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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, February 14, 1913, Image 13

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PEOPLE'S COLUMN
\
V I
PLEA FOR SEW ELECTION DIS
TRICT.
but you got off a bad ono in Satur
day's JOURNAL In reference to a
new voting place at Bear in the Tenth I
district. You have either been rals-i
led In your Information or show a
woeful state of small peanut politics. !
The conditions in New Castle Hun
dred, to the best of my knowledge, do
not exist in any other thickly-settled
section of the county It would have
To the Editor of THE EVENING
JOURNAL.
Sir;—I enjoy reading your editor
ials, which are usually fair-minded,
In? places are all In New Castle and
voters living in the lower end of the
district have nine or ten miles to go
to register and vote at the primary
election. I have to drive five miles,
If there were a voting place at Bear
I should have only two miles How
some voters In Wilmington would
kick if they were compelled to go
even as far as Market street to vote,
which i 8 a short distance to what
some voters in our district have to
go./ The Ninth district (White Clav
Creek Hundred) has a voting place In
the eastern, western and middle dis
tricts, convenant to all voters. In
Other hundreds the same rule is loi
lowed, except New Castle Hundred,
which is denied the same courtesy
through small peanut politics, which
comes of electing partisan noiiticians
who work for self first, party next
and the country gets what is left.
Your only claim why this bill
should not be passed Is it would make
a Democratic district. The only
thing the Democrats would, or could
get would be inspector of election,
As the Tenth district usually goes
Democratlc It would be of no special
benefit to that party You will find
the voting place is demanded by Re
publicans us well as Democrats. At
the last election several Republicans
cut .-. candidate on their ticket be
cause ho had opposed the new voting
place.
Please Investigate this more care
fully and see if you cannot be fair
minded enough to drop such small
politics, and use your Influence to
accommodate quite a community or
farmers God know,, the farmer gels
the small end at all times.
Yours : pec.fj.Hy
Christiana. Del.. Fob. 10. m3.
A SIMPLE REQUEST.
.
T ° rcTr-nvAT ' ° f THE EVENINQ
JOI R.NAL.
s ir:—°u r citizens should keep dis
thictly in mud exactly what 1.3 asked
of the Legislature In requesting the
passage oi the enabling act now be
fore them, which If adopted would
rive Wilmington opportunity to have
v. new charter.
1 ho adoption of the enabling act
will not of itself change the gov
answered years ago, when the county
wa 8 sparsely settled. I have heard
old inhabitant» tell how far they had
to travel to vote. But as the popu
latlon increased, new voting places
I felt iblished to accommodate
them. In this district the four vot
PMMÜ
■ I
it
4 Mountain of Desirable Bargains in This
L
u
YNTIC UMOVAL SALE.!
Ef
* .
5 JL

«i:
J&.
Fach Saturday sees us one week nearer the time for moving. Each weeks sees
■tiiierjis smaller Each week also sees greater reductions in prices.
Tomorrow, the mercury in our price thermometer reaches the lowest point of the entire winter; this indi
calcs thaï it is (he proper time for YOU to take advantage of the hundreds and hundreds of specials in evidence
throughout the store.
(he stocks getting lower and
tomorrow. Many of the following items w ere never adv ertised before and never will be advertised again at these
figures, as the prices are so low that the merchandise will be all gone by Saturday night*
Notice, the size of the reductions—see, they are from 40 to 60 per cent lens than regular, which makes them
positively lower than cost to manufacture.
SHOP HERE TOMORROW—GET SOME OF THESE SPECIALS AT LESS THAN COOT. FIT OUT THE
ENTIRE FAMILY AND SAVE MONEY.
SMSOi
*

Every time we advertise a number of specials they are invariably sold out the next day—so don't writ—come in
:
srsc
—HERE ARE A FEW OF THi SPECIAL BARGAINS
i
±
il
SHOES.
Little Boys' $! 50 '«n calf
Shoes. Solid lea h-i . . . $1-15
Boys $1.75 Shoes Tan end
calf. High top.SI .13
MEN'S FURNISHINGS.
