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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, February 21, 1890, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

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WILMINGTON, DEL., FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 21. 18S0.
NO. 54G
ONE CENT
FOR SALK.
F or salb, — hklp-u egu l at : nk 'dia
tuond State IncnbatorH and Brooders for
to J. A GEBHAKT. B. * O and
. R. Jonction, near Wilmington^_
SALK. TWO PROFESSIONAL
banjos, only been used two weeks. Ap
ply at FLOUR STORK., 108 East S econd street,
UVJU 8ALK.-A GOOD FRE8H COW AND
•T calf. Address WILLIAM DONALD
BON, Christiana, Del.
W:M
XT'OH
Jt 1 bi
Horses, carriages, harnkss. Etc,
ANDSOME TURNOUT FOR SALE.
Large Bay Horse. 11 years old, fearless
Of «loam, electric cars or bicycles, trot in betj
Sr than 2.46 _ .
Large Doable Seat Top Wagon, finely uphol
stered. built to order, brand new. suitable for
fight delivery wagon and family use.
Nickel Mounted Harness, new.
Hohes, Blankets. Whip, etc.
Can he seen at the Club Stables, corner
and Twelfth at
H
Elegant
>l*
Made
ADMINISTRATOR'S SALK.
j^DMlNISTRATOB'S SALE
OF
REAL ESTATE.
By virtue of an order of the Orphan's Court
of the State of Delaware, in and for New
Castle county, made on the ti.fit day of Feb
ruary. A. D., 1H90, will be exposed at public
vendue.
ON THURSDAY,
THK 6tb DAY OF MARCH. A. D,, 1890,
at 10 o'clock a m.. at the Court House, on
market street, between Tenth and Eleventh
etreets, in the city of Wilmington, New Castlr
county, and State of Delaware, the foilowilu
described real estate, late of Caroline Klinglet
deceased, to wit:
All that certain lot or piece of land, will
the three-etory brick dwelling house thereoi
sweeted, situate in the city of Wilmington
County and State aforesaid, known us No 3lf
East. Second street, and more particular!)
bounded and described as follows, to wit
Beginning at a point on the northerly side ol
Second street at a distai ce of 83 ft. 1 in east
erly from the easterly aide of French street at
the easterly side of a :i ft. wide alley leading
tnto Second street, thence northerly »long
said sldeof said alley and parallel with French
street 55 feet to the southerly side of another
3 ft. wide alley, thence thereby easterly, par
allel with Second street, 1« ft. to a stake,
thence northerly crossing the head of the last
mentioned alley and parallel witu French
street. 3 ft. to a stake, thence easterly parallel
with Second sireet, 18 ft. to a stake, thence
southerly parallel with Frenchstreet, 58 feet to
the aforesaid side of Second street, and thence
thereby westerly 32 fett to the place of begin
ning. be the contents thereof what they may,
with the privilege of the use of said alleys in
common with others entitled thereto forever.
Attendance will be given and terms made
known by W » 1 . F. SMALLEY. Jb .
Administrator, d b. n, c. t. a.
Or by his Attorney.
Attest:
CfikBun H McWiioktkr.
Clerk of Orphans' Court.
REAL ESTATE.
F or sale on monthly- payments.
Only four more houses—31133 Madison
atrcet.six rooms, monthly payments $12 25. 734
East Eleventh street and 10-0 Bennett street,
monthly payments $15.50; 1212 Pleasant street,
monthly payments $13.50.
JOSEPH L. CARPENTER, Jk .
_ _ No. 933 M a rket street.
TjV)v SALK-ONE THREE STORY BRI K
J 1 hi use. No. #05 West Ninth street, contain
ing # rooms and bath, with all the modern im
provement»; also brick bouse. No. 1225 West
Third street, six rooms and bath, and No. 1314
West Fourth street, sev
back porch, cellar cemented andunderdrained,
1 Imre other houses in different parts of the
oily which I will sell on easy terms. Apply to
DANIEL MoKENNEY,
Third anil Monroe streets.
rooms and bath ami
F OP. SALE.—THE HOUSE NO. 1131 WEST
Third street, three storiee: eight rooms
and bath; nicely papered and painted; sum
mer kitchen and private alley: also in a
at house or
L. BROWN.
desirable neighborhood. Apply
λ Or ang e street._ H. I
L'OR SALE
X* three-story
OR EXCHANGE. THE
brick saloon and dwelling,
non heist corner Front and Walnut streets,
with 10 room« and hath, and now doing good
business. Will exchange for city property.
Terms easy. Possession given March 2o,
■ext. Apply to THOMAS R. LALLY.
8iXl Market street.
CTABLK FOR RENT-WILL AC 30MMO
L' date six horses. Apgij^to^
A CO.,
Seventh and Market streets.
J jHHi RENT.—A FARM OF Ö0 ACRES, »
1 tuile© from Wilmington, near Brandywine
Summit camp ground Apply to F. MILES
FRAME, Elam. Delaware coun t y* Pa.
1 7*OR RENT-MODEL FARM No. 11, BE
louging to the New Castle Common. Pofc
•cwluu given Mar. h 25.1890.
W1LUAM HERBERT,
John c. Mahoney,
GEORGE A. MAXWELL,
HHHII_ Acting Committee ,
■Jj'UH K^NT.—NO. 238 MARKET STREET,
« oocnpltid by Lichtenstein & Hart as
•dry goods store.^ Apply
to
g ARPENTER. Jr ,
No 913 Market street.
