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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, May 27, 1908, Image 3

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419 Market St.
OPEN EVENINGS THIS WEEK.
SENAT'OR RICHARDSON TO
SPEND SUMMER ON YACHT
Spécial ts THE EVENING JOURNAL.
\ DOVER, May 27.—Senator H. A.
iRlchardson, who returned home from
Ihls Washington labors last evening, Is
'preparing for his summer cruise in his
jBwlft cabin yacht, the Priscilla. The
Priscilla arrived In her moorings here
on Saturday evening, having left An
napolis at 10 o'clock that morning In
charge of E. T. Helte, of Dover, with
Captain Dean, of Washington, as the
pilot. The new machinery worked
well, the boat averaging over twenty
miles per hour. William Maag, of
Dover, accompanied the crew.
boat will leave for Thousand Islands
about July 1 for the summer.
The
BOY WHO PLUNBED THROUGH
TAR BARREL LOSES SKIN.
! Special to THE EVENING JOURNAL.
I GEORGETOWN, May 27.—John EI
llngsworth, the 13-year-old son of Mr.
and Mrs. John Ellingsworth, had the
misfortune to fall in a barrel of tar
{during a horse sale at the stables of
John H. Truitt here yesterday. The
little fellow was standing on the bar
rel when an untamed
pony was
] brought out of a stall for sale. The
j animal became excited at tho large
crowd of people standing In front of
' the stable, and the boy, fearing that
! the pony might jump on him, jumped
around the barrel-head until It gava
away, precipitating him Into the tar.
In scraping the tar oft, the boy lost
mufji of his skin.
Read THE EVENING JOURNAL
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD.
Bulletin.
REDUCED RITES TO WESTERN CITIES.
For the benefit of delegates attending the sessions of
the bodies enumerated below and others desiring to visit
the cities of the West, the Pennsylvania Railroad Company
has arranged to place on sale to all persons excursion tick
ets to the various meeting places at a considerable reduc
tion from the usual fares:
Chicago, Ill. American Medical Association, June 2 to
5. Tickets sold May 28 to 30, good returning until June 12,
inclusive.
Louisville, Ky. International Sunday School Associa- '
tion, June 15 to 23. Tickets sold June 13 to 17, good re
turning until June 26, inclusive.
Chicago, Ill. Republican National Convention, June 17.
Tickets sold June 12 to 16, good returning until June 27,
inclusive.
Denver, Col. Democratic National Convention, July 7.
Tickets sold July 1 to 4. good to return until July 17,
inclusive.
Cleveland, Ohio. International Convention, Baptists
Young People's Union of America, July 8 to 12. Tickets
sold July 6 to 8, good to return until July 15, inclusive.
St. Paul, Minn. Imperial Council, Mystic Shrine, July
ft3 to 18. Tickets sold July 9 to 11, gopd to return until
July 25, inclusive.
Columbus, Ohio.
Prohibition National Convention, ,
July 14 to 16. Tickets sold July 10 to 13, good to return
until July 24, inclusive.
Indianapolis. Ind. National Convention, Ä. O. H.,
July 20 to 25. Tickets sold July 17 to 19, good to return ,
until July 31, inclusive.
Toledo, Ohio, National Encampment, G. r A. R., Au
gust 71 to September 5. Tickets sold August 27 to 30, good
to return until September 15, inclusive.
Denver, Col. Sovereign Grand Lodge, I. O. O. F.,
September 19 to 26. Tickets sold September 15 to 17, good
to return until September 30, inclusive.
The Pennsylvania Railroad maintains a comprehen
sive schedule of fast express trains to Chicago, St. Louis,
Indianapolis, Louisville, Columbus, Cleveland, and Toledo
from the principal cities of the East.
Full details of the reduced fare arrangements for these
conventions and the through western train service may be ;
obtained of any Pennsylvania Railroad Ticket Agent.
