OCR Interpretation


Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, March 20, 1891, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042354/1891-03-20/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Ê &l*. J

4
/
/
/

/
» ■ $f§
WILMINGTON. DEL., FRIDAY, MARCH 20 , 1891 .
ONE CENT.
NO. 879 .
BEAL ESTATE.
1AOR BALK OR EXCHAN GF ON EASY'
F term», a number of new house» In »rood
location»: price» from SI, 100 upward,
new three-etory dwelling on Jackson
between Seventh and Eighth. Apply to
CHARLES H. TINDALL,
4!T East Seventh street.
Al:
so a
street
j^OR KENT.
No. 508 Weet Fourth street, 10 rooms.
714 Franklin street, 12 rooms
704 Franklin street, 10 rooms.
015 Market street, 14 rooms
536 West Fourth street, 10 rooms.
2307 Market street, 8 rooms.
604 Harrison street, 8 rooms.
510 Harrison street. 8 rooms.
513 Harrison 8treat, 8 rooms.
514 Hairison street. 8 rooms.
»13 <!la> ton street, 8 rooms.
820 West Fiith street, 6 rooms.
822 West Fifth street. « rooms.
718 KiuK street, 11 rooms.
1012 Monroe street.
STORES
Southwest corner Fifth ami Lombard Sts.
Southwest cor Seventh and Jefferson Sts
Northwest cor. Second and Washington Sts.
FARMS.
44 acres, near Clay iront.
125 acres, near 8my rna.
4 acres, on Kennett pike. 1 mile from city.
150 acres, ne«r Bear stntion.
GKO. R. TOWN^END & CO.
_No. 614 Market street.
OR KENT — AN OLD ESTABLISHED
dry goods and trimming »'ore aud dwell
i*ig at NortoeaKt cor Adams and Elm streets.
A ml lilt 100 North Franklin street.
W ILLIAM MAL ONEY .
OR RENT.-STORE AND DWELLING.
No. t'S Market s'rect, and dwe'llng»413
Tatnall si reel and 849 Orange Btreet. Apply,
JOHN FULLMER, *10 West Ninth
¥
¥
si reut .
OH RENT,—THREE ROOMS Sl'lTAHLE
tor lipht m&TtUfacturiBg business or
society meeting room*: fronting on Market or
Hhtpley street, 16x65, 16x40,16x65; well lighted
d ventilated.
F
.... Entrance on both Market
and Sb'piey streets. Possession March Jftth.
JAMBS MONAGHAN. 419 Marke» street
FOR RENT.
Tte FrankPnsireet, 11 rooms and bath.
181« 1820 West Front street, 8 rooms and bath.
1208 '.218 West Second street, 8 rooms and batli
IftOO 15U Gilpin avenue 8 room» and bath
100, 102 108 Lincoln Btreet, 6 rooms and bath.
296 West Twelfth street, 6 rooms and shed.
$07 West Twelfth street, 11 rooms and bath.
1323 West Eighth street, II rooms and bath.
302-200 East Fifth
200 West Seventh street. 7 rooms
Sixteenth and Thatcher street, ft rooms.
Broom and Banning streets, 11 roomsandbath
and stable.
street. 8 rooms and bath.
STORES FOR RENT.
304 Market, street.
511 Market street.
100» Market street.
K E. cor Front and Cleyton street».
House ard store (10 rooms und bath,) S. E.
corner Kigath and Tatnall streets.
. Apply to
HEALD & CO
M
Seventh and Market Sts.
1801.
UP TOWN REAL ESTATE OFFICE
923 Market Street
Bargains in Real Estate
PRINTED LI8T NOW READY.
8ome of the most desirable Houses and Lot*
In the city on easy terms, or MONTHLY
PAYMENTS, if desired. Now is the time to
secure yonr residence for the comiDg year
The 25th of Maroh will soon be here. Resolv«
■ow to buy a home and don't be annoyed witi
moving. _
Money Waiting For Good
City Mortgages.
Equitable Mortgage Company Debenture
Bonds for sale in large or small amounts.
PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST GUAKAN
TDED.
JOS. L. CARPENTER, Jr.
AUDITOR'S SALES.
B AI .K— "bY~VT UT l ' E OF A
of the Mayor of the City of
Wilmington, to me directed, will be exposed
to public «ale
ON TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 1891.
At 10 o'clock a. m.
At tho Auditor's office. No. 8J£ East Sixth
street, in the clty«>f Wilmington. New Castle
count}', and State of Delaware.
All that certain lot or pi« ce of land situate
In the city of Wilmington, aforesaid, bounded
and described as follow-, to wit:
Beginning at the corner formed by «he in
tersection cf tbe easterly side of Thatcher
street and the northerly side of Thirteenth
street, thence northerly along said side of
Thatcher street, sixty-four feet to a comer,
thence, easterly parallel with Thirteenth
Btreet, thirty-one feet six inches to another
«'orner, thence southerly parallel w th
'Thatcher street, sixty four feet to the north
erly side of Thirteenth street, thence westerly
along sabl side of Thirteenth street thirty-one
feet six inches to the piece of beginnlng.bfing
part of t e same land which Daniel W. Taylor
and wife by indenture bearing date the second
day of June 1882, and Recorded Deed Record
J, Volume 12, page 70 . ifcr., did grant and con
ferring unto the said William M. Francis in
fee os by reference will more fully appear, be
the content« ihercof what they may.
