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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, October 29, 1931, Image 8

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Midwest Teams Concentrating on Important Week-End Contests
PURDUE HOPING TO
I PILE UP SCORE ON
i WEAKENED MAROONS
Wisconsin Making Last Minute
Alterations For Minnesota
Game
WILDCATS IN SCRIMMAGE
Michigan and Notre Dame
Leave For East For Inter
sectional Tilts
Chicago, Oct. 29.—<7P; —Saturday
promises to be the worst of Saturdays
for Chicago Maroons.
Purdue is on the warpath.
Upset by Wisconsin in their first
Big Ten game of the season, which
meant virtual elimination from the
championship race, the Boilermakers
now figure some consolation may be
gained by outscoring other opponents
I by as great margins as possible. Also,
I they yearn to give the Maroons a
I larger beating than their neighbor,
I Indiana, did last week.
I For the first time of the season,
I Purdue has all its manpower ready,
I while Chicago,, feeble enough at the
I start of the campaign will lack three
I of its best.
I Wisconsin is busy making last min-
I ute alterations to replace losses, in
I time to give Minnesota a tussle. Jim
I Wimmer probably will start at quarter
I in place of Buckets Goldenberg, who
I was injured in the Pennsylvania game.
I The Badgers fear Minnesota’s passing
I game and have worked against aerials
I all week. The Gophers, in better
I shape than ever, are smoothing up
I their offense.
I There may be more veterans in the
I Illinois lineup Saturday against
I Northwestern. Bob Zuppke’s sopho-
I mores have failed to show speed
I enough to handle his formations and
I several letters winners from last sea-
I son, have been moved up to the first
I squad. The Wildcats were given an-
I other scrimmage yesterday to shake
I out any traces of overconfidence, and
I will have all hands, with the excep-
I tion of Harold Weldin, center, and
I Reb Russell, fullback, ready for the
I contest.
I Indiana is planning an offensive
I battle against Ohio State with passes
I predominating. The Buckeyes have
I prepared two backfields to alternate
I against the Hoosiers.
I Coach Burt Ingwersen of lowa, has
I moved Moore and Pickering, a pair
I of sophomores, into his regular line,
I and the Hawkeyes are confident of
I defeating George Washington univer-
I sity Saturday.
I Michigan and Notre Dame were
I scheduled to head east Thursday to
I meet Princeton and Carnegie Tech,
I respectively.
Bison Eleven Has
Success Against
University Plays
N. D. A. C. Machine Hopes to
Redeem Itself After Loss
To Rabbits
Fargo, N. D. f Oct. 29.— (/P)—North
Dakota Agricultural college grid war- !
riors exhibited some of the dash Wed
nesday which had earned them an
excellent record until they ran into
the South Dakota State Jackrabbits
and suffered a 7 to 0 defeat.
Reserves armed with University of
North Dakota plays were unable to go
any place against the Bison varsity
regulars as Coach Casey Finnegan
and Bob Lowe sent them through a
scrimmage session on rain-soaked Da
cotah Reid. The Bison offense on
the other hand clicked for long gains
and the Bison were hitting harder
than at any time this season.
The enthusiasm exhibited by the
Bison indicated the club will be ready
for a gruelling test against the Sioux
at Grand Forks Saturday in an effort
to regain some of the prestige lost
through Saturday’s setback.
Continued rain made It necessary
to set up the plays Indoors and the
squad then went out for the pro
longed scrimmage in which both of
fense and defense were stressed. The
results satisfied the Bison coaches,
but they still sought better timing on
the offense and plan to stress this
and drill on assignments during the
remainler of the week.
The squad still has a number of
new plays to be mastered, some
phases of the new plays cooked up
for the Nodaks being a bit unfinished
in spots.
Some changes in personnel are
planned for the game Saturday,
partly because of injuries and for
more effectiveness. Rnnegan did not
divulge what these changes would be.
Seeks New Leader
For Pirate Outfit
Owner Denies Having Negotiat
ed With Robinson of
Brooklyn Robins
New, York, Oct. 29.— (IP) —Barney
Dreyfuss, owner of the Pittsburgh Pi
rates. is thoroughly noncommital
about who may manage his team next
season although his present trip to
New York supposedly is concerned
with shipping a new pilot. Several
men are available for the job, he says,
and he Intends to look over the eligi
bles before reaching a decision, which
will not be made before the first of
December.
Dreyfuss has had no dealings with
Wilbert Robinson, former Brooklyn
manager who has been mentioned for
the job.