>
1
ENTER THE
DIAMOND ICE CONTEST
Open To All Wilmingtonians
TWENTY-SEVEN $5.00 PRIZES
The Winning Sketches and Others oi Special
Merit are on Exhibition in our window
907 Market Street
Make a pepcil sketch illustrating the following
verse and leave it at No. 907 Market Street by Wednes
day evening.
Charles J. Field, 603 W. Front St., wins the Eighteenth five dollar prize
S is for Standard, to fix one is well,
Tile higher the Standard the better goods sell.
That is why "Diamond Ice'* leads in th'e race;
It aimed for, won, and holds first place.
CHARLES WARNER CO.,
Fool of Market St.
907 Markets*.
13th and Lombard.
SALVATION ARMY PLANS
THREE FREE EXCURSIONS
The local division of the Salvation
Army under the direction of Adjutant
W. F. Bartlett, will, in a few days,
of funds with
begin the soliciting
which to provide
families during the coming summer.
Already three such excursions have
been planned by Adjutant Bartlett, the
tlrst to be given on Tuesday, July 2.'
hen 500 poor mothers and their chil
wlll spend the day at Washlng
The two other excursions
outings for poor
s
ren
ton Park.
will be by trolley to parks and groves
adjacent to the city. Adjutant Ban
iett hopes for liberal contributions to
the worthy cause,
needed.
ized report will be published showing
how every cent of the money is dis
bursed.
That needy families of the city may
be supplied with free ice water, the
Army has placed a water barrel in
front of its barracks at Fourth and
King streets. Should the service be
appreciated Adjutant Bartlett says he
will locate other barrels In other sec ■
lions of the city where he believes
they would be most appreciated dur
ing the warm weather.
At least $300 in
The adjutant says an itern
MARYLAND NOTES
William Silver, a successful canner ef
Aberdeen, had his right leg broken by
being thrown from a horse.
C. W. Baker, Harry P. Stransbaugh and
William H. Jacobs have been appointed
assessors by tho Aberdeen Council.
Ground has been broken for the rew
electrical supply factory to bo erected In
Havre de Grace, by a Philadelphia com
pnny.
Mrs. Mary A. Stewart has filed a till
in the Harford County Court f*r a divorce
from her husband, Henry C. Stewart, on
the ground of desertion.
The Kent county authentic* are leaking
to: two negrees who are said to have been
implicated in the robbery, murder and
arson of Captain John Walmsley, of
Morgneo, for which crime Alexander
Moseley and Horace Hynsen, colored,
wtro arrested a few days ago. The Crime
was committed ever a year ago.
Festival Decoration Day,
The women of McCabe Memorial
Church will give their first strawberry
festival on Mrs. Slocomb's lawn, 1600
Washington street, Friday evening and
Saturday afternoon and evening. Tick
ets will be 15 cents, and a successful
event Is assured. Tho lawn is large
and an ideal spot for an event of this
kind.
Fine stone street for Hamilton Park.*
VALUABLE HOUSES
CHANGE hands
The transfers of property recorded
by the city registry clerk so far this
week included a number of valuable
dwellings. The list follows:
The Equitable Guarantee and Trust
Company to estate of George W. Bush.
West side of West street, 92 feet south
The same property
by the Bush estate to Ettie Bevy, $8250.
Benjamin J. Schwarts'and wife
Emma L. Hammond,
Eighth street, 67 feet west of Wilson,
»105Q.
AVilliam A. Cooper to Virginia L.
Culbertson,
$5100.
George Powlck and wife to Edmond
C. Hardesty, 1001
$6000.
Joseph J. Rebman and wife to Bouts
Lltchtensteln,
street. 97 feet north of Sixth, $3200.
William A. Heller and wife to Peter
H. Overdeer. 229 Franklin
$2950.
Ovcrdeer to Nettle A. Heller, $2950.
Thomas J. Murphy to David Dangel,
east side of Connell street, 164 feet
south of Second. $5. The same prop
erty by David Dangel and wife to
Thomas J. Murphy, $5.
Mary B. Maloney et al., to Harry E.