Seized and taken Intoexesntlon as the prop
erty of Baa uel D. 8 orbes a„d to be sold by
JOHN A. MITCHELL,
„ „ _ . City Auditor.
N. B.—The above named property to be sold
to ratisfy a lien thereon for curbing.
A UDITOR'S
warrant
A UDITOR'S SALE.—BY VIRTUE OF A
warrant of the Mayor of the city of
Wlliningtor, to me «Greeted, will be expo»e«l
to pu bite sale
ON TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 1891,
At 10 o'clock a. m..
At the A nditor's offl 'e. No. 8t£ East Sixth
street, in the city of Wilmington, New Castle
•GUnty and state of Delaware
All that certain lot or piece of land situate
in the city of Willing on. aforesaid, bounded
and described as follows, to wit:
Beginning at the corner formed bv the in
tereectioa of the southerly Bide of Twelfth
•tre*'t with the westerly side of Dealt street,
thence souther'}' along said side of Heald
street, 80 feet 8 inches to a corner, 'hence
westerly parallel with Twelfth street
to another * orner, thence northerly parallel
with Heald street 60 feet and 3 Inches to a
point in the said southerly side of 1 welfth
street, thence thereby easterly 60 feet to the
pist e of beginning, be the contents thereof
what they may.
Seized and taken in execution as the prop
erty of Samuel D. Forliei, and to tie sold by
JOHN A. MITCHELL.
City Auditor.
N. B.—The above named propeity to be
sold to satisfy a lien thereon for curbing.
60 feet
BUSINESS CARDS,
JSAIAH
PLUMBING. STEAM AND GAS
FITTING.
Estimates Furnished.
No. 409 SniPLEY STREET.
Telephone 489.
N. EATON,
rpHOMAB McHUGIi.
WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALER,
No. 13 Market Street,
Wllminet/m.
Delaware
JAMES A. KELLY,
WINE MERCHANT,
Soie Agent for Bohemian Rudwet.s Reel.
Uorutr Tenth and Shipley streets.*
Telephone
414.
AMUSKMKNTH.
GRAND OPERA HOUSE.
FRIDAY. SATURDAY. MARCH 9), SI,
Matinee Saturday.
W. T. CARLETON'S
OPERA CO.
The strongest Comic Opva Organizat'os on
the road.
FRIDAY—"Queen's iatre Handkerchief."
SATURDAY—Matinee and Evening.
"Claude Duval.'*
HELP WANTED.
I
W ANTED IN THE COUNTRY,
thoroughly respectable colored man to
drive a carriage, attend to lawn and be gener
ally useful. None without best references
need apply. 303 West Front street.
A DISH WASHER. APPLY AT MER
RITT HOUSE,Front and French streets.
W ANTED
ANTED^uTlADIHS TO HAVE THEIR
sewing machines repaired st the Nov
elty Sewing Machine Shops, No. 802 Hblpley
street. Yon W 11 save money hy leaving your
oroer. Machines bonglit, sold, exchanged or
for rent, per we6k or month. New and old
machines from $5 to $40
W
BOARD AND ROOMS.
614 KING
fT7 ANTED.—BOARDERS
▼ ▼ Btreet.
BU8INKS8 OPPORTUNITIES.
WANTED.-A SI LEST PARTNER WITH
$5,000 in a well paying business. None
bat those meaning business need apply to
"PARTNER,'* this office.
LOST AND FOUND.
OUND—GOLD AND ENAMEL SOCIETY
badge. Owner can have same by proving
property and paying for this advertisement.
Apply at Evkmno Journal counting room.
F
PUBLIC SALES.
pOSTPONED RECEIVER'S SALE OF
Presses, Type and Printing
Material,
AT NO. 30« 8HIPC.EY STRF.ET,
ON MONDAY, MARCH 23, 1891,
At 10 o'clock, a. m.
All the fixtures of a first-class printing
oftice, consisting of the following:
Three hundred and fltty-eighi. fonts of job
type, 13 fonte lahor saving ra e, 5 f**ecy
borders, 200 lbs Brevier, Donaldson; 00 lb«
Brevier, Roman: 30 lbs Brevier, old style; 100
il s 10point Ronaldson, 50 ltw Piea.Konaldson:
40 lbs Pica. Roman: 40 lbs Pica, old style; 35
H s Nonpareil. Ronaldson; 2ft it» Nonpareil.
Roman; 10 lbs Nonpareil, old style; 1 { horse
power electric motor, 1 }4 Gordon press, new
style; t }.1 Gordon pre*«. old style; 1 hi tiordon
pres», old »tvle, ea h with steam fixtures,
rollers, etc.; 1 card cutt r, 1 paper cutter, 1
paper cutter, broken; 1 old Potter Piler press.
174 cases. 4 2 * case cabinets, 7 20 case cabinets
11 double Blands, 5 single stands, 1 proof
press, 2 drying racks, 3 large imposing stone ,
'.small imposing stones,1 iron imposing table,
1 galley sack, 20 brass galleys, 3 stoves, 8
tables, 1 oonntlDg house desk 1 closet, 1 letter
press, 1 roll top desk, t Pony Campbell press.