Men's 50c Black Sateen !| Lett's Wool Gloves
Shirts.,'{8c Men's 50c leather Gaunflet
Men's 50c Work Shirts, blue GIovpx imcH 9 A<.
chatnbray; black and white. Melt's 75c i.Jher^ove.! ! £
Men'sSOc ßiue Chambray Shirts $10 ° Buck s kin Gloves, 60c pair
with two collars.35c $1-25 Buckskin Mitts; extra
Men's Blue cloth top Shirts. 38c heavy.75c a pair
Men's $1.25 Blue Flcnnel $100 Kid Gloves, lined and un
Shirts.69c lined .69c a pair
Men's 39c Shirts, with and with-; $• 25 Hanover horse hide
out collars.21c ■ Gauntlet Gloves; lined and
Men's 50c Flannelette Night unlined
Shirts
Men s 50c Fleeced Shirts and
Drawers..
Men's 50c ribbed Shirts and
Drawers
Men's 75c Lambsdown Shirts
and Drawers
Men's 50c wool process Shirts
and Drawers
Men's 50c double breasted
fleeced Shirts
Men's $1.00 *ed and gray flannel
Shirts and Drawers
Men's $1.50 red and gray flannel
double breasted Shirts... .85c
Men's 50c Percale Shirts, with
collars
Men's 50c white pleated Shirts,
cuffs attached.35c
Men's 65c Percale Shirts, cuffs
attached
Men's $1.50 pure red flannel
Shirts and Drawers.$1.00
GLOVES.
MEN'S and BOV S' CLOTHING

HOSIERY.
Men's Hose, all colors, 4c a pair
Men's heavy cotton Hose, 7c pr.
Men's 12 l-2c Hose, plain and
fancy colors
Women's Hose, black and tan, 4c
Women's heavy fleeced Hose. 8c
Children's 12 l-2c Hose, coarse
and fine rib
Infants' 10: Hose, fine rib. black
5c pair
NIGHT GOWNS.
Children's Flannelette Night
Gowns
Misses' Flannelette Night
Gowns
Women's 50c Muslin Night
Gowns..
Women's 50c Chemise; extra
sizes
Children's Muslin Night
Gowns
BOOTS AND RUBBERS.
Men's $3.00 Gum Boots.. J2J25
Men's $3.50 three-quarter Gum
Boots
Boys' Gum Boots, sizes II tQ
$1-65
Boys' Gum Boots; sizes 3 to
.$2.00
Boys' three-quarter Gum Boots;
sizes It to 2
Boys' three-quarter Gum Boots;
sizes 3 to 6
Men's Goodyetr Glove Gum
Boots
Men's Goodyear Glove three
quarter Gum Boots... .$3.75
Men's $6.50 Goodyear Glove
hip Boots.■
Men's Buckle Arctics
Men's $1.00 Wool lined Alas
Mcn's $1 50
Shoes .
strong work
.. . $1.15 pair
Men s $2.00 Shoes; gun metal
calf; button and lace,
Canvas Gloves
5c pair j Boys Bloomer Pan s, blue
and striped cloth
Boys Corduroy Bloomers. .35c
Boys' 75c Blue Serge Bloomer
Pants
Boys' $2.50 Suits; sizes 8 to
$1.48
Boys' Overcoats, sizes 8 to
$2.25
Men's Suits, plain and fancy
stripes.
Men's $12 Worsted and Blue
Serge Suits
Men's $3.50 to $4.00 fine Wor
sted Pants ....
Men's $2.90 Pants.
Men's $1.50 Corduroy Pants, SI
Men's $3.50 Rubberized Rain
Coats
Men's Single Coats.$1.25
Men's single Vests.25c
19c
Heavy canvas Gloves, knitted
i;*c
wr'sts
7c
$2.75
28c
20c
9c
$1.50 pair
Men's $2.50 and $3 00 Shoes;
solid leather, tan calf.
50c
2
33c
17
$1.75 pair
Men's $2.50 high top Shoes:
tan and black;
6
29c
9c
17
two buck
.$1.73
$1.75
les
white and tan
.$2.50
19c
Men's $3.50 and $4.00 Shoes;
high top, black and tan, $240
Men's $2.00 warm lined
$1.35
lined
$2.35
OVERALLS AND JUMPERS.
