OCR Interpretation


The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, November 10, 1934, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042243/1934-11-10/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I
I J
EDUCATORS RETURN
HOME AFTER 3-DAY
FARGO CONFERENCE
Session* of North Dakota As
sociation Marked by Spirit
ed Discussions
Fargo, N. D., Nov. 10.—(tf) —-More
than 2,500 educators of North Da
kota and speakers from other states
'will return to their homes Saturday
after a three-day visit in Fargo at
tending the 47th annual convention
of the North Dakota Education associ
ation.
Sessions have been marked by ad
dresses by persons of national reputa
tion, speaking on a variety of subjects
correlated with education principles.
Problems of adult education, a pro
gram which has come much to the
fore in the last few years, were dis
cussed along with those of the class
room.
The convention ended Friday with
a program by the Amphion Fargo-
Moorhead chorus. Guest soloist was
Miss Leola Aikman, soprano.
Studies Rural Problems
The department of rural education
Friday conducted a panel discussion
on the topic W what are the cultural
values inherent in rural life and how
are they being developed.” Miss
Leila G. Ewen, rural supervisor of
Minot State Teachers College, led
the discussion with contributions by
J. G. Moore, superintendent of Fargo
public schools; Miss Ellen Johnson,
supervisor of the rural department
of Mayville State Teachers College;
Miss Ruth Raymond, Art Department,
University of Minnesota; Miss Freda
Stevens, Buffalo, N. D., Miss Julia
Brekke, extension specialist in cloth
ing, N.DA.C.; E. H. Bakken, boy
scout executive; Mrs. J. A. Jardine,
Fargo, president of the national fed
eration of music clubs; Mrs. Katherine
M. Cook, chief of the division of spec
ial problems, U. 8. Offioe of Education,
Washington, D. C.
John E. Howard, music department,
University of North Dakota, played a
group of three violin numbers.
Three speakers Friday morning
brought messages of varied interest
to convention attendants. Miss Kath
erine Cook, Washington, spoke on
schools and the emergency program;
Miss Ruth Raymond, Minneapolis, on
“the New Thrift,’' and Samuel H.
Thompson, Washington, on Indian
Bervice.
Thompson Addresses Group
Mr. Thompson's talk dealt with the
problem of including Indian children,
government wards, in the public school
program rather than educating them
In boarding schools.
Other department talks were given
by G. HUbert, Fargo; Dr. C. W. Tel
ford, Miss Grade Madeen, Wahpeton
State School of Science; C. C. Craw
ford, Valley City State Teachers Col
lege.
Talking on health education Miss
Katen, Bismarck, said the school Is not
the only agency for teaching health in
a community but iUlsihe most im
portant.
R. T. Tolo of Minot was named
chairman of the department of Latin
and Greek, with Miss Marcella Bigot,
Jamestown, vice chairman, and Miss
Myrtle Sandie, Bismarck, secretary.
Miss Ruth Raymond, University of
Minnesota, talked at a meeting of
the kindergarten-primary section.
Sweeping revision in North Dakota
laws governing school revenues will be
suggested to the next legislature with
approval of the association. The pro
posed measure wUI ask for a gross in
come tax law, which would be in part
a replacement tax, which is expected
to produoe about 93,000,000. From this
state fund there would be a direct ap
propriation of 9400 per elementary
class room unit and 9525 per high
school class rom unit. If the income
tax law did not furnish sufficient to
make such payments, the fund would
be probated.
In addition to this revenue each
county could levy 4 per cent on aU
real and personal property, with cer
tain defined exceptions.
Then each school district could levy
a direct tax, Just half of its present
tax levying power.
C ONTINUE n
from pate one
Democrats Will Hold
38 Legislative Seats
Twenty-second, 'Towner: L. O.
Nordheim, Republican; A. J. McLarty,
.Republican.
Twenty-third, Stutsman: L. R.