2 old Model presses, 1 lot paper and card
stock. A gnanlty of leads, wood and metal
fur*'itnre, sort«, brass rule, quoins and other
small tools and all the other necessaries to
the conduct of the business of the Wilming
ton Printing Company.
Term, of sale, cash.
HENRY C. ROBINSON
Receiver.
NOTlOBb.
\TOTICE.—11384 ELIZABETH ~ ALLEN
Ln medium Tells the past and future. 695
East Eleventh street.
■\JOTICE.-A MEETING OF THE SIXTH
0 .x ward Democrats will be held on Friday
Evening, in the rooms of the Yonng Men's
Demo'-ral cCInh By order of the chairma n.
N m OTICE - I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE
that I will apply to the General Assem
bly for a divorce from my husband William
Harry Conroy (Signed]
WILHELM!
Wilmington. March 7, 18H1.
NA E. CONROY'.
N OTICE.-TO ALL PERSONS NOT HAY
lng paid thetr taxes for 1889 and 18911 and
havirg lots or other real estate at Silver
crook, on the Highlands, at Elsmere or any
other part of Christiana hundred, they will
find the collector at the following named
places:
Post Office, Highlands, Monday, March 9.
Daltons' store, Centreville, Thursday,
March 12.
Hanley & Kirkwood's store. Rising Sun,
Wedneedav, 18.
Gibson House, Fourth street near Market,
Saturday, 21.
After |which time I will place'bills with
county constable with costs for collection
„ F. A. STURGEON,
Collector of taxes for Christiana hundred.
Office hours from 10 a. m. to 4 p, m.
N otice.- i f you want to save
DOLLARS, insure your property with
HAWKINS & CO., 712 Market Street.
BANKING AMD FINANCIAL
R. R. ROBINSON & CO
•7
BANKERS AND BROKERS
0 inter Fourth sod Market Streets
FOR SALE.
20 shares New Castle county National Bank.
200 Wimington Dental Mfg.Co.. 6 per cent,
bond«.;
$4*00 certificates of indebtedness Wilming
ton City Passenger Hallway Company.
Stocks bought and sold in the New York,
Philadelphia and Boston markets on commis
sion.
Lettersof credit given, available in all parte
of the world, and drafts on England. Ireland,
Franc?, Germany and Switzerland issued.
R. R. ROBINSON & CO.
rpHE
ARTISANS' SAVINGS BANK.
No. 502 MARKET STREET.
Open daily from 9 o'clock a. m. until 4 p.
and on Tuesday and Saturday from 7 to 8 p. m.
MONEY LOANED ON MORTGAGES.
Gao. W. Bush,
Protident,
George S. Capelle,
Vice-President.
_ „ „ E. T. TAYLOR, Treasurer.
Jos. M. Mather, Auditor.
POLITICAL.
pOR ASSESSOR AND COLLECTOR,
OUTHERN DISTRICT, CITY OF WIL
MINGTON, 1891,
Joim F. Callahan - ,
OF THETTENTH WARD,
_ »'object to the decision of the Democratic
Party.
pOR CITY' ASSESSOR AND COLLECTOR
FOR THE
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF WILMINGTON
J ohx J. Kennedy,
Cf the Third Ward.
Subject to the Democratic Rules.
W. COSTA,
PRINTER AND PUBLISHER.
607 Shipley Street.
* OFFICE CITY DIRECTORY.
SPRING
Begins to day and with it the
vexed question: "Where shall
1 purchase my Spring Suit ?
Why not try us, we're after
your trade. You run no risk
dealing here. Every garment
is marked with its price plainly
on, and besides, if the goods
don't suit you, you are not
compelled to keep them as
we will cheerfully ^exchange
them or return yoi* money.
And what a stock you have to
select from ! You can have no
idea until you visit us. In
Men's Suits we have all the
latest novelties in Cassimeres,
Cheviots, Worsteds,
Wales, Clay Diagonals, etc.
Over fifty styles at $10 and
$12. Hundreds of other
styles as low as $6 and up
to $20.
Boys' Suits of every good
fabric, tough, strong and
dressy, and at very moderate
prices, $4 to $15.
Children's Clothing—We are
already busy in this depart
ment. This house was always
known to keep the best stock
of Children's Clothing in the
city. We intend to keep up
that reputation. Children's
Suits in Cassimeres, Plaids,
Mixed, Light and Dark colors,
$2.50, $2.75, $300. $3 50
Children's Suits in Cassimeres,
Cheviots and Worsteds in bet
ter goods at $4.00, $4 50,
$500, $5.50, $600 up
to $8 00.
Children's Odd Pants by the
thousand.
We handle no shoddy goods.
Our aim is to have nothing
but the best.
Wide
N. Y. CLOTHING HOUSE.
316 Market Street
MAX EFHRIIM & CO.
Give it a fair trial
and let it speak for
itself. It will be far
more convincing than
talk.
LEA'S
n
BEST
99
: LOUR
THE
GREAT AFRICAN REMEDY
FOR
DYSPEPSIA AND INDIGESTION,
PREPARED ONLY BY
GEORGE W. MCLAUGHLIN,
And Sold by WM. HITCHENS, S. W. Cor.
