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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, June 09, 1890, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042354/1890-06-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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WILMINGTON D 1 <L., MONDAY, JUNE 9 , 1890 .
NO. 687 .
ONE CENT.
1
.nue 1
KELP WANTED.
A ' good"BLACKSMTH. APPLY TO
LIaM TONER, Pennsylvania
and Pastor® Street_ /_
N ACTIVE YOUNG MAN Ad PARTNER
iu produce business. Apply at 001 King
A
s treet.
1 MUST-CLASS TOOL AND VICE HANDS
' at tue Chester Foundry and Machine
Company. Chester, Pa. Also tlrst-class fitters
on heavv engine and machine work Steady
■work nnd liberal enimvnsqMon guaranteed.
A*,B. JENKINS. Genera^ Manager.____
■\*7 A.>TED-PERSONS TO LffiARN TYPB
▼ ▼ Writ ng increase sneel or rent a type
writer. CHARLES G. GUYEH, «36 Market
street.
SITUATIONS WANTED.
A lady''wants' p mition in a
store or office. Address D. IL. this office.
WANTED.
ÂNTKD^ a"~LIMITE11 NUMBER OF
active n en to enlist in Troop R, Fir-1
Calvary Regiment, N. O. Ü Must be »ober
and well doing, between 19 and 40 years of
age. Application can he made at Armory,
(Eden Halil any evening nntll Jane 34.1889.
E. L. HICiî. Ja , Captain
C M. STEVENSON, First Lieutenant.
SAVOY EVANS. Second Llentenant.
AN
BOARD AND ROOMS.
OARD AND ROOMS FOR FOUR OR
five Tantiemen; alea table board. 8iW
East Second street.
B
TIITANTED-BOA' DERS AT 413 KING
VV street; pleasant rooms and good ac
commodations; also unfurnished front room,
for man « nd wife._ _
W ANTED -BOARDERS. GOOD ACCOM
modatlona. No. 40« East Fourth street.
FOR SALE,
Ï j*OR S ILK.—A DRIVING HORSE. 7
' years old; fine style and action; has
■peed JO HN P. WILS- N, Newark. Del
F or sale-grocery, an old estas.
llshM corner, doing good business;
reasans for selling on account o' other busi
ness
Address GROCER, this oil! ' 4.
ARNËS8.-NEW NICKEL MOUNTED
harn e ss. Inquir e s'this office. _
ORES.—PAIR OF HAND- OME LAP
robes; also blankets aud whip. Inquire
at this office
H
li
FOR RENT.
S tore ' Vor rent . - store ' Nör'soi
King street. lately oreupled for millinery
business. 1 nmerliate possession. Apply to
D. FAHRA, 924 K i ng street. _
4jftOR RENT.-VERY DESIRABLE OCT
v taaes at Holly Oak. Right at station; 11
minutes ride fn m Wilmington depot: ranges,
hot and cold water; front porches; right on
the banks of the Delaware, commanding a
magnificent view of the river Apply to
JOHN H. LONGSTREET, on the premises
or Girard Building, Broad aud Chestnut
streets. Philadelphia.
notices.
OTICK -THE MEMBERS OF Oi FORD
Castle to. 6, A O. K. M. C and the
order In general are requested to meet at the
hall, No. 504 Market street on Tuesday even
ing. Business of Importance.
A R LEWIS. Jr.,
Attest: J. M. Pi U-IN, R. 8
DUSHANE CLOWARD
JN
Commander.
N.
WILL HEREAFTER DEVOTE DIS ENTIRE TIM*
TO TEACHING BINGING.
KITH EU CLASSES OH PRIVATE.
Rooms Nos. 1 and 2,
No. 931 Market Street.
N ot
HA
10« —IF YOU WANT TO SAVE
DOLLARS, insure yonr property with
w KIVU Jb ao.. 713 Market Street.
MUMMER ZESOKT4.
W EST JERSEY HOUSE,
Atlantic City. N. J.
On Atlant!-, between Illinois and Kentucky
avenues. First-class accommodations. Kates
from $7 to $10 per week. P. J. LuNG of
Wilmington pro pH-tor.
H urt,!, uhetwoode,
, . ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.
Remodeled and enlarged; sixty sleeping
rooms; all convenience« of large hotel; newly
furnished, rooms large and airy, several hav
Ing ocean view; beds comfortable, with woven
wire springs, Lair mattresses and feather pil
lows; closets on each floor; particular care lias
been given to the sanitary arrangements
throughout the house; city water and gas; call
bells in every room,
hotel is
1
desirably located, on Pacific
avenue, between Indiana and Illinois avenues,
convenient to the Pennsylvania and Reading
Railroad stations, and within two minutes'
walk of the beach.
The proprietress takes this opportunity to
thank her friends and patrons for f irmer
favors in past experience, and promises to
make Hotel Chet wood« a HOME in every
respect.
Special attention will be given to the rare
of invalids. MH8. ANNIE GHUBB.
HANKING AND FINANCIAL,
CAPITAL,
$500,000
THE EQUITABLE
Guarantee and Trust Company
northwest Corner Ninth and Market S.s.
Wilmimoton, Del.
Deposits of money received on interest.
Bents aud income collected and remitted for
a moderate charge and estates of
zcriptlon carefully managed.