FOR SALE.
5Û8 Lombard street, 7 rooms.
H10 West street, 11 rooms.
SH0 1 aylor street, 5 rooms
013 French street, 10 rooms.
4*2 Shearman street. 7 too ns
1019 West Fourth street, 8 rooms.
1314 Walnut street. 7 rooms.
$65 West eighth street. 11 rooms.
1338 West street, 8 rooms.
983 Madison street. 10 rooms.
538 East Fourth street, 9 rooms.
31») Tatnall street,8 rooms,
NBI Bennett street, 5 rooms.
»037 Kirkwood street, 8 rooms.
8. W. eor. - eventh and Adams Sts., 0 rooms
4® East Sixth street, 7 rooms.
U18 Chippy street. 7 rooms
*24 Lomo ird street, 7 rooms.
f tJ East. Thirteenth street. 7 rooms
18 Fast Tenth street, 0 rooms.
787 French street, 13 rooms
Hie Orange street. 7 rooms,
fl Eighth street, to rooms.
Vttl Tatnall street, 12 rooms.
617 Jefferson str -et. S moms.
♦IU Lombard street. 8 rooms
1886 Delaware avenue, 7 rooms.
13118 Washington street, 10 rooms,
ao.i East Heventh street. 3 rooms.
1011 Elm street, 7 rooms.
sT. East Six h street 8 rooms.
417 East Third street. 7 rooms
NitiWest Fonrt street. 10 rooms
SOB Wont Second street, 5 rooms.
Kti West Seventh street, 8 rooms
HAWKINS & CO.,
712 Market Street.
E. MORTIMER BYE,
Real Estate and Comeyancing,
,|Bty Property and Farms for Sale.
Mineral Lands a Specialty.
Mortgag.« Negotiated.
't per cent. Guaranteed Kansas Bonds for sale.
'.Bents Collected. .
.'«taie Agent for the Union National Qua Sav
ing Company.
Corner Ninth and Shipley Streets,
WILMINGTON. DEL.
PHILIP E. CLAEK à 00.
M Estate aMMsrtiap Brokers,
824 Market Street,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
Rea! Estote bought sold or exchanged.
Loans r.eeotiatea oa cltv or country property
B. B. GROVES,
Conveyancer and Real Estate Agent,
No. 1 Kaot JBlghth 8t., \V liming ton.
Deed«, Mortgage* and ail other
Ctrefully prep • 1 ' oans
attention r «- •• *
legal papers
negotiated. Special
lection ol rent-j. and
HELP WANTED.
TA RK A 80 ROY WANTED AFTER
A J March 1; not to learn the business. H A H
VKY'B PHARMACY 4 07 Delaware avenue.
G ood m vchinist wanted, thouas
WILLI AMSON. Hookessin, Del.
NTELLIGENCE OFFICE - HELP OF
into good
Ninth and
?
all kinds supplied. Servants put
dtions. Places ready. B1CKTA,
idison street«.
T IVE MEN AS AO ENTS FOR THE DELA
■J ware Live Stock Insurance Company.
Good pay to the right parties Apoly i
of the company . No. 11)0614 Market sti
T WO PERSONS (LADIES OR GENTLE
men) wanted to engage In a refined busi
ness that will i>av from $5 to $10 per day.
Small caoital only required Andreas A. B.
C., Kvemis o Jouhwai, office. _
ANTED_AOrNTS FOR DENVER
Stale Lottery. Tickets, 50c Address,
A C. ROSS & CO.. Denver, Colorado.
nt office
reel
vv
BOARD AND BOOMS.
F or rent.-furnished rooms for
gentlemen. 517 Market street.
Ol 'MS TO LET.—ON AND AFTER
March 36 I will have some very desirable
rooms, furni-hed or unfurnished, to let at Sin
Market St. next door to Wilmington Savings
F ind building. MRS. SARAH E. WIEiL
R
ANTED -BOARDERS. GOOD ACCOM
modatlonH, No 406 Kaet Fourth street.
W
notices.
DUSHANE CLOWARD
N.
WILL HEREAFTER DEVOTE HI9 ENTIRE TIME
TOTUAt'HlNO 8INGINO.
EITHER CLASSES OR PRIVATE.
Rooms No«. 1 ant» 3,
No. »31 Market Street.
OTICK -CHANGE IN BUSINESS.— HA V.
ing bought tbe entire stock of coal and
groceries of Adam Ornbb St Son. Nos. IttU and
1818 Market street, the undersigned intends to
continue the business at the old stand, and
will be pleased to see the former customers
of the old firm; also tbe public in general.
Hoping to receive a liberal share ol patron
age will guarantee satisfactory dealings to all
who will favor him with their orders. Tele
phone No. 453. Yours respectfully.
CHARLES M GRUBB.
N
N otice is hereby given that in
conformity with ih© Act entitled "An
Act Concerning Private Corporations," pas««*!
March 14, 1883, application will 1>© made be
fore Hon. I. C. Grubb, Associate Justice, Ac.,
«t Chambers, on Saturday, March 1, 1800, at
10 o'clock a m , for a certificate incorporating
th© "Holly Oak Club."
GEORGE LODGE.
Attorney for incorporators.
OTICK.-ALL SHAREHOLDERS OF
the Clayton Loan Association are re
quested to be present at its regular monthly
meeting on Friday evening next, to decide on
a plan to close up the affairs of the associa
tion, 8. H BAYNAR1 ), Secretary.
