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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, November 24, 1891, Image 3

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CARR CASE POSTPONED.
A MATERIAL STATE W 1TNESS VERY
SICK.
O ambler (Horsey Must Far *20« Fine.
Burglar« Receive Heavy
Sentence«—Five Year« aud Forty L-astae«
Well Laid On.
The Smith
Argument in the Smith burglary case
was resumed before tbe judges at 2.30
o'clock yesterday afternoon. Frank D.
Carpenter ended his argument for the
defence.
Deputy Attorney General Davis closed
the argument for the state. He said:
"I defy my learned friend to point to
one inconsistency In the evidence for the
State. He has overstepped the line in
trying to impeach that testimony. It Is
one of the most outrageous crimes in the
annals of the state The unavoidable
absence of Amos Tucker from the box is
no excuse for the other meu.
"Put yourself In the place of the vie
tlms of this outrage. To awaken at night
and find men clutching at your throat.
It was not bousebre-.king for simple lar
ceny. It was money or murder. If Mrs.
Angelina had not displayed that presence
of mind that she displayed here on the
witness stand, aud told them that she
would give them the money they would
have all been murdered. The plot was
laid a week or two before, when they
were there ft work. To make the matter
the more diabolical, when Tucker was
sick the very bauds of these women
whom he was threatening ministered to
his wants. It was a well-laid conspiracy.
First comes Amos Tucker, then Harry
Smith, and then all three were seen to
gether in Philadelphia by Officer Alexan
der; then all tbe connecting links in the
movements of tbe men, until they are all
three in tbe house ready to do anything
to accomplish their ends. Their voices
are heard; their faces are seen, and they
are called by name. There are threats
and at last they get the money and leave.
They are traced, arrested. Identified' aud
brought here on requisition papers for
trial, aud we ask you to bring in a ver
dict of guilty, as the evidence against
them Is of a most convincing character."
Judge Cullen charged the jury In a
very impartial manner He told them
that they should reconcile the conflicting
testimony, throw out ail evidence that
they did not believe, and render a ver
diet accordingly. The jury retired at
4 15 o'clock.
Carrying Concealed Deadly Weapons.
Ex-Policeman William Redding pleaded
guilty to carrying concealed deadly
weapons. He was fined $25 and costs.
The Young Case Dropped.
The case of the State vs. Lewis C.
Young, charged with lewdly toying with
little Jennie Haggerty of this city was
nolle prosequled by the attorney-general.
He stated that tbe case was tried at ths
last term of court. The jury disagreed. It
stood eight for acquittal and four for
conviction. He did not feel justified in
asking for a new trial and would like to
have it dropped. His request was granted
by the coart.
A Heavy Sentence,
At 4.45 o'clock the jury in the Smith
bnrglarly case returned to the court
room and rendered a verdict of guilty in
the manner and form as they stood in
dicted. The jury was then discharged
until this morning at 10 o'clock.
Tbe prisoners seemed to be unmoved
by the verdict. Chief Justice Comegys
told the meu to stand up. He told them
that their case was a bad one, .and be
wonld make au exemple of them. The
sentence of tbe court was $500 fine, costs
of prosecution, five years' Imprisonment,
one hour in the pillory and forty lashes, to
be well laid on on Saturday, December 4
Court then adjourned until 10 o'clock
to day.
Court reconvened at 10 o'clock this
morning.
The case of James Carr, for tbe murder
of Basso, the Italian, [was called ap for
trial ; Biggs fer the state, Hayes for the
defendant. The attorney-general asked
for a continuance on the ground that
John Grogan, living at No. 208 West
Seventh street, who is tbe state's most
important witness in this celebrated case,
is very sick and not expected tq live.
Dr. Krumbsngb, Grogan's attending
physician, was sent for by order of the
court, in order to ascertain if Crogsn
would be able to attend later in this
term.
At 12.05 o'clock Dr. Krumbangh told
the court that it would be impossible for
Crogan to attend conn before two weeks
have elapsed, if then. The court post
poned tbe esse until December 14, and
the jnrore of tbe Court of Oyer and Ter
miner were discharged until that time.
Did He Steal the Coat?
The next case called was one of petty
larceny. It was the case'of the State vs.
Daniel Heverin for stealing a coat from
Harry 8. Weldln. Victor B. Woolley
represented the state, and William
Michael Byrne tbe defendant. The
prisoner pleaded not guilty.
