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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, November 28, 1892, Image 4

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A HOME RUINED BY FIRE.
Mayor Herbert Burned Out By
a Sunday Evening Blaze.
CLOTHING AND OTEEB EFFECTE GO.
Three Thousand llollar* Worth Goes op
in Smoke White the Mayor i* Out For
an Afternoon Drive—Bishop Taylor, of
Africa, Preaches to a Large Congrega
tion.
Special Correspondence Evening Journal.
Nkw Casti.k. Nov. 28.—Mayor Frank
E. Herbert's pretty home on Delaware
street above Sixth was ruined by fire
yesterday afternoon,
schools in that neighborhood were in
full blast when the alarm sounded and
in less than three minutes the chapels
were
All the Sunday
"cleaned out." A large crowd
eager spectators followed tlie fire
department to the scene atid'some of these
formed au effective bucket brigade to
aid the firemen. The Lcnape engine was
throwing water in six minutes after the
fire was discovered. The mayor and
Mrs. Herbert had gone out for a drive
early in the afternoon and knew nothing
of the fire until they reached home and
found two or three rooms nothing but a
blackened mass. ,
The fire was discovered by Mrs. Wil
linm Keatley, who lives near the mayors
residence. She interrupted lier hus
band's afternoon doze by a good shaking,
and the brave man rushed from the house
coatless and shoeless. He climbed up a
Tain spout, jumped over two or three
roofs and entered a rear wiudow, closing
the window after him to prevent any
draught. Finding that the cloak closet
was all ablaze he sent out the alarm.
Patrolman Morgan was the first to re
spond and t he t wo men worked bravely
but could do little in the dense black
smoke. In a few minutes the roofs were
overed with firemen.
A case of books witli $800 was miracu
lously saved from destruction,
work of the fitemru and neighbors alone
saved the building and probably the en
tlrp block. When seen by the Evkninu
Journal reporter this morning the
mayor placed his loss on household effects
at $2,580 and on building $500.Tlie former
is insured iu the Penn Fire Insurance
company of Philadelphia and the latter
in the New Castle county Mutual Insur
ance company. The fire was doubtless
caused by mice gnawing at a box of
matches.
Every article of the mayor s clothing
was destroyed except what he wore.
Laet night he and Mrs. Herbert removed
to the residence of ex Treasurer William
Herbert where they will probably reside
until the repairs and refurnishings are
completed in their own home.
of
']'ii.
Advancing Single Tax Theories.
A Baltimore man interested in the
single tax movement has furnished the
secretary of the Single Tax Propaganda
association with copies of Henry Geo'-ge's
"Progress and Poverty" and "Social
Problems" for distribution among the
public libraries in Maryland and Delà
ware and copieB of these works liavo been
forwarded to the New Castle library.
The gift, it is said, is opportune as the
large number of siugle taxers elected to
the next Congress makes it certain that
this means of raising a revenue will be
brought before the country in the near
future.
Bishop Taylor of Africa.
The M. E. church was crowded venter
day morniug by a congregation repre
senting nearly every denomination of
this city to hear Bishop William Tayl
formerly known as the hero of Method
isai in Africa. The bishop arrived iu
town about 10.80 aud was accompanied
by John G. Baker, Esq., and Rev. T.
S. Thomas, editor of the Peninsula
Methodist. Dr. Martindale, pastor of
the church, officiated and Dr. Thomas
asaisted. A remarkable feature of the
service was that the bishop instead of
reading bis scripture lesson recited it.
word for word, much to the surprise of
the congregation. His text was "lam
not ashamed of the gospel of Christ."
The bishop preached for over an hour
and held his large congregation in rapt
attention. In concluding his discourse
he carefully described some of his ad
ventures lu those distaut lauds. The
Bishop Taylor Miason band was organ
ized at the close of the eervices, the
object of the baud being to contribute a
certain sum of money annually for in
fant nurseries of the church which are
being established in Africa.
Sad Accident to a Gunner.
One of the saddest accidenta of the
gunning season of 1892 was that which
befell William Sterling, sou of Ephraim
Sterling, living near Red Lion. The
young man, who is one of the most sue
cessful fanners, in that neighborhood
/
r.
