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The Daily Ardmoreite. [volume] (Ardmore, Okla.) 1893-current, June 29, 1918, Image 1

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American Troops Sent Direct From the United States Land In Italy
SERVICE With SAFETY
GUARANTY STATE BANK.
Of Ardmore.
Not Too Small for Large Business.
DAILY ARDMOREITE
We Can Help You Help Yourself
GUARANTY STATK BANK.
Ot Ardmore.
Not Too Larue for Small Business.
A Newspaper of Character
e
t
1
FULL LEASED WIRE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
ARDMORE, OKLAHOMA, SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 1918.
VOL. 25.
NO. 266.
SIX PAGES TODAY
CARTER WAS FIRST
"OVER THE TOP" IN
WAR STAMP DRIVE
JUNE 28 CAMPAIGN ESTAB
LISHED NEW RECORD IN
WAR ACTIVITIES.
CITY MEETS QUOTA
Nearly Every Country District Re
ports Pledges in Excess of Allot
ment County's Excess Estimated
at More Than One-Third.
Carter County was first in the
State to report "over the top" in
yesterday's War Savings Stamps
drive. Thomas W. Champion,
county chairman, received the fol
lowing telegram this morning from
George W. Barnes, state director:
"Congratulations; your county first
'over the top.'"
In view of the fact that Carter led
all the counties in the United States
in prorata purchases of war savings
stamps on June 1, the result of yes
terday's drive is particularly grati
fying to local workers, as it sets a
new record in local war activities.
Reports are being tabulated at the
county headquarters today and the
indications are that nearly every
community in the county oversub
scribed its quota. In the city the
quota was $160,000 and all but one
ward passed its limit. First Ward
pledged $52,000, an excess of $2,000;
Second Ward, $39,000. an excess of
$4,000; Third Ward, $65,000, an ex
cess of $15,000; Fourth Ward was
the only ward in the city which
failed to meet its quota, $25,000. The
Fourth Ward pledged about $13,000.
Outside of Ardmore most of the
districts oversubscribed. Wirt prob
ably made the largest oversubscrip
tion .pledging $60,000. Its quota
was $25,000. Healdton's quota was
$35,000 and $60,000 was pledge..
It was announced today that $50,
000 worth of stamps were sold for
cash yesterday.
Chairman Champion estimates
that the total amount pledged in
Carter County yesterday will pass
the half-niillion-dollar mark.
WILSON WATCHING HOW
MONEY IS EXPENDED
INTIMATE KNOWLEDGE OF
THE COMPLEX PROBLEMS
ARISING FROM WAR.
Chicago, June 29. An intimate
picture of President Wilson's famil
iarity with the industrial phases of
America's war preparations was giv
en yesterday by F.dward N. Hurley,
chairman of the shippaing board, in
an address before a meeting here
of the Illinois manufactues' Asso
ciation. "We are applying manufacturing
principle to the shipbuilding busi
ness and we find these methods suc
cessful," Mr. Hurley said. "Inci
dentally, it may be of interest for
you to know that the methods
adopted have been followed with
close interest by President Wilson.
"1 think there is no impropriety
in telling you that the president is
handling all his work so systemat
ically that he finds time to give a
part of his time to the more inti
mate problems of the various de
partments. "The president knows more about
costs than any of you would believe
to be possible in the case of a great
war executive. You know that con
gress allotted the president an ap
propriation of $101,000 for emerg
ency war purposes, lie personally
kept his accounts, and you may feel
confident that every dollar was care
fully expended under his direction.
"The president has been stead
fast in his determination that there
shall be no profiteering in this war.
and I am willing to stand sponsor
for the fact that he knows what
constitutes profiteering, and what,
on the other hand, constitutes a
margin of profit that enables the
manufacturer to expand his plant to
meet the nation's needs in this
war."