This company acts as executor, administra
tor and guardian and receives and executes
trusts of every description from the courts.
corporations and individuals and acts_
agent for the registration and transfer cf
loans and stocks of corporations and in the
payment of coupons or registered interest or
dividends.
This company also guarantees the vaildlt y,
performance and effect of any contract, be
comes surety on bail bonds and court* and
officials are directed to accept it as sole
surety In ail cases.
Executors, administrators or trustees of es
tates and ladles unaccustomed to the trans
action of business will find this company a
convenient depository for money.
Wills receipted for and safely kept without
charge.
For further Information, call at the office or
send for a circular.
WILLIAM BIIHH, President.
PBKoTON LEA, Vice President,
OTHO NOWLAND.
Secretary and Treasurer.
DIRECTORS.
every oe
Wm, H. Swift,
Samuel Bancroft, Jr..
Preston Lea,
William Bush,
W. Saulsbury, Jr.,
H. H. Carter,
Dr. J. A. Draper,
E Kringhurst, Jr.,
George W. Bush,
Christian Feblger,
H. 51. Barksdale,
William DuPont,
Thos. Jackson,
Wm. T. Porter,
Joseph Swift,
W.G Pennypackei,
J. Smith Brennan,
George V. Massey,
A. P. Robinson,
H. A. Richardson.
R. R. ROBINSON & CO.,
HANKERS AND BROKERS
Corner Fourth and Market Street«
Stocks bought and sold in the New Y or!
Philadelphia and Boston markets on commit
Mon.
Letters ot credit given, available In ail parti
the world, and drafts on England Ireland
Prance Germany and Switzerland issued.
ARTISANS' SAVINGS BANK,
KO BOS MARKET STREET.
Open dolly from B o'clock a. m. until 4 p. m.,
and on Tuesday and Sat urday from 7 to 8 p. m,
MONEY LOANED ON MORTGAGES.
Ozo. W. Bush, g«o. 8. Oafzixz.
President. Vise President,
K. T. Tatlob, Tressxrer.
To* W Mrsnan Andltift.,
»JftHE
AMUSEMENTS,
For Rentals or other
business, address, D. P.
Wells, Manager ol tlie
Academy ol Music.
EXCURSIONS.
VIEW JERSEY & WILMINGTON FERRY
l>l COMPANY. DELAWARE RIVER AND
WEST JERSEY RAILROADS.
FIRST GRAND EXCURSION
J\xly 4 t*i
TO ATLANTIC CITY.
Special through train from Pennsgrove to
Atlantic City "Without change of care
ExiüHRnN Tickets.|
Boat (Steamer Christina) leaves King street
wharf at 7.30 a. m. Returning train will
leave Atlantic City at lip. m.
An opportunity to spend a delightful day at
this famous seaside resort Is now offered.
Eight hours at the Seashore. Fare. $1 50.
A. G McCAUSLAND. Superintendent.
BOWNES8 BRIGGS, Gen'l Pass. Agent.
.11.50
teeffll-SmäaiMoolEiciirsiffl
TO
CAPE MAY
ON
STEAMER REPUBLIC,
WEDNESDAY JUNE 11, 1890.
Tickets, $1. Children under 14 years, 50c.
Music by Grace Orchestra. Train leaves
foot of French street at 7 30 a. m. sharp.
New Jersey&Wilmingt'ii Ferry Ca
STEAMER
CHRISTINA
Will on and after Thursday. Mav 22, make
daily trips as follows between Wilmington,
Del.,
Pennsgrove and Pennsville,
NEW JERSEY.
Leave Wilmington at 7 30 a.m. and 3 50 p.
m. for Pennsville.
Leave Pennsville at 9 15 a. rr. and 5 05 p. m.
for Penns* rove and Wilmington.
Leave Wilmington at 7 30, 1130 a. m M 3 30
and 6 45 p. m. for Pennsgrove.
Leave Pennsgrove at tt and 1015 a. m. and
125 and 6 p. m. for Wilmington.
ON SUNDAY.
Leave Wilmington at 9 30 a. ra. and 2 33
p. m. for Pennsgrove and Pennsville.
Leave Pennsville at 1115 a. m. and 4 p. m.
for Pennsgrove and Wilmington.
Leave Wilmington at 9 JO a. m., 2 30 and 6 p
m. for Pennsgrove, ap»l leave Pennsgrove at 8
a. m., 12 30 and 5 p. m. tor Wilmington.
This arrangement will afford a fine oppor
tunity for a delightful sail on the Delaware.
Excursion tickets between Wilmington and
Pennsville, 30 cents; single fare, 20 cents Be
tween Wilmington and Pennsgrove, excursion
tickets, 25 ccnts and single, 15 cents.
Pennsgrove an 1 Pennsville are beautiful
places, affording great opportunities
lug. boating, bathing and dancing.
Special arrangements may
day school and moohllgbt
for ttsu
be made for Suu
excarslons, etc.,
A. ». McCAUSLSND. Superintendent.
BOWNESS BRIGGS. Gend F. and P. Agent.
yyiLMINGTON STEAMBOAT COMPaN F
STEAMERS
etc
City of Chester
, and Brandvwini
On and after Saturday, Marcfi i, 1890,
Ldave Fourth street wharf for Cheater ant
Philadelphia, dally (Sundays included) st
7.30and UI..J0 a- in., 100 and 4.15p. m.
