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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, July 29, 1913, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042354/1913-07-29/ed-1/seq-10/

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SOMERS' TAX
ASSESSMENT
EXPLAINED
Dm tors of the Chamber of Commerça
went n record ve- eid „iterm.I,
fsVorma n scientific tax sysiei# tor VVil
m I ml ton when they adopted resolut mm,
... m thp R.vn.i ôf Kevi-.
bn nml th A , uti ls to eteiciae tué pmvU
aim,! iifbiii », v the li-r i euibiatiire to
tinie such an -s.i.ent ' Ita
Chamber of Commerce Will Get
Idea of Purdy rlan Betöre
Recommencing Change
• FIX $350 AS FOUI
VALUE UE UTÏ FLOT
r.«.dution was adonuu .«er .Walter ...
ijacen, and Walt« t\ I ..»1.« ., relue
* k the N.imi-' -i sum eins
xpliiinVd in minute
.rkings ol tin' svsteni.
The explanation was made m the
i ». » I uimnhMi \i.,» ..I
SuvêÎTlhesUi:«^ oi ^CoundJ i't.ite and
present. At
aïd itt la vol* any
vint New
x' i i.. !.. ,.i,.ro ti,, I'nnlv
' ' ' „u.pi-ty will u
' Mm...''who will Mink.- the
.1,,si ih Marvel, t.e„rue W .
I) („rutuen, o i I'nrdv
v 1) Wmin v.i.n \t »1 1 {• .„muntcfl
. ui.mmitt,. VlM-v Will réunit lit il
t .,«*) i it r
r 1 f ,| ' '
' j understood
. . ..' |,v :1
i l , î i-j. l' to ' tiv the as
the plot of ground
rmirit v in
i, s, r .,il af r
informml that the nrlt^s for thei
' l#-n t
i t vlrNMWMÎhWr.':
a^nrHinV *he Somers svstenJ
According to the Homer» a>»i 01
1 on* wfcdLided loTe
-ciuai i
searing property had
detail the
Councilman Stover
» eie
thmigh the directors
•**teui. it was derided
to
system of
looked into.
tup
me
fspark», C.
a
nu
the Somers system
the men
lex experts,
sessroent value* on
desired for the new
, nicipal building.
1 ein;;
la
d
rceov«!
show the members present
> at-" a ' proper vnluajion ol
led to î
i arrive
[HOC
how i
nî.mnat vahroîdé In Dm block at'
TentHod Market sDeots whwe the
.■■•Pont î uiMine utiiud« /rontliic on
M.?ke afreet * The unll foot In this
i>ineu wHK initni, «s renrerioiitiiia 100'
ner cen^ aid woUh »I SOfi Dv con
tinned deliitln« and agreements the.
nronortlonate value of unff feet In
surrounding blocks was determined
ThuT'on Marki tslree'l^etw^een Ninth
and Tenth the proportion was 90
pee cent on M«rkTbe"wcen Kiev-'
enth and Twelfth was 50 per rent,!
King bf-tv.oon Ninth and Tenth
was 16 per cent, and o n King bej
en an exen t was
- n
per cent.
The proportion on Eleventh strep'
between King and French was placed
at S per cent. Allowing for the. 1th
to have frontage on two streets and
to be 239 feet deep the unit fool value
fixed "al MBO th Thl's 0 cJr n responda n neTi
ly to the lower estimai. | P placed on
Hie ornnertles tiv the real estate'*'^
dealers
" In re ni v to a niieslion as to the
inferences between the Purdy and
Mie Somers' system Mr Sweeting
krld the Somers' ay'iilem was a avs"
fern of asaesslng while the Purdy ays
tern was one of recording. The speak
4rs showed (hat the strong point I"
•fiielr eys.em Is that the value of
:nnit foot In each section of the c'ty I
Is appraised bv the people living In !
