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The Daily Ardmoreite. [volume] (Ardmore, Okla.) 1893-current, July 01, 1918, Image 1

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Wilson Asks Congress To Authorize Control Telegraph and Phones
SERVICE With SAFETY
GUARANTY STATE BANK.
Of Ardmor.
Not Too Small (or Large Business.
DAILY, ARDMOREITE
We Can Help You Help Yourself
GUARANTY STATE BANK.
Of Ardmore.
Not Too Large for Small Business,
A Newspaper of Character
s-
FULL LEASED WIRE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
ARDMORE, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, JULY 1, 1918.
VOL. 25.
NO. 268.
SIX PACES TODAY
PART OF RUSSIAN
FLEET TURNED
OVERJO ENEMY
BOLSHEVIKI SURRENDERS
WAR SHIPS OF BLACK
SEA SQUADRON.
E WERE BLOWN IIP
Germany "Promised" to Return All
the Vessels After the Conclusion
of Peace, Russian Foreign Min
ister Explains.
(By The Associated Tress.)
London, July 1. The bolshevik
government has surrendered to Ger
many a part of the Russian Black
Sea fleet which fled to Novo Ros
sysk when the Germans captured
Sebastopol, says an official telegram
from Moscow. The other ships of
the fleet were blown up by their
crews. Germany has promised not
to use the warships and to return
them to Russia after the conclusion
of, peace. Foreign Minister Tchit
cherin in an announcement says:
"It was only on condition that
such an agreement be concluded
that Germany stopped the advance
of the German troops toward Novo
Rossysk."
Moscow, Sunday, June. 23. (By
The Associated Press). the recent
report of the capture of Irkutsk, Si
beria, by German war prisoners is
without foundation, according to a
dispatch received here from Vladi
vostok. Irkutsk is in direct com
munication with Vladivostok, the
message states.
There is no rising in progress
among the war prisoners in Siberia
and the position of the societs is
stable, the message declares.
Moscow, June 23. (By The As
sociated Press.) A state of war
has been proclaimed in the province
of Archangel.
The province of Archangel ex
tends from the Ural mountains
westward to Finland, a distance of
approximately 900 miles, and from
Vologda and Olonels on the south to
the Arctic ocean, about 400 miles.
It contains the ports of Archangel
and Mourmansk, the only Russian
outlets to the Arctic ocean. It was
on the Mourmansk coast that
French and British troops were
landed some time ago to protest the
Mourmansk railway, over which al
lied supplies had been going into
Russia.
Washington, July 1. In the Rus
sian province of Aarchangel, where
a state of war has been proclaimed,
according to a dispatch from Mos
cow, lies the Arctic port of Kola,
with its railroad guarded by allied
and American naval forces. Conse
quently, the greatest interest at
taches to any developments there
and officials and diplomats are won
dering what the declaration of a
state of war may mean.
Vast U. S. Supplies.
All recent reports to the state de
partments have represented condi
tions to be quiet around Archangel
and along the railroad southward
from Kola, and it is hoped that the
latest development may mean no
more than that the bolshevik gov
ernment has proclaimed martial law
to maintain order.
At Kola and for miles inland
along the railroad there are acres t
milifnrv en mil ip mnninir all fh
fr.m lnmnlivM an, I rannnn
to clothing and provisions, scattered j
over the country. Most oi these
were shipped from America and
England when the Russian armies
still were fighting the Germans, and
were short of supplies.
The goods accumulated while the
railroad from the Arctic port was
being rushed to completion as a mili
tary measure. When the line was
opened, but before any large quan
tity of supplies could be shipped
southward, the Brest-Ditovsk peace
was declared and the movement
ceased.
Wanted by Germans.
It is known that the Oermans
have been exceedingly anxious to
obtain possession of these supplies,
or if they could not do so directly,
to have them taken over by the
Finnish White Guards, who have
been acting under German prompt
ing. MORE HONOR TO U. S.