For Marcus Hook. 7.30 a. m. and 4 IS p. n ,
Leave Philadelphia, Chestnut street wa»- ,
at 7.30 and 10.16 a. m.. 1.40. and 4 O'
' r al®T)l'ore V« v*
IT*. .
PROPOSALS.
PROPOSALS.
SEALED PROPOSALS will be received In
the lock box at the rooms of the Board of
Education until 8 o'clock p. in., on MONDAY,
the 9th day of »une, 1890, for the labor aud
materials required in the alterations and ad
ditions to public schools Nos 3 and 13, In this
city. In strict accordance to the plans and
specifications, copies of which may be seen at
the office of Beggs & AUmond, No. Id West
Eighth street
The committee reserves the right to reject
any or all bids. E. G. SHORTL1DGE,
JOSEPH PYLE,
H. H. BAYNAKÜ,
J IHN PILE.
D. H, »Mi l H.
Committee.
Bad Bread will
spoil a meal.
USE
LEA'S
u
BEST
99
IIEALD & CO'S Sale of
Lotfe, on Maryland avenue,
on June 14, will be posi
tive.
withdrawal or underbid
ding. A chance to make
some money.
No postponement.
TOiLST»
PtRFLCT
lempDOHS
c.uxr ' J
■NT
ÄWnküTEfD
' » /-iV
Cora Fifth and Mark«« 8(rests,
HUmlaxtu. Dai.
506 Market St.
WILMINGTON'S
Cheapest Credit Honse.
On a Bill of $10 $1 Cash
and $1 Per Week.
True economy doesn't con
sist in buying the cheapest
article that can be obtained at
a low price. You might buy
a farm for a few hundred dol
lars and yet pay more than its
value.
Now we claim that you can
buy more and better goods for
the money at No. 506 Market
street than at any other Credit
House in this city, and as much
and as good as can be got for
the same money in any other
city. Why ? Because we buy
our goods in large quantities,
and, paying cash, get all the
discounts, which enables us to
place them at your service for
the same price that you pay for
them elsewhere for cash, and
on the easy terms of $1 down
on a hill of $10 and $1 a week
until the bill is paid.
8
Warm Weather Clothing.
Blue Cloth Suits, $10 and
F
$ 12 .
Slater's best Black Cheviot
Suits, trimmed in best style
and sewed with silk throughout,
$12.00 and $15.00.
Men's strictly all-wool Chev
iot Suits, $10.00.
Men's stylish Wide Wale
Suits, $15,00.
Men's all worsted Serge
Suits, blue and black, $12.
Boys' handsome Cheviot
Suits, $7.50.
Boys' Wide Wale Suits and
Coats and Vests at all prices.
Boys' Nobby Worsteds in
light and dark shades.
Children's Norfolk
Pleated Suits, $2,50 and up
wards.
,
,
In
of
at
and
Warm Weather Dress
Goods.
3S-inch all-wool cashmeres,
50c. per yard.
46-inch extra fine all-wool
Henrietta, $i per yard.
Ladies', Gent's and Chil
dren's Underwear, all grades.
Ladies' and Children's Para
sols from 65c to $12.
Swiss embroideries, Vic
Lawns,
toria
Piques, striped, plaid and plain
Surahs,Faille Française, Sat
ines, Ginghams.
Handsome display of Mil
linery.
Nainsooks,
Furniture, etc.
Oak Chamber Suits,
pieces, $25 00.
Walnut Hair Cloth Suits,
pieces, $30.
Extra Super Ingrain Car
pets, half wool, 50c per yard.
Good Fancy Matting, $5.00
per roll.
Cooking Ranges, best cast
ings, with large ovens, latest
improved draft, with fixtures,
and warranted to give satis
faction, No. 6, $13.50; No. 7,
$16.00; N0.8, $20.00.
On a Bill of $10, $1
Cash and $1 per Week.
MOTTO : If the goods are
not satisfactory and as repre
sented, come to us and we will
allow all reasonable claims.
P.J.Walsh&Co.
506 Market Street.
Open Saturday till 10 p. m,
A CONGRESSIONAL FORECAST.
Whai thfl Renate mul IIoum* ITuy Do
Thin Week.
Washinot* n. Juno 0.—The Republican
members of t lie wnste will hold it caucus
Tuesday evening to maku choice of a sutv
cesser to Sorgeaut-at-Arms Canaday. whose
resignal Ion takes effect on the 1st of next
month. There aru several candidates iu
the Oebi, the chief of them being ex-Repre
sentetire Valentine, of Nebraska. Deputy
Scrgcai.t-at-Arms Charles B. Keude, of
Maine, luis a strong following, and the
friend»of William Bailey, of Philadelphia,
Senator Quay's candidate, think he has a
fair chance of winning the prize. Col.
Swords. of Iowa, is a candidate and Mr,
I teed, of Minnesota, is tentatively iu the
race, it is Out impossible that when the
Republican senators get together they will
consider the possibility of making other
changes in the executive staff of the senate.