- «Rial community at « public ni.H-n :
5nd that with this unit value deto-
JBlned'It was a quest'on only of niHt'l- ;
«metical routine to tlx the assesoed
Value of any given property In tho
«eUhborhood. ;
'.The Somers people contend also;
^that the!) method of fixing (he values
,^0l corner lots ts also much more com-[
.$letr than that employed hy the Pur
the Somer*
' <

lid lie flginerl the ox
mv of the Mnuufnctur
Mr. K
>tln,
ft a* in ii
\pprnual t ruupany, by whom he is
could do their part of their
t by January I," Mil4. nnd that
rttie t » a! » t would i.e iron JflJ.WH to
Mr *nid he would hair ehaige
1.1 ml value* while a
a
k
lV w O.
HI
.'miiidinü e\| < it would pae* on the build
.$£ r '
j* claimed for
tale
. nl* Hut mi e\ery eity where
t. in h.i. 1» ii applied certain ml
have retuhsd the
i n reduction in the tax
*ilii,» bv th, equalization
and m part by be di-eovery «I hitherto,
d.realty. In Houston, loxcs,
jS 1 '» » ■ i"i j ul ■ t'uni- in back lix.
n hi* pre.ioiio ille>,»«l exemption was
followed m
■ kjppiyui" tlie Sumer* oyslcni account for
tin
-■
»>
t »
feieret he
Jtrici of II"
m I,
Kit
-
fli
method*
I. Ihe
'ahery foot of Und. so it is impaissihle
jj» mi»« any property.
»• In closing hi* remarks, Mr. Sweeting
«Jnid the Somera'system had been adopt -
*fc i in tldrter'ii cities, and that ninety per
•ç'iit. of the citizens of (hose cities had
. endorsed the system.
i In Des Moines a large amount of
• tli'der assessed property was found, in
|p41 $8.415,000, nnd the eil > is pieparing
»)> make a considcrnhle cut in tin- tax
Kue, Oiit of nine bundled mel -ixln'ii
-Sh-sessmcnt* -seven hundred and two
eitere increased, two hundred am! (ne te
On oed and nine were unchanged. Augusta
v Wduoed it« basis of assessment from *0
hjer cent, to 60 2-3 per reut. Houston re
Arced its rate from $1,70 to $1.33, and
xRnl veston from $1.62 to $1.10, and other
'Sties made similar rend just ment.
\TALK OF TROLLEY EXTENSION.
V As a result of the request made
-V>' Krefi K. Felt, of the Concord
'Heights Development Co., tor an ex
tension of trolley service. Thomas W.
.«W'Uson. vloe-presldent of (ho Wll
■Jjiington and Bhlla^ Traction Com
pany; William A. Helndlc, the man
^jkger. and Fred K. F'elt. yestTday
afternoon visited the Ninth ward and
ent over the street railway sllua
on there. Xo definite action was
^aken by the railway officials.
«
%
FORT DUPONT BASEBALL.
.(Spc-cinl io THE. EVENING JOURNAL.
'«J'FLAAV4|<I CITY. Del July 29.—
T» Following ir the Mandiuff of thr Artil
Ç-ty U-«gup of the Delaware:
W. L. IVt.
13 4
•JUk'ltli Conipi.uy
VRli Company
> 41t h Company
"W'h Company
Company
■tv
ii
' 2 .
. in 6 .62
. . . in n 52«
..
>12th Company . 2 16 111
•'iXext games—July 20, U2fh Company
»* 139th Company at Fort DuMont;
July 31. 4th Company is 45th Com
j»4tiy at Fort Molt . August 1, Bl»t. Com
psny va. 112th Company at. Fort Du
»l'ont; Anglist 4. 36th Company vs 45th
"feonajauy at Fort DuPont.
IPR1NC1PAL
AND TEACHER
ASSIGNMENTS
OF THF NEW SCHOOL
UF int nt w atilUUL^
I
nr. Thomas 0. Cooper, chairman of
the teachers' committee of the Board
School Board Makes Some
Changes In Schools for
Next Term
MISS DEVINE IN CHARGE
Pllhllc Kduratlon at a meeting of
* M,ni,c K ' au HIlon ' al a 711 ung
the b(,ard last evening, submitted the
following recommendation relative to
the prlncipnlshlps and teachers of
lhe thirty nubile schools of this city
IT' th,rt> PU "' ßcboola of this city.