Fourth and Walnut street i. Wilmington.
Del , and Druzgists generally.
Mr. George W. McLaughlin-Dear Sir: Two
bottles of your Great African Remedy com
plctely * ured me of th» dyspensiaof which i
was a sufferer. T recommend it to all so
afflicted. Respectfully,
DENNIS T.
MARGEREUM,
817 Buttonwood street.
PtflKCT
rju'8e*?''iOS3';i-;
V , iu-i»- Jjf
OA'M'o5-n«:'.HT
1 fef. 'c/£ i /j<7ynardr^
Id starke* Street»
rtfta
Willing tq b JDeL
THE MACQUEARY VERDICT.
It Means His Permanent Suspension, for
He Will Not Retract.
Cleveland, March 'JO. —The following in
a verbatim copy of the verdict itt the case
of the Rev. Howard MacQueary:
In the name of God, Amen Where»», the
Rev. Howard MacQueary, a I*reeliyter of tlio
diocese of Ohio was. by a written presentment
from the standing committee of said dioroHe,
dated Oct. 27, lHSSi, duly presented for trial under
title two, canon two.
digest of the canon» and »rcording to the canons
of dieciplino of the dloceeeof Ohio, upon the
charge of bolding and teachiug publicly and ad
visedly doctrines contrary to tlena: hold by the
Protestant Episcopal church in the United
States of America, and ujs>n the charge of hal
ing by such hoidiug and leaching been guilt y of
act which involves a breach of his ordination
rows, said obnoxious doctrines and the manner
of holding and teaching them being plainly set
forth in aaid presentment; and.
Whereas, the eccslostti-alpartof thisdioeese
of Ohio, after a fair and publie trial of Rev
Howard MacQueary upon the said presentment
and after the paticut conalderatiou of the rec
ol'd of the case, have declared in writing, signed
by a majority of them, tliat they have found
Rev. Howard MacQueary guilty of each of the
charges set forth In the presentment as afore
said, and,
Whereas, this finding of the court, together
with the attrated ropy of all the proc,dings
has been delivered to the bishop according to
the canons of the diocese, acrompanbsi with the
canonically required oplniou of tne court
what sentents. should la' prououiosHl. which
is tirât Rev. Howard MacQueary should be sus
pended from the functions of tbe holy ministry
for the i*eriod of six months In order that he
may have time to recoiiHider his views and er
rors and give evidence that ho will no longer
teach and publish the same And that in case
Rov. Howard MacQueary fails to retrai t his
errors and comply witli this,,, conditions afore
said within the aix months of his suspension, he
should then and there ba depoaed from the
priesthood of the church.
Now, therefore, we, William Andrew I
ard, D. D.. of divine permimion exercising ec
clasUntical and spiritual jurisdiction In this
dioorac of Ohio, do hereby pronounce ui» m the
Rev. Howard MacQueary sentence of suspen
sion from the exercises of the functions of the
holy ministry In all and every particular aud
in accordance with the above cited opiniuu of
the ecclesiastical court for the period of six
months,
thormore sentence that if after tile expiration
of Bix months from March 18, 18«!. he shall not
have retracted and given evidence that he will
no longer teach his errors of doctrine, of which,
under the presentment aforesaid, he ha» been
found guilty, lie shall be thereupon deposed
from the priesthood of the church
William Andrew Leonard.
Bishop of Ohio.
MacQneary Will Not Retract.
CANTON, O., March JO.—ILjv. MacQueary
has written to Bishop I awn uni tending his
resignation from the ministry of the Epis
copal ehurch of the United States and asks
that it be. accepted at once and that steps
be taken immediately for his deposition.
He says: "There is not the slightest proba
bility of my retracting tuy alleged errors.
On tbe contrary I have every reason to be
lieve that further investigation will simply
confirm my present convictions."
'lions 1 aud ft, of the
i*.
following March 18, IBM, and fur
TO PRESERVE THE SABBATH.
An Appeal to the New York legislature
To Defeat the Srhaal BtlL
Albany, March 211.-The following pe
tition was presented to the assembly:
"To the Members of the Iiegisluture:
"Gentlemen—T he American Sabbath
union, a national society, whose sole object
is the preservation of the American .Sab
bath, makes its appeal to yonr honorable
body against the proposed Schaaf bill,
which vyould legalize the opening of saloons
from 1 o'clock p. m. to midnight on Bun
days. In making this appeal we desire to
say that we are without doubt supported
by the united voices of the 5,000 Protestant
clergymen of New Y ork state. As an evi
dence of this, permit us to present to your
honorable body the communications of tj«K)
ministers received at our office within the
last few days, all protesting against such
action as is proposed in this bill.
"When the communications are received
at our office, which are now on their way,
the entire num lier will aggregate over 1,000
letters from as many leading Protestant
ministers from all parts of the state. They
thus desire to join our Roman Catholic
fellow citizens in making this earnest pro
test. The emphatic sentiment expressed
in these communications is that sucli lile
erty granted to the liquor trade, a privi
lege granted to no business in the state,
would be a conspiracy against morality
and would tend inevitably to break down
the weekly rest day for the tailoring classes
of our communitlies, being a flagrant vio
lation of the law of God. Respectfully
submitted,
,7. H. Knowles.
