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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, October 06, 1909, Image 6

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DR. COOK WRITES OF THE WEIRD ATTRACTION OF THE
LIFELESS WORLD OF THE MID-POLAR FIELD OF MOVING ICE
TRAVERSED BY THE EXPEDITION IN ITS SUCCESSFUL DASH
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THE NEW LAND
COPVielûHT 1909 *w TM It M.V. HERALD CO • ALL KKSHTS «SERVED
Hissing Spouts of Arctic
Air Drive Over the Party,
No tv Nearing the Big Goal
But When the Atmosphere Clears and It Is Possible
to Breathe Without Being Choked by Crys
tals a Little Blue Is Seen in the West.
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THEN, WITH FULL STOMACHS, DOGS AND NÆN
—i)NCE MORE MOVE ONWARD TO THE NORTH
Much
. €
Frightful Storm, However, Has Disturbed rhe Pack and
Time and Distance Are Lost in Seeking a Line of
Travel That Can Be Worked On.
Copyright, 1000, by the New York Herald Company.
Registered In Canada in accordance with' the Copyright Act.
Copyright in Mexico under the taw» of the Itepublic of Mexico.
All Klghta Uotwrved.
I
• » « *

; SYNOPSIS OP CHAPTERS PRINTED ;


In the first imtalmrnt o/ his thrillinff story, "The Cotn 7 «c»l of ths Pole. *
printed I« the Herald of Wednesday, Soplcmhcr 15, l>r. Frederick A. Cook J
told of the start from Gloucester on the liradleu , of the royaye to lh« polar «
seas and of ike overhauling en routs of the equipment needed for the dash to ^
the pole.
Jn a graphic manner the discoverer wrote a sloe y of Ksfcimo life that never *
has been ewe riled for human interest. He told of the home I i/o. the tragrdu *
and oomrdy that mingle in the dreary existence of lha dwellers in the Arctic, *
and of the childlike eagerness of the natives to trade their valuable furs and *
ivories for the simplest things of civilisation. J
The yacht, her owner, Ur. John B. Hradley, the explorer and his party «
ivere pictured in their preliminary mark for the final dash. J
Finally, after describing the various places visited in Greenland in search *
j of guides and information as to conditions further north. Dr. Cook wrote of J
4 the trip across Ingle field Gulf, past Capo Auckland and on touord Cape f
Robertson.
Here the discoverer closed the first part of his narrnfive, tcilh Utah and
Annootok, the last points of call, looming in the icy distance.
In the second instalment Dr. Cook described the voyage to Eiah and then ♦
4 on to Annootok, the place of plenty, which he selected as the basa tor his dash
0 to the pole.
In the third instalment the explorer described the work of preparing his
winter quarters, closing with a graphic description of a narwhal hunt.
In the fourth instalment Dr. Cook described the approach of the long
X Arctic night, tehico caused his party at Annootok to become very active in
f preparing for the dash to the paid.
In the fifth instalment Dr. Cook told of the actual start on February 19, ♦
♦ 1908. and described the equipment he took for his great final dash. ' J
X In the sixth instalment the disegverer told of the first progress of his little ♦
t party and the list sight of land, and his adventures on the perilous trip with X
X the two Eskimos who went to the pole with him.
v Jn the seventh instalment Or. Cook described how his Eskimo
X ions saecd his Ufa.
In the eighth chapter Dr. Cook gave a vital picture of the terrors of the
Arctic cold.
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♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
Ninth Instalment
THE CONQUEST OF THE POLE,
By Dr. Frederick A. Cook.
Copyright. 1900, by the New York Herald Company.
Registered In Canada In accordance with the Copyright Act.
Copyright In Mexico under the laws of the Republic of Mexico.
All Rights Reserved.
WAKENED in the course of a few hours by drifts of
A
snow
about our feet, it was noted (hat the wind had burrowed
h<> 1 <M iu the Weak spots through the snow wall. Still Wf ,
were bound uol to 1 m . beal. d out of a |,. w hours' si. i
, . , _ , w nours Bleep, and
with one eye opened we turned over. Later 1 was awakened by falling
a
snow blocks.
Forcing ray bead out of the ice encased hood, 1 saw that the
dome had been swept away and that wo wore being buried under
dangerous weight of snow. In some way 1 had tossed about suffi
eiently during sleep to keep on top of the accumulating drift, but
?orapanious were out of sight and did not respond to n loud call.