Th8 recommendation was adopted
subject to change by the committee:
First, That the following transfers
be made, vli: Mias Saille Devine, from
,hp »rtnclpalshlp of School No. 2 to
tbp Principal ship of School No. 30,
Ml#» Tilho Graham, from the princl
palfthlp of flohool $\o. 20 to the princl
' . **
P u * sb, P of 8p hool No. 2: Mias Joseph
lnp Csborue. from School No. .26 to
School No. 19; Miss Caroline Tadman,
Iron School No. 2 to School No. 30;
vticu \h.Hn WAAiiw, 0 «A,r a
? ******* Wooclmanc>, from Sch ° o1
1*^° *° ® c h°°l N°' 5Âî Misa Elisabeth
'M. Bullock, from School No. 14 to
Srb °ul No. 25. and Miss Sophia James,
,piT om School No 21 to School No 22
Second, That the following assign-1
1 uienls of principals be made, viz:
I Miss Matilda L. Sayers. School No.
1
Miss A. Adelaide Simpers. School
3- ■
Miss Fannie J, Butler. School No. 4.
Miss Annie Magarlty, School No. 5.
•Mrs. Elizabeth W. Pritehett,
School. No. 7 and 8.
Mls « 01ara Mendenhall. School No.
Mlas^Annle J. Black. School No. 10.
MIbb AI1co l J«ckman, School No.
U -
Mia« Amanda L. Medara. School No.
12
Si *rah C. Bye, Schools Nos.
13 ^7.
M ' 88 K" p n M. Ritchie, School No
Ml88 Emma A - Strickland, School
Ho 15.
Hiss Kdwlna B. Kruse. Schools No.
16 a " d »•
Marie C. Loney. Schools 17,
"n* 1 " ,l -
^M*« 8 Mabel I. Caldwell. School *«>•
Miss Ellen Sumworth. School No
Miss Julia R. Jones, School No. 21.
Miss Florence V. Morley, School'
No. 23. *
19
Miss Saille Reid Shaw, School No.
«1.* Mary M. Brady. School No, 25. i
Ml.. Mary M.. Turner. School No. j
t
Third. That the following appoint
««nt» bp made, viz.: Miss Margaret
Kp,, y- Principal, at School No. 20;
M,li8 Ru,b M Taylor, teacher, School
No - ft: M,sp r ' p « ,,p M. Bonham, reach
pr - «ÿ Mtas Florence F. Mink, leach
PfR..School No. 14; Miss Mary Me
!!?" °!j. ,ra( bp ''- srbt ' n! lN - 0 - 17 811,1
th->j'Mh* lprpp ' High School
Miss Kelley who Is promoted to the.
PrtncIpalnWp of school No. 20 has!
f* eb 8 t 1 par, (! Pr fop 8, ' ra ® t,nlp ,lt N '°
1 Miss •'"Hie Dcvlno, who
bas , t>Pe ,7, pr 7 f 7 a , of . ?f 0 ' A ^ cbon •
b, ' No. 30 Rchool.
wb cb bp f >Pened for the flrtt :
t,mc ,n __
—T,. ... !
1 ItnlSIUitA t l.l It UH IS. j
The Christiana Athletic Club at a ,
meeting last nlghi elected these of
- I
.
,
jftcers: James Walsh, president; Jo
seph Mcllin. vice-president; Thomas'
August, secretary; John Smith, treas
urer; Joseph Ackerman. T. Lynch,
J Falters, J. Goldstein and M. Cot
tlngham, directors; Joseph F. Fall- 1
era. sporting writer.
After the meeting Mr. Walsh and
Mr. Meltin gave the members of the j
club a banquet There were speeches i
b V Tames Taylor, former president.
James
whose chair was filled by
Walsh. Mr. Taylor said he was glad
t bp way the club Is going. Mr. Walsh
syoke and a solo was given by Joseph i
Mellln. Malcom McCornttck sang 1
Francis Rtrollman was the pianist.