“I have not had an application from
Mr. Robinson," he said, “and I cer
tainly have not made any overtures
to him."
MAJOR HIGH SCHOOL ELEVENS ARE INVOLVED IN MUDDLE
| .OUR BOARDING HOUSE
Hazel ton Trims Bismarck Reserves
NIMRODS TO FIRE LAST BARRAGE
OF HUNTING SEASON SATURDAY
Saturday to See
‘Make or Break’
of Nodak Season
Undefeated Sioux Would Rather
Beat Bison Than Any
Other Team
Grand Forks, D., Oct. 29.— (A*} —
A season’s success hangs in the bal
ance as the University of North Da
kota's grid squad attempts to get
ready for its annual battle with the
North Dakota Aggies here next Sat
urday afternoon. And thus far
preparations have gone op in the
cramped quarters under the stadium,
where scrimmage is impossible.
Three days have gone by already
and only the regular linemen had a
brief scrimmage Monday and the
Sioux want to win their next game
more than any they have played. On
the contest with the Aggies rests the
undoubted championship of the
North Central Conference—the fourth
in a row—for the Sioux are conceded
a victory in the last loop game with
Morningside. And if West’s club can
defeat the Aggies it is more or less
certain of winning the remaining
four, for none of the teams ahead
look as good as Finnegan's big ma
chine.
An undefeated record means many
chances for a post-season contest.
There already is one opportunity to
play on the west coast if the Sioux go
through without a loss. The Los An
geles A. C. wants North Dakoa back
for another game.
Weather conditions forced the
coaches to work out the squad under
the stadium. The practice was much
the same as Tuesday’s except the line
had a better workout.
The punters and centers went out
on the stadium grid before indoor
drill was called.
Ralph Pierce, sophomore left wing
back, who has been out of action since
the South Dakota State game with
an Injured shoulder, was in uniform
and ran singnals.
Captain John Burma, big fullback,
still was out. He has done nothing
since the Oregon tilt, When he pulled
a muscle in his right leg.
MINOT MAN LOSES
Seattle, Oct. 29.—(AP) —Scoring six
knockdowns Wesley Ketchell, Salt
Lake light heavyweight, was awarded
a technical knockout over Herman
Retzlaff, Minot, N. D., in the second
round of a scheduled six round main
event here Tuesday night.
Army Hero
Richard B. Sheridan, Jr., Army foot
ball player, who died from a broken
neck received in a game with Yale,
was buried with impressive military
services at the West Point chapel
Wednesday. He was an honor stu
dent and president of his class.
Will Be Given Chance to Shoot
Deer in 10 Counties
Next Month
North Dakota hunters, who for the
past month have pursued ducks, geese,
brant and other aquatic birds, will
fire their last barrage of the season at
sunset Saturday.
The season, which opened October 1
in all northwestern states, will close
at sunset October 31.
Hunters reported that ducks
year had not come up to previous
years. Weather conditions through
out the northwest have been too mild
to force ducks out of their favorite
haunts, and the drought of the past
two years has greatly dimished the
supply of waterfowl throughout the
United States and Canada. A federal
emergency regulation reduced the
length of the season this year to 30
days because of the drought condi
tions.
The hunter In North Dakota, how
ever, had an opportunity for a variety
of hunting. He was given the privi
lege of shooting pheasant for the first
time in the state’s history when the
season was opened for a day and a
half October 17 and 18. The prairie
chicken season ran from October 1
to October 15, and the partridge sea*
son from October 11 to October 15.
Next month, those with a flare for
big game hunting will swing into ac
tion in pursuit of the wily deer. The
season begins November 16 and con
tinues to November 20.
Deer hunters, who planned to try
their luck in the Turtle Mountain
country, will be forced to try other
areas as the result of an executive or
der issued this week by Governor
George F. Shafer closing the season
in Bottineau and Rolette counties.
The governor amended his previous
proclamation by which an open sea
son was declared in the two counties,
giving as the reason that deer are in
danger of depletion and extinction in
the Turtle Mountain district.
Hunters, therefore, will have to con
fine their shooting for deer to ten
counties instead of the twelve. The
area in which the season will open on
November 16 consists of Williams,
Mountrail, McLean, Burleigh, Em
mons, all of the portion of McKenzie
county north of township 149, Mer
cer, Oliver, Morton, and Sioux. Deer
hunting is prohibited on the islands
in the Missouri river.
The limit is one antlered buck dur
ing the season. Hunters must wear
a red cap while out for deer.