The passage by the house of the caucus
silver bill will doubtless operate Ui cut
short the silver debate in the senate. A
Republican caucus may be held on the
sonate side of the Capitol early this week
for the purpose of determining whether or
not the senate will indorse the action of
the house on this question. The general
belief is that the Republican senators will
not Ire able to agree upon a measure and
that the senate will puss a hill differing
from the house bill, especially in the bull
ion redemption feature, and that the whole
matter will then he settled in conference
between the two houses.
Senator Vest promises that he will bring
up soon a new subject for débat«, the dis
cussion of which may occupy several days.
The special committee (of which he is chair
man) which spent many months in the in
vestigation of the transportation of tx'ef
and beef products has reported a bill, and
during the past week the committee on
agriculture reported a substitute for it. Mr.
Vest has given notice that some afternoon
during the coining week he will call up
these bills and urge their considération to
a conclusion. The river and harbor ap
propriation hill may lie reported to the
senate during the week. The committee
on commerce has made such progress with
it that Senator Frye thinks Us considera
tion may Ire concluded by the middle of the
week.
The senate finance committee had hoped
to have the tariff hill ready to report before
Use end of this week, but fire indications
now are that the bill will not Ire ready to
return to the senate before the beginning
or middle of next week. The Republican
members of the committee have turned
over to the Democrats several of the
schedules, and all of the more important
items in the bill will Is* passed upon Irefure
the end of the week. There is a prospect
of a comparatively dull week in the house.
On Monday, beginning at 1 o'clock, eulo
gies to too memory of the late Samuel J.
Randall will ire delivered. Eulogies on
the late Representatives Wilber and Nutt
ing, of New York, will 1» delivered Thurs
day.
TO COLORED VOTERS.
A Circular Which Advise» Them to Di
vide Their Party Fealty.
Washington, June it—The officer» of
the Washington Tariff Reform club and
colored bureau of information have l»ued
an addraas to the colored voters of the
United State«, and especially to those
south of Mason and Dixon's Hue, in which
a division of their votes among all the po
litical parties is asked. The circular says:
"We were once needed to assault forts on
the battle fields, now we are needed at the
ballot box to protect the high tariff monop
oly, and when we cease to give aid to tills
extraordinarially high tariff and the thou
sands of white Republican officeholder»
we will be abandoned again and relegated
to a political shade of quietude."
The circular says that all the love the
Republican leaders have for the colored
man is to receive his vote. It declares that
the negro was freed simply as a war meas
ure. Two colored regiments organized in
Massachusetts lay for a year without being
recognized as a part of the Union army.
Force of circumstances drove the country
to it; "so you can see," continue« the cir
cular, "that you freed the northern Repub
licans, If any freeing was done."
Tlie negroes differ religiously, why not
politically, it is asked. It is declared that
tho southern problem will not lie solved by
the passage of national election laws.
Nothing but Christianity on the part of the
white people and education and wealth on
the part of the colored will ever settle it.
Who Will Succeed Senator Stanford?
WASHINGTON, June 9.—C. A. Buckley,
who is said to lie tho most potential figure
In San Francisco politics, is in the city ac
companied by Jacob Rudolph, John F.
Farley, J. M. Chenowlth and Jere J. Dris
coll, oil from Sun Francisco.
Hears« and Representative Finnic were
among his earliest callers, and spent sev
eral hours in fixing up coast matters. It
is probably not far from the tenth to state
that the political campaign which is to de
term loo the complexion of the next Cali
fornia delegation, and the succession to
Senator Standford'» seat, is being now
mapped out in Washington, and that whut
Mr. Buckley has to nay will be iloei
with a great deal of consideration.
Senator
Viti
Mr. Depew Has Recovered.
Nrw York, June 9.—Hon. Chanucey M.
Dcpew said laut evening that he had en
tirely recovered from the illness which an
noyed him tn Chicago. He speaks highly
of his reception in that, city, and says the
fair will do more for the city than fifty
years of ordinary progress would. Refer
tjng to the rumored sale of the stock yards
he said lie understood an offer by an En
glish syndicate had been entertained. The
management ol the yards would, however,
remain unchanged. *'
Got Away with 1417,000.
Buff alo, June t».— Suit has been brought
by the firm of Ramsdell, Sweet & Co.
against Lewis B. White, their former
bookkeeper, for embezzlement. In the
complaint the firm state that White, be
tween May anil October of US8, got away
with $17,Adi) of the firm's money. He tried
to conceal his thefts by false ent ries, but an
investigation resulted in the discovery of
the shortage. White's present whereabouts
is unknown.
Paralysed by Lightning.
Lockpoht, N. X,, June 9.—During the
storm which prevailed at Hosmer, a village
near here, Joseph Bacon and his family,
who were sitting in a room of their house,
were all paralyzed In their limbs and arms
from electricity in the air. The victims
did not recover until the storm had passed
off. Beyond a severe fright they received
no injury. _
Over 1,500 Immigrant« Landed.
NZ'v York, June ».—The steamer City of
Chi sign, from Liv
ni. landed 574 imml
luV Uuf 0 o UUiCO L) uuu<»y.
Alz«!
steamer La Bretagne, from Havre, landed
534; the P. Calami, from Rotter'lam, 247,
and the Xuormnm, from Hamburg, 182.