Mr». Isaiah Emerson
Of Manchester, N. H.
After the Crip
jt Hood's Sarsaparilla Restored
Health and Strength
"Last winter I had the Grip and was quite
sick. After I began to get better, being weak
and run down, I concluded to try Hood's Sarsa
parilla. seeing it recommended so highly. I
must say that I was more than pleased with It.
I^reooverod my health completely m a short
I Am In Better Health
than before I was sick. 1 feel sure that this it
due to Hood's Sarsaparilla. Iu the package ot
BaxiaparUla when I opened It I found a sample
box of Hood's Fills. I was surprised and de
lighted to 6nd how well they agreed with me.
BO griping and no weakening afterward. 1
have tried many other kinds of pills, but
Hood's Pills
the preference every time now. I think they
an just wondcif
I°°4 »
ul. I am gla<l to recommend
preparations a» Hood's Sarsa
parilla and Hood's nils." Mus. Isa lau Eu
tniaox, East Manchester, N. B.
HOOD'S Pirns cure Constipation by rutorln,
tp* penswhic »cilon of the stlmsoUrj cans!
two auch
w
ßakinef
Powder
Absolutely
Pure
A cream of tartar baking powder. Highest
of all In leavening at rengtli.— lastest United
States Government Food Report.
Royal Ha kino Powder Co.. 106 Wall 8t.,N.Y.
was preparing for n gunning expedition,
when a premature discharge of his gun
in the house blew off the thumb of his
right hand, making him a cripple for life
in the most useful member of his body.
His relatives in the house hearing the dis
charge of the gun were afraid for a
moment to enter the room aud called
loudly to the men outside to come In and
help The young man soon came from
the room and assured them that hiB
wounds were not serious and he was at
once taken to the railroad station and
brought to this city. Doctors Black aud
Tybout performed the operation of am
putation, although the young man
dreaded to see the knife put upon his
hand. He has been using the gun since
boyhood and has always exercised , the
greatest care in handling the weapon
and it was a great shock to his relatives.
He Is now recovering at the residence
of his uucle, ex-Chieftleorge Williams. ^
Incidents of the Day.
Portions of the New Castle 'Woollen
Mills and the Riverside Rolling Mills
started up again this morning after a
week's stop. This makes Christmas
prospects better but all the operatives
have depleted purses and not the best
of spirits.
The City Cornet Band lias received its
pay for all campaign work from the New
Castle and Wilmington Democrats and
each member now has enough money
upon which to go abroad.
George Matthews, a well known young
mechanic of Water street has decided to
spend no more whiter evenings alone for
on Saturday he hied himself to Magno
lia, Del, and there was wedded to Miss
Emma Meteor, a belle of that town. Mr.
and Mrs Matthews will reside on Water
street.
Tlie colored choir of Exion M. E.
church, fashionably dressed aud riding
in four-horse hacks, came to this city
yesterday and did some fine singing iu
the colored church on Vine street.
The pleasant autumn weather yester
day brought out the fresh air seekers in
large numbers. Hundreds of carriages
and bicycles from Wilmington passed
through this city, and the Newcastle
and Riverside
alive with people.
A club of young Democrats intend t
go to Wasiiiugtou on March 4, and are
now making arrangments to charier u
special Pullman cur iu which to attend
the inaugural ceremonies of President
elect Cleveland.
The active members of i b« Ancient
Order of United Workmen of this neigh
borhood will organize a branch of the
Adhesive Order of MngulliniiH, and spend
one night a week laughing until they
can laugh no longer.
The Philadelphia und Salem Transpor
tat ion company, which has done much
business all this season at New Castle, is
now sadly feeling the effects of the recent
cold spell, the business having greatly
fallen off since Jack Frost's appearance.
The one steamer now running, the Major
Reybold, will probably be kept running
until January 1.
The schoouor R. T. Maull is anchored
in the river just opposite this city.
■ Orange street girls have adopted a bad
and rather risky practice of ringing door
liells, out of sheer mischief, and then hid
The Btreets were fairly alive with peo
ple last evoning. all hands being bent on
seeing the comet when it struck the
earth In the neighborhood of New fCastle
or Port Penn. They did not even see
any stars spilled.