HYDE ISSUES* RULING
AGAINST EXTENSION
St. Paul, Oct. 29. —(AP) —Word came
from Washington Wednesday that
Agriculture Secretary Hyde had ruled
against the request that the Minne
sota duck hunting season be extended
to November 10.
W. D. Stewart, state game and fish
commissioner, made the suggestoin
because unusually warm weather has
delayed southern flight of ducks from
northern lakes and made hunting
poor. J ,
The federal biological survey advis
ed against extension of the season,
which will end Saturday after one
month’s duration.
Mott Suffers First
Defeat in Two Years
Mott, N. D., Oct. 29.—(/P) —Mott suf
fered its first defeat in two years of
high school football when the smooth
passing and running attack of Elgin
high school marred a homecoming
program here last week-end.
Mott resorted mostly to line plung
ing, but attempted four passes, three
of which were intercepted and the
other incomplete.
This week-end finds the two teams
engaging in some more tough compe
tition with Mott meeting Bowman
and Carson invading Elgin.
THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29,1931
Fourth Quarter Rally Spells De
feat For Imps By Score
of 14 to 2
Leading at the start of the fourth
quarter, the Bismarck Imps went
down 1 before a last minute rally to
lose to Hazelton, 14 to 2. at Hughes
Field Wednesday night.
Bismarck annexed two points in
the third stanza, scoring a safety to
take the lead. The counter came
after Benser had kicked out of
bounds on the invaders’ three-yard
line. A Hazelton back was downed
behind his goal line as he attempted
to run the ball out.
The visitors came back strong in
the final period to score when Brown
intercepted a forward pass and ran
90 yards for a touchdown, A few
minutes later they again pushed the
ball over the counting stripe on a
concerted drive that took them al
most the entire length of the field.
Baker, Benser, and Shafer played
well for the locals. Brown, Parsons,
Orthmeier, Raesler and Dutton were
outstanding for Hazelton.
The lineups:
Bismarck Hazelton
Baker le Dutton
Engen It Chalfin
Jenkins lg Mathews
Saxvik c Orthmeyer
Weisenberger rg Jenner
Schneider rt Raesler
Benser re Westcott
Wenaas q Goughnour
Brauer lh Parsons
Sorsdahl rh Kaeffcr
Shafer f Brown
Substitutions: Bismarck—Dohn for
Jenkins, Elofson for Dohn, Enge for
Baker, Beylund for Baker, Ahlen for
Wenaas, Wenaas for Ahlen, McCroi
rie for Saxvik. Hazelton—McCusker
for Kaeffer, Benedict for Westcott,
Montieih for Mathews.
Touchdowns, Brown, one; Gough
nour one.
To Reduce Cost of
Speed Boat Racing
New York, Oct. 29.—(/P) —Racing for
the gold cup. the blue ribbon trophy
of the speedboat world, still is far
from being a poor man’s sport but
the gold cup contest board of the
American Powerboat association has
done its best to reduce the cost of
building a boat for the contest.
Meeting Wednesday night, the
board decided not to change the pres
ent rules but adopted a set of alter
nate conditions permitting the use of
stock motors. These motors are lim
ited to 350 horsepower and may not
cost more than $5,000.
Thus the cost of building a gold cup
speedboat will be reduced from a
minimum of about $20,000 which in
cludes a specially built motor, to $15,-
000 or less.
m
Specifications for a flagpole to
flaunt the world’s championship pen
nant at the Cardinals’ training camp
at Bradenton, Fla., were asked of
Manager “Gabby” Street.
* Stickler Solution 1
• ■ ■ ♦
A SUTLER SAT IN MIS
ULSTER cttAv,
WATCHING TUB MOONBEAM'S
LUSTRE pay
ON A NEC THAT M TUB
80SHES LAV.
» the LEfiHES / WITH A RUSTLE,
Took up His soa/c;
"TMOU LUREST THE GRAVE;
i THOU RULEST THE •STRONG’,
Lj "TO THEE DOTH RESULT Of
CQEAr 8 ATTLEE BELONG.
'frieno op me Luster ,
TO THEE T SING,
; "and HAIL THEE AFAR AS
' John baquy cosh , k/mq
5 The eight word* in the Urge lettas
wrere the missing ones. They all are com
-1 posed of the same lettas. n
By Ahern
EASTGRAND FORKS
HAS ASSUMED LEAD
IN LOOP STANDINGS
Defeat at Hands of Jamestown |
Tips Bismarck From Pin- \
nacle Position
■ i
DEMONS IN THIRD PLACE|
I
Twelve Outfits in State Have
j
Been Undefeated So Far
This Season
(By The Associated Press)
Football contests on various North
Dakota high school gridirons this
week-end are expected to straighten
out the tangle that some of the major
teams became enmeshed in follow
ing last week's engagements.