-
T>, P Want« are the first aid to huai
n $« B advancement. They provida a
summary of tabulated infnrniaticn for
the buying nnd selling public -Adv.
(
(
.
J
1
I
j
'
In Which Class
Are You?
Are you fitted for the positions which pay well and
offer opportunity for advancement? Or must you be con
tent with just a job?
A knowledge of Stenography or Bookkeeping will put
you into the class of trained workers. It will take you
out of the long hours and low pay class. It will enable you
to obtain and hold a good position where "promotion is
sure if work is satisfactory."
Enter our school and you will be trained so that your
work WILL be satisfactory. You will be instructed in the
best systems of Stenography, Bookkeeping, Typewriting,
Penmanship. Etc., by expert teachers. If you do your
part, your success is assured.
OUF CATALOG eontalns information of interest nnd
value (n you. V postal or phone rail nil! bring It to
you. *
I
1
o?i
■>

Institute Building
TO IMPROVE
CITY SCHOOLS
Bids Are Opened For Palnt-|j^„'
Last evening was contract night at
.. „ Kn
the meeting of the Board of Public
Education, bids for hooks, supplies,
painting schools, installing metal ceil-j
Inga and cement work being opened.
the blds bp 'ns submitted to cdmmll
to art
tk. ku/ w mmin.
Thp blds for nl,n an(1 1 8
In g and Kepairing
Institutions
The awards were not made, hotvever,
'
the various schools were as fol
loW8 - *
r h . ùrho _, v n o *190.
Charlea Main, school No. 2. $128,
Andrew P. Mahoney, school No. 2.
*109; No. 3. $107; 9, $333; 10. «141;
11*». *1«3; 15, »265. Way and Max

( well, 2. $90, 3. $153. 9, $281. 10,
$115; H. »100; 15. $524.40. William
'S. Prcttyman, 10, $128; James Kee
nan. 2, $108; 3. $138; 9. »160; 10,
$146; 13. $116; 16. »205. Charles
Blocher, 10. $129.50; 13, $98.25; Wll
: iinm E. Linden, 2, $100; 3, $186; 9.
i $160: 10, $132; 13, $135; 15, $295.
' * _ *
Robert L. \Minley, 2. $135; 3, $237; 9,
$177; 10. »187; 18. »145; 15. $300;
Lynam and Harry, 2. $154; 10. $182;
U3. $156.
« Th« HmirH ronuirort that all bids
1 . . u J ^ / . CPrlif)f . rl
. , 11 1 •» ( n Jot ,. r ,'nt nf *h'p
' ' J _? |hr ' ... * w '...
. . . tt n , , ..j
J h v 1 * b accompanied
y , r t" f ua. ' inr «nnnlvin» metal cell
-, Ph 1 ' h fo . U J''' / 71 .
,nRB at ? < ^ f ' 0,8 NoS ' 4 ' 16 " nrt 26
iwere as f ol ows:
™i n V n f, e o° n T n T -
;4 $37; 16. $96: 25. $180; Charl p * H
«»aine Company. 4. »41.84 ; 1«.
»W4-33, 25. $225, Sheet Meta
Company, 4, $4-; lb, $146;
25 ' $2ft! L , , , .
The b 'd 8 ">r cement work In the
cellar of No. 3 school follow; John
T. Healy $85 and A. S. Reed and
Brother Company $158.
1)1,18 for book8 Hnrt supplies were
received from Ihe following. Wll
.mlngton Office Supply Company and
|E. S. R. Muller and Fon.
dame» la.gue. who was elected $o (111
the unexpired fern» of Samuel II. Bay
"•«». ■ f "'| a " lp N " lth ward, reewtly
elected président was sworn into oflU-e
l.,»t exen.ng. oath was admfni.
lered hv President Ba\n«r,l.
r " l '> 1 '" 1 <; lij " «•» member
fro« the. Eighth ward, wasjm.t present.
although he Imp taken the on.h.
