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The Daily Ardmoreite. (Ardmore, Okla.) 1893-current, June 13, 1916, Image 1

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VOLUME TWENTY-THREE
ARDMORE, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 1916.
NUMBER 214.
lERICAfl TROOPS RIUT LARGEST
REIil BAND OF HANS
ON JUNE NINTH, TWENTY MEN OF THIRTEENTH CAV
ALRY UNDER CAPTAIN RETHOUSE, DEFEATED
BANDITS IN SANTA CLARA CANYON.
None of the Americans Participating in the Battle were Injured
But Three of the Mexicans were Killed and the Band Rout
ed Large Quantity of Ammunition Captured by the
Americans One of the Mexicans Bandits Killed Near La
redo Found to be Carranza Officer, Wearing the Insignia
of a Carranza Lieutenant One of the Bandit Prisoners
Says it is the Body of Lieutenant Colonel Villareal of the
Carranza Army Attack upon Pershing's Forces by the
Mexicans is Feared in Washington.
Field Headquarters (via
wireless) June 13. The finish
ing blow to the largest striv
ing band of Villa followe. -as
given on June ninth by twi, 'r
mon rif fVio t V) ii'tponf Yi cava?
under Captain Rethouse, in
dashing fight in Santa Clara
canyon, north of here.
The Americans were unhurt.
Three Mexicans were killed,
the band routed and an im
mense quantity of ammunition
captured by the Americans.
Situation Unchanged Now
Washington, D. C, June 13.
While some of the state de
partment advices today gave
a more favorable aspect to the
.northern Mexico situation, oth
ers reported further anti-American
demonstrations, leaving
the situation generally un
changed. Fear Attack on Pershing.
Washington, P. C, June 13. It
is officially admitted that there is
growing alarm over what the agita
tion through northern Mexico may
produce, and the possibility of an at
tack being made upon the Pershing
expedition. Fifteen hundred additional
regular troops were ordered to the
Mexican border, last night as a result
of the rapid spread of the anti-American
reeling. The ordering of these
additional troops is due in part to
the recent raids in the Laredo section.
Secretary ISaker announced that these
new troops are being ordered to the
border to fill up the gap along the
liorder and will be composed of ten
companies of coast artillery and a
battalion of engineers. The artillery
troops will be drawn from Sandy
Hook and Portland, Maine, while the
engineers go from Washington.
California Troops Ready
San Bernardino, Cal., June 13. In
structions to be ready to-entrain up
on an hour's notice for the Mexican
border have been received here by
Company K of the California national
guard, according to a statement by
Captain W. D. Hogue. Other Califor
iiorstnnH tn lm ve '
received similar orders.
Raider Was Carranza Officer
(Laredo, Texas. June 12. One of
the three Mexican bandits killed yes
terday in the chase of the outlaws
who raided the Coleman ranch Sun
day wore a Carranza uniform with the
insignia of a lieutenant colonel. One
of the bandits taken prisoner, identi
fied the body as that of Lieut. Col
Villareal of the Carranza army. Ceno
dio Mendez, the Mexican cowboy who
was taken prisoner in -the Taid on the
Coleman ranch and who later escaped,
says, the Mexicans attempted to burn
the I. & G. N. railroad bridge near
Webb, but were frightened away. He
eaid the Mexican raiders talked free
ly of their intention of burning the
bridge and wrecking a train, after
which they intended killing and rob
bing the passengers.
Nearly everybody reads Tie Ard
moreite. .Do you?
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WEATHER FORECAST
New Orleans, La., June 13.
The weather forecast for Ok
lahoma for tonight and Wed
nesday is generally fair.
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PROSPECTS FOR
II HOTEL WERE
p.
m BETTER
MR. SHARP WAS IN CONFERENCE
WITH HOTEL COMMITTEE THIS
MORNING COME TO AGREE
MENT. John R. Sharp was in the city
today in conference with the hotel
committee and came to an agreement
with them whereby a hotel will be
erected, costing, together with the
lot, Jii5,0o0, at the corner of West
Main and C streets. The stipulation
is that the building shall cost $125,
000, and that the citizens subscribe
forty-five per cent of this amount,
which would make the amount that
would have to be raised here $.G,250.