After a little search a blowhole was located, and in response to
another ckll came Eskimo shouts. Violent efforts were made to free
their bags, but the snow settled on them tighter with each tussle.
I was surprised a few moments later as 1 was digging their
breathing nlace open to feel them burrowing through the snow. They
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MOW HOUSE CAMP A TJeOUBX.BSOM£ ♦ PRESSURE ANTCrLE
COPYRIOHT 1909 -*V TM*3 c-t . VI MtRALB CO. ALL WföHTS RESEfcVED
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MARCH 16
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MAP SHOWING DR.COOK^S
PROGRESS DAY BYDAV
OVER THE POLAR, ICE.
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Lancaster .
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h a fl entered the bag without undressing
anJ half emerged with shirt and pants
'" ll "" b baro foet
After a little more digging their boots,
were uncovered, and Uten, with protected
feet, the bag was freed and placed to the
side of the igloo. Into it the boys crept
in full dross, except coats. I rolled out
to their side in my bag.
Tower« of Glitter.
The air came in hissing spouts, like jets
of steam from an engine, but soon after
noon of the 29th the ice under our heads
brightened,
breathe without being choked with float
ing crystals, and as the ice about the
facial furs was broken a little blue was
detected in the west.
The dogs were freed of snow entangle
ments and led. and a shelter was made
It became possible to
in which to melt snow and make tea. A
uu,|a,iublc ration was eaten aud then the
Soon the sun burst through the seitarat
ing Ü" S ^ .p^ InTw"™
of glitu , r The wind tllpn CPnseJ cntirplv
nnd a gcrno of cr} Stal glory n . aB lnill
over the storm swept fields. With full
stomachs, fair weather and a much
needed rest we moved with inspirations
anew. Indeed, wc felt refreshed as one
docs after a cold bath.
The pack had been much disturbed and
considerable time and distance were lost
in seeking a workable line of travel.
Camping at tuidnigbt, we hud only made
nine miles for the day's effort.
Awaking in time for observations
the morning of the 30th, the weather
found beautifully clear. The fog, which
sleds began to move again.
on
a a i
had persistently screened the west, had
tanislied and laud was discovered at some
distance extending parallel to the line of
march, from the southwest to northwest
The observations placed ns at latitude
84 deg. 30 min., longitude 95 deg. 36 min.
■ .and Cloud« Seen.
In the occasional clearing spells for
several days wc had seen sharply defined
land clouds drifting over a low band of
pearly fog, and we bad expected to see
land when this veil lifted. We had,
however, not anticipated to see so long a
of coast The land as we saw it
gave the impression of ing two islands,
but our observations were insufficient to
warrant such an assertion. They may
be islands, they may be part of a larger
land extending fnr to the west. What
of the most southerly coast
In
waa been
fHVTMKAPKÎ DR. FREDERICK A. COOK.
r
Snow Clad Land Is Found
Close to the 102d Meridian
Resembling Heiberg Island
Or. Cook Describes Accurately the Position of This
Polar Continent and Gives Its Peculiarities and
What He Could Learn of Its Contour and Height.
ON APRIL 3 THE THERMOMETER AGAIN
SINKS, BUT THE BAROMETER IS STEADY
Then Come Long Marches, and as the Ice Steadily Improves
the Little Party Is Encouraged—Weariness, However,
Is Marked and Houses Are Seldom Built.
NOW FAR BEYOND THE RANGE OF ALL OTHER LIFE
extends from S3 deg. 30 min. to 83 deg.
31 min., close to the 103d meridian.
This land has an irregular mountainous
sl.y line, is perhaps eighteen hundred feet
high and resemble« in its upper roaches
the highlands of Hcihcrg island.
i) lime visible.
t
The
lower shore line was at
This land is probably a part of Crocker
Land.
From 84 deg. 23 min., extending to 83
deg. 11 in in., close to the 102d meridian,
the coast is quite straight. Its upper sur
face is flat and mostly ice capped, rising
in steep cliffs to
feet.
(inotly seen that we were unable to de
tect glacial streams or ice walls,
lands were hopelessly buried under ac
bout twelve hundred
The lower surface was so indis
Both
cumulated snows.