GREAT BARGE LINES
FOR THE MISSISSIPPI
SOON BE AUTHORIZED
Washington, June 29. A favor
able report cm the plan to construct
barge Iinei on the Mississippi Kiver
to relieve railroad congetion has
been made to Director General Mc
Adoo by Charles A. Prouty. director
of the division of public service of
tbe railroad administration. No an
nouncement has yet been made re
garding what amount will be ex
pended for the purpose. Represent
ative of commrcial and civic organ
izations along the Mississippi River
have urged the administration to set
aside between $8,000,000 and $9,000,
000 for tbe project. ,
PROFITEERS ARE
AMERICAN PEOPLE, U. S
TRADE COMMISSION SA YS
INORDINATE GREED ..JLf BAREFACE
FRAUD ARE TERMS APPLIED TO
MANY INDUSTRIES OF COUNTRY
MEAT, FLOUR, CANNED MILK, CANNED SALMON, STEEL
COPPER, ZINC, LUMBER,
DUSTRIES NAMED IN REPORT TO SENATE EXOR
BITANT SALARIES PAID TO HEADS OF CONCERNS
AND SADDLED ONTO THE PEOPLE ARE ALSO EX
POSEp BY THE COMMISSION.
Washington, Jnne 29. Investiga
tions carefully conducted have led
to the conclusion that profiteering
exists among American industries
at the present time, due in part to
tdvantage being taken of "war pres
sure for heavy production," and in
part to "inordinate greed and bare
face fraud," the Federal Trade Com
mission announced today in a re
port sent to the senate.
The report was sent in response
to a resolution asking the commis
sion to furnish the senate with all
figures and information relative to
profiteering in order that steps
might be taken to remedy present
conditions.
Outstanding features of the re
port, each supported by extensive
data, are:
The heavy profit made by the low
cost concern under a government
fixed price for the whole country.
The heavy profit made by the
meat packers and allied industries
and by the flour millers.
The trade tendency to increase
and maintain prices against forces
of competition.
Some Included Articles.
The report is based on findings by
the commission for the war indus
tries board, the food administration,
the fuel administration and other
executive departments, on industrial
surveys and through enforcement of
laws against unfair methods of com
petition. The products investigated
and which the report covers are
steel, copper, zinc, nickel, sulphur,
lumber, flour, canned milk and can
ned salmon. Salaries and bonus
paid higher officials also were the
subject of inquiry.
Trice fixing by the government,
the report says, has tended to pre
vent the market from running away,
but at the same time it strengthens
the stronger factors in industry in
their position and enriches them by
profits "which are without prece
dent." While the price of flour has been
stabilized by fixing a price for wheat
and a maximum margin of profit for
flour, the report shows that profits
increased from an average of 12 per
cent on the investment fur the four
SENATE REFUSES TO
EXTEND DRAFT AGE
Washington, June 29 The senate
late yesterday rejected by a vote of
49 to 25 the Fall amendment to the
$12,000,000,000 army appropriation
bill extending the draft ages to 20
and 40 years, respectively.
Preliminary to disposition of the
Fall amendment, the senate voted
down, 41 to 33, an amendment by
Senator Hardwick of Georgia to
make the minimum age limit 21
years, as at present, instead of 21).
as proposed by Senator Fall. A
proposal by Senator Weeks of Mas
sachusetts, to make the maximum
age 35 years, instead of 40, proposed
in the Fall amendment, was reject
ed on a viva voce vote.
'DARKHORSE" ELECTED
PRESIDENT OF ROTARIANS
Kansas City. Mo.. June 29. John
Poole of Washington. I). C. 'dark
horse' candidate, yesterday was
elected president of the Interna
tional Association of Rotary Clubs
on the second ballot. He received
273 votes, hut his election later was
made unanimous on a motion of
Robinson A. McDowell of Louis
ville, past first vice-president and
one of the candidates for president.
Hun Editor Convicted.
Kansas City. Mo.. June 29.
Jacob Frohwerck. a former editorial
writer for the Missouri Staats-Zei-tung,
a German language newspa
per, found guilty by a jury last
night of violating the espionage act,
today was sentenced to 10 years' im
prisonment on each of 12 counts,
the sentences to run concurrently.
In addition. Frohwerck was fined
$500 on the first count.
OIL ARE SOME OF THE IN-
years ending June 30, 1916, to nearly
38 per cent in the vear ending June
30, 1917.