Of this amount the old committee,
which was retained, has most of that
amount raised. Mr. Sharp will put up
the balance of the money for the ho
tel, and the $30,000 for the lot is to
he taken out in stock.
iMr. Sharp's proposition remains
open until July 15, and if the terni3
of the agreement are met with, he
will begin work on the hotel at once.
Governor Cruce stated this morning
that he considers the hotel proposi
tion as practically set led anl that
the people had .in opfnitunity of
showing bow badly Ihey desire one
to be built, by subscribing the
terms of the agreement.
JUDGE HOWELL HERE
Think Bloomfield Academy is Worth
Double What Government Gave.
Judge J. W. Howell, from the office
of the United States Indian com
missioner at Washington, is here to
spend a brief time with Col. S. A.
M ills of the Ardmore office. Judr?
Howell is a special supervisor, arl
makes frequent visits to all the offices
of the interior department and with
the probate attorneys. He has a bet
ter acquaintance with the men and
with their work out in the field than
any other man at Washington and
takes an active interest in all affairs
of interest to the Indian tribes. He
was formerly with the United States
attorney general and has a broad
knowledge of law, which makot him
a most useful man to the department.
In speaking of the probate work
of J. iB. Moore of this cit. Jndpe
Howell said the department ser'ously
regretted the resignation n? Mr.
Moore as probate attorney. That his
opinions were valued vern highly,
and he was recognized as not only
being industrious, but efficient as
well, and a man of the h't:htsi honor.
Judge Howell visited the ?ite pur
chased by the government fcr Pioom
field Academy, and he e3Mmates that
the piece of property is e!l worth
double what the government paid for
it for school purposes.
CONSUMING MORE COTTON
More than Half a Million Bales Used
During May.
Washington, D. C. June 13. Cotton
used during May amounted to 574,867
running bales, the census bureau an
nounced today, as compared with
493.7S9 for May, 1915.
Democratic Leaders in St. Louis
Anticipate a Quiet Convention
w - wescoit r
to...:-:?t, -WILL NAME
lNtv:i V ) WILSON l v f
f -i ft AY BE PERMANENT VV Af
CHAIRMAN j Jy '
n
MAJOR -W0UL0
LIKt TO BE
VICE PRESIDENT
aw
St. Louis. June 13. Kverything's been ready for several days for the big
assemblage of democrats here beginning tomorrow, but no such excitement
Is promised as has enlivened the gatherings of the republicans and progress
ives in Chicago. The democrats will proceed in a ciuiet. unexciting way to
renominate Wilson, adopt a platform and adjourn. There have been rumors
of a contest over the vice-presidency, but friends of Marshall nooh pooh the
suggestion. They say he'll surely be named again. Governor Elliot W. Major
of Missouri is a candidate for the second place. The orators nre ready, notably
Martin H. Glynn, ex-governor of New York, who will bo temporary chairman,
and John W. Wescott, New Jersey attorney general, wlia will have again the
honor of naming Mr. Wilson, lie made the nominating speech in 1912. Ollie
James, senator from Kentucky, is boosted again for permanent chairman, as
in 1912. Chairman William V. McCombs of the rational committee, who will
retire after the convention, has been busy for several days with the arrange
ments for the meeting.
RENEW ATMS
FOLLOWING THEIR SUCCESS AT
FT. VAUX, GERMANS NOW AT
TACKING EAST OF MEUSE.
BRING UP FRESH MEN
German Lines Being Reformed and
Are Pounding Away at the French
Defenses Paris Admits German
Success at One Point.
The battle for Verdun has broken
out with unusual violence on the east
bank cf the Meuse. After a lull fol
lowing the capture of Fort Vaux, the
Germans put their respite to good use
by bringing up fresh effectives, re
forming their lines and advancing
their artillery positions, from which
they have been methodically pound
ing at the main French defenses.
The French was office said today
that the Germans have succeeded In
entering the advanced trenches at
one point, but that elsewhere they
were repulsed.