FROM SOUTH AMERICA
RV Janeiro, June 20. The Bra
zilian government today announced
that the Fourth of July would be
celebrated as a national holiday.
Uurguay last week also decreed
July 4 a national holiday in honor
rd the United States.
WESTERN UNION CO. AND
OTHER WIRE SYSTEMS BE
TAKEN OVER BY WILSON
AS RESULT OF
E
Washington, July 1. Government
control and operation of the nation's
telegraph and telephone systems was
recommended to congress today by
President Wilson.
In the face of an impending strike
of union operators employed by the
Western Union Company, an effort
will be made to put through before
the recess of congress this week
pending legislation empowering the
president to take over the systems.
Washington, July 1. President
Wilson today informed the house
interstate and foreign commerce
committee that he is heartily in
favor of legislatiaon authorizing the
government to take over the tele
graph and telephone lines.
A resolution authorizing the presi
dent to take over the lines probably
will be reported favorably by the
committee this afternoon.
In Brief Note.
The president's views were com
municated in a brief note indorsing
the legislation, but making no ref
erence to the strike of Western
Union operators called for July 8 by
the Commercial Telegraphers'
Union after the Western Union had
refused to abide by rulings of the
federal war labor board on the dis
charge of union operators.
Letters of approval also were sent
by Secretary Baker, Secretary Dan
iels and Postmaster General Burle
son, whose opinions had been sought
by the committee.
Members of congress said today
that the attorney general had ad
vised the president that he is with
out authority under existing law to
take over the lines and that if neces
sity tor action arose with congress
in recess he would be without pow
er to act.
To Head Off Chaos.
The president's views were con
veyed in a brief note to Chairman
Sims of the house interstate and
foreign commerce committee, in
dorsing a letter written by Postmas
ter General Burleson, urging legis
lation, "at this moment when the
paralysis of a large part of the sys
tem of electrical communication is
threatened."
Representative Sims had written
to the president, Secretaries Baker
and Daniels and Mr. Burleson, ask
ing their opinion of a pending bill;
introduced by Representative Aswell
PRESIDENT
MEASUR
WILL
CONGRESS BEFORE OPERA
GEN, ALEXIEFF'S VOLUNTEER ARMY
PREPARING
TO
UN
FORC
ES MARCHING E
London, July 1. Tile VoluntfCf
army being raised in the Don Cos
sack district is increasing rapidly in
sue. iienerai Alexiett has been
pointed commander-in-chief, and is
directing all operations. This is re- The manifesto mentioned is prob
oorted in an F.xchanee Teleerauh ' ably identical with one reported in
dispatch from Moscow dated June
25 transmitting advices received
from Rostov.
The Germans, according to re
ports received from Voronesh, are
advancing steadily and are arming
German colonists in the Tavris dis
trict. The Ukraine government has or
dered the mobil.zation of all men
who have not taken part in the war
up to this time, and plans to create
eight new army corps.
Duke Micltael Issues Manifesto.
London, June 1 Grand Duke Mi
chael is reported to have issued a
manifesto stating that he considered
it his duty to restore and regener
ate the Russian people, say an Ex
change Telegraph dispatch from
Moscow, under date of June 25. He
calls upon the people to overthrow
the present government.
The grand duke's appeal for the
ousting of the bolshevik government
is based upon dissolution of the
constituent assembly, which was
called to decide upon Russia's form
of government, from the bolshevik
S
REQUEST
BE HURRIED T
T
of Louisiana, empowering the presi
dent to take over telephone, tele
graph and radio systems. All three
gave their approval.
Immediately upon receipt of the
president s letter, the house commit
tee arranged to report the resolution
to the house with a view to its pas
sage before the recess.
It is understood that the presi
dent has not concluded definitely to
take over the telegraphs and tele
phones as soon as the power is given.
He probably will await the result
of the strike of Western Union op
erators called for July 8 by the Com
mercial Telegraphers' Union be
cause the Western Union refused
to abide by dealings of the war
board and continued to discharge
union operators.
