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Tulsa daily world. [volume] (Tulsa, Indian Territory [Okla.]) 1905-1919, July 04, 1917, MORNING EDITION, Image 1

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THE WEATHER
TIM. HA. July 3. Maximum 91,
minimum J5; south wind and partly
rloudv.
OKLAHOMA KOKKCA8T Wednee
day timet lied, local ehowoM in w.-nt
portion; Thursday probably local
ahowera.
With the resurrection of tbi Jt'l
in in tile parking propNffunila fur auto
mobile on Mb in trift w mov that
the inunii'tpahiy pa a law limiting
the kiijiturii of Hit idler on thr tret
rorurm to 1ft tninut. i belicre il
huirld ,lu done.
VOL. XII, NO. 286
TULSA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 1917
12 PAGES
PRICE
5 CENTS
11
i m m m jh, oaw" raw mhm w
AMERICAN DESTROYERS TWICE BEAT OFF SUBMARINE AIMS jRAINST TROOP TRANSPORTS
GOLOBIE SPEAKS
IN TULSA TODAY
Is Foreign-Born Citizen, Essay
ist, Publicist, Legislator
and Orator.
PARK SET FOR BIG EVENT
Band Concerts and Fireworks
on Program; Most Stores
to Be Closed.
Owen Pnrk Projtinm.
Picnicking all duy. Free leo
water. '
2:80 to 5:30 Concert at park
bandstand.
4 p. m. Patriotic address by
Sonator John Uoloble.
7:80 to 10:30 Hand concert on
lake peninmila.
8:30 Gorgeous fireworks dls
pluy begins on west banks of lake.
6 p. m. l'ark closed to all ve
hicles. I'nrs may park on Irving
hill by traversing Duluth to north
of park.
An unusual patriotic address by
Senator John Uolobie of Guthrie, band
concerts afternoon and night and a
gorgeous fireworks display will fea
ture the annual municipal Fourth of
July program at Owen park today.
Senator Goloble will arrive early
this morning over the Katy. Ho will
be tendered an Informal luncheon at
noon in Hotel Tulsa by newspaper
friends here and members of the park
board. He speaks at 4 o'clock on a
special platform erected In the shade
of the giant trees at the park.
I'rothero's band will give a concert
this afternoon from 2:30 until 6:30
o'clock and tonight from 7:30 until
10:80 o'clock. The concert tonight
will run simultaneously with the fire
Works. A bandstand will be erected on
tne little uenlnsu la in the Dark lnke.
Free water in barrels will be avail-
oble thruout the park. Refreshment
sianns nave also been Dut ud. Fire.
crackers will bo offered for sale at
i nose a lands.
- Two Hours of It.
The fireworks display will start at
8:30 o'clock and last nearlir two hnnn
Frameworks for the big set pieces
were oreciea yesterday on the west
banks of the lake. The place hus
ucen encioseu witn a barbed wire
fence so as to keep all spectators at
a safe distance. All avuilable park
benches will be arranged on the east
side of the lake. The effect of the
fireworks across tho water Is beautl.
ful In the extreme, as has been proven
In former years at this park. Several
hundred can be seated and there will
be room for thousands more to sit
ana stand.
At 6 o'clock sharp the park will be
closed to all vehicles. Automobiles
muy De parked on the numerous con
tig'uous streets or on Irving HIM,
which can be reached by driving down
Iuluth street, immediately to the
norm or mo park.
Scores of families and organizations
win now picnics at the park today.
iney win oegin nooning to the recre
fttlon spot early this morning.
Park Superintendent John Meluen
bacher has hud a largo force of men
working overtime to put the park In
peneei irini ror tonay. The exten
sive flower beds at the east end were
never prettier. Excavations at the
south entruace were refilled yester
day, so as to avoid traffic congestion
us much as possible.
Kvcr) thing Closed.
The wheels of government and
commerce will practically be at a
standstill here today. Flags were fly
ing last night from thousands of
homes, but there was a noticeable
lnck of colors In the business district.
Pcrhnps the business men are too
busv to exhibit their patriotism.
Ranks will be closed all day. The
city hall will bo closed with the ex
ception of the mayor's office, where
they are working overtime to com
plete the task of duplicating all tho
registration cords from the conscrip
tion registration. Police station, of
course, will be on the Job as usual.