^'«thitecia ^i.mitS
,plan« foi new toilets in schools Nos. ij
(and 11. The»e were approved and bids
will he naked for within a short time.
The report of the city treasurer fol
tows: Current neeoimt, »490.74. and fpe
cinl, flfi.fi02.!W, to which will he added
this morning nboiit $3037.32, making a
total "lIter
- „ -
TO L.Vi ( 111 lit SIMNL.
The laving of the corner stone of
the new M. E. Church at Hlllcrest
.will take place on Sunday afternoon,
The services will be conducted by
n r E. L. Hoffecker. and the Rev.
Thomas Harding, pastor of the
church, and .as many of the Wllmlng
SHORT SUSSEX PEACH CROP.
Special to THE EVENING JOURNAL.
GEORGETOWN, Del, July 29.-
peaches are -.ailing in the local market;
f(lT jaj tb(1 pro nglith Uaskqt, and fowl
can |, p ,j that price. \ drive
ton pastors a* can attend will he
present to assist In the ceremony,
[through th. country reveals the fact!
that there mg lew orchard* in Wntral
Sussex that have mere than n tenth of a
crop and «ouïe hardly that much.
i
May Weed, of No. 1109 Lancaster ave
mu', were married I«»t evening by the
Rev. W..A. Wise at Scott M. K. parson
Inge. They were attended hy Misa Mary
F. Sayles and Leroy K. Thomas.
Instead of enduring the dally tor
ment of weak back, backache, sore
WOLLING WOOD.
William T. Wolfing, of No. 420 1-2!
EGio
t Seventh street, nnd
Mi
OBEY THAT IMPULSE!
kidneys, swollen Joints and rheuma
Hem. obey that impulse to take Foley
Kidney Pills They co-operate .vlth
nature, which accounts for their sne
msa In all kidney and bladder dis
orders. They are healing, stiengfh»
ening and tonic. Obey that Impulse
to-day and give them a chance to help
you. N. B. Danfnrth, Market and
Second streets, W'H„ Del.—Adv.
NEWS NOTES FROM
THE SETTLEMENT
I Increasing Interest Is being shown
I in the playground work at the Peo-,
f ""!!SS"« l .nd*M«"*""'
A number of the young men of the
Settlement met there on Saturday and
levelled the ground for the new ten
nis court, the work on which will
shortly be completed by E. R. Mack.
'After the young men had completed
their work, supper was served them
anfJ R rte , lRhtf „, BOclal tlme en j 0 yed.
I Success Is attending the Junior
baseball club, and the young players
! arp fast becoming experts at the j
are'held The® DleMant^Umes^Ä i
much enjoyed by the lads and their !
'(friend..
1 Miss Marlon Sweelzer who was '
! formerly In charge of the physical
} WO rk' at the Settlement, and who has '
i bef>n " n * a K prt in tbp 8a » p wor k «
Kansap. 1 b at her home ln Philadel
|^ a on her vacation/ She was a
( war mly welcomed ruwat at the Settle
|meht today.
I Miss Sarah MendlnhaU, who has
.„'been assisting with the playground
wor * th)s ye „, entertained.* group of
tbp ,,i a>gr ound children at her home
near Newport today.
Mrs. Anna R. Opdycke, one of the
rPhidunt 1 '. if the S<*tllcinpnt will rp.
C/ ber vacatlon on WednesJ
day. 1
î Mise Alice Wyatt, one of the aaslst- i
i ^ntR. will leav« about August 1. to be*
ii ... o î, f nr « month 1
i | saar P y| p father of Miss Sarah
i Fylp hea( j w orker at Settlement !
| will ' spend the month of August at
.Northfield, Mass.