Union officials claim pne-fourth
of the 20,000 operators of'the West
ern Union will walk out. The com
pany insists that the strike call will
have no substantial effect upon its
business.
Senator Sheppard orf Texas today
introduced a resolution, identical
to that pending in the house. It was
referred to the military committee.
House Resolution,
The resolution, which was intro
duced by Representative Aswell of
Louisiana, reads
"That the president, if in his dis
cretion it is deemed desirable in or
der to insure their continuous oper
ation or to guard the secrecy of mil
itary and governmental communica
tions, or to prevent communication
by spies and other public enemies
thereon, or for other military or
public reasons, shall have power to
take possession and control of any
telegraph, telephone, marine cable or
radio systems, and operate the same
subject to those conditions of law,
so far as applicable, which are in
force as to steam railroads, while
under federal control."
Californian's Crew Lands.
Washington, July 1. The crew of
the American steamer Californian,
sunk by a mine off the French coast,
has been landed at a French port,
the navy department today was ad
vised. This is the first news received
of the vessel since a dispatch sev
eral days ago from Admiral Sims re
ported she had struck a mine and
was sinking.
act resulting in the disintegration of
Russia, the manifesto declares. Am
nestv for past offenses will be grant-
, rd all w ho take part in the revolu-
ap-i,:nn ,h- rnH Hub nmm;s
an Amsterdam dispatch of June 27
to have been issued about that time
by Grand Duke Michael Alevandro
vitch, a younger brother of former
emperor Nicholas. This manifesto,
it was announced, had been ad
dressed to the Russian people upon
the grand duke's placing himself at
the head of a new government in
Siberia.
Clash Is Expected.
London, July 1. Increasing ac
tivity along the Mourmansk railroad
is reported by the Christiana corre
spondent of The Times under date
of July 27, who says that a Finnish
command of 600 troops, of whom
500 are Germans, are marching
down the Pasvill valley.
An armed British steamer with a
British vice-consul aboard has gone
to Petchenga, whence it is expected
to make a dash along the Pasvill
River.
A large and well equipped Rus
sian force, according to reports re
ceived by the correspondent at Pet
chenga, is marching toward the
railway "ro the mountains.
U
ORS STRIKE
BATTLE ADVANCING
mm
TO
RAISE $1,064,000
FOR Y. M. C. A.
JAKE HAMON CREATES UP
ROAR WHEN PROMISING
OKLAHOMA WILL
San Ontonio, Texas, July 1. Ok
lahoma is to raise $1,064,000 in the
fall drive for the $112,000,000 min
imum war fund for the V. M. C. A.
When a Texan at Saturdays' confer
ence of delegates of the two states
objected to the Lone Star state's
allotment of $2,721,600, Jake Hamon
of Ardmore, after a brief caucus
w ith P. C. Dings and Wirt Franklin,
also of Ardmore; K. V. Marland
of Ponca City; E. Roger Kemp of
Tulsa and several other big oil men,
shouted;
"We Oklahomans in addition to
handling the sums assigned to the
state, agree to take any portion of
the allotment for Texas, which Tex
as can't handle," and the convention
roared.
Marland Heads State Campaign.
W. Marland of Ponca City was
elected chairman of the state cam
paign. Marland announced his plans
to open headquarters in Ok
lahoma City as soon as the dates of
the drive are announced. He says
he is going to call a state convention
and enlist the co-operation of the
whole state in his task.
"Oklahoma raised $411,000 in the
Y. M. C. A. drive in November,
1917," Mr. Marland said. "We have
also three times as much to get this
year and we will do it, but it is go
ing to take complete organization
and work."
The following Oklahomans will
assist: E. Roger Kemp of Tulsa,
district chairman in organizing the
work of the department campaign
committees. C. E. Sharp of Wood
ward, C. W. Howard of Frederick,
P. C. Dings of Ardmore and II. V.
Foster of Bartlcsville.