The courthouse will be closed all
day, with the exception of the sher
iff's office, which. will be prepared
to answer trouble culls from uny part
of the county.
All dry goods, ready-to-wear and
furniture stores will be closed thruout
tho entire day today and all clothing
stores, boot and shoe shops and down
town grocery stores will close at noon.
This action Is taken as a result of ac
tion several days ago by the lictall
Vnehanis association.
The stores and shops. In the resi
dence section of the city probably will
close also, Secretary W, A. Itayson
announced, but few were represented
when the matter was voted upon.
All baxber shops will be closed
thruout the day. The majority of
them remained open until I) o'clock
Inst night
All brunches of the Chamber of
Commerce. Including the Ketail Mer
chants association and the Traffic as.
soeliitlon, will remain closed thruout
tie day.
APPOINT INDIAN ATTORNEYS
Coin nu ts With It C. Allen and Itu
ford Ilond Approved by Wilson.
Spc iml to Th Wo-d.
WASHINGTON, D C.,' July 3.
Contracts of R. C. Allen, national
attorney for the Creek Indians, and
of Kuford Bond of the Chickasaws,
for the year ending June 30, 1918,
yero today approved by President
Wilson. There were no other can
didates or opposition. Davis was
named Allen's assistant
The appointment of Choctaw at
torney to succeed P. J. Hurley ha
not yet been approved by Uie In
terior department
Owen Park
!'" SENATUZ G0L03IB
isM Jiym M SS I SPEAKS RT O'CLOCK.
rf- C j
At yjf APTfPNocN FHh Plenty of Jki?a
ImMtA'. Jfitf AN DEPEND THC DRY.
U. S. TROOPS GUESTS
OF HONOR IN PARIS
French Capital Goes Wild as
Battalion of American Sol
diers Marches Into City.
PARIS, July 3. A battalion of
American troops arrived In Paris this
morning to parade on July 4. The
Americans were crowded by wildly
enthusiastic c r o w ds when t h e y
marched to Ncullly barracks, where
they are quartered. The Americans
arrived at the Austerlitz station at
7:4R o'clock.
Headed by their own band, the sol
diers carrying their rifles and field
packs, fell in and marched off to the
barracks. The crowds waved Ameri
can and French Flags. ' Hundreds of
Americans were In the throng.
As the troops swung thru the streets
French girls pinned bouquets and
American Flags on the soldiers'
breasts. Flowers were scattered along
the route. The band played "Yankee
Doodle," "Dixie" and other American
airs. French soldiers on leave
grasped the hands of the Americans
and marched beside them.
Several times groups of shop girls
on their way to work sllpod thru tho
police lines and kissed the soldiers
to their great embarrassment. Now
and then an American voice would be
heard calling out "hello boys," "wel
come to Paris" or "good luck." When
the regimental colors were carried
past, men bared their heads. The
Amerirans were greatly surprised to
see n number of children kneel In
the streets as the Flag was carried
bv. They were orphans from an In
stitution In tho neighborhood.
The soldierly bearing of the men
Impressed the military observers.
They were lean and brown and tho
new field packs gave them quite n
different apcpnranro from British or
continenril soldiers.
ATLANTIC SHIPPING GROWING
New York Trade Increases In Spite of
Submarine Activities.
NEW YORK, July . In spite of
Corman submarines the movement of
shipping between New York and for
eign ports increased In June as com
pared with May, according to customs
house statistics given out today.
Thirty-seven more ships arrived at
this port in June than In May. The
June arrivals numbered 465, with a
total tonnage of 1,252.599, as com
pared with 428 ships with a total ton
nuge of 1.099,433 for May.
Additional aurraita
Mr ConCfH IN
ThC MOWN!' BUT!
from the heat n In
TiUenra again ytitr
day. Imhng th dar
th vry baftl the heat
conditioners -could
achtev was some 05
degrees of regular
rarmth. For today wo
hav hn promised to
tal showers in the went
portion which means In
the vicinity of Enid
or perhaps out near
the Korky mountains.
Anyway wa can't ua
rain today. 'Tia In
dependence day and
the girla want to dresa
up and the joye want
to ogle the girls, 10
there will be no rain.
NOT THt f .NllW
D
'fsQl
mi fit.
-Zimmie"
the Mecca of Patriotic Tulsans Today
r
FltKK MOV IKS FOK SOLDIERS.
t Thru the efforts of Sirs.