Burgum, Democrat; E. J. Du Ilea.
Democrat; Beu Gilbertson. Demo
crat; H. J. Morris. Democrat.
Twenty-fourth, LaMoure: Earl E.
Clarke, Democrat; Zack Shockman,
Republican.
Twenty-fifth, Dickey: Gottlieb
Wendland, Republican, Joe Fitz
gerald, Democrat.
Twenty-sixth, Emmons: Val P.
Wolf, Republican; Math Dahl, Re
publican.
Twenty-seventh, Burleigh: Thomas
J Burke, Democrat; W. M. Bchantz,
Democrat; J. M. Thompson, Demo
crat.
Twenty-eighth, Bottineau: Howard
Parkinson, Republican; Peter Peter
son, Republican; Fred Shurr, Repub
lican.
Twenty-ninth, Pvt Ward: J. C
Blaisdell, Democrat; M. D. Graham,
Democrat; O. G. Vtosaker, Republi
can; Einar Muus, Republican.
Thirtieth, Morton: Gus Schauss,
Republican; W. E. Godwin, Republi
can; Cvl Keidel, Democrat.
Thirty-first, fetark: Fred Born, Re
publican; Anton Kubischka, Repub
lican; Ray Schnell, Republican.
Thirty-second, Eddy-Foster: Dave
Bailey, Democrat; W. W. Treffry, Re
publican.
Thirty-third, Wells: George Aljets,
Republican; Leonas Myers, Republi
can.
Celebrate Armistice
Appropriately Tonight
National Com Husking Champion
gH9Hp|P^^
MM
jk - M lb
i- v
&
• • t -
m 'll ! fi El *\ is
i mt'
r .: f Wb&z} ' 'HBIBiB
> ' 7^ s I'i 1 ? *' v * Tk\ £ss
mm
i^iyBBBBBBBBBBBBi
Thrice Minnesota state champion, Ted Balko of Redwood Falls,
Minn., won the national corn husking championship before a Crowd
estimated at 50,000 persons in a field near Fairmont, Minn., Thurs
day afternoon. He is shown above holding an ear of com afterl
he finished the 80-minute workout.
Thirty-fourth, McHenry: H. F. Nei
woehner, Republican; L. E. Goodlafen.
Republican; W. O. Biberdorf, Repub
lican.
Thirty - fifth, Kidder - Sheridan:
John J. Adam, Republican; Charles
Mode, Republican.
Thirty-sixth, Mclntosh-Logan: W.
H. Bettenhausen, Republican; Wil
liam Bauer, Republican; Christ P.
Ritter, Republican.
Thirty-seventh, Part Richland: C.
H. Morgan, Republican; H. C. Wil
liams, Republican.
Thirty-eighth, Part Barnes: James
Thoresen, Republican.
Thirty - ninth, Billings - Bowman -
Golden Valley •Slope (unavailable L
Fortieth, Burke-Divide: E. J. Maries,
Republican; O. F. Anderson, Repub
lican; E. J. Mcllraith, Republican.
Forty-first, McKenzie: F. W. Erick
son, Republican; M. L. Holey, Repub
lican.
Forty-second, Pierce: Paul A. Sand,
Republican; W. H. Tuft, Republican.
Forty-third, Renville: F. D. Hurd,
Democrat.
Forty-fourth Montrail: Ole B.
Stray, Republican; Axel Olson, Re
publican.
Forty-fifth. Williams: Harvey Sol
berg, Republican; Chris Borstad, Re
publican; Joe Shannon, Democrat.
Forty-sixth, McLean: Arlo Begg,
Republican; J. E. Erickson, Republi
can; R. R. Sohall, Republican.
Forty-seventh, Grant-Sioux, (un
available.)
Forty-eighth, Mercer-Oliver-Dunn:
J. W. Bailey. Republican; Gottlieb
Isaak, Republican; Nels P. Jenson,
Republican.