OTICE -THERE WILL BE AN EX
amination of teachers for second and
third grade ce'tiflcates in School Building No.
1. on French street, bet wee a Fifth and Sixth
streets, on Sa'unlay, the 22d Inst. HERMAN
BEffllY, ' ounty Superintendent.
S TORAGE. — FURNITURE AND MER
ehandise of all kinds received on storage.
M ARTIN A DURE, Fourth and Orange Sts.
OTICE.—IF YOU WANT TO SAVE
DOLLARS. Insure your property with
HAWKINS & CO.. 712 Market Street.
N
N
N
POLITICAL
pOR SHERIFF
OF NEW CASTLE COUNTY* 1890,
John T. Dickey,
OF WILMINGTON HUNDRED.
Subject to the decision of the Demo
•r»tic Party
P<OR SHERIFF
OF NEW CASTLE COUNTY. 1890,
Joseph S. Dunlap,
OF WILMINGTON HUNDRED.
Subject to the decision of the Demo
cratic party.
POR SHERIFF,
1890,
Peter J. Ford.
Subject to Democratic rules.
pOR SHERIFF
OF
NEW CASTLE COUNTY,
Pierce Gould
J
OF WILMINGTON.
Subject to the decision of the Repub
lican Party.
P*OR SHERIFF
OF NEW CASTLE COUNTY.
George 0. Rothwell,
OF BLACKBIRD HUNDRED,
Subject to roles of the Democratic
party
pOR CORONER
or
NEW CASTLE COUNTY, H90,
James Clark,
OF MILL CREEK HUNDRED.
Subjsct to the rales of the Democratic party
H. W. VÄNDEUER,
BEAR STATION, DEL.,
AGENT FOR
Agricultural Fire In
surance Company
OF NEW YOKK.
„ . . . , ..
Headquarters for the
OSBORNE BINDERS AND MOWERS.
„ .
Hiebest Market Prices Paid for Oram.
I Estimates on Lumber cheerfully furnished.
NO MORE SICK HEADACHES,
How Sylvester Heller Says He Got
Kid of Them.
,
He Is a Clerk in P. A. Davis's Rig Medi
cal and Scientific Hook Publishing
Filbert Street. Phila
delphia—Bis Tribute to
Ore McCoy and
Wildman.
House
Sylvester D. Heller It a clerk in the publish
ing house of F. A. Davis, at tail Filbert street.
Philadelphia. Mr. Davis Is one of the most
extensive publishers of medieal ami scientific
books in Philadelphia He employs a small
army of clerks to take care of the enormous
corresp mdence and fill orders.
The place is a perfect human bee-hive
Nearly n dozen pretty young women are busy
every day at typewriters and the men clerks
bobbing about the place all the time.
Among them is Mr. Heller. He lives at ill)
Crease street, Philadelphia, and he is one of
Mr. Davis's most trusted employes.
-are
1
V■* '
W 9
mm
i 1
f#r
\
V
m
% 7
/
*
, !
Nte
\n
Mr. Heller has been a sufferer 'fortwo years
from sick headaches There is nothing in the
every-day existence of a human being that
makes his or her life so miserable as a sick
beadacne and tbe root of that misery is in
ninety-nine cases out of every hundred
Catarrh
A reporter went to Davis's pubiishiag house
the other day and interviewed Mr Heller,
who said:
"For two years I suffered with sick head
ache and as a consequence I whs miserable.
My head was stopped up all the time and the
pains over my eyes dulled my eyes.
"Part, of tbe time 1 had no appetite. Kelt
languid and when I would get up in the
morning i felt as tired as when I went to bed
the night before.
"1 found out that I had catarrh and about
(our months ago I went to see Drs. McCoy &
Wildman. of 1822 Chest nil street, Philadel
phia, ami after consultation with them I found
teat their charges were very low and that
they would furnish me with all the medicine,
besides treating me twice a week at their
office.
"1 began treatment at once and soon began
to feel better. I continued to improve and
now my head is as clear as a bell. I don't have
any more sick headaches, thanks to them,
and I don't have that tired feeling. My ap
petite is good now, too.
"Altogether, 1 feel like a different person
and I believe that Drs. McCoy * Wildman
have cured my catarrh. At any rate, I am a
well man now as a result of their treatment.
I simply make this statement because I am
glad to testify to the great benefit I have re
ceived as regards my health, and you know
the old saying, 'health i- wealth,' and it is
only those who have suffered who know tbe
golden truth of this old time saylug.''
DOCTORS
McCOY & WILDMAN,
LATE OF
Bellevue Hospital, New York,
Office, 1822 CHESTNUT STREET,
PHILADELPHIA,
Where All Curable Diseases are Treat
ed With Success.
If yon live at a distance write for a symptom
blank.
Consultation at office or by mail, 81
Office hours—9 to 11 A. M.;2to4P.M.: 7 to
9 P. M. dally. Sundays. » to 13 A. M. If you
write enclose four cents ia stamps.
LEA'S
NEW PROCESS»
it
BEST
»
AND
CLIFTON FFF
9
Since our recent improve
ments, are superior to any
thing we have ever pro
duced.
The Wm. Lea & Sons Co.
Wilmington, Del.
AMlIsKMENTH,
T ECTURE AND LITERARY ENTER
A4 TAINMKNT
By MISS IDA PARR A'.
Subject: How the Blind are Educated.