A German official statsmmt today
repeats the Frenjh announcement
that the Germans nae enured ioi;.e
advanced trenches on the Vtrdjn
front.
An Austrian statement says the
German and Austro-Hungarian troops
delivered heavy counter attacks on
the Russians advancing in northeast
ern Bukowina and drove them back,
capturing more than thirteen hundred
prisoners.
Bombard Bulgarian Coast.
Paris, June 13. A Saloniki dis
patch says the ailed fleets are bom
barding the southern Bulgarian coarrt
from Port Lagos to Dedeachatcs. The
population is fleeing inland.
Austrian Attack Venice.
"Berlin, June 13. Austrian aero
planes raided Venice, Italy. Sunday
night according to an Austrian of
ficial statement, which says that the
raid was successful
IT M
GLYNN. THE TEMPORARY
CHAIRMAN-
WILSON SPEAKS
AT WEST POINT
WILSON MAKES
OF POLITICAL
WEST POINT.
FIRST SPEECH
CAMPAIGN AT
T BE PREPARED
Tells West Pointers That Although
America Must Not Be Country With
a Chip on Its Shoulder, She Must
Be Prepared.
West Point, June 13. President
Wilson, in making his first address
since the presidential campaign be
gan, today discussed preparedness,
militarism, Americanism, the causes
of the war in Kurope, peace, the Mon
roe Doctrine, divided allegiance and
the ideals of America.
He was addressing the graduating
class at the military academy.
He said that America must not be
a country "with a chip on its shoul
der" but that it was imperative that
America be prepared for "Mankind
to know that when America Bpeaks,
she means what she says."
Ford and Dooge Race.
This afternoon Pat Murphy, driving
a Ford touring car and L'oc Turman,
dm ing a Dodge, will run a race from
the Rlngling crossing on McLish ave
nue to Ragtown. Considerable ex
citement has been created by parti
sans of the both cars, and unless
accidents occur the distance will be
covered In record-breaking tira.
Ford Wins Race to Ragtown.
The race between the Dodge and
Ford to Ragtown was won by the
Ford which made the race in 58 min
utes and at time of going to press, the
Dodge had not yet reached Ragtown.
Birth.
Dorn to Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Tyer
in Fort Worth, Tex., a daughter,
who has been named Dorothy Lee.
Mr. and Mrs. Tyer formerly resided
in this city.
MUS
mam eyes centered on
CRAIRIITO SUCCEED MIS
COLONEL HOUSE, SENATOR SALISBURY OF CONNECTI
CUT, AND HOMER CUMMINGS OF CONNECTICUT
MOST PROMINENTLY MENTIONED TODAY.
Delegates Are Lining ud for Marshall for Another Term for
Vice-President and Expected Fight for Vice-Presidential
Nomination Appears Diminishing Bryan Arrives in St.
Louis to Report Convention and Says He'll Urge Demo
cratic Leaders to Adopt Treaty with Progressives to In
duce Bull Moosers to Support Democratic Ticket Next
Fall Would Put Planks in Democratic Platform Similar
to Progressive Platform Hughes Says Support Offered
Him by German Americans is "of Undiluted Americanism"
USE PARTY
STILL ALIVE,
THINKS RALE
OKLAHOMA BULL MOOSERS WILL
ABIDE BY ACTION OF COMMIT
TEE JUNE 25, SAYS CANDIDATE
BE NAMED.
Oklahoma City, June 13. If Colo
nel Roosevelt is 'out of politics,' as
lie declared in Ills most recent state
ment, the progressive party lias little
concern with his wishes and opin
ions, it was intimated yesterday by
John M. Hale, state chairman of the
third parly, upon it. his return from
tin Chicago convention.
Mr. Hale declared his belief that
a progressive party presidential can
didate will ho named if the former
president definitely declines to make
the race. Action on Colonel Riosc
velt's conditional refusal will be tak
en by the progressive national com
mittee when it meets June 2o.
Victor Murdock of Kansas, Hiram
Johnson of California or Raymond
Rohhins of Chicago will be nomi
nated by the committee, Mr. Hale
thinks.