Harry 8, Weldin, George Silles, Officer
George 8. Lucas a
nesses, and testified to the circumstances
of the theft,
Mr. Woolley wanted to give the case to
thef jury without argument, but Mr.
Byrne would not consent to it. The
state's prosecutor addressed t he jury for[a
few minutes for a conviction.
Mr Byrne claimed that the prisoner
did not take the coat with the intention
of stealing it. He was in the habit of
visiting Weidin's home as a bosom friend.
They had a falling ont, and in order to
get revenge Weldin brings the charge of
larceny aud tries to bring him to the
whipping post.
This Mr.JWoolley denied.IHe disclaimed
any animus in the matter.
Judge Cullen charged the jnry for tbe
prisoner.
The jury retired and brought in a
verdict of guilty, with recommendation
to tbe mercy of tbe eoart, after being
out only twenty minutes
The lashes were remitted, but he was
sentenced to pay costs, |13 restitution
money, aud suffer one mouth's imprison
ment.
as state wit
Th« Election Case«.
The case of tbe State vs. Officers
Peterson, Stelzer, Bnrleigh and Wbann
for refusing tc obey Fiauk D. Carpenter,
inspector in the Fifth ward, was called
np by ex-Mayor Harrington. He stated
that his witnesses were not present, as
he understood that the Carr case was to
come np to-day.
The court decided not to take up the
cases until after the trial of the DuPont
barn burners. The witnesses were dis
charged until Monday, December 13.
Ellas Segars pleaded guilty of stealing
the horse of Wesley Russell, in Brandy
wine hundred. Sentence was deferred
until 2.30 o'clock this afternoon. This
is the case wherein Frank D. Carpenter
volunteered to defend him. Tbe other
bill against him was nolle proseqnied.
Andrew Horeev, colored, charged with
policy writing and backing gsmblers,
pleaded guilty, and was fluid #100
costs In e ch case. He paid It.
Court adjourned until 2 30 o'clock this
AfteniWA,
and
STATE BOARD OF HEALTH MEETS.
PhyMlelanH at the Central Hotel Thin
Morning—Sanitary Reports ftleatl By
the Secretary.
The Board of Health of the State of
Delaware held its regular meeting in the
Central Botel at 10 o'clock this morning.
The following members were present:
Dr, C. W. Cooper of Camden, Dr. 8 O.
Elligood of Concord, Dr W. V. Skinner
of Qlascow, I. 8. Valandlngham of Mid
dletown. Dr. D. L Mustard of Lewe», Dr.
L. P. Bush and Secretary E B. Frazier
of this city.
The secretary read a number of reports
of bis wrrk and stated that some of the
dairy farms through'be state were not
ih a healthy condition. He cited several
cases where he had visited and found
them in a bad condition. Several members
also made the same statements. The
secretary read abstrac*s frem law bearing
on that question. The seuretary read
a report on the inspection of towns and
titles throughout the state.
Laurel, Milford, Hanington, Seaford,
Concord, Lewis, wore reported to be in
excellent sanitary condition, while
Georgetown was In bad condition,
jail at this place was also reported to be
Impure condition,
of inmates were reported
be fifty five,
suggested that the board Insist upon
having children thoroughly vaccinated
and thus prevent the spread of diseases.
A discussion arose over this question.
The secretary was Instructed to notify
the school teachers and 'trustees of the
poor of each county, and mail them a
copy of the law on the subject of sani
tary draining.
After some deliberation Dr. Cooper
drew up the following resolutions;
"Whereas, The Legislature of this
state state has instituted a State Board
of Health, to whose directions and
proper execution the various laws for
the'promotion of hygieue and the sanL
tary condition of the state and condition
ol the health and life of its citizens have
been entrusted, and, where as small pox
has made its appearance instates,immedi
ately adjacent towns, and as the laws
providiug for the vaccination of school
children and not being executed, making
now more than half of our citizens vehi
cles for the reception and spread of this
dire disease; therrfore be it
"Resolved, That the secretary prepar»
and furnish to every clerk io the several
school districts and also to the Trustees
of the Poor of each county a copy of the
law regulating the vaccination of the
pupils of our schools, and
"Resolved, That a failure to comply
with this law will be mot with such ac
tion as the State Board of Health may
deem necessary in the premises."
The resolution was adopted. At 12 50
the board adjourned for dinner.