"General Secretary A. S. U."
Debating the Seymour Substitute.
Hartford, March 30.—The debate on the
Seymour subst itute was continued iu the
senate. This is the bill the Democrats fa
vor as a substitute for the Jud»on meas
ure. In speaking on the bill some of the
Democrats opposed certain clauses con
tained therein, while some Republicans
were outspoken in their opposition to the
whole bill. It is uot known what strength
the measure will develop should it reach a
vote. It is believed, however, that the bill
will have to be amended to obtain the full
Democratic support. It is said that Sena
tor Thayer intends to offer another substi
tute, which provides that if after two days
the legislature fails to declare the state of
ficers elected the candidates on the state
ticket having the largest number of votes
shall be declared elected. It is probable
that no vote ou the Seymour bill will be
reached before Tuesday.
A Colored Convict's Awful Fall.
AUBURN, N. \\, March 20.— J. P. John
son Howard, a colored convict, was killed
by falling from the fourth gallery in the
south wing of the prison. He fell a dis
tance of twenty-five feet, striking on his
head and dying almost instantly. Howard
was known as the "Black Prince," and
was sent from New York in 1888 on a sen
tence of seven years for perjury, the speci
fic offense being furnishing "straw bail"
for New Y'ork crooks. He leaves a family
in Brooklyn.
They Ate the Samoau Chief.
San Francisco, March 30.—From Samoa
the steamer* Mariposa brings news that a
Saraoun chief who was recently blown out
to sea in a canoe landed on One Island
and was killed by some plantation boys
and eaten. The chief's tribe at latest ac
counts was preparing to wipe out all the
laborers on the island.
One More New Jersey Congressman.
TRENTON, March 30.—The congressional
appropriation bill has passed both houses.
It gives New Jersey eight congre»sman, an
increase of one. The lines are arranged so
that six out of the eight will lie Demo
cratic. The First and Secmnd districts re
main tbe same. The ot hers are all changed.
The Australian System on Top.
AUGUSTA, Me., March 30.—The motion to
substitute the minority for the majority
report on the Australian ballot system was
lost in the senate by a vote of 31 to 10. The
majority report favoring the hill was ac
septed—21 to 10.
THE DEADLOCK BROKEN.
Felton Chosen United States
Senator in California.
ESTEE LOSES THE GREAT RATTLE.
Tilers IV.. a Stumpe, le to Felton at Last
ami Ho Carried tlie Day—K.tee Say.
That a Poor Politician lia. No Cliunre
In California.
Sacramento, March 30.—The long sena
torial fight between the Ifcpuhlh-ans for
choice of Senator
Hi-»ret '» successor
came to an end
last evening. The
deadlock had be
come almost as
obstinate aud long
lived as tlie recent
one in Illinois. A
c o in li i n a 11 o n
against Estee was
li n a 11 y effected
and ex-Cotigress
man Felton was
elected The bal
lot lirsl stood:
Estee,40; Felton,40; Johnston, 4; Hancock,
4; Blanchard, 1; White (Dem.), 33. A num
of changes being made to Felton, a stam
pede occurred which finally made the bal
lot elect lilm.
The next vote stood: Felton, 73: Kstee,
15; White (Dem.), 88; Hancock and John
ston, 1 euch, t'harles N. Felton |wns
horn In New York fifty-eight years ago
and came to California when tie was seven
teen years of age. Ho engaged 1» mining
and mercantile pursuits and entered poli
tics as a Democrat . He afterward liecame
a Kepuhlican and was elected tot lie assem
bly for four years. He declined renomin
ation six years ago and wa» sent to con
gress from the Fifth district. He has also
held the position of United States sub
treasurer nt San Francisco.
A Poor Man Ha. Ko Chance.
In an interview Mr. Estee »nid: "I have
nothing to say for publication except that
I wa» defeated because I had not enough
of vote». No poor man has a chance to as
pire to oftice in California. 1 do not pre
tend to say that money wa» u»ed for tiie
election of Mr. Felton, but he certainly
had with him the influence of great cor
poration like the Alaska Seal Fur com
pany, sugar refineries, federal brigade, etc.
"The men who Storni by me are men
against whom there lias never been the
least suspicion. After my defeat I con
gratulated Mr. Felton on his election and
wished him many happy days. I am sat
isfied, and 1 do not want the Japanese
mission even now. California climate is
good enough more tne."
The Democrats In caucus refused to
withdraw their candidate and thus leave
the field to Kstee, They claimed that this
legislature has made such a bad record
and been mixed up m so much scandal
that the Democrats dared not shirk the
responsibility by assisting in any way to
elect a Republican senator.
ij
W
?
M. M. K6TEB.
ATTACKED BY STRIKERS.
A Reign of Terror Kxlsts In the West
Kmt of Braddock, I*».
Braddock, March 30.—The west end of
Braddock Is under a reign of terror. Au
gust Coulson, a Swede, came here from
the east to go to work at the Carrie blast
furnaces. He was met at Copeland station
by his brother-in-law, John Martin, and in
making thetr way toward Hanking sta
tion with two valises thrown over their
shoulders were thought to be men coining
from work In the wire mill, where a strike
is in progress. They were set upon by a
crowd and unmercifully beaten with st ones
and clubs. Martin is under a doctor's care.