50c Blue Overalls and Jump
$5.00
FOR THE BABY.
39c long Dresses, trimmed with
embroidery
50c short Nainsook Dresses,
with embroidered yokes, ,29c
75c short and long Nainsook
Dresses, trimmed with lace
and embroidery yoke and
bottom
$1.50 Coats, short and long;
made of fine pique, trimmed
with lace
75c Bonnets, silk and bear
skin
39c long Petticoats, made of
bleached daisy cloth
Children's $1.00 Dresses;
sizes 8 to 14, at
Children's 39c Gingham
Aprons; sizes 8 to 14, at.. .19c
Women's Calico Wrappers,
sizes 32 to 34.38c each
Women's three-quarter length
Coats. Value $3 98. now $2.25
39c white wool Leggings.
19c pair
$3.00
33c
ers
Shoes .....
Women's $1.25 warm
Shoes; lace and button..85c
Women's $2.00 Shoes;
metal;
colt .
Women's $2.00 and $2.50 Shoes;
coitsktn and gun metal calf;
sizes 2 1-2 to 5
Women's $2.00 Russet Shoes:
lace and button
Baby Shoes, black, tan and
white
Children s $1.00 lace and button
Shoes; gun metal calf and
patent colt
Misses' $1.25 Shoes. Black
and tan calf. Button and Wu
cher .
Men's $1.25 Romeos, ,85c pair
Men's 75c leather and velvet
Slippers. 39c a pair
Women's leather and cloth
Slippers.
Men's 65c Canvas Leg
.35c a pair
$2.50
$1.25
50c Blue Stiiped Overalls and
Jumpers
White Overalls & Jumpers. 25c
$1.00 Railroad Overalls and
Jumpers
21c
I
85c
29c
■Tic
gun
calf and patent
.$1.45
$1.75
SUSPENDERS.
15c Men's Suspenders..
25c Men's Suspenders.12c
50c Men's Suspenders.17c
$1.69
85c
33c
58c
7c
75c
kas
33c
SILK NECKWEAR.
25c silk knitted four-in-hand
Men's Storm Rubbers.45c
Men's $1 roil edge Rubbers. 65c
Women's Storm Rubbers... .35c
Misses' Storm Rubbers
Children's Storm Rubbers. .35c
Children's Gum Boots... .$1.00
Men's and Women's 25c Over
Gaiters ....
Men's $2.50 4-buckle Arctics;
roll edge .
Men's $2.50 Felt Boots; one
buckle.
Men's $3.00 Felt Boots;
buckle .
Women's and Misses' Rubber
Boots .$1.25 a pair
Children's and Misses' black
Jersey Leggins .25c
:19c
$ 1.00
WOMEN'S FURNISHINGS
50c long Corsets
50c black and white Fascina
tors
50c and ' 75c Leather Hand
29c and 38c
Women's $2.50 Skirts, black
and blue serge.$1.69
25c Belts, fancy and silk elas
tic, all colors .15c
$2.00 Fur Neck Collars.69o
$1.50 Lace Curtains at....87c
Women's 25c ribbed Pants. .17c
Women's 50c white fleeced Vests
and Pants .
Women's $1.00 gray and red
flannel Underwear.68c
SWEATERS.
$1.00 Gray Sweater Coats with
pockets
Boys' 50c Gray Sweater
Coats
48c
Ties
9c
.35c
$1.45
50c silk four-in-hand Ties, 19c
15c silk bow Ties
39c
89c
35c
39c
7c
38c
15c
39c
25c
LONG PETTICOATS.
Women's long Skirts, made of
good muslin with embroidery
or lace ruffle
Women's $1.25 long Skirts,
made of fine cambric, flounce
trimmed with 18-in. embroid
ery and ribbon beading. .75c
Women's 75c Black Sateen
Petticoats with embroidery
ruffle .■
Bags
plain
$1.50 Sweater Coats,
white, gray and tan.