Merry Young Folkf,
A very pleasant surprise party was
given to Mias Zriia Truitt of No, 904
Chestnut street, last evening. Among
those present were: Miss Bessie Jones,
Miss Nettie Jones, Mils Bessie King,
Mias (lassie Logan, Miss Olile Dansie,
Miss Bailie Johnston and sister, Miss
Bailie Maguire, Miss Sarah Johns
ton, Miss Maltha White,
Lena Reese, Miss Alle Frazer, Oscar
Frauke, Albert Paulie, William Myers,
Edwin M. Gain, Preston Chalphin,
Charles McBride, Edwin Jones, Brant
Hoffman. Clarence Croason, George
Hanna, Harvey Little, Charles Sola
way and Albert Truitt,
and cake were served at a late hour, at d
after an evening's enjoyment In playing
games and indulging in other amuse
meats the party dispersed.
The Association is-Door Sport«.
The Y . M. C. A. la-door sports will be
held in.the gymnasium on Thursday, Le
cember 10, at 8 o'clock p. m. Ten solid
cold medals will be awarded to winners
of first prizes, and ten association but
tons to the winners of second prizes.
The events will be as follows: Dive,
running high (handicap) bar vault, Ugh
kick, potato race, pull up, putting shot,
forty yards'hop. standing broad jump,
and high jump (juniors' handicap) The
entries will close on December 5.
A Great Foot Rail Number.
Frank Leslie's Weekly is becoming
noted for the way in which it treats the
great sporting events of the year. This
week's double page represents by instan
taneous photography. characteristic
plays made by the great 'Varsity elevens
of Princeton and Yale in practice When
one considers that forty thousand people
are expected at the grounds to see them
play on Tnanksgiving Day, it really
seems that Frank Leslie's la worth buy
ing just for this one feature.
Tired of Per Hnsbaud.
Mrs. Sophia Arulau of No. 7 Klund
street, left her home and has not since
been beard from. She is supposed to
have eloped with a young South Wil
mington married man named Thomas
Emmett, who, it is said, has been quite
iutlmate with her. Her husband, Joseph
Arulan, made a vigorous search for his
missing wife, bat failed to find her. He
sold his household goods, resigned his
position on the P. , W. & B. railroad, and
will return to Germany.
The Storm lu This City.
Yesterday's wind and rain storm did
no serious damage to property in this
city. Telegraph communications were
cut off from points down the Peninsula
during the afternoon, but everything
was in working order this morning. The
gale was severe off the river, and the
steamers City of Chester and Brandy
wine experienced much difficulty in
lauding their passengers at Chester.
Trips Discontinued,
From Philadelphia the 7.30 a. m and
1 30p.m .and from Wilmington the 10.30
a. m. and 4.15 p m. boats of the Wilming
ton Steamboat Company will be discon
tinued from to-day.
The
The
in
»
number
Mr.
Bush
to
Ulsi
Lemonade
CITY NEWS IN BRIEF
Court Stenographer E. C. Hardesty
will make the prothonotary's office his
headquarters.
The wheelmen are preparing for the
nlnety-eight-mila relay race to Dover and
return to be run on Thursday.
J, Miller Thomas, the Market street
publisher, who has been suffering from
an attack of pleurisy, is somewhat
better.
Dr. E.E. White delivered his lecture on
"Practical Results of Education."before
the students attheFrieadi'School yester
day afternoon.
Tbe young women of Sacred Heart
Chnrch will give a supper and musical
entertainment In tbe church on the even
ing of Thanksgiving Day.
William Michael Byrne's ieeture on the
"Study of History" to the members of
theBrownson Library Association will be
delivered this evening at 8 o'clock.
Bishop Curtis will preside.
St. Mary's T. A. B, Cadets is the name
of a new society organized in 8t. iiarv's
Church last Sunday by Father Flynn. So
far nearly 100 boys, ranging in age from
13 to 19, have been admitted The
greatest interest ie shown towards the
movement hr both parents and children.
So that this promîtes to be the largest
and most popular organization in the
cit 7i
A THANKSGIVING STOHY.
Sensational DuPont story Published In a
Philadelphia Paper.
A Phl'adelpbla dally contains s sensa
tional story this morning in relation to
to the DuPont fire-bugs. It says that
there was a regularly organized society,
called the "Neversweals," bant upon the
destruction of all property belonging to
the DuPouta The society was, accord
ing to this story, known as a "social and
litera.y" club Once a year It
gave a ball. The programs and
invitations were obscene aud the dances
were regu'ar orgies The members were
bound together by an iron clad oath to
redress one another's grievances. They
were servile to the dictates of the regu
iarly-eleoted officers, and dared not de
mur from the execution of any crime,
however diabolical.