Coulson, being a stranger, got lost in his
flight, and has not yet been found. Martin
thinks that Coulson has been dangerously
hurt.
John Penny was attacked by a crowd
while returning from work at the wire
mill. He drew a revolver aud warned his
assailants to stand aside. He was after
ward arrested for carrying concealed weap
ons and held for court. Andrew Hanson,
another Swede, was stripped of bis cloth
ing and is confined to his tied as a result of
bis injuries sustained by the rough treat
ment of the crowd of strikers. The police
are now keeping the west end under sur
veillance, but no outbreaks are expected
until the change of turns.
Three Men Fatally Injured.
Mahanoy City, Pa., March 130.— 1 The
Brandouvllle powder mill caught fire and
blew up last evening, fatally injuring two
men aud seriously injuring a third. The
victims are Cyrus Faust, who was burned
in a horrible manner, the flesh hanging in
shreds from his Isxly; Jeremiah Zimmer
man received injuries from which he can
not recover; Klias Lindermut h was also
badly burned aud is in a precarious condi
tion. The men were blown thirty feet into
the air. The cause of the accident was due
to a pebble getting under the crusher
while the men were making powder, the
friction of the stone coming in contact
with the heavy iron crusher causing the
(siwder to ignite. Tlie drying house was
burned to the ground, but the magazine
escaped. Tlie men were carried to their
homes, but there is no hope for the recov
ery of Zimmerman and Faust, and the life
of Lindermuth hangs on a thread.
No Retaliation Against Germany.
Washington, March 30.—Mr. Blaine said
last night that he knew nothing whatever
about the published reports that the United
States intended to institute retaliatory
proceedings against Germany in case that
country refused to admit American pork.
No pronunciamento, he said, looking to
the exclusion of German imports bad been
issued. Private Secretary Halford also
said he knew nothing about the president
contemplating such retaliatory proceed
ings. _
Moncrief Admits His Crime.
Canton, N. Y., March 30.—William
Moncrief, the old man who shot Henry
Forney while in the Adirondacks last
May, and who has iieen on trial here the
last throe days on a charge of murder,
pleade«! guilty to murder iu the third de
gree when the prosecution closed its case.
He was sentenced to eighteen years' im
prisonment in Dannemora prison.
The Utopia's Captain Arrested.
Lon PON, March 30.—Captain McKeague,
of the Utopia, has been arrested at Gibral
ter on tlie charge of wrongful acts, im
proper conduct, negligence and misman
agement in the control of his steamer be
fore and at the time of the disaster. He
was admitted to bail.
One More Arrest.
Rochester, N. Y'„ March 30 — George
TheiD, a brother of John G. Thein, has
been ai rested and admitted to $3,000 bail
upon the same charge as the rest of the
cutters implicated in the lockout.
IT WAS AN AWFUL FIGHT.
Goddard and Utioyu.kl Nearly Killed
One Another.
San Francisco, March ao.—Details of
the (Joddard-Choynski fight,, received by
steamer Mariposa from Sydney today, in
dicate it to have been one of the most des
perate affairs of the kiud on record. Both
men entered the ring in splendid condi
tion, blit Goddard weighed nearly thirty
pounds heavier than Choynskl. It was a
hurricane fight, from the start. Toward
the end of the first round Choynskl got in
a terrible blow on Goddurd's jaw, cutting
him to tlie bone and knocking him clean
off his feet. He took his ten seconds and
was carried to his corner, the call of time
saving him from living knocked out,. In
tlie bi> cond round the men went at it ham
mer and tongs. They were soon both
staggering with weakness,
been the pace. Choynski at the end of the
round was bleeding from tlie mouth and
laid a lump over his left eye. Tlie third
round was a furious one, Goddard twice
forced Choynskl to the boards by lib
superior weight,
The American nearly knocked the Aus
trnliuu out in the latter part of the round.
Both were utterly powerless licfore the
round was over, and were covered with
blood from head to foot, Choynski's leg»
liegan to give way in the fourth round
aud Goddard drove him all around the
ring, leaning on the ropes all the way. At
last Choynski fell to the floor limp and
Goddard stood glaring at him, panting
painfully, his knees shaking. Choynski
after five seconds got up, and as Jlicy stag
gered toward each other the round ended,
and the men were almost carried to theit
comers. After aliout thirty seconds hud
ticked away, Choynski'» seconds threw up
the sponge. Goddard'» face was almost
unrecognizable, Choynski'» objective point
lining Goddard's head, while Goddard
rained most of his blows on Choynski'»
wind and over his heart. At the conclu
sion of the fight Goddard made a speech,
in which lie attributeil his victory to the
fact that he was the heavier man.
The Sydney Referee commenting on the
light, said: "It was a grim slaughter, a
terrible light all the journey and tlie bet
ter man won Choynskl was whipped, hut
he proved himself to be n man for whom
America may well feel prend."
!
terrible had
THE ABDUCTION A FAILURE.
Jack.on Coaid Not Force His Deserted
Wife to Love Him.