THURSDAY EVENING. FEB 27, 1890,
At 8 o'clock, in St. Paul's M E. Church
Tickets,
Tickets can be had at °. H. Barnard's, Fifth
.nd MsrWi «♦rents: Capt. Sooj'a, 212 King
' »troet, ana at ohurvu.
3G Cents.
beaten by the wizard.
Schaefer Wins First in the Bill
iard Match.
,
HEISER DEFEATED WITH EASE.
Opening of the Great Balk Line Billiard
Tournament at ritirkering Ball, Now
York—Sketches of the Respective Con
testants for Glory and a Fat Purse.
Nkw York, Feb. 21.—The great balk Hue
billiard tournament opened auspiciously at
Chiokering ball last night. The hpnetntnrs
were numerous
and enthusiastic.
Among them were
some lading. There
will be fifteen
games of 500 points
each, to lie played
afternoon und
&
«to evening up to and
Wifi- including March 1.
There are six con
i ,f testants, and each
man will play one
game with every
other man. The six
experts who are to struggle for tin* $4,000
in prizes guaranteed by the Brunswick -
Bnlke-Collcnder company are: Jacob Schaef
er, of Chicago; William H. Caton, of Hock
Island, Ills.; J. Randolph Heiser and George
F. Klossen, of New York; Frank Ives, of
Chicago, and Maurice Daly, of Brooklyn.
The man who proves tbe victor will get
$1,600, tho second man $1,300, the third
man $800, and tho fourth man $400, Schaef
er and Hlossen will lie handicapped on the
line principle, they playing the fourteen
inch game, while the other four men will
play the eight inch game.
Schaefer Was Winner.
Schaefer and Heiser, who played the open
ing game, were warmly received. William
Sexton was selected as referee and Ludd
Scofield was chosen
marker. Schaefer
r a ;
f. '
'
'1 J
N>
fiLdSHOK.
won by a score of
333; winner's high
est run, 105; win
ner'» average, 17
T-39; loser's aver
age, 11 3-30.
Schaefer played
a fourteen inch
bulk line game
against Heiser's
eight inch gam»-.
Jacob Hcbaefer
was bora in Milwaukee, Feb. 3, 1855. He is
5 feet 0 inches in height, but baa a wonder
ful reach, considering his size. His first
effort with the cue was when fl years of age,
on a pigeonhole table. At 15 he could easily
defeatall the players in I»eaveu worth, young
or old. His first match woe with Adam
Klesson, champion of Wisconsin. Jake won,
1,400 to 503. After playing a tmmb r of
matches he was put up against Slosson, but
the ''student" ran away with him with a
^ »
^3*
HTIIAKKKK.
score of 400 to 080.
The last important match Jake partici
pated ill,was that played against Maurice
Vigueur, at Cosmopolitan hall, New York,
Jan. 36, 1886. Schaefer won this great match
by a score of 3,000 to 8,838, with a grand
average of 36 105-145. His stylo of play dif
fers from that of any other billiardist.
Quickness, dash, brilliancy and seeming care
lessness are the characteristics of his work at
tho table. He never studies out a shot, but
plays off-hand.
George F, Slosson's History.
George Franklin Slosson was bom in De
Kulb, St. Lawrence county, N. Y.,on March
5, 1854. Wh--n but 15 years of age he made
his first public appearance as a billiardist
in a tournament at Kochester. There he mot
and defeated Maurice Daly and Moses Yot
ter; in fact, he downed them all and took
first money. Slosson ran against Schaefer
in Indianapolis in 1873, and defeated the
"Wizard" in a tournament. Up to date he
has played twenty-nine games with Jake
winning fifteen of them.
In 1880 ha went abroad for the first time,
and iu Paris was defeated by Maurice Vig
naux, at the straight rail games, 4,000 points
up. Tbe following year be was again de
feated by the Frenchman at the champion's
game. A third match was made with Vlg
uaux, and this time Slosson was victorious,
Sloeson's liest run at the straight rail throe
ball game is 1,103.
The Otlu-r Players.
Maurice Daly was born April 35, PM9, in
New York. He once won the championship
of Maryland. J. Randolph Heiser was born
on Washington's birthday, 1855, at Ander
son, Ind. Among his early achievements
was the defeat of Eugene Carter, now in
Europe, lu a mach at Cleveland, and the
taking of third prize in a tournament in the
same city about the same period. Frank C.
Ives, the "boy wonder," was bora iu Plain
well, Mich., Oct. 30, 1866. His career on tlua
green cloth began only a few year» ago, but
he is looked U|K>n as the coming champion at
billiards. William H, Caton was born
May 10, 1850, at Solon, la. H s first impor
tant match was in January, 1884, when he
defeated Eugene Carter at straight rail
billiards. The match was (or $1,000 a side.
He has since succumbed to Carter's prowess.
Caton has since defeated Francois Magioli,
of Now Orleans, with a score of 3,000 to
1,300; Edward McLaughlin, of Philadelphia,
with a score of 3,000 to 3,000, and Thomas
Gallagher,of Cleveland, eight inch balk line
game, with a score of 800 to 603.
The Complete Score.
Tbe following is the complete score;
Heiser— 0, 11, 6, 8, 13, 5, 34, 9, 88, 0. J5, 10,
18, S3, 16, 1, 3, 38, 3, 13, 3, SI, 83, 0, 2, 7, 3, 0,
0.—
Schaefer—3, 2. Ü, 0, 48, 11, 13, 2, 0, 3. 6, 13,
54, 35, 3, 0, 3, 41, 69, 23, 18, 5, 0, 6, 1, 44, 195
4, 6.—500. _
Personal Property Eluffi
Taxation.