The story in question says that it wns
tbe plan of this society to bum ail the
property of the DuPont's on this Thanks
giving day. A holiday was selected in
order to make the loss of life from the
explosions much less than it would be
when the men were working. The dry
leaves in the neighborhood were to be
ignited in several places simultaneously .
Attorney-General Will Net Talk,
When this story was referred to At
torney-General Biggs at noon to day, he
eaid :
"I have no knowledge that the con
spiracy to burn the DuPont pro
perty fixed upon Thanksgiving
Day. Further than that I have nothing
to say about tbe case, as trial is now
pending, and I do not think that I ought
to do It."
That there was an organized conspiracy
no one doubts, but the "Tbauksciviug
Explosion" story Is probably an effusion
of the over-heated brain of someWilming
too penny-s-liner who was writing to kill
space "for a considération."
NEAf TELEGRAPH SYSTEM
Two Dollar. foraO.«d Horse Wheelmen
Fall to Enter lhair Fruteat.
The stated weekly meeting of the
Police CommUsioners was held last even
ing. Chief of Police Blackburn reported
that Colonel Cody Anfenger refused to
enter a complaint against Officer Beale
for the insults received at German Hall
Ths chief recommended a reprimand.
The reprimand was administered and the
officer was warned to b» more careful in
the future
The monthly pay-roll amounting to
#3 985.31. was passed.
No action was taken upon a letter pre
sented from Secretary VV C. R. Öol
quobonn of the Board of Health, asking
that the commissioners pay |2 to Execu
live Officer Shultz for removing a dead
horse which tbe chief of police bad killed
on private property.
The Pneumatic Fire Alarm Telegraph
Company of Baltimore asked leave to at
tach its system to the fire alarm wires
in this city.
The petition will not be acted upon
until (he matter has been thoroughly
considered,
A delegation of bicyclists was ex
pected to be present to formally enter
a protest against driving wheels from
tbe sidewalks. The committee appointed
by the wheelmen on Friday evening failed
to pat in an appearance aud no action
was taken on wheel matters.
A Japeneso Fntlmmon.
Deputy Attorney General Davis ex
hibited a large Japanese persimmon at
the Court House this morning. It was
from the nursery of JobnT. Jakes, at
Wyoming, In Kent county. Mr. Jakes
has one tree in bearing. It has 250 per
simmons upon it. He is raising a large
number of young trees in his nursery.,
The persimmons somewhat resemble a!
medlum-siz"d tomato and are a rich
yellow in trior. It is said that unlike
tbe American persimmon they do not
put a puckering string in a man's mouth
and pul! hard at It when they are eaten,
Forty Hours' Devotion at Newark.
Tbe devotion known in the R. C.
Chnrch as that of the Forty Hours' was
opened in Newark last Sunday by Very
Rev. J. A. Lyons, V. Q. Rt. Rev. A. A.
Curtis, D. D., officiated last evening, and
the exercises will doss this evening with
a sermon by Rev, Dennis J, Flynn.
PERSONAL PARAGRAPHa
Clarence Clayton of the recorders
office is sick.
Miss Katie Allen is in Altoons, Pa , at
tending tbe funeial of her grandmother.
Miss Jennie Woodbury has returned
from a week's visit to friends in Balti
more,
Ex-Mayor Harrington will tender his
nephews and nieces a dinner on Thanks
giving evening.
George Russell of Wilmington has
been visiting his brother In Qaiestown,
Sussex couuty.
T w » ,_.. t
James Mouaghtn, the young mau who
was injured on board the U. 8. steamer
Atlanta some time ago visited his falber,
M agistrate Monaghan,on Sunday.
The coroner's jury in the case of Peter
Carlisle, who was killed on the P., W
& B railroad on Saturday night, returned
a verdict of accidental death.
Owiers of unimproved property com
plain that the Street and Sewer Com
mlsHoners assess damages for sewers
before th/y receive any benefit from
them.
Lieutenant LeRov C. Webster of the
United States Marine Corps, now
stationed at League Island aud bis wife
were here, to-day, visiting friends and
relatives.
THE MATCHLESS
HAEDMAN PIANOS.
The Swick and Kelso Piano,
A Marvel of Beauty and Perfect in Quality
ONLY AT
S. H. BAYNARD'S
BBS
a
A MADMAN'S VICTIM.