__ I
nu rR ir E vnv w HFS
,, . *
H i^i t ' ,V | f ''i' 1 ' V,< ia' ,n V J lîSi
SMV RNA, Dei.. July 29. At the
gening service at the ü. A_ M. h .,
>' , * U » rC D i hen ° n S K I î. day ' 't's ReV kr A1 :i
,^ rt P J ,:e P rpacbpd on the *u b J«ict
° ur Cpn 8p ' p n pp - He spoke of the j
wayward tendencies among many of
' he ,1°™? s Wh °T he , , Batr1 ' I
would not heed the warnings of thosa
| older than theraselvw I
I'T- Price called B P pp!al
to the lecture the movement
and ur ged all to heed Its lesaon. ,

h. H. Martin, the speaker at the j
gospel ten( services at Nlntji and
Clayton streets last night delivered
an excellent address on the subject,'
„ Vp Must Be H orn Again. " Mr. Mar
I tin said It was a good thing to know
the romman dment8.
could live a righteous life in Indtvl
du>1 BtrPn g th . ThP r.od of glory he
t t d hflK prt>( j tcted the destruction.
L f thp wor ,V and , he people must
get ready to meet the Lord. In order
„„ wh ^ h thP muBt bP born again
fhat they may bave the fruit of the!
: spirit In their lives and become can
j dWat " for the kingdora of Hw * a -
NECESSITY OF NEW BIRTH.
because none
1
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION GROWS..
tlon continues to grow In membership j
under the presidency of Patrick Mc- j
j Connell, president; The association
jis making elaborate plans for the win- j
It is the intention of tho ;
The Wilmington Athletic Associa- i
wort
ÂdeJhîI'
| Pllllfldelphla shows,
1 Gn last Thursday the association .
jhad the pleasure of entertaining the j
imember« of Chinese ball team. I
(Luncheon was served by Hanna,
;
|
|
RAILROAD MEN!
i
r» 4 » 1 f n fine wRtrh.
kly pay« for It.
or any high-grade work.
No outlay;
HnmIUon our
8 p*'
Own y
$ 1.00
E-purialty
us and Ret on»»
MITCHELL, Jow»l»r,
Ford Buildlug. Tenth ii Market Btreete.
Second Floor. Open Night« Thl« Week.
I
I
Patent Crab Nets
I
:
ilk
U 7 —
v
|
I
j
'}s=CÎ*>
Catches everything in sight.
Folds up like a book.
Price 75c
Also Crab Net=, short and long
handles. 25c and 35c.
David A. Hay Co.,
Marine and Fishing Supplies.
121 Market Street.
4IIIIIIIIIHnill!l!l!lllllllllllllll
Dla
Q
Travel Troubles
/
rs
Note'll
tFORE your next long trip don't fail to have
us give you a letter of Credit or Book of
Travelers' Cheques. You will then be re
lieved of getting checks cashed, writing home for
money or carrym 1 » large sums on your person.
They cost so little that you will not consider it an
expense at all.
If interested call on us for further information
COLUMBIA GkAFONOLAS
Columbia Double-Disc Records I
B
i4
I
A combination that produces a clearness and
naturalness ol tone that is incomparable..
You have only to hear it once to be convinced.
Call at our store—or better—let us send an in
strument and a selection oi records to your home
ior trial. Terms to suit purchaser.
Gr&fonolas S2S-00 to 5500.
Columbia. Double-Disc Record», 65 c to 57-50.
3
I
Wilmington Trust Company
i
1 B
I
I
TENTH AND MARKET STS.
FIFTH AND MARKET STS.
SECOND AND MARKET STS.
Delaware Graphophone Co
610 Market Street.
=
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%
RUNNER OUT ON
SLIDE TO FIRST
Chivlngton Says So, But
Herrman Is Not Quite
!aw promulgated by umpires, under
which they declare out a batter who|
slides Into first base, was upheld by j
President Chivlngton of the American'
Association on the ground that the j
8,We * bp 1ni,,a I sack servos no j
P ur P o«.buttst Of^confusing the urn
P<re. President Chivlngton's state
»ent was made In answer to an In- j
formal protest by Manager Frlel, of i
ft- Pau!, regarding a play made at
^t. Pau * ,he other day when Umpire.
O called out "Dixie" Walker j
* or lading head first into the base.