Indefensible Profits.
These profits, it is stated, "are in
defensible considering that an aver
age profit of one mill for six months
of the vear shows as high as $2 a
barrel."
The report declared that unprece
dented profits are shown in a sur
vey of the packing industry. In this
connection it is said:
"Five meat packers Armour,
Swift, Morris, Wilson and Cudahy
and their subsidiary and affiliated
companies, have monopolistic con
trol of the meat industry and are
reaching out for like domination in
other products. Their manipula
tions of the market embrace every
device that is useful to them with
out regard to law. Their reward
expressed in terms of profit reveals
that four of these concerns have
pocketed in 1915, 1916 and 1917,
$140,000,000. However delicr.te a
definition is framed for 'profiteering,'
these packers have preyed upon the
people unconscionably.'
Investigation in the coal mining
industry reveals, in the opinion of
the commission, that despite gov
ernment price fixing large margins
of profit have been made.
In Oil Industry.
In the oil industrv large profits
are now being made in fuel oil and
gasoline, the industry being one
where the law of supply and demand
still operates. The operation of this
law is held to be responsible for the
heavy profits, but a portion of the
blame is laid to the spreading of
false reports regarding supplies.
Steel companies made abnormal
profits before the government fixed
a price for the product, and it is
shown that some have since made
unusual returns. Profits of the
United States Steel Corporation are
estimated at 24.9 per cent in 1917, as
compared with 15.6 per cent in 1916,
and 5.2 per cent in 1905.
In practically everv one of the
other industries covered by the re
port it is shown unusually heavy
profits have been made in the last
few years. Abnormal salaries are
also shown to have been paid ex
ecutive officials.
WIRE BULLETINS
Washington, June 29. Capture
of 309 German prisoners and the
destruction of three German air
planes by American aviators was
reported by General Pershing in an
official communique today.
Washington, June 29. Following
enthusiastic praise by senators of
the administration of the army draft,
the senate today adopted an amend
ment to the army bill to make Pro
vost Marshal General Enoch 11.
Crowder a lieutenant general dur
ing the war.
Washington, June 29. Declaring
that all the United States asks of
Mexico for American citizens is jus
tice and fair dealing, the United
States today made public a "solemn
protest" sent to President Carranza
against the Mexican decree of Feb.
19, 1918. establishing a tax on oil
lands.
London. June 29. Four British
torpedo boat destroyers fought a
long-range engagement with a Ger
man destroyer force across the Bel
gian coast on Thursday evening.
The action was broken off before
anv decisive results were attained.
London, June 29. The German
government, according to German
newspapers, is taking preparatory
measures with a view to intervention
in Russia, says a dispatch to the
Exchange Telegraph Company to
day from Zurich. Under this plan,
it is stated, troops will be sent to
"restore order," and be assisted by
maximalist forces.
ROBBING
PLAN OF KERENSKY
PROPOSED PROJECT OF IN
TERVENTION IN RUSSIA
OPPOSED.
ALLIES WERE DILATOR!
Entente Should Have Helped Ke
rensky When He Was in Office
and Struggling to Continue War,
Englishman Declares in London.
London, June 29. The question
of what the attitude of the allies
toward Russia should be, especially
with reference to former Premier
Kerensky's appearance upon the
scene, is discussed by the Daily
News today in an editorial under
the signature of its editor. The ar
ticle contends that if the cause of
freedom is the cause of the allies,
then the allies should have helped
the revolution when it was given
birth, but it declares that they neith
er welcomed nor aided it.
"With the exception of the Unit
ed States," the writer asserts, "the
allies have for more than a year
looked on with cold distrust. They
have thought of interests when they
should have thought of principles."
Remarking that the allies did not
help Kerensky when he might have
held his position with their aid,
which it interprets as an invitation
to the allies to enter Russia and
repress the bolsheviki as a prelim
inary to raising an army to fight
the Germans.
After discussing at length the
practicability of military interven
tion through Siberia, apart from
the question of expediency, the ar
ticle dismisses the project as imprac
ticable and reaches the conclusion
that Kerensky's method is not the
way to regain the confidence of the
Russian people and bring them to
the side of the allies.
