcotics—you
can’t depend on mild medicines to
overcome stubborn rheumatic condi
tions and handy relievers used only to
stop pain won’t get the uric acid out
of your joints.
Allenru is sold by Hall’s Drug store
and all modem druggists America
over—an 8 ounce bottle for 85 cents—
And guaranteed to do as advertised
or money back.—Advertisement.
TRANSPORT CONVICTS VIA AIR
To forestall an attempt to frse his two prisoners en route to the
state prison. Sheriff Wylie Wilkinson (rlQlit) of Macomb county, Mlch-
Igan, hustled the men into a U. 8. air service plane and landed them
in the prison at Jackson within an hour. The prisoners (seoend and
third from right, respectively) are George Miller and Ben Schlmerln,
Chicago, sentenced to 9 to 25 years for a Mt Clemens hotel robbery.
The men on the left are Lieut. J. S. Griffith and Deputy, Clyde Thornton.
GUARDS’GAMP SET
FOR JUNE 13 TO 27
Tentative Schedule Announced
by Baird; Governor's Day
Is June 21
I
Grand Forks, N. D., March 13.—(AP)
—Colonel L. R. Baird, 164th infantry
commander, Thursday announced a
tentative schedule for the 1931 field
training period of North, Dakota Na
tional Guardsmen at Camp Grafton,
Devils Lake.
Colonel Baird estimated that 1,180
officers and men would attend the
camp, as virtually all of the 20 state
guard units now are at full strength.
The encampment is set for June 13
to 27.
The program includes general field
instruction each camp day, rifle and
machine gun competition, the gover
nor’s day demonstration June 21 and
recreational and atheltic events. The
Joins Force of
Copelin Motor Co.
Mr. Oscar Selvig, well known in the
Bismarck territory, is now connected
with the Copelin Motor company,
selling Ford cars and trucks. He will
greatly appreciate your business in
this line.—Advertisement.
COAL
$3.50 Per Ton
The Asplund Coal
Mine
WILTON, N. DAK.
Phone 477-J Bismarck, N. Dak.
AGAIN
BISMARCK STEPS
OUT IN FRONT
Congratulation s
to
KFYR
LOGAN’S
- “We Thank You ”
CONGRATULATIONS
To K F Y R
on their
NATIONAL HOOK-UP
Tune in on Montgomery .Ward & Company Merchandise Announcement of Our Golden
Arrow Jubilee Next Week.
MontgomeryWard&Co.
latter will be arranged by Captain
C. C. (Casey) Finnegan, athletic di
rector of the North Dakota Agricul
tural college.
The camp schedule will be set offi
cially when approved by seventh
corps area headquarters at Omaha,
Neb.
More than 50 guardsmen were
guests of the Grand Forks Chamber
of Commerce and the local 40 and 8
chapter at a smoker Thursday night,
held in connection with the National
Guard Officers’ school. The school
was to end Friday.
BUILDS UP THE BLOOD
La Crosse, Wis.
—-“My mother al-
ways kept Dr.
Pierce’s Golden I
Medical . Dis-
covery in her t,-' . ! '
medicine chest and
gave it to mem
hers of the family 1 ' V* &§ *
as a blood and KprarangOfl
stomach medicine.
I have always
taken it as such, especially in spring
time. I think it the best medicine any
one can take as a spring tonic and tc
build up and enrich the blood. It alsc
regulates the liver and is good foi
weak stomach—it renovates the entire
system.”— Chas. Van Sickle, 821 Li
Crosse. All druggists.
Every package of Dr. Pierce’s medicine
contains a symptom blank. Fill It In ant
mail to Dr. Pierce’s Clinie In Buffalo
N. Y. for free medical advice.
PERSISTENT AT GOLF
Bellealr, Fla., March 13.—(£*) —
Frank French, New York, la persist
ent whatever the cost. He bet S3OO
he would not leave until he had
beaten 80 on the town’s toughest
WHAT MAKES
PEOPLE MOODY?
Did you know that our health
and our moods are closely related
to intestinal cleanliness?
When the system is clogged
by constipation, poisons are
generated. Often these bring on
eadaches and listlessness. Yon
feel blue, or become irritable.
The poisons of constipation
frequently aggravate nervous
troubles, rheumatism, high blood*
pressure and heart trouble.
Yet constipation can be over
come by eating a delicious
cereal: Kellogg's All-Bran.
Two tablespoonfuls daily are
guaranteed to relieve both tempo
rary and recurring constipation.
Try it with milk or cream.
Use in cooking too. Recipes on
the red-and-green package. All-
Bran also supplies iron for the
blood. At all grocers. Made by
Kellogg in Battle Greek.
All-Bran
We Take Pleasure in Joining with the other firms in
Bismarck in congratulating
KFYR
on their affiliation with the
NATIONAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM
WESTERN BAKING COMPANY
Bakers of the Wonder Loaf
We Join
with the Bismarck Business and
Professional Men in complimenting
and congratulating
KFYR
on its progress and affiliation with
the
National Broadcasting
System
First National Bank
"The 'Pioneer Bank"
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA
Established 1879
. Total Resources over $4,000,000.00
Affiliated with the First Bank
Stock Corporation of Minneapolis
and St. Paul
Capital, Surplus, Undivided Profits
and Reserve, $485,000.00
course. After three months trying, he
did it—42 out and 36 In. He Is going
home to collect.
J**? .
The
Graver
{Corner. SpBERjS and 2nd Av*
This hotel offers you attrac
tive environment, conveni
ent location .... and the
best of beds.
$1.50 to $3.00 Single
Write or wire for
Va 7 reservations.
Heartiest
Congratulations
to KFYR
For completing the Nation
al Broadcasting hook-up.
Incidentally, radio fans,
tune in every Friday and
hear “Adam and Eve”
Sponsored by
The S. & L. Stores
Time will be announced In our
next Thursday’s advertisement.

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