FOUND A WATERY GRAVE
Terrible Accident to a Sunday
_ Fishing Party.
T
SEVEN 31 EN AVERE DROWNED.
On# by One They Ik'ioafuid Tli«*lr Hold
Upon the Overturned limit and Sunk
Ho neat h the Waves of llosttm Harbor.
Hut One Man Wat baved.
Boston, June 9.—A sailboat with eight
young men on hoard wo* capsized in the
waters of Dorchester, Sunday, and seven of
the eight lost their lives before aid could
reach them. The nauuvs of those drowned
ate;
The Names of the Drowned.
James Husband, aged IS.
Albert Lombard, aged 85.
Edgar Maloney, aged 'A!,
Lawrence McTlernan, aged 93.
John Sullivan, aged 38.
John P. Troy, aged 18.
Joseph Tufts, aged 81.
The Boat AY as Overturned.
The only survivor of the accident is Wal
ter Quinlan. He was found unconscious,
but clinging to the boat. All were resi
dents of South Boston and all unmarried
except •MoTSernati, who leaves a widow aud
an ll-montha-old cl *%!
Tlie party set sail at 8 a. m., intending to
make a voyage about the bay aud put in at
Squautum fur dinner. At 3<45 the boat
was alamt a mile off Thompson's Island.
A heavy squall caused the sail to jilie; the
tiller became jammed ami the bool quickly
upset.
Tlie Deat Sank and Ros»v
With the exception of Lotulotrd every
tnomlrer of the party could swim, and all
managed to regain tlie lioat, 1ml the boat,
only twenty lect iu length and shallow,
wren fill«! with water under the weight of
the eight men. As it sunk the seven «wim
mere released their holds, but u* the boat
slowly name to the Rurfaoe all took hold
again. This was repented auveraJ times.
At last Maloney attempted to awim to the
shore for help, but he hod not gone a half
mile when his companions saw him throw
up both hands and disappear umeuth the
waters.
But On« WiM Allvfv
At last a watchman on a (South Boston
plot sighted tlie upturned boat aud ro
Jiorted it to James and Edward Clark, two
brothers, one of whom had saved several
men from drowning. They put off from
shore, but when tlie y reached the upturned
boat there was only one man clinging to It
and he half frozen, wholly ex 1 mu sled and
unconscious. The others tuul one by one
been overcome. Quinlan wits taken to tho
shore, resuscitated aud from him was ob
tained t'ue story of the accident.
A Desperate Struggle fur Life.
Quinlan says that one of his companions,
he doesn't know who, clung to his leg, but
lie himself was too weak to even reach a
hand to him, and he soon dropped off. Two
besides himself clung to the 'suit, and just
how long they fought the chill w aves Quin
lan cannot tell, but it was fully an hour.
Just before the Clarks reached the over
turned boat Quinlan's two companions re
laxed their hold and dropped into the sea.
The sole survivor was apparently dead
when tho Clark brothers reached him, but
by tlie time they reached their home signs
of life were visible in tlie half drowned
youth. Two of the bodies have been re
covered.
DARING MAIL ROBBERS.
A Northern Pacific Train "Held Up" by
Four lllghwnyiuem
Bismarck, N. Dak., June 0.—The most
daring train rubbery ever committed in tho
northwt st occurred near New Salem,
twenty miles from Bismarck, at midnight,
where the east bound Northern Pacific
passenger train w;is "Held up" by four
highwaymen. When the train arrived at
New Salem two men jumped on the front
p lift form of tlie baggage car, and after tho
train got under way they climbed over tho
tender into the engine and covered the en
gineer and fireman with their revolvers.
They brandished the cocked weapons and
threatened the terrified engineer ami fire
man with instant death if they did not
stop at a certain point down the line, where
the robbers were joined by two confeder
ates.
Express Messenger Angevine, noting that
tlie train came to an abrupt stop on a lone
ly prairie, suspected something wa« wrong.
He opened the great iron treasure box of
the express company, which contained
many thousands of dollars, aud stowed
the contents safely away in the big safe,
which oould not be opened except by sev
eral hours hard work at safe blowing. He
then left the car by the rear door, locking
it after him, and hastened back to Now
Salem, whore be gave the alarm.
After the train had been stopped tlie
mail, express and baggage cars were un
coupled, and the robbers compelled the en
gineer to pull these cars away from the
passenger coaches. When the detached
cars bad been stopped again the engineer
aud fireman were forced to break open tho
door of the express car. Then with a coal
pick tlie robber» succeeded iu opening an
iron box, but found it entirely empty.
They were so enraged at this discovery
that one of tlie robbers struck the fireman
a stunning blow on the head with the butt
end of a revolver, felling him like an ox to
the floor of the car. The robbers then
turned their attention to the mall car, from
which they took seven valuable pouches of
registered mail matter, besides a largo
quantity of loose registers. They then
made their escape. The train was delayed
an hour. None of the passengers were
molested and until the train got back to
New Salem they did not know what had
happened. A posse of men with the sheriff
very heavily armed, left on a special train
for the scene of the robbery. Chief In
spector Rathbone, of the postoffice depart
ment, has offered a reward of $1,000 for
each conviction aud sentence in United
States courts.
The Minerva Beaten.