S.
W. Parish, who has spent much I
I time in aiding the - local army I
I unlm that are homeless and un- I
I claimed, six local theaters have (
I thrown open their door to the I
soldiers. Until they are called I
from the city all men in Tulsa I
I belonging to cither the nmbu- I
I lance company, the engineering
I corps or company C will be ad-
mitted to the following theaters
free:
I Majestic, Empress, Palace, I
I Wonderland, Strand, Dixie air- I
dome. '
I....... ............. ....4
Whites and Blacks Fight
on New York's San Juan
. NEW YORK, Juy 3. Negroes and
whites fought for more than an hour
tonight In the section of the city
known as San Juan hill as the re
sult of the arrest of Lawrence Joa
quin, a negro private in the Fifteenth
infantry, on a charge of disorderly
conduct. Pistols and night sticks
were used by the police reserves,
who were called and clubs and
bricks and knives by the rioters..
Joaquin and two other negroes were
arrested.
Child's Black Assailant
Killed Trying to Escape
ORANOK, Texas, July 3. Gilbert
Guldry. negro, arrested by officers
and being taken to Jail, was shot to
death eorly today when he tried to
eccape from his captors' automobile.
The negro was charged with an at
tempted criminal assault on the
6-yenr-old daiinhter of a well-known
oil man of Vinton, La, Ouldry was
caught around midnight after he had
been chased all yesterday forenoon
and last night by a posse of two hun
dred men with bloodhounds.
Japanese Warships May
Go to Mediterranean
TOKIO, Monday, July 2. If neces
sary, Japan may send a fleet to the
Atlantic, said Minister of the Navy
Kato in the diet today. The minister
was replying to criticism of the oppo
sition that the despatch of Japanf-gt)
warships to the Mediterranean was
not required by the terms of tne
Anglo-Japanese alliance and
merely for the benefit of the entente
and not for Japan.
U. S. Mint 8 Making New
Coins at Record Rate
WASHINGTON, July . An Indica
tion of the unusual industrial activity
of the Vnltcd States is shown In the
coinage report of the director of the
mint for the year ending June 80.
The number of coins minted, con
sidered an almost unfailing Indication
to business conditions, has risen from
154.523.524 In the fiscal year 1916 to
506,500,792 In 1917.
The World business office will j
I be closed today from 12 o'clock I
I noun until 6:30 o'clock p. m., I
I so aa to give the employes a
I half holiday. The office will be
I open all forenoon and from I
6:30 until 9:30 o'clock tonight t
t The editorial department will t
I observe the usual hours from I
I 8 a. m. until 3 a. m. I
i.....
MANCHU MONARCHY IS
ESTABLISHED IN CHINA
Emperor Hsuan Tung Regains
Throne; Offers Amnesty to
Political Offenders.
PEKIN, July 1. (Delayed). The
Imperial emblem Is everywhere dis
played marking the restoration of the
Manchu monarchy, There has been
no disorder.
In a long edict Emperor Hsuan
Tung, who was restored to the throne
today explains how. being youthful, he
was forced to relinquish sovereign
power to Yuan Shi Kal, late president
of tho Chinese republic.
The country being threatened with
disintegration and party strife and the
people appealing to him to take over
its administration to save the people
from suffering, the young emperor
says he was compelled to take action.
China's future government will be
bivscd on the following:
"The country shall be administered
according to the constitutional laws
promulgated by the lute emperor.
"Expenses of the imperial house
hold shall remain the same as those
fixed by the republic.
"Blood princes shall not bo allowed
to Interfere In polities.
Thero shall bo no difference be
tween Manchu and Chinese. " Mar
riage between them Is allowed.
"Foreign treaties and contracts
thall remain in force.
"The stamp tax and other petty
taxes are abolished.
"The republican criminal law code
Is abolished and that introduced the
first year under Hsuan Tung's gov
ernment is reinstated.
"Political offenders are pardoned.
"The wearing of queues is optional."
A hundred Japanese have arrived
to strengthen tho legation guards.
There Is no news of President 1.1 Yuan
Hung's expected resignation.
Jack the Newsie and Buggsie the Bug
BY MITCH
ST. LOUIS POLICE
CALLED COWARDS
Civil Officers and Militiamen
Censured for Not Suppres
sing Race Riots.