Forty - ninth. Adams - Hettinger:
E. A. Child, Republican: O. C. Olson,
Republican.
This Curious World |
■ ■
* ■ 1 1
FROM HIPPOPOTAMUS TUSKS tS MORE VALUABLE THAN
THE IVORY FORMED IN ELEPHANT TUSKS/
H 45.000,000
SQUARE MILES
OF THE
5Z 600.000
SQUARE MILES
OF THE
WERE INVOLVED
ll .■■■■' : '' ±... ’ . ein* sr nca aunncc, mc/.'-.'t
Second. Part Ward: W. J. Lowe,
Democrat.
Fourth, Part Walsh: G. E. Coffey,
Democrat.
Sixth, Part Grand Forks: Nick
Nelson, Democrat.
Seventh, Part Grand Forks: Oswald
Braaten, Nonpartisan (for unexpired
term).
Eighth, Traiil: Dr. Syver Vinje,
Republican.
Tenth, Part Cass: Max Strehlow,
Democrat.
Twelfth, Part Richland: Melvin
Johnson, Republican.
Fourteenth, Ransom: R. D. Ma
gill, Democrat.
16th, Griggs-Steele: George W.
Kolpin, Republican.
18th, Cavalier: Ed Greene, Repub
lican.
20th, Benson: C. W. Fine.
22nd, Towner: B. W. Lemke, Repub
lican.
24th, LaMoure: Milton Young, In
dependent Republican.
26th: Harry Lynn, Republican.
28th, Bottineau: William A. That
cher, Republican.
30th, Morton: J. T. McGillic, Dem
ocrat.
32nd, Eddy-Foster: Otto Topp,
Democrat.
24th: Ole Ettestad, Republican.
36th: William Kroeber. Republican.
38th: A. C. Nelson, Republican.
40th, Burke-Divide: R. A. Owlngs,
Republican.
42nd, Pierce: F. T. Oronvold, Re
publican.
44th, Mountrail: Harry Peteraon,
Republican.
46th, McLean. E. C. Stuck*. Re
publican.
48th, Mercei’-Ollver-Dunn. E. F.
Mutchler, Republican.
THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10,1934
j Weather Report j
FORECAST
For Bismarck and vicinity: Gen
erally fair and somewhat wanner to
□— ■ night; Sunday
unsettled ana
2&3S warmer.
For North Da
,*>«• 3 3-* kota: Generally
lair. somewhat
warmer west and
cTwEggh north portions to-
MJtKRr night; Sunday
yAsPI _ unsettled and
J At warmer, possibly
lawT jI rain northeast
portion.
_j- y • -1.-- For South Da
v kota: Generally
*—■ -■ fair tonight and
wakmcp Sunday; warmer
Sunday and extreme weet portion
late tonight.
Minnesota: Fair Saturday night,
colder in southeast portion; Sunday
fair in south, unsettled in north, pos
sibly rain in northwest, rising tem
perature.
For Montana: Fair tonight and
Sunday; warmer east of Divide Sun
day.
Weather Ontlook for the Furled,
Not. 12 to 17:
For the northern and central Great
Plains: Fair most of week; frequent
changes in temperature, but mostly
near or above normal.
GENERAL CONDITIONS
A high pressure area extends from
the Mississippi Valley westward to
the western Rocky Mountain dope
(Rapid City 30.86) while somewhat
lower pressure overlies the Pacific
coast region (BeatUe 90.10). Tem
peratures dropped slightly through
out the Plains States ana along the
eastern Rocky Mountain Slope, but
mostly fair, pleasant weather pre
vails in all sections.
Bismarck station barometer, inch
es: 29.71. Reduced to sea level 10.57.
Missouri river stage at 7 a. m.: -0.7
ft. 24-hour change, 0.0 ft.