AMERICAN MAJOR IN
FRANCE GOT SURPRISE
ANSWER FROM AMERICAN
With the American Army in
France, June 13. (Correspondence
of the Associated Press) The at
tack made last night by the Ger
mans on Bouresches, which the
American troops were holding, was
so violent that the worst was feared.
A report was rcceivej that the town
had been occupied by the Germans
and a major was sent down from
headquarters to ascertain the facts.
He fell in with the officer who had
been entrusted with the defense of
a village.
"Are the Boches in Bouresches?"
he inquired hastily.
There was a lurid interlude, and
the staff officer bellowed:
"Was it not the order that no
Germans were to be allowed to re
main in Bouresches?"
"Yes, sir."
"Then, why in the hell have you
left them there?" was demanded.
"Burying party not yet arrived,
sir," was the answer.
FRENCH PAPER DEMANDS
BOMBING REPRISALS BE
MADE ON HUN CITIES
Paris, June 29. In an effort to
organize the defense of Paris against
German raiding airplanes, the avia
tion committee of the chamber of
deputies will confer with Premier
Clcmenceau and recommend the
pursuit of German machines which
bombard the capital and the crea
tion of three distinct zones.
The first of these zones will be
exclusively for cannon and airplanes,
the next will be defended by small
balloons and the third will be bril
liant y lighted.
Peprisals against German cities
are demanded by the pres, the Petit
Parisian demanding that the cities
of Cologne, Coblenz and Frankfort
be made special objects of attack.
The newspaper recommends that
the control of airplane bombard
ments of German cities be placed in
the hands of an independent body.
New York Bank Statement.
New York. Jnne 29. The actual
condition of clearing house banks
and trust companies for the week
shows that they hold $171,971,680
reserve in excess of legal require
ments. This is an increase of $124.-
526,550 from last week
I S. TROOPS TAKE
CHARGE OF TWO
CANAL ZONE CITIES
WILSON ORDERS COLON AND
PAVONA OCCUPIED BY
ARMED FORCES.
OUARREL OVER ELECTION
President of Country Postpones
Date for Tests at Polls and Op
position Parties Appeal to Wash
ington Executive Sends Protest
Panama, June 29. Upon orders
from Washington American troops
bega-i policing the cities of Pana
ma and Colon at 2 o'clock yester
day afternoon. The action was tak
en under the treaty of 1904 author
izing the United States to assume
this police duty whenever it was
necessary to maintain order. The
Panama government has protested
to Washington against the meas
ure. Because the former administra
tion hail refused to correct condi
tions in the two cities, soldiers in
the canal zone were forbidden to
enter them and l tie civilian em
ployes boycotted Colon and Pana
ma until the mandate of tile mili
tary authorities was carried out by
the Panama government.
Postpone Elections.
The new administration, under
President Urriolu, began to clean up
the cities, but in connection wit n
this work, announced that the elec
tions fixed lor June 30 and July 7
would be postponed for six mouths
because of the tear that serious dis
orders might occur if held on the
dates set by law.
The opposition party protested
to Washington against the defend
ant of the elections, claiming tint
such a move would serve no purpose
except to favor the candidates sup
ported by the new administration.
The American state department ad
v isjV.d President Urriola to hold the
elections, but he replied that a fair
election could not be held now, and
he suggested that American com
missioners supervise the making up
of poll books and assume charge oi"
an election to be held late in July
or early in August, which, the Pan
ama president said, could be held in
an open and fair manner.
No disorders have been reported
since it was announced that the de
cree forbidding the election would
be enforced by the police.
Opposition Appealj to U. S.
The opposition party again pro
tested to Washington, and yester
day the American state department
notified President Urriola that bc
caues of disorders American troops
would police the cities until further
notice. No time limit being se,
'there
one in Panama who
knows how long the occupation will
continue.