Yoniig P Frank Shield« Will He Hurled
To morrow-Barnett -tilt At the City
Hall.
The funeral of P. Fr»nk Shields. 21
years old, who was killed yesterday
morning by Amos H, Burnett, the King
street maniac, will be held to-morrow
morning from the home of Joseph Full
mer, No 608 Market street. At, 10
o'clock the cortege will leave the Full
mer residence and proceed to St. Peter's
Pro-Cathedral where requiem mass will
be celebrated.
Father Meaiey will be celebrant. The
remains will be interred In St. Joseph's
Cemetery,
Meeting of the Warren Club.
The Warr»n A'hletlc Club met last
evening to take action upon the untimely
and tragic death of Its favorite member.
Resolutions of sorrow, respect and
esteem for the deceased were passed, aud
ordered to be published
The club decided to attend 'be funeral
In a body aud furnish special music for
tbe occasion. It will also offer a hand
some floral testimonial of its regard.
This floral tribute will consist of a
broken column. Upon Its base will be
the followiog Inscription: "A Beloved
Member, W. A C."
The body was removed from the Dela
ware Hospital to the Fullmer residence
by Undertaker Fox last evening.
Barnett at the City Hall.
Amor Y. Burnett, the slayer of Shields
is still confined to bis cell in the police
station. He shows signs of insanity at
intervals aud has not once regretted his
action.
Coroner Sparks will hold an ir.quei-t
this evening. The jurors will go to the
Fullmer residence, view the body, and
repair to tbe coroner's office on East
Front street, where the inquest will be
Speaking of this matter, a lawyer said
tots morning: "The coronet's jury can
only fix the responsibility. It cannot
release Barnett or commit him
to an insane asylum. Burnett
will have to stand trial in tbe court of
Oyer and Terminer just the same as auy
other jrlmiual. Experts will decide the
question of lunacy and he will be dealt
with accordingly."
Both Fathers Shot.
Young Shields' father was mistaken
for a burglar by Watchman Hayden at
the Front aud Union car stables about ten
years »go. It. was a dark night aud Shields
had lost his way. Tbe watchman,
thinking bis visit was for the pur
pose of stealing a horse, dealt the
benighted traveler a bkw from
which be soon died Hayden got a short
sentence for manslaughter.
Burnett's father was shot dead in 1868
by a man named Demley, afterward
proven to be insane, in a fit of jealousy
The son, Amos, in an instant had his
dying father's rifle in bis hands, and
aimed it at the murderer's heart, but the
crowd rushed in upon him aud wrested
the piece sway before he could fire.
John S . Ellason 111.
John A. EUazon son of Deputy Clerk
of the Peace Frazer Ellason, is very 111
in Philadelphia
pneumonia. Mias Edna Frazier of Mid
dletown. a niece of Clerk Ellason U also
very sick.
He Is suffering from
„ „ .
Nathaniel Laird of Oswego, N. Y . has
: recently cast his eighty-seventh anuusl
| V °J®' claims to be 109 years old
i Ex Beuator Blair will not resume life
; in New Hampshire, it is stated, bat will
make anew borne somewhere in the Wes',
Rt. Rev. Dr Hawkins, presiding
bishop of the African Methodist Church
of Canada, Is said to be the only bishop
now living who was born a slave.
Thanksgiving Mapper.
Bethany Baptist Church will give its
annual Thanksgiving supper In the
cbapel, corner Elm and Jackson streets,
on Thursday evening. First table at 6
o'clock. Tickets 25 cents
WELL-KNOWN PERSONS
of Mount Labanon. Syria, bas presented
' to Mrs. Harrison a picture of the Prest
; dent painted on silk and framed in native
wood, iulald with mother of pearl.
ÂZ36Z Musealem« au Ottoman subject
:
TheBEST SET 0F TEETH
$8
CO
CD
03 <33
oo
c-s
CD
C/3
QJ
co
25c.
03
co
CD
-g» Jg
FOR
EXTRACTING TEETH.
Teeth Extracted Alsolu^eiy Without Pain
I with my Painless Compound for 50c. a Tooth:
( Warranted Perfectly Halo. Vitalized Al** and
Gas also given.
sl 'f^ r a ' '"aü other work' Tow^sYPiTvm
Teeth Extracted Evening«.'
AH work Warranted.
DR. F. E. SMITH,
SURGEON DENTIST,
Office and residence.