New York, June 9.—The Larchmont
Yacht club'» spring regatta was sailed Sat
urday. The chief interest centered in the
race between the forty footers, in which the
Scotch yacht Minerva was entered. The
race was over a twenty mile course. The
Minerva was beaten by the American yacht
Laris by 8 minutes and 14 seconds, but the
time allowance reduced th» victory to 89
seconds.
A Clergyman Diet in Church.
Philadelphia, June ».— The Rev. .T, B.
Kniest, aged 55 years, died 1«*« night in
his In pew in Emanuel Reformed Lutheran
church, the r.ns'o-ste of which he resigned
two years ago alter a paralytic stroke. He
was vice president of the g neural synod of
the Reformed Luthetan eiturch Of the
Lui bod statu».
THE BASEBALL WORLD.
A-ncrican Association.
At Ttfiok* v —
Brooklyn,.
ByramiM
Rum* hit;., 'rooklyo, It); 8y metis«, 7. Errors:
Brooklyn. 5; By mourns 4. Uatuuteti: Daily ami
Toy. Cnmty mui O'Rourke.
AI SI. Louii
HI. Louih
T oledo. ..
.501 100011— 0
.81000010 l— 5
.0 S 0 I 0 0 0 0 0-4
.0 0 0 1 1 S H (I 0—8
huso hit«: St Latin, D: Toledo, 0. Errors: St,
Lniin. 0; Toledo, V, Batterien: Ramsey auil
Munyon: Earl, Cushman and Bago.
At Rochester—
ttouheeter .0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0—1
oiooooaoo— «
Bane h.te Rocheeter, 7: Athletic, 8. Errors:
Kw'h(«tv, ■>; Athletic, * Boiterie»: Collil.au
HcKsmigh. F«|**r and Kohtuaou.
At Louisville -
Louisville.
Ooluuthus
!
At hlet le
. isoooiooa-R
.i o a « t n o i z—it
Bose lilts: Lml vlMe, 8; Columbus, ttt Error*;
Isimsvili«. A: (ViluitiI'll h 4 Ballone»; Ebro.
Hyon, Gsstrigbt. ami O'Connor.
At lint tic ArthtM-lutioii.
At Paltlmore—
Raltimor*.
00000400 0-4
0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 I— r>
Washington
B.»m* hits: Haiti more. ft WcutlOn^tmi, io. Er
rom: Baltimore, 4. Washington, .H. haiu*russ
ILlcor ntul ToWlunmd, PhbllpM ami UKiUle.
Al KmusUuâ -
Jf?nu»y CHy.0 ô l 0 0
WÜiiilnjftttu..
Hase lilt*: Jersey dt.v, 14; Wt.mlngum. 1 H
Error*; J m*y tlty. 4: Wilmington. 7. Fattvilos
KicwfuraM and Murphy, Gallican and William*.
ai Newark—
Newark .
Wo reell tor. . .
fl 1 9-P
. »8080000 1—1
.0 0 0 0 0 « 1 « x— h
.0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2
llawi hit*: Newark. 4; WoroMttf. th Error«:
Newark. I: Worcester. i Hattert«*; öullivuu tum
Ctukln, BuilToid and (iubnuiHO.
Standing of the ritibn.
I'LAVKHs' LEAGUE.
dut», W. L. 1-A l.l Cum. W. L POL
.... 8» 14 JIKI I'hi odelp'a 18 81 .471
New York. 8* 1ft .59 Ulevelaml. tft 18 .467
llrooklvu 81 17 .57. ifitlstturg . It 81 .401
.. 18 17 .5: l|rtuffaln,... 10 88 .ÏI9
NATIONAL LKAOUE.
W, U P IT I Clulu. W. U P Ol
.0801 New York. 19 111 .5
,080]Beaten. is 8U .474
.571 Olcveand . 18 il
.5S0jtTM«burg.. 9 87 .8.0
AMTilllCAN ASSOCIATION.
Clubs. W. L P.Ot.l Chit«. W L. P Ot
Athletic.. .. SO II .7 S Oolumbu».. 18 81 .49.'
Rochester. 8» 19 .68u{f»!adiV ,. » IU <0 .45!
IwMlIsvIlkt.. 8,1 17 54l;Svraril««.r. 15 81 .40
St. Lana.. »> >8 5«fl|Br,«klyn il 8S .»>
ATLANTIC ASSOCIATION,
NV L POt.1 Clubs. W. L. P.Ot
.«■T Jereev City 18 IU .5 i
.fttttfWaah'ton. 17 17
.94» Hartford., 10 8« At
.5581Wliming;Ti « 89 481
Club*.
Cincinnati «S 18
PnilaUelp'a 21 14
Chicago.... 10 1.5
Bn*okiyn. 9ft 16
Chiba
N Haven., 8-' 11
Baltimore LT 11
Worcester, 18 IU
Htnvurh. 8" 14
A NEWARK SENSATION.
Tire TrmihU* Between John D. ITxMl.
and He*. W, W. Boyd.