President Urriola yesterday issued
a statement on the situation:
"F'orciiMi Secretary LaFrevrc
states that at 11 o'clock the char-e !
d'affaires of the United States scut
a note informing him that the Unit
ed States by virtue of article 7 of
the treaty of 1M has ordered that)
its armed forces at 2 o clock this
afternoon would enter the cities of
Panama and Colon to maintain pub
lic order in them and on the waters
adjacent to them.
"At that hour in the midst of pro
found tranquility the armed Ameri
can forces entered without the least
resistance on the part of our police
or of authorities, notwithstanding
that the Panama government did
not have lime to intorm the officials
that the government would exer
cise their action because of the
memorandum covering this feature
was not handed to me until after
1 o'clock in the afternoon.
Some Peppery Language.
"1 do not wish to characterize
now as unjustifiable this act of the
goernment of the United States,
but the fact should be understood
that my government, with the force
at its disposal, is able to maintain
public order in the whole nation,
and without doubt in the cities .t
Panama and Colon. True, it is, th.it
there is considerable political ex
citement of the approaching elec
tions, but this is characteristic cf
all democracies.
"It also is true that although
there were fears of disturbances in
some parts of the republic, nothing
has taken place, nor could take
place, which would give rise to a
doubt that the government is impo
tent to put down with a strong
hand the least attemp a public dis
order. "It is also pertinent that the politi
cal problem which stirs the country
could have been solved satisfactorily
by the United States, whose friend-
j ly co-operation we solicited."
President I rriola has prepared a
1 manifesto to the country, and yes-
WEATHER FORECAST
For Ardmore anil Vicinity:
Tonight and Sunday, generally
cloudy.
Oklahoma: tienerally cloudy
tonight and Sunday.
Fast and West Texas: Tonight
md Sunday partly cloudy to
cloudy.
Local Temperature.
Maximum temperature yester
day, 104 degrees; minimum last
night, 67.
Precipitation.
Rainfall last night, .40 inch.
FIRST TROOPS FROM U. S.
ARE ON ROMAN SOIL
MORE TO BE SENT.
Washington, June 29. The first
American troops landed yesterday
in Italy, General March, chief of
staff, announced today. These are
not the force sent bv General Persh
ing, but consisted of units shipped
from this country.
The troops consist largely of sani
tary units, but include other special
organizations, General March ex
plained. On the whole, however, it
is made up mostly of non-combatant
units. The combatant troops will
be sent by General Pershing as pre
viously announced.
General March had no announce
ment to make today as to the total
number of troops shipped from this
country to France. Formal an
nouncement, he said, would be made
later.
Surveying the entire battle front,
General March said the situation
could be said to be extremely favor
able to the allies. He would make
no comment upon the indications of
an impending German attack.
The first National army division
has taken up a sector at the front.
General March also announced. It
is the Seventy-seventh, raised in
New York, trained at Camp Upton,
and originally commanded by Maj.
Gen. J. Franklin Hell. It was taken
across under Major General John
son. Five American divisions which
had been brigaded with the British
for training have been returned to
General Pershing's command with
training completed.
One of these is the Thirty-fifth
division, composed of Kansas and
Missouri troops and commanded by
Maj. Gen. William M. Wright when
it left the United States.
General March disclosed that the
official reports from the Italian front
place the number of Austrians cap
tured at 18,000 and a large amount
of war material. The line of the
Piave has been entirely restored by
the Italians and in some places has
been slightly advanced.
PRESIDENT WILSON
VETOES POSTOFFICE
APPROPRIATION BILI
Washington, June 29. President
Wilson today veteod the postoffice
appropriation bill.
The president vetoed the bill be
cause it provided for having the gov
ernmrnt take over pneumatic tube
mail services in New York. Boston.
Philadelphia. Chicago and some
other cities until next March and
then have the Interstate Commerce
Commission determine their dispo
sition. Postmaster General Burleson op
posed the provision, but congress in
sisted on it.
terday afternoon sent the following
cablegram to President Wilson.
"Today at 11 o'clock I was in
formed by the charge d'affaires of
the United States in this capital
that at 2 o'clock in the afternoon the
cities of Panama and Colon would
be occupied by he military forces
of the canal zone, on the pretext of
maintaining public order. I protest
against this interference, which
violates the sovereignty of Panama
without any justification, inasmuch
as the government of Panama has
sufficient means to maintain public
order in these cities, and 1 decline
to share w ith your excellency's gov
ernment the responsibilities which
so grave an action implies.