811 MARKET STREET.
Graduate Baltimore College Dental Surgery
SITUATIONS WANTED.
\\7 ANTE Ü —BY A DRESSMAKER, WORK
'* with dressmaker ; will go out by day.
507 West Sixth street. L. FARRELL.
WM. B. SHARP
&D CO,
Fourth and Market Sts.
A new arrival in our dress
cloth department and one
destined to meet with great
favor is a narrow and wide
wale diagonal in ten different
shades at $1.25 per yard, 56
inches wide. They are exceed
ingly stylish and handsome
rough effects.
Two or three bits of dress
stuffs that aie worth remem
bering for gift purposes. All
wool, 36 inches wide, and the
balance of one line of 50 cent
fabrics in stripes, checks and
plaids, about twenty pieces
and all this season's styles, are
reduced to 37^ cents.
Another is a lot of 36 inch
dress stuffs, mostly in hair line
stripes and neat checks, very
suitable for house dresses or
wrappers, are reduced to 25c
from 37*4.
And a few pieces of cotton
dress fabrics in plaids and
stripes, very closely imitating
the costly wool stuffs are 8
cents per yard, 24 inch, 10
cents for 27 inch, 12^ cents
for 36 inch.
Feather Boas are catchy and
popular neck wear. We have
them in fine assortment at $i
to $3.50 in the regular goods
and in 5 yards long, 5 to $12
Feather trimmings 50c in
black, and in all shades and
black, $1,00, 1.25, I 50, 2.00
per yard.
A special lot of stitched
back buttoned kid gloves,
mostly in shades of brown, to
close out, are reduced from $1
to 50 cents, sizes 5.)^ to
with two intermediate dropped.
Our upholstery department
is one of the busiest places in
our store, it goes from morn
ing to night and boasts piles
on piles of beautiful and de
sirable house decorations at
very low prices.
In lace curtains we show a
large line. We have just put
on sale the best Tambour for
the money you will see this
season,
than $8, now $6 per pair.
In Linen, Flax, Chenille
and Velours Curtains we have
the finest tinted effects just
produced in
Never before less
Terra Cotta
Golden Brown
Reseda
Old Rose
Ivory
French Bine.
All these are in superb quali
ties with heavy tassel fringe
valances, making a most artis
tic and graceful portiere or
window hanging, and we have
made a decided cut in prices
to insure a large sale of these
elegant curtains.
t TAO to $5
$10.00 to $7 AO
$16.00 to $ 10.00
$30.00 to $15.00
One hundred Chenille Table
Covers handsomely fringed all
around. We shall sell these
at the following reductions:
$2 to $1.60
£1 to $2X0
$7 to $5. 0
In Nottingham Curtains we
have a large variety, many be
ing exact copies of the Brus
sels Point Lace,and you can get
here in quality for $5 per pair
what looks in effect $20.
We have decided to put on
sale one hundred pair Notting
ham Curtains which will do
nicely for upstairs rooms ; they
have always sold for $1.50, in
cluding poles We shall offer
this lot until sold for $1 per
pair.
The Curtain pole trade of
this town is done right here at
this store. We have one thous
and In cherry, ash and walnut
which we shall sell for 125^
cents each, including ten rings,
( two brackets and two ends—
WM. B, SHARP * CO.
regular price, 25 cents.
New fur-trimmed coats ar
riving daily, and you should
visit our coat department.
WM. B. SHARP & CO.
Fourth and Market etreetn.
RETIRING FROM BUSINESS.
HENRY C. MAHÄFFY,
229 Market Street.
Grand Auction Sale.
MY F-NT1RK STOf'K OF
Diamonds, jfold am! Silver
Watches, Jewelry, Silver
ware, Clocks, etc.
Beginning on THURSDAY NOVEMBER
10, at 2 p in., continuing daily at 10.30
a in . 2 80 aud 7 30 p. m , until every
»rtlcle is closed out. The sale will be
positive and to a finish.
Grand Opportunity for
Chris I mas Presents.
L. W. STIDHAM * SON, Auctioneers.
Card to Mv Fiuibids and Patron«: Your
Attention Ami attendance At thin «al© Is re
ypwllvely invited Having ether bnslne s
Interests whic h demand my entire attention,
I have decided to r tiro from the jewelry
business and will close out my entire stoc k at
amtlon The quality of the goods which I
have always carried will l*» a
ffio'ant guar
antee to you. The «ale will be p'-ettlve and to
a llnlsli, a» I have alieolutely decided to ill»
centiiHiethe Jewelry buslne-s. Every article
will be fully ««aranteed by me to lie ae repre
sented by the auctioneer«. all person» hav
ing wi.tehee for repair will please call for
thematonce. HENRY C MaHaFFV.