Men 's $ 1.25 Black Cardigan
Jackets, double breasted, 75c
Men's $1 50 Cardigan Worsted
Jackets.-H
Men's $2.00 All-wool Cardigan
Jackets
Bovs' $1.25 Red and Gray Wor
sted Sweater Coats; sizes 30.,
32 and 34 ...» JH
.10c
1 Be
6V
75c
75c
$1.75
69c
38c
85c oair
S1.75
two
$ 2.00
33c
. S1.00
$1.25
35c
38c
.39c
.38c
.75c ;
ginA.
-, Q. mu-5 FEIN
Odd Fellows
Building
3rd & King Sts.

ernment of any town or city. It »!m
ply asks that the people be give, the
liberty to adopt the pure commission
form of government If a majority de- I
sire it. Can it be that those whom
the people have elected to office, will
deny those who have elected them
the liberty to express their desires?
As 1° I be enabling act before the
Legislature. It is most conservative,
u u more conservative than the New I
J cr B «y >» w . because It has eliminated |
the reca11 - 11 can not be rejected
on the «rounds of being untried or I
nov *>- Wc see what the 8ame laws i
are doing In hundreds of other cities.
Everybody knows that they will I
brtn * Wilmington, and the towns that j
should adopt the law, more efficient
The only true reason!
If the enabling law is not passed
at this session of the Legislature, the
people will not be discouraged Its
defeat will but Increase their zeal. 1
I am told by some who are in a
position to know that the enabling
act cannot pass in this Legislature,
In reply I would say that the people
will not be discouraged by Its defeat.
If It is no passed at this session, the
only result will he that the zeal of
those who stand for the inherent
rights of the people will he increased.
The great masses of the people do
not care who holds ce. Their su
prerae wish is that those whom they
elect to office serve their desires, and
serve faithfully. As a rule a man is
kept in office as long as the majority
of people have confidence that he is
serving the highest interests of the
people. A controlling minority shifts
P ar,y t0 Party in the effort to
better government. Public sentiment
bas changed, and Is changing. It be
comes necessary to elect people to
office who represent the newer ideas
°f progress and of public good. If
the present officers will represent the
heat In th public mind, then they are
the best men to re-elect, hut if they
refuse to respond to public demands,
18 inevitable that ethers take their
Places. If the enabling act Is not
passed, at least this »'ill be accom
pHshed. the public will know who are
' n favor of the liberty of the people
and who are desirous o. bolding them
* n subjugation. We therefore appeal
to the people to watch how their rep
resentallvea vote on the question, and
ascertain who are their true friends.
This, ray reader, is your moral duty
to your State.
GEORGE HENRY DOLE.
WUmlngton. DeL_Feb. 11. 1913.
FIGURES WERE MIXED.
JOURNmZ ° f EVENINO
Slr: — ln a letter to you printed ini
Wednesday^ EVENING JOURNAL, by
tome inadvcutenco. "however did
they do It?" "they mixed those fig
urea up." in the tabulation of eensus.be
figures of the four nearby cities
the race for years for growth and
population.
I am very sorry to have to make
this correction and that Wilmington
has to make acknowledgement of
falling behind, but the printed ligures
RO'ernment.
f ? r P a88in 8 m tbe enabling act Is
those in office desire to with
hold from the people their Inherent
of liberty.
for Wilmington belong to Reading,
those for Trenton to Wilmington and
those for Reading to Trenton,
The correct figures of census are:
{Census of Wilmington:
Census of Reading
1880 1890 1900 1910
l_ 43.278_ 68,661 78,961 96,071
Census of Camden :
1880 1890
41,669 63,018 76,936 94,508
Showing that in the last ten years
the census gain was:
Wilmington.10 903
Trenton ..
Reading .
Camden .
1880 1890 1900 1910
42.478 61,431 76.508 87,411
Census of Trenton:
1880 1890 1900 1910
29,910 67,458 73,307 96.815
1900 1910
Gain. Per Cent.