'There Is no time^gained by sill- j
,n K and ib thp pasp of . flr8t . basP -;
«•« base runner does not have
to do<, * e a 'ouch, the only reason for
8 , slld ® 18 t0 rals *! a <1,,8t tba I w1 !' h ^ e !
Î* P' a *' from ,be umpire, said Mr.,
h'vlngton. _ i
I
COVER RUNNERS'
CINCINNATI, July 29.—Chairman ,
August Herrmann, of the National j
Baieball CommlRslon, In diacnaalon j
the unwritten law of calling a
P'a vft r out who slides into first base,
which was upheld by President
[Thomas Chivlngton, of the American
Association said It was not only pro
posterouB but directly contrary to the
«ruin covering the point.
"A player allowed to reach any base
b >' running, walking, jumping or in any
other manner ns long as he remains
within t) „. j, nM presnilad," said Mr.
Herrmann. "This is laid down in the
ru | M of ., 1P ,j anle tnc j no umpire, presi
,, Pnt 0 f $ i cilfr „ e or „ nv one else has any
rjll , to phlln t)ns ru|f , - ,
-
MACK NOT IN FAVOR OF RULE.
c „ nr , io Mnck M)n ,ething to s«y
yesterday on the ruling of Chivlngton,
- ^ h American Aüocfation. upholding
Mnwri ttan ruling of his Wpirea ill
;
Agreed
CHICAGO, July 29.—An "unwritten
Store Open Wednesday
Until 9 o'clock
Cohen & Finkelstein
We Give Yellow
Tracing Stamps
Economy
Economy
Store
Wilmington's
Department
Day
OUR TENTH
ECONOMY DAY
»
Economy
Economy
Day
Day
Watch For the Yellow Pennants
Tomorrow's Great Bargain Day Slash in Prices Are
MISSES' $1.50 SHOES
FOR ..
Good
75c
25c QUALITY RIBBON
FOR.
Almost all colors;
lection.
Sli/zc
5c
65c MUSLIN
SHEETS FOR..
Nice quality. Size, 72x90,
selection in patent
leather, gun metal and russet;
button and lace.
good se
39c PILLOW CASES
FOR.
Good selection.' Size 50x36.
15c
LADIES' 25c GAUZE LISLE
STOCKINGS
10c
$ 1.00
LADIES' $2 AND
$3 SHOES FOR
Materials are patent colt,
gun metal, russet; button and
lace.
FOR
3 FOR 25c,
High spliced heel and toe;
double garter tops. Colors,
black, white and taq.
50c BOLSTER CASES
19c
FOR
A rare bargain for Wednes
day.
BABIES' 75c SHOES
29c
LADIES' 25c VESTS
FOR..
9c
15c IO WELS
5c
FOR
An excellent bargain. Come
in patent leather, vict kid; but
ton and lace.
FOR
' 3 FOR 25c.
Come in V neck, with lace
front and back.
EACH
Unbleached buck with blue
border.
LADIES' 75c LAWN
KIMONOS FOR ...
Come in fancy materials.
Latest style.
39c
39c AND 50c QUALITY
REMNANTS
12^c
10c
35c DOILIES
FOR
FOB
YARD
Pretty assortment in China
Silk. Colors are black, blue
red, yellow and white,
make nice shirtings.
Nice selection. Linen mate
rial.
LADIES' $3,50
SKIRTS FOR .
Nice quality; the materials
are mostly whipcords and fancy
stripes.
$1.69
Alsu
12 l-2c AND 25c NO
TIONS FOR .
Almost everything useful,
you will find on this table.
lc
12 l-2c QUALITY REM
NANTS AT .
3c
LADIES' 39c CORSET COV
ERS AND DRAWERS ■
YARD
Some lawns, cretonnes and
linings among the lot. A good
bargain.
15c
50o GOLD PLATED 1 A p
BRACELETS FOR ... 191
Good assortment; excellent
quality.
FOR
Come with lace and embroid
ery trimming.
228-230 MarketSt. COHEN & FINKELSTEIN,22S-230 Markets..
TODAY'S BASEBALL CHANCES
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
PHlladelphia at Pittsburgh, rloudy.