"Uncle Isaac" who was located in the
old express office on Delaware Btreet, lias
cleared out, he having found that there
is not money enough in the pawn bus!
ness in New (Castle to buy coal for his
little stove.
causeways wore fairly
a
m
l'emoiml Event«.
W. 8. Hofmann, William Cannon.John
Schuhardt, diaries Lancaster and Kckert
Tindal visited fair friends In Delaware
City yesterday.
Samuel K. Naylor, who has been
spending a short time here with his
parents, left last evening for Maine,
where he will, with a large force of fel
low-workmen from Camden, N. J.,prepare
the ice fields for next winter's harvest.
George Brough,formerly of Newcastle,
but now of the Quaker City, spent Sun
day with his parents here.
William J. Keatley, who recently
resigned his position as conductor of the
Delaware Iron Works shifting train, hau
accepted a similar position with the W.
A N. railroad company and will remove
to Wilmington.
Harry Off, a Philadelphia football
player, visited New Castle friends yester
day.
Miss Sallie Hubbard, of Wilmington,
drove over to this city yesterday and at
tended the servicos iu the M. E. church.
RURAL PERSONAL EVENTS.
Many Sunday YI«ltor»—X Fair and lU/ar.
Hor»e Drop» Head.
Special Correspondence Evening Journal.
Fa util, and, Nov. 28.—A horse of John
Temple dropped dead a few day» ago
while at work. The animal was young,
and no reason can be attributed to the
cause of such sudden death.
Richard Doody, who went to Eden,
Md., several weeks ago ou a visit to
friends and a gunning trip, returned on
Saturday evening.
Miss Hannah Duross. of Wilmington,
visitor to relatives at Wooddale
1
was a
yesterday.
Rev. John D. Blake returned on Saturl
dav evenin
Princeton.
Miss Bertha Allcom, of Philadelphia,
visited relatives here yesterday.
Charles Hartman, of Wilmington, was
entertained by his son, Albert Hart man,
yesterday.
Mrs. Thomas O'Rourke had as guests
yesterday Misses Lizzie and Maggie
Kelleher, of Kaolin, Pa., and Miss Lizzie
Brown, of Wilmington.
A bazar for the benefit of the new
Episcopal church will be held at Mar
shallton on the evenings of December 8,
9 and 10
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mayne and
Herbert- Mayne, of Wilmington, were
guests of Thomas Lutnd at Laudenberg
yesterday.
C. Alexander, of Wilmington, visited
from a viai** to frieuds in
VI
I
his son, Walter C. Alexander, at Landen
berg yesterday.
The fair that is in progress in the hall
kt Landenberg will close this evening.
financial
The occasion is proving a
success.
BIT OFF HER TONGUE.
Mule Nearly Sever» a Cow*»
Tongue Ily » Sudden Snap.
Nairn«*«
Snow Him., Md., Nov. 28.
the farm of A. B. Nairne, near Snow
Hill, stuck bertongue through a crack
In the partition separating her from a
mule iu the next stall and the mule bit
Mr. Nairne la
-A cow on
off about one half of it.
afraid that the cow will have to be killed.
Oysters continue to improve aud the
business of shipping them correspond
ingly. The Siuepuxent bay is producing
better stock than for.many years past,aud
Chiucoteagucs are also plentiful and very
fat.
Northampton county, Va., in which
President Cleveland is now sojourning,
visited by President Harrison about
He went on a gunning ex
in
u
is
on
the
see
the
lias
his
was
a year ago.
pedition and had plenty of good sport.
Northampton county lias always been a
Republican stronghold until the recent
election, when it went Democratic by a
good plurality.
nev. Jolin Squier Demi,
Port Dkfosit, Md., Nov. 28.—Rev.
John Kquier, a Presbyterian minister and
member of the New Castle Presbytery,
died at his country residence Saturday
afternoon.
and treasurer of the Cecil county school
board, which position lie had held for
about twenty years. He was pastor of
tlie Port Deposit Presbyterian church at
the time of the breaking out of the war,
and resigned to accept a call at Suow
Hill, Md. Mr. Sq liier was u» native of
Scotland. He leaves three daughters and
a son, who is a member of the Cecil
county bar.