NrwAKK, N J., June 0. —A local paper
recently stated that John D. Peddle, tin
millionaire trank manufacturer, was of 11
legitimate birth. Mr. Peddle not only la
gan a IIIh-I suit, but made an investigation
which disclosed the fact that the ortginntoi
of Um st-ory was Hev. W. W. Boyd, of the
Peddle Memorial church. I lev. Mr. Boyd
admits that he told the story to a reporter,
but says the reporter promised not to have
It. published until n later date. The editor
of tlie paper, however, disregarded the re
porter's request and published H. Hev
Mr. Boyd now says that while the publica
Mon was premature, the statement is trite
4ind be will stick to it. Mr. Peddle will
doubtless sue tho minister for libel as well
tlie pujier.
The matter has caused a great social sen
sot ion. It is the sequel of another and
lesser scandal which has been a matter of
gossip for some time—namely, the refusal
of the trustees of the church to reuognlze
Mr. John Peddle in the church's affaire,
The late ex-Mayor and ex-Congressman
Thomas B. Peddle founded the church with
an endowment of IHftO.tXIO. When the
church was dedicated recently the keys of
the church were presented to tho trustees
by an adopted daughter of the late Mr.
Peddle. There was some surprise that
John Peddle was ignored an4l a family
quarrel wus hinted at. Tlie publication
of the statement ulxtve referred to then
followed.
Mr. Peddle'« friends assert that Rev. Mr
Boyd is angry st Mr, Peddle for falling to
carry out, curtain supposed intentions of
his father in regard to tho minister's sal
ary and other incidentals, ami that his re
sentment has led him into making a libel
ous statement.
The pastor's friends, on the other hand,
declare that he is a man who would not
say such a thing unless be hud proof of its
truth. Mr. Peddle threatens to drive the
minister from the pulpit, aud there ar>
likely to he sensational developments.
Itev. Dr. M 11 mitt Dead.
Princeton, N. J., June 9.—Rev. Dr
James Clemente Moffatt, emeritus profes
sor of cbitreb history of tlie Princeton The
ological seminary, tiled Sunday afternoon
in his eightieth year. He was born in
Scotland, rame to this country ia 1833 and
graduated from Princeton iu the class of
1835. After a iMistgraduBte course of two
years at Yale lie was a tutor st Princeton,
professor tn Uitsyette sol lege, Miami uni
verslty aud the Cincinnati Theological
seminary. In 18(51 he was made professor
of church history »t Princeton and hsld
the chair until two years ago. He edited
The Prinoetoniaji In 1870, hoe been a fre
quent contributor to Tlie Princeton Re
view and has written a number of books
and poems.__
Royal Arcanum Officer«.
Milwaukkk, June 0.—Tlie supreme coun
cil, Royal Arcanum, has elected the follow
ing officers: Supreme regent, Leigh R
Watts, Portsmouth, Va.; supreme vice
regent, C. F. I siring, Boston; supreme
orator, H. H. C. Miller, Chicago; supreme
secretary, W. O. Robson. Boston; supreme
treasurer, K. A. Skinner, Westfield, N. Y.;
supreme chaplain, Charles O. Spencer,
Connecticut; supreme guide, D. W. Wil
son, Illinois; supreme warden, Hoscom
Myrick. Americus, (Ja.; supreme sentry,
H. H. Dodd, Fond du Lac, Wis.
Republicans Against Stone.
PITTSBURG, June ».—About 5,000 Repub
lican voters of the Twenty-third Congres
sional district assembled in Carnegie Li
brary hall, Allegheny, for the purpose of
protesting against the action of the recent
convention in the alleged nomination of
William A. Stone for congress and to re
quest the county committee to order a new
primary election. Among th* speakers
was Hon, B. F. Jones, ex-chairman of the
Republican national committee. Resolu
tions In accordance with the purpose of the
meeting were adopted.
Alleged Smugglers Arrested.
New York, June 9.—When the steamer
City of Chicago arrived at quarantine
treasury inspectors arrested two of the
crew upon an old charge of smuggling.
The men arrested are Chief Storekee[«sr
James laithnin and bis zsslstant, Archi
bald Murtagh. No contraband goods were
Toned <n their possession. The arrests were
made on information obtained through the
confession of confederates in former smug
gling operations. Other arrests, based on
the «une grouutU. arc te follow.
KIDNAPER COWLES SHOT
His Brother-in-Law Fatally
Wounds Him.
DEADLY AFFRAY IN A CARRIAGE
Voting Conies Attempted to Kill ITB
Wife, but Came to Grief at the llandl
of Her Plucky Brother—A Child th.
Bone of Contention.
Montreal, June 9.—Eugene II. Cowles
«on of Edwin Cowles, the bite proprietor oi
The Cleveland Leader, Is lying in the Gen
eral hospital here prol« hly fatally shot,
The shooting is the end of the sensational
altdnetion by Cowles of his daughter, Flop
puce, from ills wife, a (laughter of K. B
! Rule, the Cleveland banker, a week ng*
lust Tuesday. Detectives were employed
and Cowles was tracked to Buffalo, Crm»
there to Niagara Falls, thence to St. Cath
arines, Out., and there to Toronto, where
Mrs. Cowles, Judge Ingersoll, her lawyer,
and C. C. Hale, her brother, arrived just is
time on Thursday to miss him,
Cowles arrived here on Friday morale i
with his daughter and put up at the VVimi
»or hotel. The pursuing party arrived Su n
day morning and immediately employ- l
Detective Grose, of the Canadian tarer. I
service. Ho located Cowles, but the da ighe
ter hud disappeared.