Alrany, Fob. 21.—The state assessors' re
port says in brief: There appears an increased
assessment of real estate over the preceding
year of $90,583,117, and an increased assess
ment of personal property of $7,646,595, mak
ing the total of real and personal for 1889,
$8,567,439,757. Tbe assessors say that the
personal in the state liable to taxation is
fully equal to the assessed value of tbe real,
while the real pays more than 90 per cent.
Thus $3,500,000,000 escapes assessment.
Florida's Chautauqua Opened.
Dekuniak Bpiuxgs, Fia., Feb. 31.— The
sixth annual meeting of the Florida Chau
tauqua has opened with a grand concert
Bishop Vincent, of New York; Professor
Head, of Chicago, and other welt known
men tram various parts of the country will
be among the s neakers during the coming
week. _
A llrakemun Killed.
Oswego, N. Y.. Feb. 2L—While switching
car« at Kose, N. Y. f .Joseph Viselanour, of
Oswego, a brakoraan employed by the Rome,
Watertown ami Ogdaxiaburg railroad, was
SOCIALISTS GAIN GROUND.
The Government Lost Fifteen (teats Is
the Uelehstag Flections.
Berlin, Feb, 31.- Elections for member!
of the reb-hstag were held throughout th«
empire yesterday. The Herman Socialist!
never prosecuted an electoral campaign will
more vigor than that which marked theli
work yesterday at the polls, and, from all
appearances, never with greater success.
They have unquestionably made large gain»
in Berlin, and their unceasing work In othei
purls of the country is plainly apparent.
The returns indicate that the government
has lost fifteen seat« in tho relchstog and
that the Socialists have doubled their vot
ing strength throughout the kingdom ol
Prussia,
Prince Bismarck drove la a closed carriage
to the polling booth situated at the Herren
haus restaurant, and (iiqiosited bis ballot in
favor of Herr SWdier, Conservative candi
date for the reichste g.
When Prince Bismarck entered the voting
post ho was greeted respectfully by every
one present. In ucknowledgmont the chan
cellor remarked: "This is probably my last
vote." Kes)saiding to expressions of doubt,
in view of his vigorous appearance, the
chancellor continued : "1 am now 75 years
of age. Five years longer is a long time."
I -
New York Socialists Rejoice.
New York, Feb. 31.—An enthusiastic
meeting of Socialists wss held last night, at
which Bergius Shevitch ami others spoke,
and cablegrams of the results of the tier man
election were received. Borne of the cable
grams placed the entire Socialist vote at
1,350,600, which Is an increase of 50 percent.
New Enterprise, In tba Sooth.
Baltimore, Feb. 31.—Among the largest
new enterprises in the south reported last
week to The Manufacturers' Record are a
$1.500,000 coal ami iron company in Bir
mingham, tho contract fur buildings for a
$500,000 cotton mill in Florence, Ala. ; the
purchaee by Alabama capitalists of two fur
naces and mineral property for $ 000 , 000 , a
$500,000 cotton mill In Arkansas, a $350,000
car building coni|>auy iu Atlanta, a $50.000
brick and tilo works in Brunswick, a $300,000
phosphate company in Florida, a $300,000
cotton mill company in Georgia, a $100,000
cotton mill in North Carolina, a $70,600
pulp making company iu South Carolina, a
$300,000 cigarette machine company in Roa
noke, Va. ; new iron furnacca at Pulaski,
Va. ; Johnson City, Tenu. ; at Bristol, Tenu,,
by Pennsylvania iron makers, ami one at Dig
Stone Gap, Va.
Ayrshire Breeders Meet.
New Yokk, Feb. 31. —The Ayrshire Breed
ers' as*ociatiuii held its fifteenth annual
meeting at the Fifth Avenue hotel yester
day. President Converse presided. The
election of officers for the ensuing year ri
ant tod
verse, of Woodvllle, N. Y. Vice president*
—Obadiah Brown, of Providence, R. I ; F.
H. Mason, of Leon, O. ; H. R. C. Watson, of
West Farms, N. Y3, and William Oroxler,
of Northport, L. 1. Committee for three
years—J. H. Coldrin, ot Iowa City, la., and
J. D. W. Krebs, of Walden, N. Y. Secre
tary— C. M. Winslow, of Brandon, Vt.
Treasurer—Henry E. Smith, of Enfield, tt.
I. Ambling committee— C. M. Winslow and
J. D. W. French. The treasurer reported
$3,044 on hand. A number of prominent
breeders from all part* of the country were
present.
follow«; l*re«i<lenl—J. W. Con*
The Brotherhood's I'm pi res.
CHK'AOO, Feb. 31—Secretary Hrunneil, of
the Players' National league, hu« announced
tbe eight umpires who are to serve tbe Play
ers' league under tbe double umpire system
during tho season of 181*0. Their names are:
J. H. Gaffney, Worcester, Mas«. : Robert
Ferguson, Brooklyn; Alonzo Knight, Bos
ton; Robert Mathews, the once famous
pitcher, Philadelphia; T. F. Gunning, ex
catcher of the Boston and Athletic clubs,
Fall River, Mass. ; Charles Jones, ex-out
flelder of the Boston and Cincinnati clubs,
New York ; W. H. Holbert, ex-catcher, New
York, and Ross Barnes, of this city. Tho
latter once led the second basemen and was
well known through bis connection with tbe
Bostons, Chicagos and the Tocumsuhs, of
Loudon, Out.