Bismarck which had a lead in the|
state race as well as the Sioux Land j
conference championship strug g 1 e
surprised football fans when they
suffered an upset by the Jamestown
Bluejays, 6 to 0. R. D. McLeod, De
mon coach, blamed a bad attack of
overconfidence for the result of the
encounter. Bismarck previously had
beaten Mandan and Minot, both of
which defeated Jamestown earlier in
the season.
Comparative scores with teams i
both elevens had met, gave Mandan
an edge in their tilt with Minot last
week, but the Magicians handed
Mandan a 6 to 0 setback and further
tangled the unofficial championship
race.
East Grand Forks leads the Sioux
Land conference as the teams go into
battle this week-end with Minot sec
ond and Bismarck third.
Some outstanding performance s
have been among teams which have
been undefeated and unscored on
this season. Among the teams which
mostly have met minor competition
are Max with six consecutive wins.
Carrington and Oakes five straight
wins and Ray with 4 victories. They
practically constitute district cham
pionships.
Max has rolled up 211 points to go
into the lead for individual high
scoring honors while Mandan holds
second in that department with 194
points. Both outfits have engaged in
six games.
Hatton, Hillsboro, and Hankinson
and Milnor have succeeded in pro
tecting their goal line from the
enemy so well that not a point has
been tallied against them. Hankin
son also is waging a fight to mam
tain an undefeated record for the
season.
Twelve outfits have been undefeat
ed this season. They are Carring
ton, Elgin, Flasher, Grand Forks,
Hatton, Hillsboro, Lakota, Max,
Beulah, Milnor, Oakes and Ray. All
have suffered a tie, however, except
Oakes, Carrington, Hankinson, and
Max.
EAST GRAND FORKS
LEADS CIRCUIT RACE
Jamestown, N. D., Oct. 29.—(/P) —
East Grand Forks. Minn., high school
football team having won two con
ference games and tied another, leads
eight competitors for championship!
honors In the Sioux Land confer-;
ence, according to figures announced!
by A. O. Elstad. Jamestown, secre-l
tary of the circuit. !
East Grand Forks, Minot, and Bis
marck each have one conference
game to play while Devils Lake,
Grand Forks. Mandan. Moorhead,
Jamestown and Valley City have two
more conference engagements on
their schedules, Elstad stated.
The standings;
S 3 £ a 7 5 ?
o t 8 5 .4 7 6
3 f- ft ‘ . *1
72 ©
E. Grand Forks 2 0 t .534 19 0
Minot 3 1 0 .730 45 40
Bismarck 2 10 .607 39 19
i Devils Lake .... 1 1 1 .500 12 19
i Grand Forks .. 0 0 2 .500 0 0
I Moorhead r 1 1 0 .500 6 6
I Mandan 1 2 0 .333 42 19
| Jamestown .... 1 3 0 .250 14 55
j Valley City .... 0 2 0 .000 0 19
j Canzoneri to Defend
I Welterweight Crown
Newark, N. J., Oct. 29.—(/P)—Tony
1 Canzoneri of New York, holder of two
' world’s boxing championships, de-
{ fends the lesser of his titles, the jun
ior welterweight championship,
against Philly Griffin of Newark in a
ten round bout at the Newark arm
ory tonight.
Lindley Hatfield carried the ball
for Auburn three times In the last
three minutes of play In the game
against Wisconsin.
ff PERSONAL |
Lserv CEJ
I You are assured of pro
-111 fessional integrity of
HI the highest order, as
H well as expert attention
H and service, when you
HI entrust us with respon
ffl sibllity. You can de- R
U pend upon us. I
II We Understand. |M
I Webb Bros. H
Sj Paneral Directors H
Phone M Jb
Cadets Pgy Last Tribute to Comrade
NORTHWESTERN'S CAPTAIN
Associated Press Photo
The experts predict that Northwestern will have another mighty
football team this year and one of the reaaene la that Capt. Dal Marvil
Is back at tackle
Notables Gather
To Pay Respects
To Owner of Sox
Comiskey Funeral Expected to
Be One of Largest in Chi
cago History
Chicago, Oct. 29. —i/P) —Baseball's J
leaders came to Chicago Thursday to
bid a final farewell to Charles Albert!