PRECIPITATION
For Bismarck station:
Total this month to date JO2
Normal, this month to date 19
Total, Jan. Ist to date 7.43
Normal, Jan. Ist to date 15.38
Accumulated defey. to date .... 7A5
TEMPERATURES
Low- High
est est Pct.
BISMARCK, ptcldy ... 25 58 .99
Amarillo, Tex., cldy ... 42 94 .00
Boston 34 46 .00
Boise, Idaho, clear ... 40 64 .00
Calgary, Alta., clear ... 18 46 .00
Chicago, 111., cldy ..... 40 52 .00
Duluth 24 42 .00
Denver. Colo., clear ... 34 82 .00
Des Moines, Is., clear .. 38 58 .00
Devils Lake, N. D„ dear 22 46 .60
Dodge City, Kan., clear 28 68 .00
Edmonton, Alta., clear.. 26 46 .00
Grand Forks, cldy .... 27 27 .69
Havre, Mont., clear ... 24 52 A 0
Helena, Mont., claer .. 34 56 A 0
Huron, 8. D., clear .... 29 59 A 0
Jamestown, dear .. .84 37 A 9
Kamloops, B. C., clear 34 44 .00
Kansas City, dear .... 42 66 .00
Lander, Wyo.. clear ... 29 64 .00
Medicine Hat, A., clear 26 52 AO
Miles City, Mont., clear 24 56 .00
Minneapolis, cldy 22 52 .00
Modena, Utah, cldy ... 29 70 .00
Minot, clear At 16 A 0
Moorhead, Minn, dear 28 46 A 9
Miami 74 78 .00
New Orleans 64 82 .00
New York 38 48 .00
No. Platte, Neb., cldy.. 29 62 .00
Oklahoma City, dear.. 50 62 .00
Pr. Albert, Saak, clear 16 38 .00
Qu’Appelle, Saak, dear 18 46 .00
Rada City, 8. D., dear 30 54 .00
bwJmw-:.'* a 3
Salt Lake City, dear .. 42 64 .09
8. 8. Marie, Mich, cldy 34 38 .12
Beattle, Wash, dear ... 42 56 .00
Sheridan, Wyo, clear .. 24 58 .00
Sioux City, fa, clear .. 40 54 .00
Bpokane, Wash., clear.. 40 54 .00
Bwift Current, S, dear 18 49 .00
Toledo, Ohio, ddy 16 44 .00
The Pas. Man, cldy ... 28 36 .00
Wllliston, N. D, dear.. 22 52 A 6
Winnemucca, Nev, dear 30 68 .00
Winnipeg, Man, cldy.. 26 34 .00
j . Church Notices |
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Thayer at Second Street
Floyd B. Logee, Pastor
We cordially Invite you to discover
the Christian Fellowship of the
church and worship with us.
t:U a. m.—Ths church school meets,
all departments.
11:00—The morning worship—" E
nriching Character Through Christian
Education.”
• :30 p. m.—Pioneer and Tuxis
Toung People’s socistlsa meet.
Tuxis topic: “Tha Right Use of
Leisure Time.”
7:30 p. m.—Special Armistice Day
Fellowship Service. Veterans and
their children arc particularly Invit
ed. The pastor will speak on “Arm
istice, Merchants of Death, and the
Prince of Peace.”
8:30 p. m.—AU young people are
invited to the young people’s meet
ing In the chapel.
The musical aervlce, Mrs. R. D. Mc-
Leod at tha organ:
Morning—
Prelude: Sextets from “Lucia”—
Donisettl.
Quartet.
Offertory—Lysberg.
Postlude:. Prayer from “Lohengrin”
—Wagner.
Evening-
Prelude: “Pastoral Scene” —Lude-
buehi.
Special music by. Ladies’ Choral
club: (a) “Prajrer”—Beethoven; (b)
“To Thee O Country”-r-Elchberg.
Offertory: "Voluntary”—Leybach.
Postlude—Scheve.
Tuesday at 7:30 p. m.—Trustees
meeting.