Mr. Hale, Mrs. Cowles and Judge lnge*r
soil met Cowles at the Windsor and askutS
for the child. Cowles refused to tell where
she was, hut asked them to take a drive.
They all entered a carriage together, while
Detective Grose continued his search.
A Bullet Through HU Neck.
Driving down St. Catharine street, Cowle#
became very excited and angry at his wif«
and brother-in-law, and suddenly pulled
out a revolver to shoot Mrs. Cowles, but
Hale was h>o quick for him. Staying the
would Ire murdering arm with one ham
with the other he pulled his own pistol an
fired at Cowles, sending a bullet through
his neck. Bale ordered the driver to gd
to a hospital, where Cowles' wound wad
pronounced very dangerous, If not
lie was unconscious all day.
Hal» Locked Up.
Hale went from the hospital to the een»
tral police station, where he recited the cir
cumstances of the sluxiting and was locked
upon a charge of attempting to kill Cowles.
Hale claimed self defense. Mrs. Cowled
was also placed under arrest, but was after»
ward released on hail given by Lawyer Mo
Gibbon and Detective Grose. The detectivd
had in the meantime found the chihl In a
convent. The nuns refused to give her up,
but a writ of habeas corpus will ho sued
out, and Mrs. Cowles will attempt to so
cuke her. Mrs. Cowles refused to talk, Hof
father has lieen telegraphed for, and the
case will come up today In the police court
fatal.
The New. In Cleveland.
Cleveland, o., Junes.—The news of th«
«hooting of Eugene Cowles iu Montreal ha*
created a profound sensation here. Fo|
Eugene Cowles himself there is little sym
J lathy owing to
lis wife, und
estimable lady, daughter of E. R. Hale, ■
prominent banker of the highest busbies*
aud social standing.
The Story of the Trouble.
Eugene Cowles and Alice M. Hale wer«
married about tan years ago. They liav«
bad init one child, Florence, about 8 year«
of age, who lias been the innocent cause ol
the tragedy. Siam after the marriage young
Cowdes became dissipated and began to
neglect his wife and associate with other
women.
He formèd an intimacy with one Clara
Llenesehloss, of llloomfleld, N. J,, «orna
four years ago, and iu the full of 188(1 she
accompanied him to Europe, where they
remained until the next spring. They then
came to Cleveland, where Cowdes rented a
house for lier on Arlington street. Sine*
then they have traveled about together a*
man ami wife.
Ile IVaiiteil to See the Child.
In October, 1888, Mrs. Cowles wont to liv*
with her lather, taking with her her little
child, Florence. Subsequently there was a
reconciliation on the husband's promise ta
reform, but ho soon relapsed into his old
evil ways, and his w ife was again forced
to seek refuge with her father, taking lier
child with her as before. Eater, when she
had given up all hope of reclaiming lier
husband, she instituted proceedings for di>
voroe.
CCowles, who had not seen his wife fot
some time, came to Cleveland on Monday
lust and went to his mother's bouse. From
there lie sent word to his wife that h«
would like to see his child, and Florence
was permitted to go and see him. He said
he was going to Buffalo and wanted the
little one to go with him to the depot.
The Child Abducted.
Mrs. Chase, sister of Mrs. Cowles, became
auspicious and went with them. When thee
arrived at the depot she found that he had
bought two tickets for Buffalo and was de
tenuhiea to take the child with him on the
train. Mrs. Chase tried to prevent him
from doing so, fighting with all hat
strength to drag the terrified child from the
grasp of her excited father.
A crowd gathered, but not understand»
ing the situation did not at once attempt t4
interfere. When Mrs. Chase explained that
Cowles was abducting tlie child several
men attempted to take her from him,
Cowles then, drawing a revolver, yelled;
"(ptund bock! I'll shout the first persoq
that stops me!" Holding the crowd at bay
he dragged tlie child on the train just as U
was starting.
The Pursuit of the Kidnaper.
Mrs. Chase hurried home and gave th*
alarm. Mrs. Cowles ran to her father fo»
help. Mr. Hale secured the services o|
Judge Ingersoll, and an order for the child
was placed in the hands of Sheriff Sawyer,
who left immediately for Buffalo, expect
ing that Cowles would try to get the child
into Canada by that point.
He did not succeed in intercepting them,
and they reached Montreal safely. Edito*
Cowles did not name Eugene, who was th«
eldest son, one of the trustees of his will,
in which be directed that the payment of
one-half of Eugene's share of the income
be made to the latter's wife. It would
appear from this that the elder Cowles wa*
aware of bis son's character and disposi
tion, and so did all he oould to protect thfi
young man's wife.
Ins shameful misconduct,
possible widow, is a most
To Educate Miners.
SHIELDS, June 9.—Mr. W. B, Beaumont,
member of parliament for the Tyneside
division of Northumberland, has, ia mem
ory of hi.» wife, given £350,000 for the pur»
pose of founding institutes at York amt
Newcastle for the education of miners. Th*
princely owner ascribes his wealth to th»
hard and often HI paid labor ot me minium
do*»»«. Mr. Beaumont has represented
the Tyneside from I8w) os a Gladstone Lib»
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