OCR Interpretation


Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, November 09, 1922, LATE NEWS EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042354/1922-11-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

1
The Evening Journal
23,033
The Weather
Circulation
Yesterday
! -#•'
m
Fair tonight and Friday, slightly
odder tonight, fresh northwest
winds.
Non-Returnable
T
I ATE NEWS EDITION
-A
WILMINGTON. DELAWARE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9. 1922
TWO CENTS.
THIRTY-FIFTH YEAR. NO. 130
18 PAGES
52 REPUBLICANS IN SENATE, 218 IN HOUSE,
CLAIM DUPONT ELECTED FOR SHORT TERM
CHANGE OF FIGURES
GIVES DUPONT LEAD OF
73 FOR SHORT TERM
Discrepancy in Fourth
Ward Returns on
Unofficial Sheet Re
duces Bayard Vote
Considerably and
Overcomes Early Ma
jority of 79
REDUCES LONG
TERM LEAD TO 411
Ohrrk np of the nnofürlal return* |
of Tuesday*« election «how« that
Senator T. Coleman duPont ha« been
•Jected United State* Senator for the
short term from election day to
March 4 next by 73 majority. An
error In entering return* for the
Third district of the Fourth ward In
*he figure* pointed yceterday ha*
been dl*eoTerod that reduce* the
orat, by 156 votes, and reduces *hc
rote for Senator duPont by 8. This
turn« the majnrfty of 75 credited on
nie for Thoma* F. Bayard, Pemo
tfle unofficial figure« to Mr. Bayard
h! tfv &«*««* f«* 1 »he sheet term lnto f
a majority of 73 for Senator dnPont
on the face of the unofficial figure«.
majority In the State for Mr. Bay-1
as
board of canvass at noon began
tabulation of the official Tote.
The change In the Fourth ward
figures also reduces the unofficial
(Continued on Page Sixteen.)
REPUBLICANS TO
FILE CONTESTS
Recount of Vote for Senator
Will Be Asked in Some
Districts
OFFICIAL CANVASS
NOW BEING MADE
Canvassing of the ballots of New
CABtle county was started by Chief
Justice Pennlwell and Judge Rice in
Superior Court at noon today. After
the calling for and depositing of the
certificates of election of the var
ious districts, the court adjourned
until 2.30 o'clock.
At 2.30 o'clock 25 contests had
been filed In various districts of the
county to ascertain the vote for U.'
S. Senator In those districts.
When the court convened, the as
-istant* and bailiff were sworn In
after which Prothonotary Harvey
Hoffecker called in the election cer
tificate«.
Prothonotary Hoffecker Is assist
ed by Joseph H Bartlett. The as
sistants to the Judges, In addition
to Messrs. Hoffecker and Bartlett,
are David M. HUlegas and Alexander
R. Abrahams, Republican clerks;
Edward H. Hobbs and Eugene Hard
psty. Democratic clerks; Reuben
Patterthwalte, Jr., Republican n t
tomey, and Clifford V. Mannering.j
Democratic attorney; Clarence A.
Southerland and Frank L. Speak-1
man will be attorneys for the Re
publicans in contests. Francis de H.
Janvier Is counsel for the Demo
crat
The vote in Kent county Is being
Continued on Page Eight.
FINED ON ASSAFLT CHARGE.
f assault and bat-]
Walter
Taylor was fined $5 and costs,
Judge Hastings this njornlng. Heintz
siirf that he and two others were
lor wa* a member, and that he was
ts t \t
. N
4.50 P. M.
High water.. 2.55 A. M. 3.20 P. M
I*Q"' wa t er , ,11.20 A. M. 11.45 P. M .
- ~ 11 1 = -
LOST.
On a charge
Wallace Heintz,
tery on
assaulted.
TODAY'S TEMPERATURE
At The Evening Journal Office.
12.01 P. M. .54
1.00 P. M..58
8.00 A. M. .49
10.00 A. M. .53
SUN AND Tn»E.
Sun rises
Sun sets
IP'nd of Christiana.
LOST—In Postoffice. Monday afternoon.