Wednesday at 7:30 p. m.—Midweek
service—“ Redeeming the Acquisitive
Spirit,”, the second of the studies,
"The Christian Way Out.”
Thursday—Circle meetings of ths
Ladles' Aid Society.
Thursday at 8:00 p. m.—at New
Salem, meeting of the Presbytery of
Bismarck for the ordination of Mr.
C. C. Converaa.
Has the church no message for
you? When did you last attend
church? It the church has no mes
sage for you. you have no message
of hops to expect.
“We believe In Jesus as Christ.
We accept Him ae our Savior and
Friend. We pledge Him our loyalty
In every relationship of life.” Will
you not join ua?
Suicides in Virginia are largely
among the white population; the
majority of homicides are negroes.
A monument has been erected near
Garden Glty, Kas., to G. J. "Buffalo”
Jonas, pipneer plainsman who helped
found the city.
As Guests of,die
Bismarck post of
the American Le
gion at a Dance be
fitting the occasion
Plan Wildlife Refuges for State
BYRNE* OUTLINES PROGRAM
• « « •• •« • * »
Would Restore Natural Conditions
Completion of the parks now being
developed in the Badlands near Wat
ford City and Medora will give North
Dakota two fine game refuges, Secre
tary of State Robert Byrne, in charge
of the park Civilian Conservation
Corps service in North Dakota, said
Friday.
Although the parks now are under
construction, final details have not
been completed, Byrne said, but as
soon as the necessary conditions have
been compiled with they will be stock
ed with all the game natural to the
region.
Elk, buffalo, deer, antelope and
other non-predatory animals will be
obtained from the national parks
where they now abound and so also
will such predatory animals natural
to the region, such as bear, lynx and
wildcat.
The object of the interior depart
ment, in charge of the project, is to
restore natural wildlife conditions as
they were before the coming of the
Whiteman and the predators certain
ly were a part of the picture, accord
ing to advices received by Byrne.
According to present plans the park
near Medora will contain an area of
118 square miles and that near Wat
ford City 46*4 square miles. In each
case the area will be fenced to pre
vent the grazing animals from stray
ing off the federal reservation.
The only obstacle remaining be
fore the federal government gives
final approval to the two parks,
Byrne said, is the acquisition of a few
tracts of land. Many landholders
have been willing enough to give op
tions on their holdings, particularly
in the Watford City region, but in the
Medora section, which has. been set
tled for a longer time, some of the
pioneers have been reluctant to move.
Under no circumstances will the gov
ernment construct a park around any
private holdings, Byrne said, and at
best the outlines of the two areas will
be somewhat Irregular.
Information on the wildlife phases
of the park projects has been receiv
ed by Byrne from Conrad L. Wirth,
assistant director of the national park
service.
“While much was being done on the
more than 300 state park projects
throughout the country to conserve
natural resources and increase recrea
tional facilities not enougn was being
done to improve conditions favorable
to the increase and restoration of the
native wildlifesaid Mr. Wirth.
WUI Assist States
“In order to stimulate activities
along this line an offer was made to
the park authorities in the various
states to employ, in the Emergency
Conservation Work program, scienti
fically-trained men to make studies
in the state park areas and to rec
ommend certain measures necessary
for the betterment of wildlife condi
tions.
“To supervise the work of the wild
life field organization and to keep it
closely connected with the Washing
ton office of the State Park Service,
which agency is supervising state
park development, Dr. H. P. K. Agers
borg, formerly biologist with the New
Hampshire Department of Fisheries
and Oame, and author of many ani
mal and plant life works, was named
chief wildlife technician with head
quarters in Washington.
‘Dr. Agersborg will make a study of
the reports of the men in the field
and direct their work In accordance
with the established policies of wild
life conservation. He will also spend
considerable time in the field discuss
ing problems with the wildlife tech
nicians and state conservation au
thorities and assisting them in work
ing out their individual situations for
the betterment of animal and plant
life in their respective regions.