'rleet Disperse* a Mob.
A Plucky
Wii.kesbarhe, Pa, Fob, 81.—Martin Wil
ker, tiie "Polish king," who led the church
riot at Plymouth a few few weeks ago, was
brought here aud held In $3,00(4 hail for bis
appearance at the next criminal court. On
his return home last evening he ami his fac
tion marched tu the resilience of Rev. Father
Bzimfoski, formerly of Buffalo, the priest
assigned to the charge by Bishop O'Hara,
and demanded possession of the premises.
This the priest refused to give. The Poles
In-ram, « insulting, and the clergyman ap
peared at tiie door of the parsonage and or
dered them to leave at the point of a revolver.
They retreated in confusion.
A Novel Railroad Car.
Chicago, Felt 31.—Bishop Walker, ol
North Dakota, let a contract to the Pullman
Palace Car company for a Gospel car, with
a seating capacity of eighty persons and
supplied with a robing room, pulpit aud
font. The car is to be of rich design and is
tc be completed in fifty days. Bishop Walk
er, with his car, will now bo able to conduct
confirmation services with appropriate sur
roundings in the barren country, where few
churches exist aud where the villager* are
devout.
The Conneiuaugli Raging.
Johnstown, Pa., Feb. 31.—The heavy
rains have raised the two rivers consider
able, the Conncmaugb being within six inches
of overflowing and tha Stoney creek two
feet. A telegram from Shade, about twelve
miles up the # valley, has just been received,
announcing that the boom at that place con
taining an enormous quantity of logs is liable
to break at any time. If this breaks all the
wooden bridges on Btouey Creek will be
destroyed.
Shot HI« Wife*« Paramour.
CotJ'MBUS, O., Feb. 21.— Richarde. White,
a private policeman, found his hrotli»'r-in
luw, Achillis Kell, talking to Hra White
near tho Davidson hotel, end shot twice in'
succession at Kell, one or both shots strik
ing Kell in the left aide of tba head near the
ear, indicting fatal wound. Kell, accom
panied by Mrs. White, was taken to the hos
pital White charges Kell with being inti
mate with Mrs. White.
The Danmark Hero to Harry.
Baltimore, Feb, 81. — Capt Hamilton
Murrell, who made himself famous by res
caling the passengers from the steamship
Danmark last year, has succumbed to the
charms and graces of a Baltimore lady,
and this coming summer will see him a
happy Benedict The lady is the sister of
Dr. J. L. McCormick, and resides at No.
1,631 Madison avenue, bhe is 81 year» of
age. __ „
Forty-three Rodle« R«co«er®dt.
Patis, Feb. Sfl.—Up to the present time
forty-throe corpa^a have been romoved from
tho olliery at Decize, in which occurred the
explosion on the night of last Tuesday.
Bight miners, who ar« seriously hurt, have
EXPOSITION ELOQUENCE.
Many Fair Arguments Heard
in the House.
FOLK CITIES AFTER THE HONOR.
The Month Opposed to the Project—Able
Orators Ergo Upon Congress the Claims
of New York, Chicago. Washington and
St. Louis to the Prlee.
Wabhixoto», Feb. 21.—It was plainly ap
parent soon after the house met that there
was a fixed intention on the jiart of a num
ber of southern Democrats to oppose the
Worldÿ fair project because of tbe govern
ment. appropriation of $1,509,006 provided
for III the several bills. When the speaker
announced that the consideration of the
World's fair bill was tho regular order Mr.
Csndlsr, of Massachusetts, the chairman of
the committee in charge of the matter, made
a statement concerning the allotment of
time for discussion by the committee. Mr.
Mills (Tex ) and Mr. McMillan (Tenn.) ob
jected to calling up the bill. Mr. Mills was
not satisfied with the allotment of time. He
demanded half of the time in behalf of the
opponents of the bill. A wrangle ensued.
Mr. Kilgore (Tex.) finally raised tbe ques
tion of consideration, and a vote was taken,
resulting in 138 yeas and 31 nays.
Democrats Agreed with the Bpenker.
"No quorum," said Mr. Kilgore. "The
chair overrules the point," »aid the speaker
deliberately. There was much laughter at
this remark, and for the first time In several
weeks the Democrats did not oppose a radi
cal ruling made by the speaker. On the
contrary most of them seemed to ba much
pleased.
Mr. readier Argue, for the Fair.
Hr. Candler finally succeeded in begin
ning his speech on tbe general features of
the project, outlining reasons why a (air
should be held. He defended the sections iu
the general lulls appropriating money tor a
government exhibit, contending that the
people should have a chance to improve
themselves by a study of an exhibit that tbe
government of tho United States eon id
make. It was clear that the fair would bring
Into circulation an immense amount of
money. The proposition wo* of as much
interest to the south, that might voteagainst
it, as it was to the other sections of the
country.
Mr. Flower for New York.
Mr. Flower (N. Y, ) opened the discussion
fur tile metropolis. lie said he believed I liât
the selection of New York as the site for the
fair meant the greatest possible success in
this undertaking. New York would assume
tho responsdiility to filiation tho fair and
make it a success. He dwelt upon tho claim
that the success of the (air depended upon
the participation of foreign nations, and
said that Chiuago, Ht. Louis and Washington
could not offer proper facilities to foreign
exhibitors because of their situation. Mr.