Comiskey, owner of the White Sox. j
Funeral plans called for extrema i
simplicity, but it was expected to be !
one of the largest in Chicago's his
tory. Not only were notables of the
sport to attend, but the huge number
of friends of the “Old Roman” gath
ered to pay their respects.
The active pallbearers were Patrick
Nash. Urban Faber, John P. Harding,
Ed Fleming, Judge Henry Horner, Jo
seph T. Barry. Jesse Matteson and
William J. Leahy. Kenesaw Moun
tain Landis, commissioner of baseball,
John A. Heydler, president of the Na
! tional League* and William Harridge,
president of the American League,
which Comiskey helped organize,
headed the list of baseball powers,
and presidents of other major league
clubs were to attend the services.
| Services were scheduled for 10 a. m.,
at St. Thomas the Apostle Roman
i Caholic church, where a solemn
requiem mass was to be sung, with
burial at Calvary.
We Specialize
in
Diamonds
Wedding Rings
and
Bulova Watches
F. A. KNOWLES
Jeweler
“Bismarck’s Diamond Store”
Perry
Funeral
Home
Offers
Convenience
and Privacy
■ ■ ■
W. E. Perry
208 Fifth Street Phone 687
FltinfcTS
U*T/l
(By The Associated Press)
Madison, Ind«—Rosy Baker, An
derson, lad., outpointed Dewitt
Young, Carrollton, Ky., (8).
Grand Rapids, Mich.—Mart Le
vandowskl, Grand Rapids, out
pointed Matt Agdie. Philadelphia
(10).
McKeesport, Pa.—Buttling: Gls
sy, Donora. Pa., outpointed Harry
Forbes, Indianapolis (10).
Seattle—Wesley Ketchell, Salt
Cake City, stopped Herman Rets
laff, Minot. N. D„ (2)t Tony Por
tillo, Seattle, outpointed Leonard
Bennett, Detroit (O).
San Francisco—Gaby Bagdad.
New York, outpointed Buddy Gor
man, Vallejo, Calif., (10).
Used Auto Parts
«> hate In stock hundreds of parts that are In good condition which
will give good service, many are practically new. Many people take
advantage of thfa opportunity to save money. . . . Why don’t youf
We are always glad to serve you and our prices are low.
Bismarck Auto Parts
1011 East Main Ave. Bismarck, N. D. Phone 154
FOR FIRST AID • • • Yes!
IN MOTOR OIL .. . No!
Because Sinclair Opaline Motor Oil contains
no petroleum jelly Sinclair dealers can apply
it to your car according to the Sinclair
Law of Lubrication. Petroleum jelly is valu
able in many ointments but, unless removed,
makes motor oil too thick when cold—too
thin when hot. Petroleum jelly is removed
from Opaline at as low as 60 °F. below zero—
a much lower temperature than required for
just removing wax. Ask the Sinclair dealer.
®J. A. KOHLER
Agent Sinclair Refining Co. AsSfllfTfvßlV
109 Tihird Street
Bismarck, N. Da* NSQLW
Army Turns Back on Tragedy
and Starts Intensive Foot
ball Practice
West Point, N. Y„ Oct. 29.— {JP)~
Army turned its back on tragedy
Thursday, tried to forget for the mo
ment the fresh grave of Cadet Rich
ard Brinsley Sheridan, Jr., and
thought only of the Army code, “Car
ry On.”
On the bulletin boards was the of
ficial announcement: “Army begins
today intensive practice for the foot
ball game Saturday with Colorado
college.”
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Brinslev
Sheridan, father and mother of the
Army end who died of a broken neck
suffered in gridiron battle with Yale,
together with another son, Gerard,
and a daughter, Mrs. J. L. Herman,
were on their way back home by train
to Augusta, Ga.
In the Army records, across the
name of “Dick” Sheridan, president
of the second year class, honor man
and soldier, was written: “Died of in
juries accidentally received.”
The corps rallied Wednesday to
give their comrade a military burial
that for dignity, impressiveness and
depth of feeling has never been sur
passed In West Point history.
Godfrey A. Matheson, former hock
ey coach at the University of Mani
toba, will pilot the Chicago Black
hawks of the national hockey league
this winter.
Twelve teams hold franchises in
the newly organized Midwest Pro
fessional Basketball league.
Modern While Gold Frames
With comfortable pearl pads
Only $4.50
Expert Eye Sendee at Greatly
Reduced nices
DR. MacLACHLAN’S
Health School and Eye Clinic
DR. A. 9. ANDERSON
Optometrist—Eye Specialist
Lucas Block Blamarck
-l
A

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