I wish to take this means of thank
ing the people of Burleigh county for their
confidence in my work as County Superin
tendent, and for their loyalty as expressed
at the polls.
MARIE W. HUBER.
(Pol. Adv.)
NEW NICOLLET HOTEL
MINNEAPOLIS.
A strictly fireproof; modem Hotel within t short
walk of Shopping, Amusement Financial and
Wholesale Centers. . . . You'll appreciate the
friendly hospitality, the reasonable room rates
- end the moderately priced Restaurants.
W. a CLARK, MAMAOIR
rout
•LOCKS
PROM ALL
PAMHOKft HRMMALS
At The
DOME
Pavilion
Seek Fenner Pattern
"The aim of our program la simply
to restore as far as possible the living
pattern of the wildlife that existed
before the normal process of nature
had altered and the delicate balance
had been upset by the intrusion of
large numbers of men seeking to con*
vert the forces of nature into economic
rewards.
"The method by which we hope to
accomplish this is as follows:
"Find out what the primitive pic
ture looked like.
"Determine what the present pic
ture looks like.
"Discover the causes of the alter
ation of the primitive picture.
"Restore those conditions, the re
moval or change of which altered the
primitive picture
" Take such steps as are necessary
to perpetuate these restored condi
tions.
“Most important feature of the pro
gram is its broad viewpoint. Wildlife
authorities consider, especially in the
park areas that are sanctuaries, and
most of them are, that game species
are only a part of the picture. If the
problem were approached with the
purpose of conserving only fish and
game, there would be a tendency to
ward the eradication of animals of
prey.
"But in our wildlife program in the
parks, we have a broader concept of
conservation, and consider that the
predator has as much right in the
picture as the prey. It has been found
that if the natural environment, which
has been altered through human
use of the land, such as proper food,
water and cover, is restored, the wild
life will return to the area so restored
and increase to the normal popula
tion regardless of one animal's prey
ing on another.
Is Golden Opportunity
"If we do not take care of a proper
wildlife population, which naturally
belongs to and can be supported by
our park lands, one will lose a golden
opportunity to give to our people a full
ness of outdoor enjoyment which is
impossible without the presence of
wildlife."
“The difference between the con
servation of wildlife and the conser
vation of fish and game, is that one
is for the purpose of restoring and
perpetuating the whole picture for its
historical, scientific, aesthetic and edu
cational value, while the other is for
the purpose of restoring a part of the
picture for its recreational value, pri
marily. Both of them are highly de
sirable and necessary, but in our State
Park program we are concerned with
the first named.
"The idea is to dedicate the nation
wide system of state parks being de
veloped with the labor of 142 Civilian
Conservation Corps companies and
Emergency Conservation funds in 41
states to the preservation of animal
and plant life as it was in the begin
ning, as well as to the conservation of
natural resources and the development
of recreational facilities.”
THANK YOU,
VOTERS
You have my sincere gratitude
for re-electing me to the office
of register-of-deeds of Burleigh
county. I will do my utmost to
merit your confidence.
Sincerely,
FRED SWENSON
(Pol. Adv.)
Now
Low Rates
0000 eeos—vou'll
SLOP IN COMPOST
A
OffOMI
gateway
TOURIST SURCAU
Leonard Dahl
and His
Piece Band
11
Frank Lanz Funeral
Conducted Saturday
Glen Ullin, N. D., Nov. 10.—(*»)-
Funeral services were conducted here
Saturday for Frank Lanz, fatally
wounded by the discharge of a shot
gun with which he was hunting birds
near his home.
Lanz, who was 40, was hunting the
birds in a grove adjacent to his home.
The gun accidentally discharged, in
flicting wounds from which he died.
His wife witnessed the accident from
a window of their home, and carried
her husband into the house, where
he died before medical aid arrived,
authorities said.