1294
.23.508 32.06
.17,010 2152
.18,603 24.49
It is with much regret that, I have
to call attention to
that show' that we have
ground, but it only emphasises the
need of strongest and best effort to
advance Wilmington. Can any 1m
provement or betterment do so much
to advance Wilmington by a rapid
stride as the development of the
Delaware River Deep Water Front?
Very respectfully, for Wilmington
upou-Delaware.
GEORGE CHANDLERSON.
fRIIKFR Tfl HUNT
VHUlOtn lu ii*m t
Port of Baltimore, has collected in the
last ten days $7500 from owners of
motor boats and oilier small crafts
in the Chesapeake Buy district,
The department of Commerce and
Lfl, OI . is determined to enfore the
navigation laws and ha* every «mull
j, oa t equipped with the régula emtln
Znt as .MClfled In the navigatlon
g®" 1 end the Governor has
ordered the cruiser Tarragon, under
com mand of Cantaln Drvden tn ttm
Delaware Bay to look un violators
of the ffiw Molators
w ... •• v i i n\l
g 0 ecial tô THF FVFvivr mroVAi
SMYRNA Del F«h is .77
e ,. u , ivP meeting of the Kent rn.intv
Woman's ChrUtlan TcfnueZnce T,
j on wl] | h ,,i rt jn p .. ..
! church at ClaVton tomorrow
! An cxeeutU^ meetm/ of the state
ft" "become of ÄT Stato'w "c
i T ' U - Dresldont. Mrs. Emma E. Caull.
COLONIAL ENTERTAINMENT
i "A Colonial entertainment'' under
the auspice, of the Aid Society
; Christiana Presbyterian church'will
given at the home of Mrs Marv
in'IC. Webber. Christiana on' 'next
Thursday evening Ice cream cake
and candy tor a,*e A pieas ng nro
.gram of music, rending and tableaux
I of the olden times has been arranged
1 ____*
lost
FOR LAW VIOLATORS
Collector of Customs Stone, of the
for violation of the navigation laws
Rend THE EVENING JOURNAL.
BOOSTING THE
ASSESSMENT
The member» of the Levy Court are
going over the county assessment.
There Is a probability that by the
manner In which the members are
enabled to ranch a proper assessment^.
that the assessment valuation of NN11
rolngton will be increased about Î10,
000 over that of former years. The
rural member» are also raising the
assessment in their districts. The
memhcis of the court will he busy all
of the jponth of February.
_ . „ , , .
Fair Grounds have placed windows
in the southern side of the grand
stand and the Interior of the exhlbl
tion space under the stand is now
well lighted. The spates used last
summer were dark but the Improve
ments allow plenty of light. Car
IMPROVING FAIR GROUNDS.
Workmen at the Delaware Slate
penters have also completed the eree
tlon of the cattle stalls, about ono
hundred In all. and the work on the
new stables Is progressing rapidly.
The directors of the holding com
.
I
j
i
Mrs.Smith or Brown thus reason, in a certain town, that Gold Dust
I
The Gold Dust Twins'
Philosophy ^
L
•srrrM
—r
7
OES it occur to you, my friends, that woman's labor never
ends:—that is, if she's inclined to be a trifle stubborn
constantly. Some housewives glory in the thought that
battles won must be re-fought.
D
This jingle is for those who try to smile
at toil and reason ''Why;" who will not
let the household cares crush down life's
First Aid
to The Housewife
other glad affairs. You'll find, where
helps to minimize the number of back-aches and sighs.
The Gold Dust Twins forever toil, with dirt and trouble as a foil.
They start each morning, at the top, and only after night-fall stop.
r-;—. ' .-n-r— Theirs is to DO if NOT to DIE-—'
Opportunity u Knocking at Your Door Theirsis to never question'Vhy?"
_ # 3 * 4 - #■ ^ kitchen tasks their talents
shine; the floors they polish up
In are fine; in fact, no matter where
iar JA they go they leave a spotless trail;
«LfiSSa and so, like sunshine, when the
sky is grey they help to drive the
clouds away.
Each grain of Gold Dust also
shares in cleaning up the house
hold wares: each mop it touches
seals a bond, to make a mop a fairy wand; each brush or cloth bolds
regal sway in driving dirt's dull care away.