FURTHER TROUBLE EXPECTED
Death List May Not Exceed
28; Stories of Brutal
Killings Related.
EAST ST. LOIMS, III., July 3 Thir
teen companies of national guardsmen
tonight patrolled the streets of Eu.it
St. Louts In an effort to prevent a re
currence of the race riots here,' which
since yesterday morning, have re
sulted in a death list of 28 persons,
the Injury of 7 5 or more and tho de
struction by fire of S10 negro homes,
covering 16 4 acres of ground.
Tho entire community of eighty
thousand persons Is terrorized by the
events of tho last two days and that
they fear the Inability of the guards
men to oopo with the situation was
intimated todf.y when the chamber
of commerce demanded to know from
Adjutnnt-'lenernl IMrkson why the
troopers hud not displayed more ener
getic activity hint night. Members of
the chamber were not slow to charge
tho soldiers with Inefficiency bord
ering on , cowardice, but Adjutant
General Plrksnn explained that Ins
force was handicapped by the small
number of troops avullublo at that
time.
l'ollop Accused.
Tho police force, which numbers
sixty, also was charged with neKU
gence In attempting to quell the vio
lence. Of all tho Incidents of the
riot related today not one told of a
single act of bravery on the part of
the police or guardsmen. Anxious
citizens who inquired of individual
militiamen why they did not stop the
looting and murder which were going
on in ninny instances under their very
eyes, received grins for their reply.
Some of the soldiers were disarmed
by rioters.
Many Floe City.
Today some of the negroes walked
out of town on the railroad tracks,
more crossed to the Missouri sine,
where all was tranquil, nnd still
others assured of protection by the
uuKiuented force of soldiers, returned
to their homes but they did so In fear
and trembling. Some whoso homes
were burned were cared for In a
ramp hastily arranged by the cham
ber of commerce '
Killings Cold-rilooilctl.
A newspaper reporter, who was In
tho thick the trouble last night, re
lated a ourticulai ly brutal story. A
white nion observing a cowering
negro approached and snld:
"Come with me into this alley:
you'll be safe there, there's a soldier
mere.
His tones wero inviting and the
negro followed. Once In the alley
tne white man calmly shot his vie
tim thru the head and sauntered back
Into the street, presently Joining a
mob Intent on a rope-and-lump post
lynching.
No systematic search of the ruins
was mado today, but fear that scores
of dead might lie beneath gradually
disappeared. IJiHt night brought
forth rumors, too, that many bodies
had been thrown In the liver, but the
waters gave up no, dead today and
by nluht It was doubled whether the
death list would much exceed the list
In the mortuaries.
Congress PctitloniHl.
An appeal for immediate congres
sional investigation of race riots in
East St. Louis yesterday was con
tained in a memorial sent to Itepre
sentatives James It. Mann and Claude
Kitchen In Washington by an emer
gency meeting of the Negro Nat
ional Educational congress held In
Kansas City tonight.
l'-ltout.s After Swedish Ships.
LONDON, July 3. German subma
rines have opened a campaign against
tho Swedish merchant fleet along tho
Norwegian northern coast, according
to an Exchange Telegraph dispatch
from Copenhagen today. Newspaper
reports state that four vessels were
attacked and sunk yesterday outside
tho blockade zone, the crows being
compelled to make haste to reach the
lifeboats.
j Russia Urged to Unite
j Ilchind Army Marching j
j to Death and Victory
PETUOC.UAI), July 8 The
I provisional government has Is- I
I sued an appeal to the Russian (
I people urging all cltl.ens to for- I
I get personal Interests and to I
I mans us a single man behind the I
nrmy which "is marching to t
I death to save the revolution and t
I to tree the Itus.ilan people", I
I Minister of War Kereimky, In I
( view of the new offensive move- I
( nieut, has forbidden all leaves of I
9 absence of soldiers unless neces- I
( sitaled by ill health. I
I I'nlts of four ItiiKHlan armies I
i are co-operating In lhe (iallclan I
advance, covering a front of I
I about twenty miles. These I
I units, with the approval of tho t
comuiander-ln-chief, are resolv- I
I lug to do or die In thn supreme I
I test of Russia's manhood. They I
are culled respectively regiments, I
( battalions, companies, butteries I
I and squiidrons-Hjf "death". They I
wear black nnd red stripes on I
I their cuffs with a death's head I
I on crossed sA'nrils. I
'4
AUSTRO-GERMANS
YIELD BRZEZANY
Russians Continue Advance on
Lemberg; Prisoners Taken
Approach 20,000.