No. 8 Waterman Fountain Pen. Re
turn to Evening Journal Office. nov9-lt
(Continued on Page Seventeen.)
Delawareans Should Respond 100 Per Cent, to the Red Cross Roll Call !
g
'

MOTT TALKS
Jersey Prosecutor Will Pre
sent Hall-Mills Case
Early
MEN, 1 WOMAN
MAY BE INDICTED
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J., Nov »
—(United Pres«).—Wilbur A. Mott,
special prosecutor In charge of the
Investigation of the murder of the
Rev. Edward W. Hall and Mrs. Elea
nor R. Mills, met Justice Charles
W. Parker, of the Supreme Court
and Alfred B. Gibbs, foreman of the
Somerset grand Jury it» the Somerset
county court today,
Further delay In arresting the
alleged slayers of the Reverend Ed
ward W. Hall and Mrs. Eleanor
Mllls developed today,
After a conference of prosecutors
and detectives at Somerville today,
special prosecutor Mott stated no
decision had been reached as to
when the grand Jury would meet to
hear the evidenc
would not meet this week and there
would be no arrests this week.
Officials investigating the murder
declare that the Jury will be asked
Continued on rage Sixteen.
but that It.
.
SEE PROSPERITY
IN P. 0. RECEIPTS
Wilmington Office Reports
16.17 Per cent. Increase
During October
«
12 OTHER CITIES
REPORT GAINS
Special to The Evening Journal.
WASHINGTON Nov. 9 —The Wil
mington post office stands well up In
the list of fifty representative cities
In the amount of increase in postal
receipts. It was announced at the
Post Office Department today,
receipts for Wilmington for the
month of October totaled $48.097.69
The
as compared with $41,403.39, an
increase of $6,69'4.30 over the same
month last year, or 16.17 per cent.
In reporting on these fifty repre
sentative offices, the department
said: "A tremendous industrial re
vlval is Indicated In October postal |
receipts In fifty repreeentative in
dustrlal cities. Thirteen cities show-j
ed gains over October, 1921. of morel
than 20 per cent, and four of more
than 30 per cent."
The largest percentage of Increase
t»" 32.95. reported by Topeka. Kan-,
. *«?• Three other cities— Oakland. ]
'Cullfornia. with 32.64; Albany, with
31-57, and Phoenix, Arizona, with,
•' gain* of more than 30per]
06 " 1 '
''iimlngton stands at the head of
aucb " Madison. Wisconsin;
• ou ' h B, " d ' Ind.; Savannah, Ga.;
Jackson, Miss., and Shreveport, La.
r
WARRINGTON LORES JOB.
Patrolman George L. Warrington,
who had been summoned to answer
to charges refused to appear before
lhe Bureau of Police yesterday af
by.'ternoor. and was ordered dismissed,
Warrington, who was reported off;
duty *ick on Hallowe'en night.
«»ughly handled t wo j
J T,en -J Ater arr ^ 8t1 "^ them and bring
lng them to the police station in the ;
(patrol wagon. They were released
Jclpal Court. I
wom\n IMI ni n I
»OMA.N INJURED
Miss Martha Matthews, of Elm i
hura *' w * s e ,1 K h,| V injured by b ®-1
ln« thrown ngninst the wind shield:
when her automobile collided with a |
bus of> the Wllmington-Mnrshallton j
line, operated by Collls Hurd, 624]
South Connell street, early last night
at Fourth and Union streets. Both
cars were slightly damaged.
Eversharp
*ens.
—Adv.
Pencils.
Eng. Free. Brofeky's, 825 Mkt.
Waterman
Tlw Death Pit at Spangler Where Eighty Lives Were Lost
«1
fcH ;

• r
il
- i ,
'
I
C -v
4 ■ *■
_
V W
»
Mi 4
&7'
*
y
k ScH- • t
e
, l r
V
!