Asked if lie believed Mr. Roosevelt
would support former Justice Hughes
instead of the progressive party can
didate, Mr. Hale said: "If Roosevelt
is 'out of politics' he is not for
Hughes or anybody else. If he
sticks to his declaration, it does
not matter what action he takes."
According to A. T. Roys, Oklahoma
City attorney, did everything possible
to get together with the republicans
except refusing to nominate the Oy
ster Hay citizen. "Hiram Johnson of
California and Victor Murdock of
Kansas were the only Hull Moose
leaders who didn't try to join the
republicans," Mr. Hoys continued. "It
was a great convention and every
body was thoroughly satisfied with
the republican results and most ev
erybody with the progressive end
of it. Roosevelt will not run and
thereby the republican chances are
more favorable."
KITCHENER MEMORIAL SERVICE
King George and Other Notables At
tend Service in London.
London, June 13. One thousand
persons, including King George, Queen
Mary and Dowager Queen Alexandra,
filled St. Paul's Cathedral in the me
morial service for Lord Kitchener,
who was drowned when the British
cruiser 'Hampshire struck a mine oft
the Orkneys. The services were vir
tually divested of military cere
monial. STUDENT OF JOURNALISM
Will Spend Summer Here to Gather
Practical Knowledge.
ilrwin Xunn, a junior in the school
of journalism at the State University,
is here to spend the summer with
the Ardmore Statesman. He is gath
ering some practical knowledge of
newspaper work during the summer
months and will return to the uni
versity In September. He is the
editor of the school paper at the
university, and is one of the leaders
in the school of journalism which Is
attracting much attention at this
time.
St. Louis, Mo., June 13.
Delegates arriving for tho
democratic national convention
today turned their discussions
from the ticket and platform to
consideration of a new chair
man of the national committee
to succeed McCombs and those
associated with him in the
management of the Wilson
campaign.
The names of Colonel House,
Senator Salisbury of Connecti
cut and Homer Cummings of
Connecticut are mentioned.
The prospects of a fight over
the vice presidential nomina
tion are rapidly diminishing, as
the incoming delegates line up
for Marshall.
a Bryan Wants Progressives
St. Louis, Mo:, 'June 13. iW. J.
liryan arriving today to report tho
convention as a newspaper man, said
lie would urge the democratic leaders
to adopt a treaty with the progressives
to induce most of the Hull Moose to
support the democratic ticket next
fall. Tills could he done lie said, by
putting plunks similar to (lie progress
ive platform in the democratic de
claration. He reiterated that lie
would take no part in the conven
tion. . ,
Hughes on German Support.
New York June 13. Republican can
didate Hughes in response to ques
tions regarding his attitude toward
the support offered him by Germans,
said it was "of undiluted American
Ism." GRAND JURY IN COMANCHE CO.
Judge Asks Investigatoin of Lynching
of Carl Dudley.
Lawton, Okla., June 12. A grand
jury was called today in Comanche
County, primarily to investigate the
lynching of Carl Dudley alleged slayer
of Policeman Hays who was shot
while In discharge of his duty as an
officer. A mob of about 300 shot Dud
ley and dragged his body around the
square on Sunday night, April 9, af
ter the officers had been overpower
ed. Judge Cham Jones delivered the
charge to the grand jury, making a
plea for law enforcement.
LIGHTNING KILLS FARMER
J. A. Saxon, Young Farmer of Near
McMillan Killed Monday.
McMillan, Okla., June 13. J. A.
Saxon, aged 2'!, was killed by light
ning Monday on his farm ono mils
west of McMillan. He was out on
his farm' when killed and tha l-ody
was not found until sevial hours
later.
He leaves a widow. Deceased
was a member of the W. O. V. tnd
I. O. O. F. lodges hero.
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ARDMOREITE
SUBSCRIBERS
If at any time you fail to
receive your paper by 6:30 p.
m. on week days, or by 9:00 a.
m. on Sundays, and will phone
No. 5, I will send you a paper
by special delivery boy Imme-
a diately upon receipt of your a
a call.
a No complaints can be han-
a died if call is not received on
a or before time stipulated,
a R. T. MEEKER,
a Circulation Manager.
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