$2,600 WORTH
OF
Optical Goods.
Closing out our Optical Business
below cost.
COLD SPECTACLES.
Former price, 110.00, now #(! 00
Fortner price, 6,00, now 4.00
Former price, 5.*0, now 3.00
FINE STEEL SPECTACLES
Former price, #2.00, now *1.00
Former price, 1.50, now .76
Former price, 1.00, now .50
Former price, .60, now .25
ÂYÂRS & SON,
809 Market Street.
KOSMOS CLUB
PURE RYE WHISKEY
Fully ten years old and made
from selected Pennsylvania
Rye.
$16.00 Per Case.
$1.50 Füll Quart Bottle.
WM G. R0BELEN
J
AGENT.
108 West Seventh Street,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
TROUSERS
Made to your measure, #3.00,
♦4.00, #5 00,
Strictly All-Wool Suits made
to vour measure, #12 00,
#15.00, #20.00,
Overcoats to measure, satin
lined, #12.00, *15 00,
#18.00, #20.00.
Handsome Heavy Storm
Coats to order, #15.00,
LIVERPOOL & LONDON
MERCHANT TAILORS,
581 Market Street.
MONEY TO LOAN
5 Per Cent.
80 FER CENT. OF CArH VALUE.
J. L. CAVENDER,
830 Market Street.
k
BOOTS and SHOES»
»jSSpiss
«
v.
BURNS St MONAGHAN, here »»cared the
agency ot the ïrimby * Brewster Cork Sole
T.rnid Shoes for Ladles Th« only place In
the city that they
have tbelr large store poektd from s-reot to
street with a full line of ,g«ui lerne*'«, ladle»
and Children's Shoes for fall and winter
G«a it y from mediant to b»t. Bot
m
■HAW?
for »ale. They also
.i*ddr __ ■- ■
(PATENT PENDING.)
CROSS-SECTION OF TO®
OK LADIES'
0 $ac
wear.
tom prices. AU good^. warianteU a» reyr©
" sented.
Ladies' and Gentlemen's CtUdoQi Worfc
promptly attended to.
QORK SOLE TURNED SHOE.
TRIMBY & BREWSTER SHOE CO.,
Rochester. N. W
Sole Manufacturers.
BURNS & MONAGHAN, 419 Market aid 418 Shipley Street.
»
ho tan and Rooms
WANT«!). - BOARD« RS, '
rooms and home comforts.
412 King at reel.
t'LB-SANT
Apply No.
WANTS!).- ROAHDI US PLEASANT
bat*'-, house he« ted all through.
Good looAlftv. Bai Weg -, Mirth street._
n ^'KABLit ROOMS WITH BOARD?
Ilh Kant Lights «treet.
FOB «AU.
O urlaroncarriage"fvotory at
beveuth and Shipley «trusta.
—_fc'HISr A -VLLMON.
imunterm steam FIXTURES. CO«.
«Sïïf w bangen, eto„ aimable
JSPßTfi» or ®Ufbth*meü!um pr«« u*. a Iso a
office Afb'v at Evasiso Journal
pRINT£Hß.~F°H HALE, FOUR lThÏTk
i I m in g St on *** ._A PP» T_ * tt _
SSraër J *ssa.-si«rits,s
RlCAX K8TATK.
17011
r n
BALE.
Non. *01 to 607 Harrison street.
Non. 8 w and 808 Van Huren street.
Noh. i o) And 602 Vau Buren street.
No«. 'îSti ana <210 Vl«HR*nt street
N°f*. 181 «, Î 81 T» and 1817 Izancaster Avenue.
Dwell lug and store. Thirteenth and French.
If none of the Above suit, come get list.
JOHN MULVENA.
015 Market Street.
Offic e ope n every evening.
L'OR Ri- NT. -TM O-STORY WH B.KLR1GHT
snnn ana six-room hooae to a pood work
man at Klrtwo il, Del. R T. lUIRi;t>s,
U'OR KENT -VHR1 HIRD8TOHY ROO 4.