London, March JO.—The discharge of
Mrs. K. H. Jackson by the court of appeals
has caused tremendous rejoicing in CUthe
roe, where she ha» lieeu living with her
relatives. As soon as the news was re
ceive«! the church tiells rung out merry
peals and the townspeople began prepnr
ing for a public reception of the lady, who,
It is understood, will return to live with
her si»ter as before. Mr. Jackson declares
that his next move will be a greater sur
prise than the nhduction. It appears that
Mrs. Jackson did not receive her property
altogether through inheritance, l*"t partly
through a former romance to which she
was a party.
Some years before she married Mr. Jack
son she received an offer of marriage from
a well-to-do lawyer named Anderton. This
offer she declined, but Anderton remained
deeply attached to her, and when he died
it was found that he had left her his fort
une and the presentation to the living of
the Clitheroe parish church. Jackson's
marriage to her, which was private aud
unknown to her relatives at the time, 1»
said to have been a genuine love affair.
He i» the son of a captain in the royal
navy, and is a handsome man of middle
age. Mrs. Jackson was deeply hurt by
his leaving her on the anniversary of her
wedding «lay, and appears afterward to
have become entirely alienated. It is now
conceded that his rude attempt to regain
her affections is a failure.
a
The International League Formed.
Rochester, N. Y'., March 30.—The forma
tlon of the International Huseliull league
was completed last night, and all the pre
liminaries to the opening of the season
were arranged. Tlie circuit will include
Hochester, Syracuse, Buffalo and Albany
in the west, and Troy, Newark, New Ha
ven and Lebanon in the east. Each club
paid in its assessment for National protec
tion privileges. It was decided by lot that
the eastern division should have two mem
b«*rs on the schedule committee and the
western division one member, and there
was a drawing and Troy, Newark and Al
bany were selected as the committ«*e. Each
club will play 130 games. The season will
probably open on the lust Saturday in
April and will close the latter part of Sep
tember. The Spabliug bail was adopted
as tbe official ball of the league. Th«
schedule committee will meet at the Ken
more Hotel, Albany, at 10 a. m. April 0.
Each club will p«ist its forfeit ou or liefor«
that date. At that meeting also the name
of the organization will be changed, To
ronto's withdrawal rendering the title ol
"International League" a misnomer.
Thurman's Résignât ion Accepted.
Washington, March 30.—The following
additional baseball contracts have lieen
announced by Secrctiay Y'cruug: With
Brooklyn— D. L. Foutz, T. B. Burns, W.
H. Terry, K. L. Onruthers. With Cleve
land— J. R. McAleer. With Lincoln—M.
A. Cline. With Sioux City— C. E. Swart
wood, R. B. Black, C. H. Dewald, T. C.
Nicholson, T. J. Morrissey, Joseph Strauss,
Harry Siebels. With Troy—Frank I,. Day,
Peter Kagan, P. M. Shea. With Milwau
kee—George Q. Shock. Frank Dwyer ha*
been released by Chicago and John Corco
ran by Sioux City. The resignation of A.
W. Thurman as chairman of the national
tsiard has been received and accepted and
N. E. Y'oung has been selected to fill the
Mr. Thurman says that hl«
vacancy.
resignation wan caused by the necessity of
his entire attention to private business
affairs. He does not think his resignation
will in any way affect the present com
plications in baseball affairs, and state*
that to his knowledge nothing looking tc
a compromise between the National league
and American association is on foot.
The State Industrial School.
RocilESTKB, N. Y., March 80.—At the
annual meeting of the board of manager»
of the state industrial school the follow
lng officers were elected : President, Will
iam Purcell; first vice president, Isaac
Gibbar; second vice president, Henry
Lomb; secretary and treasurer, Marselu*
H. Briggs. The officers are the same as ot
l«ist year'» lioani. There are now in round
numbers 800 pupils in the school, 128 ol
whom are girls.
Lilia Vane Got «35,000.
Buffalo, March 30.—A New Y'ork dis
patch brought news of the settlement of a
claim against Samuel Pratt King by Lilia
Vane, the leading lady in Frohmau's "All
the Comforts of Home." The amount
was $35,000. King has been living in this
city, having as his companions a honse
keeper and a male nurse. He is suffering
from paresis. Mr. P. P. Pratt, an uncle
of King, says such a settlement has been
made.
IMMIGRANTS ILL USED.
Horrible Treatment of White
Slaves in West Virginia.
CII ASEB BY ( RI EL RLOORHOUNRS.
Poor ltolieuilan. Re.cuod from » Living
Death by a llrave Reporter of Tlislr
Own Nationality—Ugly Rumors That
Onn of tlie Laborer. Wan Muntere, t.
New York, March 20—Compelled to
work like slaves under the lash of task
masters as cruel as they were relentless,
Is-ateu with clubs and rawhides, watched
iiy armed men night and day, chased hy
bloodhounds if they attempted to escape,
with hardly sufilcicut clothing to cover
their uakednees, no shelter from the win
try blasts at night but that afforded by the
loosely built log "shacks," a laid of leaves
and tlie frozen earth for a pillow. This
faintly outline» the frightful sufferings of
the poor foreigners who wore literally sold
Into bondage in the wilds of the West Vir
ginia mountains. There were seventy-five
of them in all. They left New York on
Dec. 18 last, with It. I,. D. Rosenthal, who
received t wo dollars each for tho men from
K Furcell, Jr., & Brother, who had con
tracted to complete the extension of the
Norfolk and Western railroad into Ohio.