PENINSULA NEWS PARAGRAPHS.
Mr. Nqttier was secretary
Celery is scarce in Sussex.
Harrington lias seven secret societies.
Rising Sun, Md., wants an electric
light.
Gunners are more plentiful thou game
on the Peninsula.
The Sussex county forest fires have
been extinguished.
There are five applicants for the
Dover postmastersbip.
Tlie Kent county Bible society will
meet at Felton tomorrow.
Successful revival services are being
held in Georgetown M. K. church.
Handsome memorial windows have
been put in Georgetown M. P. church.
The water in the Susquehanna river is
lower than it lias been for ninety years.
A Denton. Md., colored barber named
George E. Jones, lias fallen heir to
$1,500.
T. R. Burton, a well-known citizen of
Hurbeson, Sussex county, is dead,
iviis 44 years old.
Rev. Clarence L. E. Wilson, of 8eaford
M. K. church, lias gone to his new sta
tion at Fort Smith, Ark.
Delaware colored conference will con
vene at Dovsr on M arch 0. It will be
presided over by Bishop Walden, of
Ohio.
Mrs. John M. Purnell, of Snow Hill,
Mil., recently found eight large black
snakes in an uuused room in her house.
They wero killed.
Perry Barnes, of Carpenter's Point,
Md., recently killed thirty-eight canvas
hack and six red-hesd'ducks in one day.
They netted him $86.50.
The Northern Convocation of the
Diocese of Easton will meet next week in
Trinity church, Elkton, Md., Rev.
George C. Sutton, of Galena, Dean, presi
dent.
Rev. John Square, nged 70, a well
known resident of Cecil county, died last
evening at his home at Port Deposit,
Md., of a complication of diseases. He
was a native of Scotland and came to
Cecil county in 1851. For many years
lie lias been a member of the board of
school commissioners and filled the office
of secretary aud examiner. He was a
member of the New Castle Presbytery
and was stationna during his ministry at
West Nottingham and Port Deposit. He
was a graduate of Lafayette college,
Kaston, Pa., and for many years was a
trustee of that institution.
lie
<1
,
4
Us.
1
m
fi»
%
DR. L L. CABMES.
Stricken Down with Heart Disease.
Dr. Mil** Medical Co., Elkhart, Ind.
Ozs-nniKf : I feel It my duty, as well ns a
pUasuro, to publish, unsolicited, to the world the
benefit received from on. MiLts- Restosstivs
R rMtoita. 1 wo* stricken down wiib Heart
IHteam and its complications, a rapid pulse vary
ing from hO to GO bonis per minulo, a choking
burning sensation in the wind pipe, oppress!
THOUSANDS""«
,.r
- -i
glen of the heart and below lower rib, pain In tho
arms, shortness of breath, sleeplessness, u cukness
and general debility. The arteries In my neck
would throb violently, the throbbing of my heart
could be heard across a large loom and would
Ftmke my whole body. *1 was so nervous that I
could not hold my band steady. I hare boon
uniter the treatment of eminent yhyjiir lane,
and have taken potion* of Datent Meiliein»
without the lent! benefit. A friend recom
mended your remedies. Hbe was cured by Dr
It lies'remedies. Ihevetahen *n» » n F 1
three bottles of your New fj | IRr I 1
Heart Cure and two bottles
Nerrine. My pulse Is normal. I have no more
violent throbbing of the heart, i **■* writ, man
■I ilneerely recommend every one wnh symptoms
of Ueart Disease to tako Hr. Mill*' Keeton*
tir* Hetnedie* and be cured
Gypsum City, Kens.
»OLD ON A POSITIVE GUARANTEE.
8,
L. L. CARvaa.
TRY DR. MILES' PILLS, 50 DOSES 25 CTS.
For sale by all Druggists.