I
-
**dr 1
• —M-1
0

'N
y/f . 1 $
W
P if
Ibkv
■ *
SÈÊM
-■*4 >
»
V ô**cn
« _
Relatlvee and friends eagerly scanned the faces of the dead brought from the pit of the Reilly mine, atSpangler, Pa., where the greatest dis.
tster in American mining history tçok place. This photograph shows th e mouth of the mine pit. out of which rescue parties carried the bodlei
>f miners who had met death from poison gas or Are. Bodies are shown covered with canvas on hastily constructed litters. The men equipped
with gas helmets are members of rescue partie« hastily rushed to the scene.
CITY TO RECALL
ARMISTICE DAY
Sirems to Blow on Saturday
in Honor of World War
Dead
jMAYOR ASKS
p 0 R OBSERVANCE
h
Whereas the Governor of the
! State of Delaware has Issued a
request to the people of this
I State for the proper observance
■ of Armistice Day and
Whereas, the City of Wllmlng- 1
1 ton desires to show its gratitude [
I to those who served and died In
j the World War,
! Now. therefore, I. LeRoy Har
j vey. Mayor, do hereby request
j all citizens of our city to pause
I In their dally occupations for
i one minute at 11 a. m. Saturday,
November 11th. 1922, and recall
the heroic and patriotic service
of the men and officers of the
! American Legion.
In witness Whereof, I have
hereunto set my hand and
caused the seal of th* City of
Wilmington to be affixed this
ninth day of November, in the
of our Lord, one thousand
nine hundred a.nd twenty-two.
i
11
jl
-
by a long blast from the siren of tnoi
Wilmington Provision Company,
th ,„ g | gna i a ll persona in the
j t y ftre tQ cease WO rk and devote a
minute to silent tribute to the men,
a|)d women w ho gave their lives In
li >; ear
LeROT HARVEY.
Mayor.
Celebration of the fourth anniver
of Armistice Day wilt be an
il o'clock Saturday
»an
nounced at
Continued on Page Sixteen.
COUPLE AGREE TO
LIVE TOGETHER
As the young couple have agreed
to live together again, lhe case of
Robert Givens, charged vrth non
lsj*uPP ort of hi* *ife and child, w .
ce ntl n u ed until upon
nrobatlon officer bv Judge!
assis ant probat on om er. *
Hastings. In Mun'elp.1 Court thta
„„n.erine for hearing yesterday. He!
was represented by James Saulzbury.
Th e ease of Willard Scott, charged
wHh non .„ U pp„ rt of his wife, was
rontlnued for one week because of
s of adjustment of their dif
r « nC es. Scott was represented by
Ca j pb jj. R Urc henal. j
Thp pasp of Alfred W. Blshell, :
char - ed non-support of his !
wlfp WIU> continued until Monday atf
(hp j. PqU p st 0 f W. W. Knowles, coun
sei for the defendant.
For Clover Dairy Safe Milk phone
1540-1541.—Adv.
Prosperity Conies With
Winter , Heads of Many
U. S. Industries Declare
(Copyright. 1822, by United Press
Association).
Prosperity and winter are coming
on. hand in hand, according to a
symposium of heads of the nation's
great industries.
When Charles M. Schwab declared
In a recent speech that never In his
career had he forseen better condi
tions than are "Just ahead" he raised
a question which was answered in
exclusive statements to the United
Press by ten outstanding business
men In the country.
Increased employment vouched
for by the Labor Department at
Washington, better home conditions
for the great purchasing public, per
mitting more business with lower]'!'
prices and a general settling down
to normalcy are given as some rea
for the outlook for the coming
sons
winter and spring.
Among the industries canvassed
BRITISH SLAIN
IN TURK CAPITAL
Kemal Reaffirms Ultimatum
Against Alllied Ships
in Straits
NEAR EAST WAR
SEEMS CERTAIN
LONDON. Nov. 9 (United Pres«.)
Declaration of martial law In Con
stantinople 1« Imminent, it was un
derstood on good authority here to
day.