"Ciro Luis Urriola."
America Is Determined.
Washington, June 29. The pro
tect from Panama over the policing
of Colon and Panama by United
States troops had not reached the
state department today. United
States troops will remain in Colon
and Panama, according to prevent
intentions, until order is establish
ed and all the elections have been
held.
AMERICAN UNITS
YEAR S EXPENSE FOR
WAR !MM000
FORMER EXPENSE OF GOV
ERNMENT FOR ONE YEAR
LESS THAN BILLION.
DAILY COST $50,000,000
With Addition of $1,200,000,000,
Which the Government Spent In
the Three Months Preceding Dec
laration of War, the War Cost In
Money to Date Is $13,800,000,000.
Washington, June 29. In discus
sion of amendments preparatory to
passing the $12,000,000,000 army ap
propriation bill today, the senate
rejected, 45 to 19, an amendment
proposing to specifically "direct" the
president to raise an army of 5,000,
000 men as soon as equipment and
transportation could be provided.
Many senators, however, declared
that the vote did not really repre
sent opposition in congress to an
army of such size, and that senti
ment for great expansion as soon as
war degiartment plans permit was
overwhelming,
Washington, June 2). The gov
ernment today closed its books for
the fiscal year just ending the first
full fiscal year in the war and
Monday will open new annual rec
ords. Cabinet members and other
heads of departments will make re
ports to the president, covering their
stewardship of funds and respon
sibilities for the year closing today,
or technically, tomorrow.
In government financial history
the year will go down as a period
of expense hardly dreamed of a de
cade ago. More than $12,600,01X1.
000 is the actual outlay since July
1, 1917, to meet the multitude of" big
bills run up for the army, the navy,
the shipbuilding program, airplane
construction, coast defense require
ments, other government activities
and the needs of the allies for
American loans to finance purchases
of war materials in this country. lily
peace rimes the government spent
less than $1,000,000,000 annually.
With the addition of the $1,200,
000,000 which the government spent
in the three months of war preced
ing this fiscal year, the war's cost
in money to date has been $13,800,
000,000. War activity now is draining
about $50,000,000 a day from the
nation's public treasury.
THRUST BY BRITISH
NETS 400 PRISONERS
TWO FIELD GUNS, MACHINE
GUNS AND TRENCH MOR
TARS ARE TAKEN.
London, June 29. In their suc
cessful attack in Flanders, east if
Nieppe wood, yesterday, the British
took more than 400 prisoners, the
war office announced today Two
German field guns, in addition to
the machine guns and trench mor
tars taken, also were captured i'l
this attack.
The statement reads:
"The total number of prisoners
taken by us in yesterday's success
ful operation east of Nieppe forest
exceeds 4J. This figure does not
include those taken west of Merris.
Two German field guns, in addition
to a number of machine guns and
trench mortars, also were captured
by us.
"The hostile artillery has been ac
tive opposite Yaire wood, south if
the Somme and west of Geuchy (Ar
ras) region.
"There has been increased artil
lery activity on both sides in tbt
Nieppe forest sector."
French Repulse Attack.
Paris. June 2. German attacks
on the front southwest of Soissons
for the purpose tf ejecting the
French from positions taken by
them on Thursday night were re
pulsed last night and the French
line was held intact, according to
the statement issued by the war of
fice today.
In addition to their attack on the
front in the Soissons area the Ger
mans sent assault detachments
against the lines held by the Italians
on the B'igny heights, southwest of
Rheiras. The Italians drove off tht
German thrust.
In an operation northwest of
Montdidier, American troops took
40 prisoners.
ST. LOUIS MAN IS
ASST. ATTORNEY GENERAL
Washington. June 29. Charles P.
William of St. Louis was today ap
pointed a special assistant attorney
general to have charge of enforce
ment of war legislation in the St.
Louis district, in co-operation with
United States Attorney Oliver.
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