Brooklyn at Cincinnati, clear.
Boston at Chicago, clear.
New York at St. Louis, clear, (two
games.)
The Wants are not only a selling
power, but a medium of exchange of
bp SUp, -aSÎ * ,ng
thp r 'P ht people. Adv.
-. - - - ■ "—■■■ ■ »
declaring out a player who slides head or
feet flr-t into first base
"There is h lot to he *aid on both
ei f i es Q f the slide-to-flrat proposition/*
Mark declared, "and it is hard to say
whether the present official ruling which
allows it. ought oV ought not 1«.
elmnged. The biggest thing in its favor
i„ the fact that it undoubtedly prevents
many collisions between the first hnse
mnn and the runner. A baseman may
nm h
throw or ft bounce, flncl unlPfifi tnc run*
RIGHTS.'coming full speed down the path.
slides into the bag. a head-on collision
is inevitable. I hnw; seen a elide pré
vent Bm«Rl»e« that might have had non
ons results innumerable, times, he con-i
eluded.
Asked whether or net he thought the|
slide to first saved time. Mack said he'
thought it did. possibly.a fraction of n
preoud, tfhich in f»o many case» decided
th'o l:f^ of a runner and the malt of a
game. "It la prohablv faater to launch
vour«elf nt Ihe hug when going at full
speed, than it is to cover the same dis
tance on the ground, step hy step," lie
eni«1. "As to the danger of sinking." he
eontinued, "some players tr$- to spike,
tpp baseman everv time thev slide into
„ b n£r hut clean plavers won't s^ike a
man jumping into first base often
enough to warranta change in the
rules The danger of colliding with both
players on their feet is the great one.
it ieema to me," s.aid he who ought to
know.
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Cleveland at New York, threaten
ing, (two games.)
Chicago at Boston, cloudy, (two
games.)
Detroit at Philadelphia, clear, (two
games.)
St. Louis at Washington, clear.
FODDER FOR
FIGHT FANS
By The United Press.
LOS ANGELES, July 29.— Lea^h
Cross Is a 10 to 7 favorite over Matty
Baldwin for their scheduled twenty
round bout here'tonight. Both men
are In excellent condition.
Baldwin Is a veteran of the light
weight division and holds a twenty
round decision over Willie Ritchie,
the present champion. He earned this,
however, before Ritchie was consid
ered among those In the champion
ship class. This Is Cross' first fight
since he knocked out Bud Anderson.
FORT DUPONT 4 BANCROFT 3.
DELAWARE
The soldiers defeated Bancroft of \Vil
minpton by the score of 4 to 3 in one
of the most exciting games at the Fort
this season.
Barrow of the visitors held the sol
diers safe until the fifth inning, when
the soldiers scored their first run. In
the next inning the soldiers tied the
score by well paced hits.
Sentes, Hawkins. Avery and Mahei
Long and Burke
Summary-Left on bases, Bancroft 6,
Fort »«Pont 3; earned runs Fort Du
ront i. hit», off Harrow 5, off Reilly „
m 6 inmng»; »truck out, by Barrow 4.
hy Reilly. 0 in .6 inningR, by Caswell, 0
in 4 innings; bases on balls, off Barrow
1, off Reilly 1; time of game, 1 hr. 30
min.; umpire, Burke.
-
«
; EVENING JOURNAL.
CITY, Del., July 29.—
played a pood game for the soldiers
('unwell, who relieved Reilly, did not al
low a hit and fanned six in four innings.
Marrow allowed five hits. Score by inn
ings J
R.H E.
12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0—3 2 1
Fort DuPont . .. .0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 x—4 5 4
Bancroft, Barrow and
Jones; Fort DuPont, Reilly, Caswell,
Bancroft
Batteries:
MT- CALVARY CLUB OUTING,
On Tuesday morning, August 12,
at 9 o'clock, the steamer City of
Philadelphia, carrying the young
men of the Mt. Calvary Club and
Sunday school, will leave Fourth
street wharf for a day's fun at Wash
ington Park.

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