. No. 41814 Market street. lOmi, well
lighted, entrance both on Market nnd Shipley
•treets. JAMES MON AGHAN, No. 41H Mar.
ket street
(PGR RENT HOUSE NO. H4» ORANGE
street..! -UN FUl.LMBR, 21» W, Ninth «L
m Don't Want
To tire you with long
lists of our Houses, Lots
and Investments for sale.
We do ask you to call or
send for list to examine
at your leisure. They are
Reliable, and we In vite
Comparison.
HEALD & CO
•»
Seveutb atid Market Stg.
MUT10H8.
i
NST1TUTÏON TO-MORROW
NIGHT.—
Golden Gale Uoinmandery. No I«), Ancient
and Hlustrloue Order Knight« of Malta, will
he instituted to marrow evening at Odd Fel
low»' Hall, aud all who have signed th« char
ter roll are lequested tobe present ROBERT
KEENAN. U. H O
VTOTIOE. -TRAVEL WILL
« Hie ro.«d leading from Bear «talion,
N*w Cast e hundred, over the Christiana
Greek, by way of the Frltzwalt.ber farm to
tbe turnpike, leading from Olirtstlana to
Iron Hill, Mondai , Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday, as, 24 *5 and 2d of November, to
construct a new bridge on the causeway.
ROBERT SUTTON,
L. C. CommlBsioDer.
STOP ON
New Castle, November 20,1*91
MONEY TO LOtN AT 5 AND « 1'KR OT.
• I in «umstosnlt. Also have a costumer
for a bouse on western side of city, «bout 10
room«. J L OCUELTREE.
Heal Estate Broker. Rooms * anil J Ex
change hntldlng.
AMÜSKMKNT«
ACADEMY OF MUSIC.
THURSDAY, EHIDAY "AND SATURDAY
AND SATURDAY MATINEE.
GRAND THANKSGIVING UATIREE.
ARLINGTON'S MINSTRELS

Old favorite«, l ire pick of tbe profession.
Price —16, su. ;*), Hi and IS cents
GRAND 0PRRA HOUSE.
Thursday, Frida* ami Haturd*?. this weok.
THAN K8GIVINO MATÎNKK.
Weber & Field s Own Company
UuarATitt'ml 1 be»Stron«*«t, Hrf glittet and Best
Vaudeville Company on cho
FREE DISPENSARY
FOR
DISEASES
OF
THE EYE.
Krery day c&seB come to my notion where
comparatively K<»od eyealtfht haalnwu spoiled.
In tome total blludne»« m-»y he caused by
wearing glaaaea bought of Inexiwsrieaced op
Jewelers.
li. Ians
DR H. HOEGELSBERGER
A REGULAR PHYSICIAN, mart« Ula«o««s of
the Eye hla «iMH'lat sturly tor yearn la thomust
prominent fantltutlou« of Europe and
America. H* cheerfullv v lunteo.-« to EX
AMINE AND TREAT VO UR EVES FREE
OF CHARGE. Correction of A.nigmattem a
Specialty.
Every Glass Guaranteed 1 J~jnh( a >MT|.
Changed 'roe within one ys*. .. C v?C
M*ol Eyeglastes,60cents up. God Specta
cles, $2.60 up. _
DR. H. HOEGELSBERGER,
Opera House, 816 Market Street,
Wilmington, Del.
CLEANED CUKRANT8
And SULTANA RAISINS. READY FOR
IMMEDIATE USE.
LYNCH & LEARY'S OFFERING.
READ MARION HARLAN'S OPINION.
''1 year« ago gave over trying to guess who
put the dirt In dried currants It Is always
there. Gravel stones, lurking under a spsclous
coating nt currantv paste to crucify grown
peoples'newes and children's 'eeth. mould
that change« to mud In the month, twigs that
prick the throat not to mention the leg«, wings
ami hodle« of tropical insects -a carions
« udy to one interested In etymology of Zante.
It Is all dirt although sold to us at Oe'imaKT
prices.
"These horrors with the wear and tear of
patience and the loss of time au l labor are
now «pared her who buys the plump, delicious
fruit fresh and of the beet qasltty, «old by the
firm named above. The price Is more than
reasonable even when one leave« out of con,
sidération the clrcnmitam e that din and
stones weigh more than fruit. Try them."
LYNCH & LEARY,
GROCERS.
N. W. Gor 4th and Madison Sts
BEHRINGER & CO,,
411 EAST FOURTH SIREJS>.
COSTUMERS.
A flne lot of Children's Costume«.

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