Each state is to make its own divi
sion of district and city quotas. It
is voted to make the deferred pay
ments on the pledges in the new
campaign due in two equal install
ments. Perkins and Mott Present.
George W. Perkins, chairman of
the national war work council, who
will head the fall V. M. C. A. cam
paign, which has taken over the
Y. M. C. A. budget for the coming
drive, and Dr. John R. Mott. inter
national secretary of the Y. M. C.
A., were the outstanding figures of i
the convention. More than 600
business leaders of the six states at
tended one of the most impressive
gatherings held in Texas in vears.
One of the most forceful statements
made by either Doctor Mott or Mr.
Perkins was contained in a letter to
Mr. Perkins from General Pershing,
in which the commander of the
American expeditionary forces said,
"900 soldiers who have had the ben
efits of Y. M. C. A. care are worth
more than 1.000 soldiers who know
nothing of the beneficent influence
of this wonderful organization,"
ALLEGED TO HAVE PICKED
UP, RIFLED POCKETBOOK
Saturday afternoon a woman laid
her pocketbook down in the railway
station at llealdton. The agent who
saw a man pick it up ond get on the
train with it, notified the conductor,
letter the conductor telegraphed
back to the agent to search the road
bed. The pocketbook, empty, was
found along the track about threee
fourths of a mile this side of lleald
ton. After leaving llealdton the
conductor had noticed the man who
is said to have taken it enter the
toilet and it is supposed he emptied
it and threw it from the train. It
contained a gold watch, two $10 gold
pieces, one $2.50 gold piece, silver
and bills, the amount of which is not
known.
On reaching Ardmore the con
ductor notified the police. Police
man Harrison, about 10 o'clock Sat
urday night, arrested W. R. Afcers
and turned him over to Jim Carter,
deputy sheriff, who placed him in
the county jail. This morning com
plaint was filed against Akers in Jus
tice Bourland's court, charging him
with larceny.
ENTENTE CONTINUES
TO BOMB HUN TOWNS
Pari. July I. Five persons were
killed and fourteen injured at Mann
heim, Germany, Saturday morning
by bomb dropped by allied aviators,
says a Havas dispatch from Basle.
Severe property damage also resulted.
OKLAHOMA
EUGENE V. DEBS
MAY DRAW 20-YEAR
TERM IN PRISON
ARRESTED ON CHARGE OF
VIOLATION OF FEDERAL
ESPIONAGE ACT.
ARRESTED AT CLEVELAND
Was About to Make an Address at
Socialist Meeting When Taken
Into Custody Sixty-Seven Other
Men Are Arrested With Him.
Cleveland, Ohio, July 1. Eugene
V, Debs, Socialist nominee for con
gress for the Fifth Indiana district
and former Socialist candidate for
president, who was arrested here
yesterday charged with violation of
the espionage act, was arraigned in
federal court here this morning.
Debs spent last night in jail. The
arrest, which occurred as Debs was
about to address a Socialist meeting,
resulted from a secret indictment re
turned Saturday by the federal
grand jury. It is understood the
indictment contains ten specific
counts, and was the outcome of a
speech delivered at the Socialist
state convention in Canton two
weeks ago. If found guilty the de
fendant faces a penalty of twenty
years' imprisonment and $10,000 fine
and costs on each count.
Following announcement of Debs'
arrest, more than $1,0(X) was raised
at the meeting for a fund towards
his defense.
Sixty-seven men were taken into
custody by police at the gathering.
Fifty-five were unable to produce
classification cards, and twelve were
detained for other reasons.
In the Canton speech Debs is al
leged to have declared the purpose
of th allies in the war is the same as
that of th central powers, urged his
hearers to know that "they were fit
for something better than cannon
fodder," declared himself as guilty
as Mrs. Rose Pastor Stokes, who
recently was convicted of violating
the espionage act, and praised the
bolsheviki and the I. W. W.