Ferguson, north side of Oak street 56
feet east of Franklin, $825.
Elizabeth 8. Nlsbct to Rebecca Mc
Lean, Nos. 2 and 4 Fifth
$4105.
John Doordan and wife to John J.
Callahan, west side of Heald street, 25
feet north ft* "D" street, $350.
James A. O'Neill and wife et al., to
of Eighth, $8,250.
to
south side of
1307 Washington street.
Madison street.
west side of Windsor
street,
property by P. H.
The same
i
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avenue,
Joseph J. O'Neill, west side of Harri
son street, 58 feet north of Fifth. $5.
v Frederic Pyle and wife to Stanislaw
Skrockl and wife, northwest corner
Oak and Broome streets, $1400.
Stanislaw Skrockl and wife to Fred
eric Pyle, north side of Marshall street
75 feet west of Oak. $1025.
Frederic Pyle and wife to Stanislaw
KotowskI, west side of Oak street 13
feet north of Brown street, $1150.
Requiescat in Pace.
Here lies a poor woman who always
was busy;
She lived under pressure that rendered
her dizzy.
She belonged to ten clubs and read
Browning hy sight.
Showed at luncheons and teas and
would vote If she might:
She served on a school board with
courage and zeal:
She golfed and she kodaked and rode
on a wheel;
She read Tolstoi and Ibsen, knew mi
crobes by name.
Approved of Dclsarte, was a "Daugh
ter" and ''Dame":
Her children went In for the top edu
cation.
Her husband went seaward for ner
vous prostration.
One day on her tablets she found a an
hour free
The shock was too great and she died
Jnstantlee!
—Saturday Evening Herald.
-
Hilles W. C. T. U. te Entertain.
The Hlllea W. C. T. U. will hold a
parlor meeting and reception to new
members In Rockford Hall. Rockford
road, to-morrow evening,
hers and their friends are Invited.
All mem
Paris Patterns
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2386
GIRL'S AND CHILD'S APRON.
Pari* Pattirn No. 2$8i
All Seams Allowed.
This dalDty little all-cover apron,
which might be used for a dress for a
very small child, during the warm daye
of Summer, la developed in shear wblta
Irish dimity. The body portion Is vary
full, gathered Into the yokebaud at tbt
front aud back and finished with a deep
hem. Satin ribbon tied In smart bows oa
tbs shoulders bold the garment In place,
and two narrow rows of scam beading
ornament tbe yoke-bond. The model is
adaptable to any of the sheer white ma
terials sad would be particularly pretty
In cross-barred dimity or scrim. For a
child of 6 years the apron requires 2%
yards of material 27 Inches wide, or 1%
yard 86 Inches vida; 1H yard of braid
to trim,
I CR obtain this pattern or nap 40
r other* heretofore described U)
; The Journal, (U1 out the following
Coupon and Inclose It with 19 cento
tx an envelope addressed to tho
Vlashlon Editor, The Evening Jour
nal, Fourth and Shipley street*
Wilmington, Delaware.
To the Fashion Editor,
Tbe Evening Journal.
Wilmington, Del.
Inclosed find 10 cent«, for whloft
send me'
1
Pattern No.
6izo. . t
Date published Mrmmnvmnn
Name .««••»•••.••••oe»
•• M* *.M M • M• ••• M • *.«
city
. buoe
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I ot thls-ord*» -...,
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Woman's World
MISS LOUISA D. HORSLEY.
She Nominated Secretary Taft Per j
President Thirt>*-eight Years Ago. j
If William II. Taft should ever be
nominated and elected president of the ;
United States, there is in Cincinnati n
quiet, inconspicuous little womuu who, '
although she bus been a wage earner !
for nearly twoscore years, would in all !
probability figure as the unofficial
guest of honor ut the inaugural ball i
and all other attendant festivities. The
little woman is Miss Louisa D. Hors
ley, nn old schoolteacher of William II.
Taft, who nominated him for president
thirty-eight years ago. Next month
Miss Horsley will celebrate her for
tieth anniversary as a teacher In the
Cincinnati public schools.