Flower held up a telegram at tills moment
and announced that Governor Hill had
signed the New York Wend'« fair bill.
(Applause.)
New England Spanks fur the Metropolis.
Ur. Moore (N. H.) said that a neighborly
feeling impelled the people of New England
to support the claims of the people of New
York. On tbe Atlantic coast, he said, had
been developed the fullest type of the flower
of our civilization, and there was no place
so fitting for the display of that flower as
tbe city of New Y T ork.
Mr. Covert (N. Y.) claimed that iu none
of tiie uumiHiUng cities except New York
could tie seen the navies of the world. He
thought the greatness of this country could
be viewed better nowhere else.
lugs Muke, « Bit.
Mr. Cummings (N. Y.j said that the fair
should be held m a city commensurate with
the greatness of the undertaking. The selec
tion of a site was a vital point. The fair
w ould not be a W orld's fair if it was not
held at the commercial center of the conti
nent. He advanced many arguments as to
the accessibility of New York to all classes.
His speech created much enthusiasm.
k Hen H
Mr. Tracy (N. Y.) said that Now York
asked only a charter, and not a dollar. He
dwelt on the fact that New York was more
accessible to foreign visitors than was any
other site. Mr. Quinn (N. Y.) spoke at length
of the lieuutlesof New York barlior and tbe
Hudson river. Mr. Sherman (N. Y.) said
that he thought that New York was tbe heat
site, but wherever tbe fair was bold it would
be the grandest in history. Mr. McAdoo
(N. J.) said that he was proud of St. Louis
and Chicago, but no exposition would be a
success unless it was accessible to the masses,
as it would bo at New York. The works of
genius and art were greater than those of
agriculture. Tbe people of the United States
should be educated by something more than
an exhibition of material things.
Chicago's Voice Kalsed.
Mr. Hitt (Ills.) spoke in favor of Chicago.
He said that Chicago was near the center of
the United States. It was accessible to the
mining regions of Pennsylvania and tho
groat agricultural lielts of the west. Its
tonnage was second iu size among American
He said that If the fair was held in
New York, foreigners would stop at
of tbe republic aad turn back.
Bold lu tjic west, they would go on and see
the grand opulence 5f the interior. The site
at Chicago was ready.
It would leave a great hole in the treasury
after Now York bad finished blasting away
rocks fur a site there. He held that a very
small proportion of tbe atteudauca at the
fair would be that of fureiguers. In
elusion he said that if the fair was held at
Chicago it would he a memorable and mag
nificent success.
Another Windy City Gun Fired.
Mr. Adams (HU) said that the (ample of
Chicago had a habit of succeediug in what
ever they undertook. In England and in
France the customs and traditions of 500
years concentrated political and intellectual
hie at tbe bead city of tho nation; with
it was diffused throughout the Union. The
farmers of the United States, rather than the
residents ot great cities, held iu their hands
the destinies of the republic. Mr. Adams
spoke of the cosmopolitan character of the
population of Chicago. He referred to the
guarantee fund already raised, and said that
almost every state in the Union was repre
sented on the subscription list No money
would be needed for the site, and none of tbe
money expended on tbe fair would go toward
the permanent improvement of the Chicago
park system.
J.
irnialtst Ci
Moi'« New Y
r<l.
ol
is
are
o i Li« s
the gate
If it was
the
be
'ii
in'
a
of
of
Four States (or Chicago.
Mr. McCreary (Ky.) argusd In favor of
Chicago, saying the three greatest national
celebrations ever held in this country bad
been held iu the east, and it was now the
turn of tho west Messrs. Cutcheon (Mich.),
Taylor (111), Perkins (Kan.) and Cfiipmon
(Mich.) spoke in fsvor of Chicago.
Speakers for St. Louts,
iighaus (Mo.) spoke tor St, Louis,
_ «d^âsm'^Oa U£ iNAVléU"
the
Mr. N«
vnntag& of th* geographical position of Ht
Lou la Mr. Breckinridge (Ark,), Mr. Dock
ery (Mo.), and Mr. Carutb (Ky.) favored Sfc
Louis.
Washington Takes a Hand.
Mr. MoComas (MdV) favored onexpoeitloax
hut whenever it was held it should be held
in Washington, in the- district hearing the
name of tho discoverer of the continent—is
tho District of Columbia, and at the_
Uotisl capital. He invoked the member*
to select some higher motive and broad«»
ground than locality. He appealed to th«
friends of Chicago, New York and St Louis
to come together in peace here—a national
ground.
There would bo no trouble about accom
modations; every other house would las
opemsl to visitors, and Baltimore was with
in forty minutes travel. Mr. Lee (Va.)
held that Washington was not only tba
proper but the only place where the fair
should lie held. If it was to bo national, il
we were to invite tho governments of for
eign nations, Washington was the proper
site. Mr. Coleman (La.) argued in favor of
the selection of Washington. Messrs Comp
ton and Htockbrldge (Md. I urged Washing^
ton, the Mecca of American life, whorw
there was no partisan spirit, as the props*
place to hold the exposition.
At 5:50 p. in. the house adjourned. Tba
fair debate will lie continued.
SIR JOHN IS HOPEFUL,
»I« Think« Can ad a* h Troubla with UivrUr
Ham Will It* Honorably Settled.