WILSON CALLS ON
TURK TO EXPLAIN
DEMANDS TO KNOW WHY U.
S. HOSPITAL AND CONSU
LATE WERE SEIZED.
Washington, July 1. The United
States government has formally pre
sented to the Turkish government
the report that Turkish troops at
tacked and sacked an American hos
pital at Tabriz, Persia, and seized
the American consulate there, with
a request for an explanation.
Corroboration of the facts of the
Tabriz incident have been received
through Spain, supporting the ru
mor sent from Heheran by Minister
Caldwell. It was said at the state
department today that the character
of the Turkish troops responsible
for the indignity might have an im
portant bearing on the attitude of
the United States in the matter.
LITTLE FRENCH TANKS
KILL MANY HUNS
French Army Headquarters, June
30. (Via Ottawa). Little French
tanks gave the infantry valuable aid
in the capture of Cutry ravine and
hill 162. north of Villers-Cotterets,
on Friday. Preceding the infantry
the tanks rolled along the edge of
the Cutry ravine and fired down into
the Germans in the deep valley be
low. The German heavy artillery
tried strenuously to put the tanks
out of action, but was unsuccessful.
One of the tanks was under fire for
more than four hours.
WILL OF THE PEOPLE
IN HUN WAR ZONE
Moscow. Tuesday, June 25. The
accepted the proposal of the Rus-so-Ukrainian
peace conference have
accepted the proposal of th Rus
sian delegation that in places where
the population is mixed, the bound
ary between the two countries will
be "determined by a referendum"
after both sides have ratified the
treaty of peace. Joint Ukrainian
and Russian commissions will su
pervise the referendum and all the
troops will be removed to insure a
"free expression of th will of the
people" affected.
DANIEL WALLACE DIES
IN U. S. PENITENTIARY
Davenport, Iowa. July 1. Daniel
aWallce, convicted of making sedi
tious utterances in a lecture here on
July 25, 1917, and sentenced to 20
years' imprisonment in federal pris
on, died Sunday at Fort Leavenworth.
Rich and Poor Loafers
Of New York Oity are
Rounded Up In Droves
BROADWAY AND SIDE STREETS ARE SWEPT OF ALL
IDLERS BETWEEN 18 AND 50 YEARS OLD THOU
SANDS OF MEN DOING NON-ESSENTIAL WORK ARE
INCLUDED IN FEDERAL AND STATE DRAGNETS.
New York, July 1. Both the fed
eral and state laws banning idle
ness on the part of men between 18
and 50 years, became operative to
day and up and down Broadway,
where bright lights and idleness
have been boon companions for
years, and in the side streets adja
cent thereto where certain classes
are wont to gather, the effect be
came noticeable early.
Soon after midnight Assistant
District Attorney Bates Smith, ac
companied by a squad of detectives,
visited restaurants, pool parlors,
chop suey and cabaret halls, where
suppocnas were distributed to all
men who were unable to produce
military registration cards, or other
wise satisfy the authorities their em
ployment could be classed as essen
tial. On the streets also pedestrians
were stopped and handed subpoenas
to appear later at the district attor
ney's office.
Federal and local authorities es
timated today that fully 25.000 men
known to be non-essentially em
ployed, or not all all, live in this
city.
District Attorney Swann an
nounced that he had prepared a list
containing the names of 10,000 men
belonging to' the idle rich class. The
majority of these names, he explain
ed, had been given to him by society
women.
MYSTERIOUS ENGINE
IS IMPRACTICABLE
Washington, July 1. An unfavor
able report on -"Garabed." the my.
terious engine which its inventor
claimed would take power out of the
air to run anything' from an airplane
to a battleship, was submitted to the
interior department today hy the
committee of scientists which test
ed the invention at Boston Satur
day, with the approval of congress.
The committee announced it did
not believe the principles of the in
ventor, Garabed ( iiragossian, were
sound or his devices operative, or
that they could result in practical
development of free energy.