OLD COLD AND SILVER
1'nuactl, nul ol'ntjlc, or
not tVorlli He|Mtirfm(f,
lake It nnsl 8EI.L IT to
tiro. A. Jenkins,
4 E.THIRD ST.,WIL.DEL.
C\V
f Saratoga
The most delicious TFjJI 1T~ ® O
I 'zxzii'z. Ü issiiig'eii
^5 The ocT.y Table Water bottled with Its own Natural Clas lust
as It nows; from the spring. U spouts up through 1A2 feet of solid
rock and Is not exposed to the air until opened for use.
^ || A post lively pure Table Water. HOI.11 IN BOTTEES OM,\,
XCVN
i
"The
Pearl
i
I
i
Of
I
Purity
' 9
Water. I
1
M.
Saratoga Klsslngcn Ginger Ale Is made from It and contains no manufactured Gas.
PARENTS, ATTENTION!
BOYS' SINGLE AND DOUBLE-BREASTED
SUITS ™ OVERCOATS
OUR JUVENILE DEPARTMENT contains the
greatest variety and selected stock of Single and Double
breasted Sack Suits and Overcoats ever collected in this city.
There is not a style, shape or material in the market which we
do not show in bewildering profusion.
Great Go This Week.
SCHOOL SUITS AND
OVERCOATS ONLY $2.19.
Garments worth $3 and $3.50.
ust come in and look for curiosity's sake, if for nothing else.
J
HAMBURGERS
220 AND 222 MARKET STREET.
MEM'S HALL
RED
515 SHIPLEY STREET, WILMINGTON.
We are Sole Agents for over 20 makes of PIANOS and ORGANS
NEW STYLE PIANOS BY
J. and C. FISCHER, over 92,000 in present use.
A. B. CHASE, the finest Piano in the market.
WEBER, unequalled for pure, sweet tone.
M ATHUSHEK, recommended for full tone and durability.
LUDWIG, sweet tone, full power and fine finish.
SCHUBERT, probably the best medium grade piano.
Also NEW PIANOS by JACOB BROS., MARSHALL & WENDELL,
R. M. BENT & CO., and other makers, all of which we guarantee.
NEW PARLOR ORGANS, by A. B. CHASE, CARPENTER, BAY
STATE, TABER, STORY & CLARK, aud others.
Old Pianos aud Organs taken in exchange.
Pianos and Organs Tuned and Repaired.
Boxing and Shipping and Moving Pianos carefully attended to.
GEORGE E. DEARBORN,
515 SHIPLEY STREET.
BEFORE YOU BUY
It will be to your interest to examine the extensive stock and
low prices of
SAMUEL SLESINGER'S CREDIT HOUSE,
NO. 706 FRENCH STREET.
We do not bother you with what other houses are doing, or
what they are not doing, or a long speech, but all we ask is that
you come and convince yourself and you will find an elegant dis
play of
CLOTHING
For Men, Youths and Boys. The latest styles in Ladies' Coats,
alto for Misses and Girls, and Ladies' Hats.
DRY GOODS, Â complete fine stock.
SHOES !
SHOES !
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Furniture, Carpets, Oil Cloths, Bed
ding, Baby Coaches aud a long list of other things too
numerous to mention. We will sell yoa oa easy monthly or
weekly payments.
SAMUEL SLESINGER,
NO. TOO FRENCH STREET.
Open till 9 p. m. Tuesday and Saturday until 11 o'clock.
4
Until Christmas
and during these
four weeks we
WEEKS
want to do a big
trade in every de
partment at Sixth
and Market. The stock is
as yet unbroken,hut during
the past two weeks it has
kept us constantly watch
ing to keep sizes and assort
ments in good shape. Our
Overcoat trade is
MORE
away
ahead of any other year's
business and we don't
know of any more stylish
or better garments to be
had any where for the
money. Diagonal Cutaway
and full Dress Suits, prop
er and stylish in cut, well
made and at low prices for
good articles. Popular tail
oring at moderate prices
with reductions inTrouscrs
to close out some of the
styles. Hats and Shoes
selling better every day, as
people become acquainted
with the fact that we keep
them.
JAMES T. MULLIN & SON,
6th & Market,
Wilmington.
Clothing,
Hats,
Shoes.
We have
WORKINGMEN'S received
a new lot
of Shirts
this week
which we would like the
workingmen to see.