Allied high commissioners were
said to have decided on this drastic
Step as the Turkish Nationalists
openly defied Allied warnings and:
continued to extend »bed author
extend »he» autnor
c i a8 h with Turks, and the situation
„ lrem .ly grave, according to
Mustapha Kemal sent a note to
the French high commissioner re
iterating his demand that the Allied
forces be withdrawn from Constan
tinople and that Allied warships be
removed from their strategical
(Continued on Page Two)
-
.MISS HAGAN IMPROVES.
Miss Katherine Hagan, 4SI South
Broome street, who recently under- ;
went an operation for appendicitis
at the Delaware Hospital, Is lm- j
--- - ■— I
Mundy Bro«. Sell Furniture.—Adv.
ty.
British soldiers have been killed
at Constantinople, apparently In a
lng.
;
war years
I dustry faces the future with confl
according to Alston H. Garslde. head
of the Industrial department of the
were: Packing. textiles, hotels,
movies, clothing, shoes, automobiles,
furniture and the American farm
bureau.
Exclusive statements from heads
of these Industries follow:
Parking
"The meat packing business Is In
a better condition than It ha* been
for several years" declared Charles
E Herrick, president of the Insti
tute of American Meat Packers
"Meat values are more nearly stable
now. and the export trade continues
somewhat larger than during pre
The entire packing In
dern'?."
. tiles
The outlook In the cotton and
wool Industries Is very encouraging.
Continued on Page Sixteen.
STATE TEACHERS
MEET ÄT DOVER
Students of Caesar Rodney
School Make Physical
Education Exhibit
FLORENCE M. HALE
GIVES ADDRESS!
semlon of the fourth aryiual meet
lng of the Delaware State Teachers'
, . . _ !
Association convened here in . tat# ;
armory today with several hundred ;
Special to The Evening Journal.
DOVER. Nov. 9.—The opening
Warren Yerger, of duPont High i
School, president of the association,
presided and the Rev. Benjamin '
Fish Thompson, rector of Christ P.
^ Church made lhe invocation, af
ter w hich greetings were given by
ffiste Superintendent of Public In
struction fir. H. V. Holloway, from
the State Board of Education; Prof.
Davls A. Ward, superintendent of
public school» of Wilmington; Dean '
E. Laurence Smith, of the Unlver
(Continued on Page Two.)
-
teachers present.
to six persons today through
our Classified. Advertising Depart
ment. Look through the classified
advs. and If your name Is there come
to the Journal office and receive Tree
tickets for two (war tax paid) to see
the special production "Love Is an
Awful Thing." at the Arcadia and
"Where Is My Wandering Boy To-
night." at the Majestic, Friday
night. See page 17 today
SEE THE MOVIES TOMORROW.
Invitations to the Movies are ex
IllSE TERMINAL
FOR FIRST TIME
_____
*
Canadian Schooner Unloads
j yesterday afternoon, inbound from
Annapolis, Nova Scotia, anchored
for a time off the mouth of the
Christiana, while its skipper. Cap
tain Creighton Haughan, visited the
Customs House in the Engineer
Building. Sixth and King streets.
This formality over. Captain
Haughan piloted his ship to the
Terminal and made fast alongside
the 1210-foot quay, now rapidly
nearing completion. He made the
brief trip through the mouth of the
Christiana and to Ihe Terminal with
out the least difficulty. The "Maid of
France" draws only 14 and one half
feet of water, while there Is from
eighteen to twenty feeA in th«,
(■Continued on Page Eight)
Pulp as Initial Business
* for New Port
CAtlTUM
CAPTAIN HAUGHAN
TO rnMP APAIM
1 U GOME AGAIN
the
Although Wilmington's new 12.
000.000 Marine Terminal,
on
south hank of the Christiana.
not he finished and formally open
ed until after (he new year, U be
gan business today by unloading a
cargo from the three-masted schoon
[ OT "Maid of France."
The vessel sailed up the Delaware
C. I. STENGLE WINS
SEAT IN CONGRESS
*
Charles L Stengle. son of the Rea-,
Adam Stengle. 407 West Twenty
first street, and a former resident
of thl * city, was one of the success
ful Democratic nominees for Con
Kr „„„ in jj aw York, having won out
j, y a plurality of over two thousand,)
Brooklyn district.