Rescued by a Reporter.
The men before leaving New York hud
nach to sign a contract, the cast Iron pro
visions of which they were na entirely
ignurntil a* the majority of them were of
the English language. 'ITtree of the men
and one woman have returned to New
York with B. Here«, correspondent of Hlas
Lidn, the New York Bohemian newspaper.
He went into the remote mountain rump
at t he risk of IiIh life, making ait overland
Journey of »evenly five miles across swollen
rivers and mountain torrents and through
«now filled gorge«.
It Canned Intern*« indignation.
The rescued Bohemians are William
Hoffmann, J. Mnycr, J. Mraa and Mrs,
Mraz. Ten others who left the mountain
camp at the same time those tour did were
supplied with work lu the coal mines at
Pocahontas, W. Va. William Hoffmann
was the man who wrote a letter to Hlas
Lldu in February, which resulted in Mr.
Heroe'l journey to rescue the man This
letter was signed hy seven of the unfortu
nate Bohemians, and it. was published in
Hlas lddu and caused intense Indignation
among the forty odd thousand Bohemians
in New York.
*
Was an Awful Journey.
When the first letter from Hoffmann
came the Bohemians disc assn] t Aie ou frage,
and money was freely contributed to send
down B. Herce, who bad instructions to
find the men and use every po«aiMe means
to liberate them. He graphically related
his experiences yesterday "I left New
York March J," he said. "I had a talk
with Mr. E. Pu«c«ll,oueof the coutraotnrs,
the day after 1 reached Pocahontas, hnt. h«
denied all the stories. On the following
day lie dispatched a Dr. McCoy to the Logpn
county camp, so that everything could ba
fixed for my arrival there.
"1 started on borseliack on March 7 and
reached the camp three days later I don't
like to think of that journey The jxior
wretches who ntudu It on foot, some of
them without shoes, must have suffered
t he most terrible sgonie«. It was like a
journey to Si tier la. I crossed over fifty
streams and had often to swim iny horse.
Dr. McCoy had arrived two days ahead
of me.
Rlooilhotinds and Winchester..
"The head foreman of the men was a
brutish looklug fellow named Shinnon,
and there were a dozen or more under
bosses all armed with Winchesters and re
volvers. A pack of huge bloodhounds,
which were kept chuintai, were bayAng dis
mally.
"Foreman Shlnnon insisted that there
wasn't a Bohemian in the camp, but I re
quested that the men be marshaled before
me. They were the most ut terly miserable
set of human beings I ever looked upon.
They were terribly emaciated, and with
hardly clothing to cover their nakedness
they stood trembling with the fear of some
new calamity.
Wan I.ange Murdered.
"I picked out Hoffmau at once, and
when assured of my protection he ac
kuuwledg 'd that he wrote the letter which
first revealed the men's condition. Then
I discovered that a Bohemian named
Lange, whom the contractors suspected of
writing the letter, hod lieen »ent away
under guard on Dr. McCoy's arrival. The
men said that Lange was routed out at
midnight and compelled to leave.
"Ten minutes after the men heard two
shots, and they expressed the conviction
that poor I-ange was killed. Foreman
Shin non told me that Lange wa* at an
other camp fifteen miles away
Bloodhounds for Runaway».
"Thirteen men and one woman, Mrs.
Mraz, were the only Bohemians I could
flud iuthe camp, and with these I started
on the return trip to Pocahontas on March
11. We left about thirty poor fellows in
the camp— Polacks and Italians. Some of
them tried to break away and join ns, but
they were chased back into camp by the
bosses. Three, however, managed to get
away. One of the foremen said, as he
pointed to the bloodhounds, "Those are
the fellers that ull bring 'em ia et they try
to slip us."
Beaten Black and Bine.
J. Mayer, one of the three runaways re
ferred to, said thut the Russian Hebrew
aud the Polock, sent with the three Bo
hemians into Ohio, were the two men who
tried to escape across the Tug river in a
boat. Foremen Shinnon, Cross and Moss
covered them with Winchesters and com
pelled them to recross tho river. Their
cants were then removed aud Shiimon and
Cross beat the men with rawhides, while
Moss covered them with revolvers and
threatened to kill them if they moved.
They were beaten black and bine and beg
ged piteously for mercy.
Hpolled Salt Pork and Bread.
Spoiled salt pork aud bread, Mayer de
clares, was their only food. Their only
drink was cold water. Coffee was served
to the bosses. The slightest disobedience
caused the offender to be beaten with club
or rawhide. Bloodhounds were at once
sent out and the fugitives hunted down
releutlessly. On the way to the camp each
person hod a loaf of bread and a piece of
bologna. It had to last three days, and
Rosenthal, who carried two revolvers, com
pelled them to keep together, threatening
to shoot them down if they did not.
ELMIRA, N. Y., March 30.— Last n ajhl
ex-Governor Lucius Robrxson was failing
rapidly and tbe physicians thought he
F.x-Govprnor Robia«un Dying.
could uot live more than a few hour*

xml | txt