It was about thirty-eight years ago
she bad among her pupils In the A in
termediate grade of the Mount Auburn
public school twelve-year-old Willie
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MISS LOUISA D. BOR3LKT.
Taft. His home was within a stone's
throw of the schoolbouse, and the old
homestead still stands there. At that
time the Mount Auburn school whore
Miss Horsley is still teaching consist
ed of but three rooms, over one of
which she presided. Just bow well she
did so Is indicated by a story told by
one of her "boys," a classmate of Wil
lie Taft
"We were all sitting around tho stove
one day toward the close of the year,"
he said. "Will Taft was there. Miss
Horsley had been talking to us as she
often did. She said that she was pleas
ed with what we bad accomplished,
but that we conld do lots better if we
tried. 'One of you boys could likely be
president Why not try 7 she said."
"I remember the incident well," said
Miss Horsley recently when reminded
of the Incident, "and I would certainly
be exceedingly pleased to see William
Tuft occupy tho place for which he is
so well fitted."
'4
Wofk as Punishment.
Unless a mother wants to heap up
trouble for herself and the child now
and later on It is better never to pun
ish by making the culprit perform a
certain amount of work, soys Hilda
Richmond in the Housekeeper. There
are mothers who keep certain disagree
able tasks for little sinners, just as
some cities compel their offenders
against public peace to repair roads or
break stone. This is risky business,
since It gives the child the Impression
that It Is n misfortune to hove to work.
A grown man says ho bates the very
sight of an onion bed because bis
mother made Wm weed the tiny plants
every time -he was naughty when he
was a child. Oniou weeding ts tedious,
back breaking work at best, but when
it Is done as a punishment it becomes
horrible. A bright penny, a special
treat in the way of a big orange or a
trip to the pond to fish would have sent
the boy whistling to the onion bed de
termined to conquer or die, but to be
chained there, so to speak, with a
smarting sense of his woes makes him
recall those days yet.
Some mothers put the little girls to
patchwork when they are restless and
In mischief, but the only thing accom
pltsbed is to make the little fingers
loathe needlework. I have seen re
bellious little girls making buttonholes
all over a piece of eld.goods as punish
ment for some wrongdoing. The work
was wasted because the mother threw
it In the wastebasket
was satisfied'with'the effort, and the
children only turned out good work In
order to be released.
tUe minute she
Solitary idleness Is better than work
as punishment. Cffton when left to
themselves the children,.would gladly
take their books.or work,' but they al
resent being«, ordered to work to
ways
A ' long, quiet
atone for their sins,
think will make . them penitent while
hard work only ' makes them feel in
jured and gltes them the lasting lm
p ression tha t alPw nrk la disgraceful.
PLEASED WITH
THE NEW BISHOPS
Special te THE EVENING JOURNAZ.
DOVER, May 27.—Methodists of this
' section are elated over the electldta of
•the two newest bishops, William A.
Quaylo and Charles W. Smith, by the
Methodist Episcopal General Confer
ence at Baltimore.
The work of these big men In Meth
odism have been generally known here
|and their election has been hoped for.
The brother of Bishop-oleatoSmith,
Dr. Homer Smith, is visiting in Wy
'omlng. near Dover, having come over
for a few days' rest at the country
house of his friend, J. W. Fletcher
Cooper.
The policemen of West Chester have
adonted, w£iu helrtieta (ac ibo eum
me*
f
LIPPINCOTT & CO.
306 to 314 Market Street
LIPPINCOTT & CO.
Have Your Stamp
Books Redeemed NOW
Have your Sperry Gold Trading Stamps redeemed not later than FHday»
As Saturday is Decoration Day and as you no doubt desire to spend this day in
pleasure it will be to your advantage to have your books redeemed NOW,
Remember, there are only a few days in which to get $3.00 worth of ANY
merchandise in this store for a filled book of SPERRY Stamps.