In a Republics
Mr Stengle attended the public |
schools in this city and was a grad-,
,lat e of •h® Goldey Business College,
H ® I > *" tor of ,h< " I*elP"'e
M. E. Church some years ego. and I
later as paator of the Armory Church j
*n Dover, during which time he was
elected Chaplain In the Delaware
legielature.
Mr. Stengle for ft number of ye*rs
has been a resident of New York ;
City, and for the past six years has
served a« secretary of the New York ]
Civil Service Commission. I
MUST PAY COURT COSTS.
Pleading
being drunk,
Ciaymont, was dismissed upon pay-]
ment of costs, by Judge Hastings In
Municipal Court, this morning. He
allowed until 6 o'clock tonight
to pay the costs of $1.70.
a charge of ;
guilty to
John S. Hamlll. °f !
■ I ■
N. C. WAFFLES.
Nobis Cafeteria, »th St. Entrance
Wil. Sawings Fund Bldg.—Adv.
REPUBLICANS IN
CONTROL OF TIIE
NEW CONGRESS
LODGE«
I.EM 18,090
FOR SENATE
Frazier, Non-Partisan, Wins
Senatorship in North
Dakota
-
BOSTON', Nov. »(United Tress!.
Democrata Insisted today upon a ra
count of the senatorial vote, al
though (Inal ligures Indicate that,
Senator Lodge's plurality over Col.
William A. Gaston, the Democratic
jcandidate, was more than 8,000. Pe-j
tltlons for a now tabulation are be-1
lng prepared.
Republicans claim that a recount]
will have no effect upon Lodge's plu-i
rallty, but the Democrats and the.
Liberal Republican
, which supported Gaatun, re-|
Massachusetts
Leag
fuse to concede the election, and say
that a recount will send their can
didal* to the Senate.
» (United
.—iciest returns lndtoated the
election of Lynn J. Frazier, Non-1
partisan to the United State. Sen
1 . ». ,« hv .
from North D *• > n „
Jority of about 8000. With 75» pre
, Inct. out of 211» in 'he State> jr* »•
I be heard from. J. F. T. O Conner
j was leading by 7254. O'Conners
: lead was being constantly cut down
Tress )
ate
land all of th* precincts to be heard
from are la heavy Non-partisan ter
rltory. O'Connera chief supporters
privately conceded his defeat.
In 794 of
premo Court bench
almost 30,000 and there 1« but little j
doubt that she has been elected.
COLUMBUS. O.. Nor. 9 (United
Pro** )—Purring errors L_
the State's 8600 preclnt«, Ohio to
day had. neoubllcan governor
R ' p "î! d a R*P ubllcan *° w "0
I with a Democrat.
Rejected the proposed amendment
to the state constitution legalizing
Untied
Replaced a Democrat
States Senator with a Republican.

will]*»l« ""d manufacture of light wines
_
elect, defeated 1.1s Republican op
ponent. Carml Thompson, by 15.000
'"congressman Simeon I). Fess. Rs
publican candidate for United State»
Senator running against Senator At
lee Pomerene. Demoerat, was elect
ed with a lead of 47.000 votes. Fess
earrled the rural and dry district«
1
by a landslide.
The majority against the proposed
beer and wine amendment may
reach 150.000.
Mis« Florence E. Allen,
land Independent. again
into aecond place In the five-corner
ed fight for two seats on the Su
tler lead was
Cleve
forged
WEST CHURCH
CALLS OR. SONNE
The congregation of West Presliy-j
terian Church at a special meeting
last night unanimously decided to
call the Rev. A. W. Sonne. D. D.. to
the pastorate of the church.
meeting was presided over by the
Rev. Charles H. Bohner, pastor of
Hanover Presbyterian Church.
Dr. Sonne has served as pastor of
The
the First Presbyterian Churh,
Flemington. N. J. for the past twelve
years.
He is an alumnus of , rinceton
Theological Seminary and Is a mem
ber of the New Brunswick Presby
* e ry.
Communication with Dr. Sonne
will begin at once. He will be offer
0 d a salary of $4500 and fres use of
the church manse. Moving expenses
will also be paid.