May Surprise Britons.
London, July 1. There is a
strong belief in well informed quar
ters that William Morris Huirhrs.
the Australian premier, according!
rt T.wv,.- 'r . i i. t : .i I
from Melbourne, intends to contest
a constituency in Great Britain for
a seat in the house of commons aft
er the imperial conference. Pre
mier Hughes, it is added, if success
ful, will enter the house as "Lloyd
George's lieutenant."
" World Is Mine" Seems
Demand of Germans
In Alleged Peace Terms
Paris, July 1. Great Britain must turn over its war fleet
to Germany, return Gibraltar to Spain and restore Egypt and
the Suez Canal to Turkey. Great Britain, France and the
United States must pay Germany an indemnity of at least
$45,000,000,000. Belgium and French territory must be aur
rendered to Germany.
These are among- the conditions included in the German
peace program published in the Nachrichten of Goerlitz, Prus
sia, by Count Roon, a member of the Prussian house of lords,
according to a Havas dispath from Basle, Switzerland.
Count Roon says Germany is entitled to the following terms
because of its strength and until they are realized there should
be no armistice and no cessation of submarine warfare:
Annexation of Belgium, with administrative autonomy in
the interior.
Independence of Flanders.
Annexation of the entire Flanders coast, including Calais.
Annexation of the Briey and Longwy basins and the Toul.
Belfort and Verdun regions eastward.
Restitution to Germany of all her colonies, including
Kaio Chow, China.
Great Britain to cede to Germany such naval bases and
coaling stations as Germany designates.
Great Britain must return Gibraltar to Spain, cede its war
fleet to Germany, restore Egypt to Turkey and the Suez canal
to Turkey.
Greece must be re-established under former King Constan
tine, with frontiers as before the war.
Austria and Bulgaria will divide Serbia and Montenegro.
Great Britain, France and the United States must pay all
of Germany's war costs, the indemnity being a miuimum of
$45,000,000,000. ,
They also must agree to deliver raw materials immedi
ately. Trance and Belgium are to remain occupied at their own
expense until conditions are carried out.
PAULS VALLEY
CASES BEFORE THE
U. S. GRAND JURY
SOCIALIST SAID TO HAVE
SLANDERED RED CROSS
AND WAR WORKERS.
T. F. Weiss, a special representa
tive of the department of justice,
and W. R. Ilignight, deputy United
States marshal, spent a part of last
week investigating several cases at
Pauls Valley, with the result that
a goodly number of witnesses will
he summoned from that place to ap
pear before the ieder.nl grand jury
called for tomorrow at McA '.ester.
One of the cases is that of a prom
inent Socialist of that locality. This
man is reported to be wealthy, but
has done nothing to aid in the con
duct of the ar. He is alleged to
have made scurrilous remarks about
the women of the Red Cross and to
have said that Liberty bonds and
war savings stamps are a graft, and
that the soldiers going over the
country speaking in Red Cross, Lib
erty bond and war saving stamps
campaigns are all grafters. He is
said to have stated that 800 men have
made a million dollars each out of
war graft, and that the war is for
the benefit of the "high collars."
It is claimed he would buy no war
savings stamps or Liberty bonds,
and that he would not give any
thing to the Red Cross. He is as
serted to have said he knows his
rights and that no one could make
him do otherwise, that he has no
use for "any of the outfit" except
President Wilson and that he "was
for him because Woodrow Wilson
stands right on the Socialist plat
form." Another case investigated there
was that of the-driving of a num
ber of Mexicans out of Pauls Val
ley. It appears the Santa Fe Rail
way Company had employed a large
number of Mexicans anil taken
them to Pauls Valley, where they
were working on the railroad. A
hue and cry was raised against them
and a number of the citizens, ob
jecting to their presence there, kept
up the agitation unlit the crowd
gathered grew into a mob, in which
were included some of the officers
of the city, and the Mexicans were
(Continued on Page 2.)
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