We were eager to set foot on the new
ly discovered coast, for we believed then,
proved by later experience, that these
were the earth's northernmost rocks, but
tlie pressing need for rapid advance in
the aim ot our main mission did not per
Ucsoliitions were rein
■ IS
mit ot detours,
forced and energy was harbored to press
onward for the pole in an air line.
Fair Marche«» Made.
Every observation, however, indicated
easterly drift, and a westerly course
must bo continuously forced to couuter
balaucc the movement. A curtain was
drawn over the land iu the afternoon of
March 31, and we saw no more ot it.
Pay after day we now pushed along in
desperate northward effort*,
winds and fractured, irregular ice in
creased the difficulties; progress 'was
HU
Strong
slow.
In one way or another we managed to
gain a fair march between storms during
leach twenty-four hours. In an occasional
spell of stillness mirages spread screens
of fantasy out for our entertainment.
Curious cliffs, odd shaped mountains and
inverted ice walls were displayed in at-)
tractive colors. Discoveries were made
often, but with clearer horizon the decep
tion was detected.
On April 3 the barometer remained
steady and the thermometer sank. The
weather became settled aud clear. The
pack became a more permanent glitter
of color and joy. At nöon there was now
a dazzling light, while the sun at mid
night sank for but a few moments under
a persistent northerly haze, leaving the
frosted blues bathed in noonday splendor.
In those days we made long marches.
The ice steadily improved. Field* be- (
came larger aud thicker, the pressure,
lines less frequent and less troublesome,
Nothing changed materially; the horizon
moved, our footing was seemingly a solid
crust of earth, but it shifted eastward;
all was in motion. Often we were too
tired to build snow bouses, and in sheer
exhaustion we bivouacked in the lee of
Here the overworked body
hummocks,
called for sleep, but the mind refused to
close the eye.
la a Lifeless World.
There vu a weird attraction in the
anomal/ of oar Boxroandiaj» wiüch
t aroused the spirits. We bad passed be
yond the range of all life. For many
data we had not seen a suggestion of
animated nature. There were no longer
footprints to indicate o(hcr life, no breath
spouts escaped from the frosted bosom of
the sea.
Kvon the sea algae of the surface
waters were no longer detected. We were
all alone—all alone in a lifeless world.
Wo had come to this mental blank in
slow but progressive Stages. As wc sailed
from the barren areas of the fisher folk
along the outposts of civilization the com
plex luxury of the metropolis was lost
and the brain called for food.
Beyond, in the half savage wilderness
of Danish Cireeoland, there was the dawn
of a new life of primitive delight. Still
further along, in the Ultima Thule of the
aborigines, the sun rose over the days of
prehistoric Joy*. Advancing beyond the
haunts of mau, we reached the noonday
splendor of thought in times before man's
creation.
Now, as wc pushed beyond the habitat
of all creatures—ever onward—into the
sterile wastes, the sun sets. Beyond was
night and hopelessness. With eager eyes
scinched the dusky plains of frost, but
there was no speck ot life to grace the
\N »
purple run of death,
lu this uiid-polar basin the Ice does uot
It is
readily escape and disentangle,
probably in motion at all times of the
ud in the readjustment of the fields
year, u
tullowiu^ motion and expansion tbcrc are
open spaces of water, and these during
most mouths are quickly sheeted with
new ice.
Mea.urtnsc the Icc.
Jn these troubled areas we were given
frequent opportunities to measure ice
thickness, aud from our observations we
to the conclusion that the ice
have come
during one year does not freeze to a depth
of more than ten feet. But much of the
ice of the central pack reached a depth of
from tweny to tw-enty-five feet, and occa
sionally we crosse^ fields fifty feet thick.
invariably showed the signs of
of surface upbuilding.
f rom below.
increase in size after that is probably
j n jbe main the result of addition to the
These
many years
It is very difficult to surmise the amount
of submerged freezing after the first year,
but the very uniform thickness of the Ant
arctic sea icc leads to the suggestion (hat
a limit is reached in the second year,
when the Ice, with its cover of snow, is so
thick that very little is added afterward
superstructure. Frequent falls of snow,
combined witb the alternate melting ami
freezing of summer and a process similar
to the upbuilding of glacial ice, arc mainly
responsible for the growth in thickness.
The very heavy, undulating fields which
give character to the mid-polar ice and
escape along the east and west coasts <J
Greenland are therefore mostly aug
mented from the surface. ' j
Jük' mi Math Isntslmeat.

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