Surviving are his widow, seven chil
dren, seven brothers and three sisters.
Missing Ellendale
Man Sought in Minn.
Granite Falls, Minn., Nov. 10.—
—Police here were searching for Clay
ton M. Harty, Ellendale. N. D., labor
er, missing since Nov. 2, whose auto
mobile was discovered parked on a
Granite Falls street.
Harty, timekeeper for an Ellendale
contractor, was reported by police to
have disappeared from that town
after making a purported trip to a
gravel pit.
The automobile, identified as
WE REBUILD
We Do Not Cobblo
We Resole with "K. L." Leather
Bismarck Shoe Hospital
Service and Quality 415 Bdwy.
Shining Parlor in Connection
DR. R. S. ENGE
Chiropractor
Graduate Drugless Physician
Lucas Block Bismarck, N. D.
Phone 260
THANKSGIVING
ITurkeys!
Armour Creameries will buy Turkeys for the
Thanksgiving period from
Nov. 8 to Nov. 16,1934
CASH ADVANCE
Our advance prices baaed en dressed weights, FOR LIVE BIRDS
delivered our plant, are as follows:
No. 1 Young Toms 16c
No. 1 Young Hens 16c
Choice Young Hens and Toms .. 12c
No. 1 Old Toms 12c
No. 1 Old Hens 12c
No. 2 Turx 9c
These advances are based on anticipated prices when the turkeys
reach the market in the east.
The difference between the returns less the advance and our selling
cost is returned to our patrons. This settlement, when due, will be
made approximately three weeks after the last buying date.
QUALITY TURKEYS WANTED
We would prefer that our patrons hold back such of their turkeys
as may indicate that they are No. 2, because of lack of finish, flesh
and color. These can be held back profitably nntil our Christmas,
Jannary or February buying dates.
ORDERLY MARKETING
Producers delivering early will realize the same price as those selling
en the last day and by delivering early you can help us to give the
best of attention in handling, dressing and refrigeration of the tur
keys you deliver.
AGAIN we urish to announce that we will provide Plant Dressing.
PLANT DREBSING PRESERVES QUALITY.
Improves grade as compared to Farm Dressing.
Armour Creameries
BISMARCK, N. DAK.
I Club Breakfasts
25c and 35c
Noonday Luncheons
EsflH. 35c and 40c
Mn Chefs Special Evening Dinner
™ POWERS COFFEE SHOP
(1 THE BIBMARCK TRIBUNE Readers can
Hi shnjn set their paper at the Newe Stand
HI in the POWERS HOTEL* FARGO.
11l i. ii ■■ ' J
Music by
of Fargo
iHarty's, was locked, contained a full
[tank of gasoline, and was totally
j lacking in clues to the man's disap
jpearance, authorities said.
! Ivy Lee, Rockefeller
Publicity Man, Dies
New York, Nov. 10.—(TP) —Ivy Lee.
publicity man for big business, is dead
, at the age of 57.
A brain tumor caused his death
Friday after he had been a patient
at St. Luke’s hospital since Oct. 20
Lee was best known as the mouth
piece of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., with
whom he was associated as publicity
advisor for 20 years. Rockefeller
rarely said anything for publicatkm
which did not come through Ivy Lee,
and all questions concerning the
Rockefellers were referred to him.
FOR
Pipe, fittings, valves, enam
eled ware, plumbing and
heating specialties—call on
Frank G. Grambs
Co.
Behind Corwin-Churchill
Rear 112 2nd St.
Bismarck, N. D.
I THE TWO BEST I
■ USED CAR ■
■ BARGAINS ■
I 1931 Buick Sedan 5395 H
■ 1932 Plymouth Sedan..s3Bs H
■ Both cars in perfect condi- I
H tion—See these before you K
■ buy any new or used car. H
■ M. B. GILMAN CO. I
U 2nd A Bdwy. Phone 808 I
Admission
50 cents
Per
Person

xml | txt