In eastern Gullclu tho Russians con
tinue their advance, toward Lemborg
and It Is reported unofficially that
tho Aiistro-nermsns under tho pres
sure of tho KiinhIiuis are evacuating
llrzeitaiiy, the center of much heavy
fighting in the last few ilavs
Around Klochoff north of Urmxnnv
and eust of Lemberg General llrusl
loff's soldiers have occupied three
villages and driven tho Austro-ler-mans
bevond the little Strlpa rlvei.
Berlin admits this reverso and de
clares that only German reserves
were able to stem the onrush of the
Kiisslun tide.
Tho number of prisoners taken by
the HiiKManH Is approaching twentv
thousand. In Volhynla there are
Blgns that thn Russians are preparing
for un offensive and alreudy attacks
have been mudo aginst tho Teuton
positions along the Kovel-Lusk rail
road, In the direction of Kovel. Some
of the fighting activity also is re
ported from around Riga and near
Smorgong, north of the I'ripet
inarshes
The Hi ll lull and Germans continue
to raid each others lines on the north,
ern end of the western front and In
Champagne and on the left bunk of
the Meuse In the Verdun region, the
Germans and French still aro fighting
Intensely at isolated points. Thero
have been no Important actions In tho
other fields of the war.
NEGRO SENTENCED TO DIE
FOR MURDER OF JACOBS
Muskogee Jury IK'HIxriibm Less Than
Twenty Minnies in Jaiut'a
Ilrown Caw.
K ritl to Tho World.
MISKOGKi:. July 3 Death In the
electric chair Is the penally James
liliwn, alia.) Jerry Monro, negro, must
pay for his part In the brutal mur
der of Glenn Jacobs, young trawling
salesman, here May 19. Klectiocu
tlon of Itrotvn was ordered by a dis
trict court Jury this afternoon after
deliberating on his rate less than
twenty minutes.
It was alleged, that Ilrown, with n
negro named Sam Shaw, bold up nnd
robbed, then killed Jacobs, north of
Muskogee M iy 19, one of tho negroes
.ihootlng him thru the heart. Ilrown
claimed Shaw fired ihe shot, but
Judge Degraffenrled Instructed the
Jury that it was Immaterial which ne
gro actually shot Jacobs. Shaw will
be brought to trial Thursday.
Tho murder of Jacobs, u young
salesman employed bv Ihe Coca-' olu
company, was one of the most brutal
In the annals of Muskogee criminal
history, and thero was talk of a
lynching when the negroes were cap
tured several days after tin; trugedy.
"HUMAN WOLF" IS CORNERED
Man Accused of Many Murders Cap
lured in Missouri.
LITTLE ROCK. Ark., July S
Yales Htandrldgo, known as the "hu
man wolf", with a record of three
murders and numerous shooting af
frays. Is under arrest at Slkeston, Mo.,
according to word received by peni
tentiary offlcluls here, Xtandrldge os
caied In June, 1916, while serving a
62-year penitentiary sentence.
He begun his penitentiary career In
1917 when no wus sentenced to one
year's Imprisonment for shooting s
deputy sheriff In Newton county. With
other prisoners he killed a warden and
escaped, returning to Newton county,
where he kllled'a man and woman at
whuse home his wife was living. Ht
shot another woman at the same time.
Woman Aviator Killed.
MAULIN, Texas, July 3. Mrs.
Ilutlle Nixon, 'it, of Waco, a student
In the Mai llu ail plane school, was
killed here this morning while mak
ing a practice flight over tho city.
Leaving the aviation field. Mrs. Nix
on's machine failed to got sufficient
elevation and struck telephone wires,
causing it to fall. Mrs. Nixon was
crushed beneath the engine.
LONDON, July 3. King I
George has directed that the
t American Flag be flown from I
I the towor of the houses of par- t
llument on the Fourth of July, I
Amerlcnn Independence dav I
...... ...... ....... ......4
YANKEE GUNNERY
TRIUMPHS OVER
T
At Least One Submersible
Destroyed; No American
Life or Ship Lost.