One lot of our very
best made and best quali
ty of Domet Flannel
Shirts, medium shades,
that was ever sold at 50c.
will be sold for 40
cents.
SHIRTS.
WYATT & CO..
MEN'S FURNISHERS,
603 MARKET STREET.
WM. B. SHARP & CO.
MOURNING
AND
BLACK FABRICS.
Ithadatnc»
A rd
Safi
Undine
Prlncett a.
Satin I.uiori
Henrietta,
Convent Cloth,
Frleotlne,
Mervilletiv,
Card! mere,
Nun'» Veiling,
Drap d'Alma,
Courtlauld Crape«,
Uro» Grain Rliadzamir.
ure,
d'f.ynn,
Cloth.
The Best Black Goods to Boy.
Tlie Best Black Goods to Wear.
Tlie Best Assortment Here.
Fourth and Market Sts.
Nothing Equal»
FRAGRANT
TRI-PIIOSA 1
For Clesulng
SILVERWARE,
k « * CHINA, GLASS,
^POTS^PANS. A
Grocers and Druggists
Sell It. ^
Vaw
ETTER TOOK over
your ward rub« and
»«« If there are not
»nm« garment« which,
if properly Cleaned aud
l>y*d, will be good a»
new.
B
ft
PwlfiBi
A. F. BOKXOT,
710 MARKET ST.
pi
THOMAS McHUGH,
WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALEB,
No. It3 Market Street.
Wilmington,
Delaw
!
MITCHELL &, BASH
i
I.
219 Market Street.
A GRAND OPERA
n three acts will be the topic
of conversation this week
through the city of Wilming
ton and vicinity, which will be
played at our famous low
priced bazaar.
I
THE OVERTURE
Will consist of the FINEST
as well as the LARGEST
display of Dolls ever exhibited
in Wilmington and will be
placed in our north window
for inspection this week.
Don't fail to see themjand
bring the children, as they are
their delight.
The first act will be entitled
Cloaks.
In this department we offer
unexcelled bargains this week'.
We first enter with an elegant
Diagonal
Twilled
Jacket, good length, four but
tons; they are worth $6.50;
our price $3.87.
Second, with an elegant
Melton Cloth Jacket in tan.
They are extra long, have
welt seams, pearl buttons,
noche collars and are tailor
made. They are fine value,
worth $7.50; our price, $4.98,
Third, with an all-wool
Diagonal Cloth Jacket, 34
inches long, four ornament
buttons, tailor-made, with
bound seams and trimmed in
black fur; they are beauties
and worth $9; our price, $6.50.
Other Cloaks at equally low
Cloth
prices.
The second act will be en
titled
Millinery.
In this act we retain our
reputation which we gain in
the preceding act, with Lowest
Prices at the lead. We enter
with
First, our regular $3 Trim
med Hats for $1.98.
Second, our regular $3.50
Trimmed Hats for $2.18.
Third, our regular $4 Trim
med Hats for $2.98.
Fourth, our regular $5.50
Trimmed Hats for $3.98.
Fifth, our regular $7 Trim
med Hats, for $5.98.
Sixth, our regular $10, $12
and $15 Trimmed Hats for
$6.98, 7.98 and $8.98.
1
The third act will be entitled
Underwear.
. In this department our
prices are WORLD BEAT
ERS. We enter with
First, regular 35c Ladies'
Ribbed Jersey Vests at 25c.
Second, regular 55c Ladies'
Merino Vests at 39c.
•Third, regular 75c Ladies'
Merino Vests and Pants at
50c.
Fourth, regular 65c Gents'
Gray Mixed Underwear, 42c.
Fifth, regular 75c Gents'
Random Wool Underwear
at 50c.
Sixth, regular $1 Gents
Australian Wool Underwear
at 75c.
Seventh, regular $ 1.35
Gents' Camel Hair Underwear
at $1.
The grand finale is a hearty
welcome to ALL, guarantee
ing that we have the
LARGEST STOCK, BEST
GOODS at the LOWEST
PRICES.
Mitchell & Bash
219 MARKET ST.
Store closed at 6 o'clock 'except Tues
day and Saturday evenings.

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