Ottawa, Out., Fib. 2L—Hon. A. O. Jones,
M l*. for Halifax, In the hou*a asked
whether iu view Of negotiation*
progress between the British minister as
Washington and the United Stute« for a
settlement of the flsherle« mid other que»
tloim of internal dispute it was the intention
of the Canadian government to appoint »
commissioner to take part in the n »gotiation»
and watch over the interest« of Canada.
Sir John Macdonald replied that Sir
Julian reuncofote would, he understood,
represent tho Imperial government. Hecra
tary Blaine has shown a desire to have que*
Hons which have for so long been a so a row
of irritation between the two countries set
tled upon «n equitable basis. The Unlt**tl
Hint»« administration and people of the nr
public were quite
tumble between the two government« settled
a* were the people of Canada. He felt sura
that the new treaty won hi be effected with
out any sacrifice to national honor on either
side.
now i»
anxious to see tbe
.fury Briber O'Donnell's Trial.
Chicago, Feb 31.— At ihe opening of th*
jury bribing case Judge Waterman entered
an order acquitting Kavauaugh. Tbe trial
of O'Donnull wits then resumed. Several
witnesses testified to the prisoner's good
character and reputation, ami a number ot
others swore that Hoaglaud, the principal
witness against U'Donnell, had a bad repu
tation ami that they would not lie lie vu him
under oath. O'Donnell then took tbe stand
anti testified that he had never told any um
that he could corrupt Eddie Hoaglaud, nor
gave his name to any one to be summoned
as a juror. He had never offered Hoaglaud
$l,UtKl nor any inducement, nor instructed
him how to answer questions iu order to gMf
on the Jury. O'Dunuell's cross-examination
by State's Attorney Longeneoker then began
and oeoupiod the greater part of the day.
The witness' memory proved very defective
when asked to remember the statement* he
made m tbe state attorney's ofllos after bis
arrest iu regard to the conspiracy.
The Sulfide Was a Murder.
Ft,KtiiNusBUKfi, Ky., Feb. 81.—Later de
velopments make it almost certain that the
supposed suicide of Mrs. James Layton was
a foul murder. In tho room were unmistak
able traces of a struggle, and the not*
which was found near her is a clumsy and
awkward forgery. Tho matter will bo rig
idly investigated. Tho suspicions point to •
worthless character of the neighborhood,
betwee n whose handwriting and the wom
an's alleged farewell note there is a striking
resemblance. His motive is said to Is a
cover for an outrageous assault on his dead
victim. _
Five Young Girt« In Peril.
Chicago, Feh. 31—Five young girln
Gertie Sparks, Sadie Sparks, Maggie Bohan,
Minnie Madden ami Theresa Frankel, an
swered
last Saturday and engaged to HU racanciew
in a Chicago hotel They arrived here ans*
were taken to a vile den at No. 515 South
Clark sireet. They speedily realized that*
they had been duped and after much troubla
escaped (rum the place and informed tins
police, who arrested Mine. Maggie Parent,
tho keeper, and Ophelia Brewer, colored,
her housekee[>er. In default of $6,000 bail
tbs women were locked up.
Kduestor, Fleet oncers.
Nxw Yokk, Feb. 31.—The session of tba
National Education association was con
tinued last evening. P. esidout Eliot, of Har
vard, read a paper ou "The Relation of tha
Colleges and Secondary Hchlooe: How Can
it Be Strengthened!" A. S. Draper, of Al
bany, was re-elected president for the en
suing year; J. A. B. Lovett, of Huntsville,
Ala., first vice president; E, B. McElroy, at
of Salem, Ore., second vice president, and
L. W. Day, of Cleveland, secretary. Tha
next annual meeting will be at Philadelphia
Oltlsea Train After Nelly's L
Boston, Feb. 31.— Georg« Franc'» Train ia
busy perfecting his plans for u.- prop.jeetf
trip around the world, which o., r x|-cct* to
accomplish in silt* Ààys, »'tarting from TS?'
fOtfi», fïe received a telegram lis*
night froui L. F. Rodcbaugh, proprietor of
The Tacoma ledger, guaranteeing a special
steamer and escort of citizens from Tacoma
to the steamer Abyssinia, which loaves Van
couver March 17. Mr, Train will leave Bos
ton March 9.
ad i ortisement iu Louisville, Ky.»
■I».
FHtuI Mining Accident.
Platthbc no, N. V., Ft*b. 31.—An accident
has ju.-st occurred at sIojm* No. 5, Lyon moun
tain, by which Edward King, a miner, looli
his life, and Dennis Wyuas, a contractor,
was badly injured. The men were going
into the mine when some rock and earth tali
upon them. King sustained injuries front
which he died almost immediately W yna»
escaped with a broken leg and some sever«
cut« about the head.
Indiana's Prohibition Platfoi
Indianapolis. Fob. 21 .—Tho State Prtp*
hlbition convention baa adopted a platform
declaring in favor of the prohibition of tb«t
manufacture and «ale of intoxicating li
quor«; that license high or low is wrong i«
principle; that the tariff should be remowd
from all ueceesarie« of life. Augustus Bradr
loy woa nominated for secretary of state.
The Promised Lend We « Mol Keeebrd.
New York, Feb. 31. —The steamship Bo
hemia, from Hamburg, has just arrived.
Au immigraa! named Louisa Buutber com
mitted suicide hy jumping overboard dar
ing the passage, and Christopher Klugei,
another immigrant, died ot aloohoUsm.
I>r. Blood in ( uitody.
Middijcboho, Moos., Feb. 21.—Dr. Blood,
wanted in the Ht «$*11« murder ente, hum.

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