The Dev. Dr. Sonne Is called as the i
successor to the Rev. U. Franklin
Smiley, who resigned the pastorate
several months ago.
of
CHRISTMAS SHOP
OrEN TONIGHT
The Christmas Shop, which Is be
ing conducted by the Women's Club
of Trinity Church In the show rooms
of the Wilmington Automobile Com
pany. will be open this evening until
9 o'clock. The shop will close to
The proceeds of the sale
morrow,
will be given to charity.
Senate and House Bal
ance of Power, How
ever, Seems to Be in
Hands of Radicals.
Republicans Ixise 10
States, Democrats 2.
Wets Add to Repre
sen tat ton
Both
in
Houses
REVISION MAY
SHOW CHANGES
!

fsr the final
„bowed that the
WASHINGTON, Nov. 0 (United
PrtM).—Virtually complete election
return* which will not alter very
official count today,
tremendous Re
public Congremloniil n ij >rlt!*a of
1920 hud been «l&Hhed to *uch nar
row margins that Republtoan con
trol on much Important legislation
Is certain to be jeopardized.
In the Senate the Republican
plurality will not exceed ten and
mey be less,
In lh » »he Republican
strength will only be about 1« more
,h * n * h « combined strength of the
Democrats and the so-called radical
ptrtlM
The Senate stands 52 Republicans,
Democrats, one Farmer-Labof
] one doubtful.
Returns yet to come probably
cannot affect
the doubtful contest being In Utah.
and a Slight chance existing In
North Dakota that the Republicans
will win.
The House stands 218 Republl
rans —*n e**ct majority of the 48S
more than two seat
member«: 206 Democrats, four of
Other parties including
on * ^dependent, and two !
Labor; with seven dt-trtots doubtful
or too incomplete to Justify a predic
tion. Most of the doubtful districts
wero favoring Democratic
t datM la4c report „.
candi
i These figures would insure the Re
pul)llMln|i nomlnaI controI of (ha
House organization, carrying with it
, f , hf . re ho ,
: '™ k party ranks
In the * ,a " t ' Ihe Representative*
of ,b ® ™dlc.l partie, gen
® ral, y have voted with the Demo*
craUl -
an
But the work -
passage
mea»
lie many ab
sentees or should there be n mild
In Utah. Senator King was not yet
certain of his re-election though h4
was leading in early morning re
turns. by more than 1700. North
Dakota's returns were not complet*
because of bad weather and conse
quent delay In getting the count Iq
from remote rural sections and i|
wan theferoe uncertain whether J,
F. T. O'Conner. Democrat, or Lynq
J. Frazier, had won. Returns now
indicate the election of L. J. Fra
zler, Non-Partisan, by 8,000 major*
;uy.
Returns early today seemed tit
make conclusive the defeat of t
more Republican stalwarts In tht
West — Senator Miles Poindexter,
Washington, who was ousted by C. d.
Dill, his Democratic adversary, amt
Senator Frank B. Kellogg, Minne
sota. who will be succeeded by Hen«
rlk Shipstead. Farmer-Labor Non*
Partisan League candidate.
Kellogg's defeat by Shipstead was
one of the most surprising upsete of
the campaign, although it was evi
dent for some time that Kellogg
(Continued on rage Two.)
Company wa*
00mpa ]|, d Ias t Tuesday evening be
tw „ en g go and 12 o'clock to call Irw
a dollb i P reserve force to take ow«|
tb e calls made concerning th»
e i eet ion. The company's local
change handled 1S.000
Tuesday evening as compared with!
5.000 calls handiod during the cor«
responding hours Tuesday evening
of last week.
Four telephones Installed by th»
company in The Evening Journal -A
offices especially for election servie« j
were constantly busy nearly all
Tuesday night and Wednesday morn*
lng with expert operators In charge.
In addition the regular telephone»
of The Evening Journal were als«
busy during those hours.
TELEPHONE EXCHANGE
HAD BUSY NIGHT
ex
calla last!

xml | txt