DJU
Ù<rtd JuniA/o
;
SGLLISti vorn MKKY'IUKH
What have you to sell? *
♦ Almost every ore is a salesman •
« 0 f Bome kind. •
* Th „ B knied mechanic, the lab- •
• orer. the journeyman, the car- *
. p< , nter w maaon> tUe household •
,. XPClltlve .
, ,, .
* aUl l Ik® Juvenile worker all have
• their services to sell, and all aro •
« desirous of receiving full rerau- •

• noration for their work.
Finding the most advantageous •
• market for labor means getting •
• the best job that is to bo had. *
1 • For n directory of opportunl- •
: • ties, a list of available Jobe, use •
„ , h Waut ro i umnH ,
j ,
i *
*«»••**•••
_____
;
' pany have planned to make numerous
I*
1 „(her changes and when the season
tion of the country.
opens thi R summer the park will be
a» well equipped as any In this sec
22m3 LANCASTER AVE.
For Sale
Wilmington, Delaware
LOT 75X264 feet.
Ten Rooms. Path. Pnntry, Cemented Cellar. Large Closets, Elec
tric Lights, Modern Plumbing, Hot Water Heat, lieauilful Shade and
Lawn, Brick Qarag« or Stable.
EVERYTHING IN THOROUGH REPAIR,
All the advantages of a country home,
from Fourth and Market Streets.
Only fifteen minutes
Henry J. Bailey
In Cure of Hltles A Jones Company.
Best Granulated Sugar, 41c lb
11 c lb
Very Best Lard
Dunlap's Best Flour, . . 36 c bag
|
Equally good for bread or pastry. Gem Flour, 34c bag. Cham
pion Flour, 36c bag.
10 EXTRA STAMPS EREE
With any nf the following:
1 pkg 4 . Quaker Puffed Rice, 15e
1 pkg. Quaker or Mother's Oats,
5 EXTRA STAMPS FREE
WUh any of the following:
1 lb. Best Pearl Barley ...,6a.
1 lb. Best White Beans, 6c or 7o
1 lb. Dried Lima Beans ....8c.
1 pkg. Hecker'a Now Farina, 8o
1 bot. Pure Salad OIL.6c. 16c.
1 bot Plain or Stuffed Olives.
10c.
1 pkg. Threaded Codfish, 6o or
8c
I brick best Codfish
10c.
1 lb. New Evaporated Apricots,
16c.
1 lb. Afmore's Mince Meat, 10c.
1 lb. Dunlap's Mince Meat, 13c.
1 pkg. New Wheat Cereal..12c
1 can Early June Peas, 12c, 14c,
ice
1 lb California Prunes, 8o. 10c
.180
12c,
Brazil Cream Nuts, Special 10c lb
Baker's Premium Chocolate, 8c
cake,
19c can Champion Cocoa, 16c
can
German Sweet Chocolate, 8
cakes, 10c. .
Fresh Baked üneeda Biscuit, 4o
pkg,
Baronet Butter Thins, 8c pkg.
Large Sise Karo Syrup, 10c nan
Pure Baking Molasses, lOo, 13c
I
|
!
can
California Asparagus, 18c. 26o
can.
Fancy Asparagus Tips, 88o can
Garden Grown Spinach, lie can
Meddo Farm Print Butter, 42c lb
}
j
j
;
1
Fresh dally Champion Prints and BIuo Ribbon Prints also at
special low price«.
1
Fresh Baked Raisin Cake, 15c lb
Plenty of fruit and plenty of goodness.
Plain Pound Cake. 16c.
Marble Cake. 16c Da
'
Swift's Picnic Shoulders, 12c lb
Sweet, juicy Picnic Shoulders in all sizes from 6 lb« upward.
Dunlap's Best Salmon, 17c Can
Choice Alaska Salmon, 10c can
Medium Red Salmon. 16c can
Hapgood's Best Salmon, 22c can
Large Fat Mackerel, 10c. 12c
each
Medium Size Mackerel. 6e or So
each.
Broiled Soused Mackerel, IBo
can.
Geo. M. Dunlap Co.

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