Do Not Wait Until the Last Day
Have Your Books Redeemed Not Later Than Friday
«
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DOVER IS AFTER
CLEANER STREETS
FRIENDS TO MEET AT
L0NGW00D NEXT WEEK
Religion," address, Frederica A.
Hinckley.
Sunday, June 7—10.30 a. m., the
usual service, with an address by Prof.
Earl Barnes, on "The Religious Educa
tion of To-day."
Music, under the direction of Charles
S. Swayne.
The fifty-fifth annual meeting of
Progressive Friends will ho held at
Lnngwood, Chester county. Pa., on Fri
day, Saturday and Sunday of next
week. The following program has been
arranged.
Friday, June 5—10 a. m., opening ad
dress, the presiding clerk; business,
memorials. 11 a. m.. "subject Woman
Suffrage;'' address, Mrs. Florence Kel
ley: 2 p. m., subject, "Temperance
—Local Option;" address, Hon. Wil
liam H. Berry: 3 p. m.. subject. "The
Influence of thq United States In Latin
America;" address. Dr. Loo S. Rowe.
At a period during the meeting a
short talk on "College Settlement
Work," from her own experience, will
be given by Miss Sarah Stebbins, of
Brooklyn, N. Y.
Saturday, June 6—10 a. m.. subject:
"Moral Education In the Public
Schools," address. Miss Jane Brown
lee: 11 a. m., subject: "Non-Resist
ance a Better Defence Than Armies
and Navies;" address, William Lloyd
Garrison; 2 p. m.
Control a Conservative Force," ad
dress, Dr. Carl Kelsey: 3 p. m., sub
ject: "Heroism and Commercialism In
Special t* THE EVENING JOURNAL.
DOVER, May 27.—Perplexed bp the
continued bad condition oft Dover's
principal street—Loockerman, from
Governor's avenus to Qusen strest—.
Former Hotel Man Dead.
Special to THE EVENING JOURNAL
DOVER. May 27.—Levi Griffith, one
of the best known hotel men on the
Peninsula, who removed recently from
Dover, after a period of twenty-five
years as manager of tho Capitol House
and became proprietor of a hotel at
Ocean City, Md., dic'd Monday right.
Mr. Griffith's death was due »0
dropsy, from which disease he was 111
a long time. He was 66 years old and
leaves a widow and one son, Edward
Griffith. Funeral services were held
In Dover this afternoon, with inter
ment In Old Methodist Cemetery.
Council yesterday put a special com
mittee to work to devise plans to per
manently Improve this thoroughjaro.
Persons whom tha Council's agents
up their properties
uWilmen tor their
failure to clean up this street and the
of street between Loockerman
rth, on State afreet.
are forcing to cleans'
are deriding the cfiiu
«
■ect
and
Remodeling Old Maaeay Home, 4
Special to THE EVENING JOURNAL. "1
DOVER, May 27;—ThbjPrork of rj
buildlng and ram«<to)lllf - thq 1
nid Oeorga V. Mann? town 1»»
Dover, which haa bean aol«*
L. Derrlokaon, the Jforth Carolin»
lumberman, haa been commenced by
Contractor A. B. Wood. The work wilt
include the thorough renovating oft-the
house and frescoing and decorating*
inside and out.
Koiffer Pears Crop Will be Good.
Special to THE EVENING .TOURNAI*
27.—George M,
5n fruit
in
Hr
to
May
Fisher, Wyamong*» authority'ri
and himself a grower, states that the
of Delaware will
This
WYOMING,
Kelffer pear
this year bear fully half a crop.
Is the crop that was thought to have
been killed early In the season.
trees
subject: "Public
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Good-naturedly go after the Cook
If the Postum is we&k
Insist that it be boiled, as per directions on pkg. (That's easy)
Then you have a dark, rich breakfast beverage, heavy in nour
ishment, and the old aches and ails from coffee disappear
There's a Reason" for
POSTUM
Made by Postum Goroal Co,, Ltd., Bdittk Cicek. Mich.
I

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