ENEMY WELL INFORMED
Attacks Troop Ships This
Side of Danger Zone on
Night of June 22.
MANY TORPEDOES LAUNCHED
All Miss Mark; Grenades Used
in Defense; Wreckage nnd
Oil Prove Hits Made.
WASHINGTON, July 3. Sufe ar
rival at a French port of tv last ships
of the first American overseas expe
dition wus announced tonight by Sec
retury Daniels In a statement reveal
ing that twice on tho way across the
Atlantic, Gorman submarines at
laiked the ships In force and were
fought off by convoying Alnerlran
warships.
Tho Amerirans did not lose a man,
a ship or unlmal. At least one of the
undersea enemies wus destroyed.
Tho work of spies, thru whom the
Germans knew secrets of the expe
dition, is disclosed by Ihe news that
the first attack wus made fnr at sea,
before the transports and their con
voys rem hd the point at which
rendezvous hud been arranged with
the American destroyer flotilla oper
ntmK In European waters. Tho sub
marine commanders apparently knew
whrro and when to ex poet the Ameri
cans bound for the fighting lines In
France, and were asssmbled in force
to meet them.
It was Just a week after tho first
trf.ops landed that the last vessels put
Into a French port. They were slower
craft, cnrrylng supplies and horses.
Tho good news came to the navy
department late this afternoon from
Rear Adnfii.il Gleaves, commanding
the convoy squadron, and was made
public at once as an appropriate an
nouncement m the eve of tho Fourth
of July. Secretary Daniels' state
ment, which tells all of the story
deemed wise to publish, follows:
Fvrry Man Safely Landed.
"It is with the Joy of a great relief
that I onnnnunre to the people of the
I'nlted States the sufe arrival In
France of every fighting man nnd
every fighting ship.
"Now that the ' last vessel has
reached port it Is safe to disclose the
dangers that were encountered and
to tell the complete story of peril and
courage.
"The transports bearing our troops
were twice attacked by German sub
marines on the way across. On both
occasions the l.'-bnats were beaten off
with evcrv appearance of loss. Una
was certainly sunk and there Is rea
son to believe that the accurate fire
of our gunners sent others .to th
hoi torn.
"For purposes of convenience tho
expedition was divided Into con
tingents, each contingent including
troopships and naval escort de
signed lo keep off su'h German
lalders ns mm lit be met.
An ocean rendezvous had also been
arrunged with the American destroy
ers now operating In European waters
In order that tho passage of the dan
ger tone mli-'ht be attended by every
possible protection. ,
Kncniy Informed.
"The first attack took place at
10:30 on tho night of June 22. What
gives It peculiar nnd disturbing sig
nificance Is that our ships were set
upon st a point well this side of the
rendezvnii nnd In that part of tho
Atlantic presumably fre-3 from subma
rines. "Tho attack was made In force, al
tho the night miidn Impossible anv
exact count of th' lf-bou!s gathered
for what thry deemed a slaughter.
"The high seas convoy, circling
with their searchlights, answered
with heavy gunfire and Its accuracy
stands proved by the fact that the
torpedo discharge became Increas
ingly scattered and Inaccurate. It la
not known how many torpedoes were
launched, but flvo wero counted aa
they sped bv bow and stern,
"A second attack was launched a
few days later ngalnst another con
tingent. The point of assault was be
yond the rendezvous and our destroy
ers wore silling us a screen between
the transports nnd all harm. The re
sults of the battle wero In favor of
American gunnery.
Wreckage Proves lilt.
"Not alone did tho destroyers bold
the l'-bonts at a safe distance, but
their speed also resulted In ihe sink
ing of one submarine at least. Gre.
nades wero used in firing, u depm
charged exoloslve, timed to go off at
a certain distance under water. In
one Instil nee oil and wreckage covered
tho surface of tho sea after a shot
from u destroyer lit a periscope and
the reports make claim of sinking.
"Protected by our high sens con.,
vey, by our destroyers and bv French
war vessels, the contingent proceeded
and joined tho others In a French
port.
"The whole nation will relolce tb.it
.io great a peril Is passed for tho van
guard, of Uia men who will fight our
battles In Franco. No more thrilling
Fourth of July clebrallon could havo
been nrrunged than this glad news
that lifts the shadow. of dreud fioni
the heart of America."
TEUTON
OR

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